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Scissors Story

So this happened earlier today at my school. Basically, some dude in my grade took a pair of scissors, took them apart, and used them to attempt to stab 3 different people. The best he got was one of them was bleeding from the finger, but the point is that he didn’t exactly intend for them to leave in one piece. A few minutes later, where only the involved people have heard about this, half the school administration comes down to get him. From the rumors I’ve heard, he got 3 weeks of OSS and a Police Referral. Anyone had something like this happen at their school?

MuseScore introduces mobile practice mode

MuseScore introduces mobile practice mode 

Every day hundreds of thousands of people use MuseScore services for practicing music, learning scores or preparing for performances. The Catalog created by the MuseScore community is the biggest score library.

We’ve been recently putting a lot of effort into improving the product for performers, not only on the website but in the mobile app.

At the moment, our App processes scores the same way our desktop solution does. But mobile devices have their peculiarities (mainly because of the screen size and touch-interfaces). It’s not always convenient to read scores using our current mobile app, especially if users don’t want or don’t know how to manage more advanced app settings. Users have to turn pages all the time (even more often than when they use regular paper scores) if they’re using the Play mode. So, they can’t see the next measure when done playing the current one. Also, it’s not clear where to manage such settings as the metronome, tempo or transposing.

Taking all this into account, we’ve launched another update which is aimed at the global improvement of mobile apps for professional performers and students.

Please, welcome Practice Mode. Now you’re one click away from entering a special mode, aimed at simplifying the process of playing an instrument and learning new scores.

In this mode, users see scores in a "continuous view" shown in one line with perfect readable scaling applied. Simply by clicking the Play button, users hear the metronome intro which is followed by the convenient flow of notes. Users can always see what they’re playing, along with a couple of more measures that are coming up next.

On the same screen, users not only change the tempo, the key or turn the metronome on/off but also play the original sound of the instrument (to hear whether they’re playing it correctly).
This improvement is supposed to make the App more convenient to use, and really, get it on the next level. Now it’s becoming much easier and more comfortable to learn and perform scores from the huge MuseScore catalog.

At the moment, we’re looking for the App and the new mode beta-testers.

To join the beta-testers community, follow the link and click "Become a tester".


After we’ve released the next build supporting the new mode, you just need to install it, open any score and you’ll be immediately redirected to the needed mode. We really hope that this update will visibly improve your experience and help with the development of your musical skills.

We are open to any suggestions and appreciate your help with the development of the new mode. You’re welcome to join us!

Regards,
Dmitriy Popov
MuseScore / Chief Product Officer


P.S. Planned date for the first beta release of the feature - the next week.

Counting game anyone?

Literally we are just gonna count and see how high we get. There’s no count breakers, so it’s just for the thrill lol. Feel free to write normal comments, but make sure you include the number we’re on. And don’t make separate replies. Instead, just tag a user. If there is an error and you messed up or whatever, try and edit the comment before you delete it.
Have fun!

How to be heard over the rest of my band?

So im in marching band and I'm the only flute out of 16 hornline, mostly brass...

I keep trying to play louder but it always goes up an octave or makes an awful screeching noise. Even though I have been playing for about two years, I've never found a solution to the problem.  I was wondering if any of you could give me some tips on how to play louder but still sound decent during competitions.

"what duty do the listeners have to the composer in the field of new music?"

I have heard this question asked many times during my early professional career, and each time I recoil when I hear it. The fact is, this question is just a way for composers to point an accusatory finger because their art was not met with the glowing reception they crave. Although the question is inherently selfish, the sentiment behind it is legitimate; people do not respect new “intellectual” music anymore. That said, the question approaches the issue from the wrong angle. Composers should instead look inwards to search out what they could be doing to make the listener’s job easier, while at the same time not sacrificing their sense of artistry. 

It is the opinion of the author that all music lies on a spectrum of purely popular to purely intellectual. Although these definitions change with the times, all music, contemporary and ancient, fall on this spectrum. For instance, Katy Perry’s newest hit single would fall as close to the “purely popular” side of the spectrum as possible. This ensures that she has as much popularity as possible, but it limits the intellectual nature of the art. Similarly, Milton Babbit falls as close to the “purely intellectual” side of the spectrum as possible, crafting highly complex music that the average music lover would not enjoy. There is certainly a place for those composers in this day and age, and maybe someday that music will be accepted, but since the academic composer of the last eighty years has met with little success in this area, it would be a safe assumption to say that this scenario is unlikely. 

To get to the source of the issue, we must ask ourselves: “what is the role of music?” This question is deceptively simple, but ask the academic composer and the average listener alike, and they will come up with answers that may seem the same on the surface, but are in reality very different. The academic might say: “music is for the expression of the inward thought processes, shaped by personal experience and self-growth, managed by our interpretation of those experiences through our intellectual compositional paths,” while the average listener will probably say “music makes me feel good.” This satirical comparison aside, you can see that the listener listens to music to feel, while the academic thinks to compose. This is the author’s opinion of the state of the art. Composers have invested so much in their ability to think up something that no one has thought of before, while ignoring the listeners who love listening to a genre that bases itself upon music that is mostly creatively stagnant and alike to itself. 

The question composers should be asking is not pointed towards the audience, but rather towards themselves: “what can I do to reach the audience while not sacrificing my intellectual identity or artistic style?” If the academics ask themselves this question, they will begin to make a connection with the listener, even if the two do not agree completely on style, for at least then, the composer is working for the listener, and not the other way around. When classical music was at its peak, this was the preeminent mindset of the composer. There was no guaranteed second performance of their newest piece, so they wrote to please their audience, but in the case of Beethoven (and others), he still adjusted the musical language for his intellectual purposes. This is why classical music (referring to music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) and jazz are still the most popular recital hall concerts – the genres balance intellectual pursuits of the composer and the desires of the listener. 

New music of any intellectual degree will never eclipse the popularity of Katy Perry or the Rolling Stones. That is a given. However, when the composer removes himself from the listener, claiming that it is the listener who owes him and not the other way around, music will never again make a true connection with the listener. Only when the academic composer decides to reach out to the listener will the listener reach out in return, meeting each other in the middle, experiencing music through both the creative lens of the composer and the emotional heart of the listener. Until that happens, the listener owes the composer absolutely nothing

Sincerely, 

The Regressionist 

Want to role play

Since this group is for talking and role playing, I figured I should start it. When posting make sure to post as a comment and not a reply. Please do not go overboard or post anything not 18+ or any weird romantic stuff unless it’s contributing to overall story *cough* musicfox *cough*

Here’s the start. It’s in a tavern in some fantasy medieval village. A few people are having a drink of rum or something.

I’ll be the guy who works at the place. You start.