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New Bari Sax Player

I switched to bari about a month ago and I'm in marching band right now so I've already gotten used to most things about the bari but I still am having trouble with phrasing and just playing longer. Is there anyone who can help? Also does anyone have any other tips and tricks about other parts of playing it?

Pad savers! Do we need them ?

I’ve been playing the Alto Saxophone for over 2 years now, and I’ve never used/owned a pad saver.
However I recently brought a new saxophone and the dealer insisted that I buy a pad saver as it is essential to prolong the life of a Saxophone,
He also mentioned that without a pad saver the saxophone pads would be at risk of moisture/humidity, which will reduce the life of the Saxophone pads to a year or two.

Now most of the advance/pro saxophonist I’ve met do not use pad savers, instead they prefer to use swabs to clean out all the moisture after playing the saxophone and keeping the case open for an hour or two to allow the residual moisture to dry out.
Moreover some(including me) believe that pad savers actually do more harm than good by retaining moisture in them, and if you keep it inside the Saxophone then it could damage the pads.

What are your thoughts about pad savers?

Hello, Friends! Who are you?

I didn't think to go deep into the subject of bass guitar, although I have an acoustic instrument for home music.

But there were pieces, where the bass is revealed unexpectedly full and beautiful — that's why I decided that it is necessary to share.
However, there was no group where such scores were in demand.
So this group was created.

And then there were musical pieces, where a variety of instruments have a solo in the bass register. And the group slowly began to be filled with content. Yet the catalog is very modest. But it's not evening yet...

Top-50 jazz sax players

Came across the list of "top 50 greatest jazz saxophone players of all time", thinking that the list is quite good. But I would place Pharoah Sanders at list in the Top-5 (he is in the end of the list, but, in my opinion, that's not right), for me he is one of the best ;Ornette Coleman was really great as well. What you guys think about the list and what changes would you make in it?

https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/50-best-jazz-saxophonists/ 

Importance of lacquer ?

Hello everyone.

I’ve been playing the Alto Saxophone for a year and a half now, I have a used Holton Saxophone which is over 20 years old a the lacquer has almost worn out. I’ve been planning to by a new student Saxophone (conn Selmer AS-710) which is a brand new Saxophone with a full clear lacquer.
Now most of the jazz gigs I’ve been to and most of the professional saxophonist I’ve seen use Saxophones without any lacquer.

So my questions are
1) what is the importance of lacquer to Saxophone? (Does is affect the sound, or is it just for the cool look ?)
2) Is the conn Selmer AS-710 a good Saxophone for a student / beginner ? (It’s definitely in my budget)

Thanks

Star Wars

I am a alto sax player, but i don't compose music. i was wondering if any of those in this community were star wars fans and would like to write up a melody for star wars that isn't to hard. not a lot out there for this

Thanks

[article] Sax as a transposing instrument and writing music for saxophone

Saxophone (no matter what type we are talking about: alto,tenor, soprano, bari or some less used ones) is so-called “transposing instrument”. It means that you are “in a different key” than “concert pitch” instruments, such as piano, guitar, (double) bass, etc. If you are not familiar with the “transposing instruments” thing, I suggest that you read the first section of the wiki article before continuing with this review, it is pretty well explained there:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposing_instrument

So, to get the pitch you need when writing some sax part, you need to transpose it up (from concert pitch):

  • For soprano sax: a major 2nd
  • For alto sax: a major 6th
  • For tenor sax: a major 9th (1 octave + major 2nd)
  • For bari sax: a major 13th (1 octave + major 6th)

As you can see the difference between soprano and tenor is one octave (as well as the difference between alto and bari).

Soprano and tenor saxes are called "Bb instruments", it means that for the “C” note in these instruments’ part the actual sounding pitch will be “Bb”.

Alto and bari saxes are called “Eb instruments”; so if you write the “C” note in some part for this instruments, you will actually get the sound of “Eb” concert pitch once it is played.

All this stuff seems to be quite complicated for someone that has never dealt with transposing instruments before, but using MuseScore notation software you can quickly make parts for saxophones even if you do not know all this transposing instruments theory (though this knowledge is vital for composers). There is a quick video tutorial on the topic, I'll post a link in the end of this post.

One more thing to remember: once you have written some sheet music for saxophone, check the range - the saxophone part (make sure that it is not shown in concert pitch, so unpress the “concert pitch” button in MuseScore editor while viewing the part) should have pitches only inside this range (from small octave “Bb” to 3rd octave “F”) :



The only exception is bari sax - it has the additional low “A” note, which, by the way, sounds pretty cool. Good arrangers, like Gordon Goodwin, often use this feature of bari saxophones. Of course, there are also altissimo pitches, but that is a separate topic for conversation.

If you wish, you can check the whole sax family at:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxophone#Saxophone_family

This table from wikipedia is really “true to the fact”. Sopranino and sopranissimo saxes sound “higher” than concert pitch instruments: I mean that the first-octave “C” notated in sheet music for these instruments will actually sound as 1st-octave Eb and Bb respectively. All other saxes sound “lower than written”, just remember this rule. However, the most used saxes have been already mentioned before, so other ones are pretty rare,I should say.

And one more thing to be aware of when writing a piece for sax ensemble: saxophones and saxophonists are not perfect, and an arranger, especially writing for an amateur/student sax ensemble, or even for big band, should try not to overuse (I write the pitches that occur in sax part, not in concert pitch, of course) notes higher than 3rd octave C# (high notes tend to sound out-of-tune-high) and lower than 1st octave D (on some medium quality saxophones it’s hard to play those pitches, especially if saxophone is not in a perfect condition).

Don’t hesitate to add some thoughts and more tips on the topic in comments.

Don't you worry 'bout a thing arrangement.

Hey guys,

So I have a problem with the arrangement I am making for a Sax Trio. The song is called Don't You Worry 'Bout A Thing by Stevie Wonder, but for this trio I wanted to transpose the Tori Kelly version from the movie Sing. 

Unfortunately, I don't know all of the notes since there are no other sheets of this version on the internet. I'd hope that some of you could help me with finishing this piece of music.

Thanks to those who would like to help!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lI5VmfngnNQ

You can find my score in my profile ;)

Help with Sax sound

Hi everyone! 

New to the alto sax and i have a quick question, when i go to play i have about one or two seconds of just air and then the sound comes out fine - is this caused by my breathing, embouchure or reed? I have no idea? I just want a clean sound to come out the moment I begin. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :)