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Can't think of a theme for my C minor sonata, what to do?

I have had this block in my C minor sonata for months. I have the introduction down as I want it but I can't think of a first theme to come after the introduction. Thankfully I have about 6 months before Beethoven's birthday comes around. That's right, I am dedicating this piano sonata to Beethoven, the 1 major composer that reinspired me after a long composer hiatus and who keeps pushing me forward in my compositions. I was able to compose a Mozart style sonata in less than a month.

But with this C minor sonata, it has been about a month and I still can't figure out what to do for the first theme.

@Tortualex has given me quite a few suggestions after I told him that I wanted to be innovative with this sonata like how Beethoven was innovative more than 2 centuries before. One of them was to have it have 3 themes instead of your typical 2 themed sonata. In particular he suggested that I have this harmonic structure to my themes:

First theme in C minor
Second theme in G phrygian(which would have the same notes as C minor but have the tonic chord be G minor)
Third theme in G major

He said that with those 3 themes, I will have a lot of thematic material to have my sonata be more than 7 minutes long and still be interesting. He then suggested that I break more rules when I get to the recapitulation. Specifically that I make the second theme be in G major and use that G major as a secondary dominant to C minor(this though confuses me. Is he suggesting that I use Bb locrian as the primary dominant instead of G major? Or is he suggesting that I have the third theme in G phrygian and use the minor dominant as the primary dominant?). Then afterwards he suggested having a second development followed by a true recapitulation. 

That would definitely be an expansion on your typical sonata form from the exposition having 3 themes instead of 2 to having a first recapitulation leading to a second development and then having a true recapitulation to the second theme being more modal than tonal.

I have gotten advice more related to symphonies but basically, one of the pieces of advice that I got for getting out of a composer's block was this:

Don't think of the theme as being 1 long unbroken melody and accompaniment if you are getting stuck. Instead, think of a short little motive and then go all Beethoven's fifth on it, basing everything off of that 1 little motive and voila you have your theme without even thinking about it.


Now, I haven't been thinking much about my sonata since last month which I figured would relieve the composer's block with it because just not thinking about the piece for a while(sometimes just a few hours, sometimes a month or more) often relieves my composer's block. But it did no such thing for this C minor sonata. I'm still in as much of a composer's block as I was a month ago.

So should I go this motive route and base my first theme off of a short little motive instead of thinking of it as 1 long melody and accompaniment like I have been doing? If so, how will I know how workable a motive that I come up with is? Is there even such a thing as a motive being less workable than another?

Thinking of making a separate account for symphonies

So, I have been planning out my first symphony. I gave it the nickname "The War Symphony". It still isn't flushed out yet but I have decided to have it be a programmatic symphony with this movement structure:

First Movement:

Key: Bb major
Aspect: Battle
Form: Sonata Form

Second Movement:

Key: F minor
Aspect: Death
Form: Not decided on yet but I'm leaning towards ternary form

Third Movement:

Key: Not decided on
Aspect: Battle again
Form: Scherzo and Trio

Finale:

Key: Bb major
Aspect: Victory
Form: Sonata-Rondo Form

The first movement is what I have flushed out the most out of all the movements so far in my plans so obviously, that will be the part I work on first. But I'm wondering, since I can't really afford a Pro membership(maybe a few years down the line I will be able to afford it but I can't currently), should I make a separate account to put my symphony score on once it is finished? And if so, should that account be just for my symphonies if I happen to want to compose more than 1 symphony?

Help needed from flutists/flautists(?)

Hi, I was wondering, are there any flute players that have Mark Karen’s ‘The Flute Etudes’ book? I’m trying to help out a friend after hearing that the flute etudes used by TMEA are among some of the hardest. I know that most of them that were selected by the author are in public domain, but I don’t know which ones. If you could tell me which etudes are used in the book, that’d be greatly appreciated.