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Commentaries (by me) on details of Bach 4-voiced chorales available in one place

Over the last couple of years, Gertim (now @SDG) has input the entire body of 389 Bach 4-voiced (some are 5) chorale settings collected by Julius Richter in the 1890's, published by Kalmus.   As he has done so, I have commented upon particularly interesting compositional, particularly contrapuntal, details.  He is in the process of moving his corpus, as it were, off of MuseScore, onto his own sites, with custom software.  As part of that, I have digested all of my comments on the chorales (and some responses by Gertim and others) into an additional single page:  https://www.bach-chorales.info/BachChorales/BachChoraleCommentSummary.html
which I think would interest anyone here who really cares about what happened "when Bach met Counterpoint", as it were.  Links back to the playable scores on bach-chorales.info are provided with each comment-set. While a few are mere expressions of subjective wonder or delight, the vast majority deal nuts-and-bolts with dissonance, consonance, gesture, and similar details. Do take a look.

Embedded iframe with YouTube recording fails in some web browsers: FIXED?

This is a problem which has existed for quite a while, and it would be good to sort it out definitively.

Many of us use the "Share" option to embed an HTML "iframe" of the MuseScore player in our own website. It's really useful for making practice files for choral societies and church choirs.

With a MuseScore file that creates its own playback, it usually doesn't matter which web browser you use: it plays normally.  But if the score is sync'd to a performance recording on YouTube as the default sound source, then the playback doesn't work on all web browsers. 

Here is the result of a test of various browsers which I ran today:
-  Chrome 73.0.3683.75  = broken
-  Edge 42.17134.1.0 = broken
-  Firefox 65.0.2 = plays ok
-  Internet Explorer 11.648.17134.0 = plays ok
-  Opera 58.0.3135.107 = plays ok
-  Vivaldi 2.3.1440.60 = plays ok

You can run the test yourself on my HTML page, where the SATB player is linked to a YouTube performance by Birmingham Conservatoire Chamber Choir:
 https://rootham.org/playlist/noeab/noeab_42.html

The Violin

A violin is taken to hospital. The doctor examines her and says:
"There's nothing wrong with you. But you broke your bow. How did that happen?"
Violin: "I only remember the thunderous applause for the composer."
Doctor: "Do you remember his name?"
Violin: "No. I think he was on the first page of the sheet music."

Can some one explain the musescore behavior on ligatures

Hi! I'm a novice in musical notation and saxophone playing. I've been practicing alto sax for 2.5 years and suddenly I realized that musescore performs different the ligature notation. I was told that when is an arc above 2 or more notes should be played as one of the total length of the notes if they are the same or as an expresion if they are different. What I've seen in musescore is that in partitures played on my computer the arc above the several ocurrences of the same note are played individually. Is that wright or there is a bug in my system ...

I'm using windows 10

I hope I´ve been clear enough, thanks

QuijoteMx

What is your composition style and who inspires you?

The composer that influenced me the most is definitely Claude Debussy. I compose in an impressionistic style, which means that my pieces evoke imagery and a sense of story when listening, with some unique chords and controlled dissonance.

Some other compositional styles (not all of them, but some general ones):

Baroque - very structured, rule-abiding, very much single note voices, court dances.
Classical - sonata, orchestral pieces, structured and with set phrases, repetition and controlled expression.
Romantic - feeling-evoking, dramatic, freedom of expression, strong and contrasting note choices.
Impressionistic - image-evoking, a flowing and free tone, more dissonance, more chord choices.
Contemporary, modern, post-modern - jazz, blues, rag, that kinda music, lots of dissonance
Popular/good sounding - repetitive chord structure, very easy to listen to
Technical - compose for the purpose of exercising the fingers