Top Groups

Video Gamers

305 discussions • 4K scores • 13.5K members

We want people who can make music for video games and also art. Anyone can join if they want a fun discussion!

TheIshter Sheets

9 discussions • 69 scores • 3.4K members

Project to create sheet music for Ismael's Covers that dont have sheetmusic.
If a transcription looks dropped feel free to pick it back up

Beginners' Music

104 discussions • 3.6K scores • 1.4K members

If you are a beginner do not hesitate and join us, share your scores with us and give us your opinions on ours!

Rules:
NO bad language
NO spamming
NO bullying of any kind

Thanks!
-John

The Whovians

80 discussions • 156 scores • 1.2K members

This group's purpose is to honor Ron Grainer and Murray Gold's music from the BBC sci-fi show Doctor Who by posting arrangements or transcriptions of their music and to discuss the show in general. Any fan of the show is welcome.

Classical Guitar

41 discussions • 818 scores • 1.1K members

Classical Guitar
Group of classical guitarists.

The Zelda Group

21 discussions • 499 scores • 599 members

Unless the song you put into this group contains even a small Zelda part, your song will be deleted.

Please take a look at our sister group, The Mario Group: https://musescore.com/groups/mario

The Piano Guys Music

24 discussions • 356 scores • 548 members

Never heard of the piano guys? Check them out here: http://www.youtube.com/user/ThePianoGuys

A G-mail user? Subscribe to them here:
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?src_vid=LV5_xj_yuhs&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_408839&add_user=ThePianoGuys

As the description states, "If you like the piano guys on youtube, this group is for you!" If you've arranged any songs that the piano guys have done an arrangment for (or you did an arrangment of one of their songs), feel free to post it. If a song posted here isn't a Piano Guys song, it'll be removed without notice.

Johann Sebastian Bach

13 discussions • 1.2K scores • 532 members

This group is dedicated to propogating the music of Johann Sebastian Bach:

Born: 21-Mar-1685
Birthplace: Eisenach, Germany
Died: 28-Jul-1750
Location of death: Leipzig, Germany
Cause of death: Stroke
Remains: Buried, Thomaskirche, Leipzig, Germany


Gender: Male
Religion: Lutheran
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Composer

Nationality: Germany
Executive summary: Baroque composer

German musical composer. The Bach family was of importance in the history of music for nearly two hundred years. Four branches of it were known at the beginning of the 16th century, and in 1561 we hear of Hans Bach of Wechmar who is believed to be the father of Wit Bach (born about 1555). The family genealogy, drawn up by J. Sebastian Bach himself and completed by his son Philipp Emanuel, describes Veit Bach as the founder of the family, a baker and a miller, "whose zither must have sounded very pretty among the clattering of the mill-wheels." His son, Hans Bach, "der Spielmann", is the first professional musician of the family. Of Hans's large family the second son, Christoph, was the grandfather of Sebastian Bach. Another son, Heinrich, of Arnstadt, had two sons, Johann Michael and Johann Christoph, who are among the greatest of J. S. Bach's forerunners, Johann Christoph being now supposed (although this is still disputed) to be the author of the splendid motet, Ich lasse dich nicht ("I wrestle and pray"), formerly ascribed to Sebastian Bach. Another descendant of Veit Bach, Johann Ludwig, was admired more than any other ancestor by Sebastian, who copied twelve of his church cantatas and sometimes added work of his own to them.

The Bach family never left Thuringia until the sons of Sebastian went into a more modern world. Through all the misery of the peasantry at the period of the Thirty Years' War this clan maintained its position and produced musicians who, however local their fame, were among the greatest in Europe. So numerous and so eminent were they that in Erfurt musicians were known as "Bachs", even when there were no longer any members of the family in the town. Sebastian Bach thus inherited the artistic tradition of a united family whose circumstances had deprived them of the distractions of the century of musical fermentation which in the rest of Europe had destroyed polyphonic music.

Johann Sebastian Bach was baptized at Eisenach on the 23rd of March 1685. His parents died in his tenth year, and his elder brother, Johann Christoph, organist at Ohrdruf, took charge of him and taught him music. The elder brother is said to have been jealous of Sebastian's talent, and to have forbidden him access to a manuscript volume of works by Froberger, Buxtehude and other great organists. Every night for six months Sebastian got up, put his hand through the lattice of the bookcase, and copied the volume out by moonlight, to the permanent ruin of his eyesight (as is shown by all the extant portraits of him at a later age and by the blindness of his last years). When he had finished, his brother discovered the copy and took it away from him. In 1700 Sebastian, now fifteen and thrown on his own resources by the death of his brother, went to Luneburg, where his beautiful soprano voice obtained him an appointment at the school of St. Michael as chorister. He seems, however, to have worked more at instrumental than at vocal music. Apart from the choristers' routine, his position provided only for his general education, and we know little about his definite musical instructors. In any case he owed his musical development mainly to his own incessant study of classical and contemporary composers, such as Girolamo Frescobaldi (circa 1587), Caspar Kerl (1628-1693), Buxtehude, Froberger, Muffat the elder, Pachelbel and probably Johann Joseph Fux, the author of the Gradus ad Parnassum on which all later classical composers were trained. A prettier and no less authentic story than that of his brother's forbidden organ-volume tells how, on his return from one of the many holiday expeditions which Bach made to Hamburg on foot to hear the great Dutch organist Reinken, he sat outside an inn longing for the dinner he could not afford, when two herring-heads were flung out of the window, and he found in each of them a ducat with which he promptly paid his way, not home, but back to Hamburg. At Hamburg, also, Keiser was laying the foundations of German opera on a splendid scale which must have fired Bach's imagination though it never directly influenced his style. On the other hand Keiser's church music was of immense importance in his development. In Celle the famous Hofkapelle brought the influence of French music to bear upon Bach's art, an influence which inspired nearly all his works in suite-form and to which his many autograph copies of Couperin's music bear testimony. Indeed, there is no branch of music, from Palestrina onwards, conceivably accessible in Bach's time, of which we do not find specimens carefully copied in his own handwriting. On the other hand, when Bach, at the age of nineteen, became organist at Arnstadt, he found Lübeck within easy distance, and there, in October 1705, he went to hear Buxtehude, whose organ works show so close an affinity to Bach's style that only their lack of coherence as wholes reveals to the attentive listener that with all their nobility they are not by Bach himself. Bach's enthusiasm for Buxtehude caused him to outstay his leave by three months, and this, together with his habit of astonishing the congregation by the way he harmonized the chorales got him into trouble. But he was already too great an ornament to be lightly dismissed; and though his answers to the complaints of the authorities (every word of which makes amusing reading in the archives of the church) were spirited rather than satisfactory, and the consistorium had to add to their complaints the grave scandal of his allowing a "strange maiden" to sing in the church, Bach was able to maintain his position at Arnstadt until he obtained the organistship of St. Blasius in Mühlhausen in 1707. Here he married his cousin, easily identified with the "strange maiden" of Arnstadt; and here he wrote his first great church cantatas, Aus der Tiefe, Gott ist mein König and Gottes Zeit.

Bach's mastery of the keyboard attracted universal attention, and prevented his ever being unemployed. In 1708 he went to Weimar where his successes were crowned by his appointment, in 1714, at the age of twenty-nine, as Hofkonzertmeister to the duke of Weimar. Here the composition of sacred music was one of his most congenial duties, and the great cantata, Ich hatte viel Bekümmerniss, was probably the first work of his new office. In 1717 Bach visited Dresden in the course of a concert tour, and was induced to challenge the arrogant French organist, J. Louis Marchand, who was making himself thoroughly disliked by the German musicians who could not deny his powers. Bach was first given an opportunity of listening secretly to Marchand's playing, then a competition on the organ was proposed, and a day was fixed for the tournament at which all the court and all the musical celebrities of the town were to be present, to see nothing less than the issue between French and German music. Marchand took up the challenge contemptuously; but it would appear that he also was allowed to listen secretly to Bach's playing, for on the day of the tournament the only news of him was that he had left Dresden by the earliest coach.

This triumph was followed by Bach's appointment as Kapellmeister to the duke of Cöthen, a post which he held from 1717 to 1723. The Cöthen period is that of Bach's central instrumental works, such as the first book of the Wohltemperirtes Klavier, the solo violin and violoncello sonatas, the Brandenburg concertos, and the French and English suites.

In 1723, finding his position at Cöthen uninspiring for choral music, he removed to Leipzig, where he became cantor of the Thomasschule, being still able to retain his post as visiting Kapellmeister at Cöthen, besides a similar position at Weissenfels. His wife had died in 1720, leaving seven children, of whom Friedermann and Philipp Emanuel had a great future before them. In December 1721 Bach married again, and for the beautiful soprano voice of his second wife he wrote many of his most inspired arias. She was a great help to him with all his work, and her musical handwriting soon became so like his own that her copies are difficult to distinguish from his autographs. In 1729 Bach heard that Handel was for a second time visiting Halle on his way back to London from Italy. A former attempt of Bach's to meet Handel had failed, and now he was too ill to travel, so he sent his son to Halle to invite Handel to Leipzig; but the errand was not successful, and much to Bach's disappointment he never met his only compeer. Bach so admired Handel that he made a manuscript copy of his Passion nach Brockes. This work, though almost unknown in England then as now, was, next to the oratorios of Keiser, incomparably the finest Passion then accessible, as Graun's beautiful masterpiece, Der Tod Jesu, was not composed until four years after Bach's death. The disgusting poem of Brockes (which was set by every German composer of the time) was transformed by Bach with real literary skill as the groundwork of the non-scriptural numbers in his Passion according to St. John.

All Bach's most colossal achievements, such as the Passion according to St. Matthew and the B Minor Mass, date from his cantorship at Leipzig. But, important and congenial as was his position there, and smooth as the course of his life seems to have been until his death in 1750, he must have had quite as much experience as can have been good for him. He was often ruffled by the town councillors of Leipzig, who (like his earlier employers at Arnstadt) were shocked by the "unecclesiastical style" of his compositions and by his independent bearing. But he had more serious troubles. Of his seven children by his first wife only three survived him. By his second wife he had thirteen children, of whom he lost four of the six sons. For the head of so large a family his post was dignified rather than lucrative, and few documents tell a prouder tale of uncomplaining thrift than the inventory of his possessions made after his death. One can only be thankful that he did not live to see anything but the wonderful promise of his son Friedermann, who, in the words of the brilliantly successful K. Philipp Emanuel Bach, was more nearly capable of replacing his father than all the rest of the family together. The prospect of complete loss of the tradition of his own polyphonic art he faced with equanimity, saying of the new style, which in the hands of his own son, Philipp Emanuel, was soon to eclipse it for the next hundred years, "The art has advanced to great heights: the old style of music no longer pleases our modern ears." But it would have broken his heart if he had forseen that Friedermann Bach was to attain a disreputable old age after a dissolute and unproductive life.

The brilliant successes of Philipp Emanuel led to his appointment as court-composer to the king of Prussia and hence, in 1747, to Sebastian's being summoned to visit Frederick the Great at Potsdam, an incident which Bach always regarded as the culmination of his career, much as Samuel Johnson regarded his interview with George III. Bach had to play on the numerous newly invented pianofortes of Silbermann which the king had bought, and also to try the organs of the churches of Potsdam. Frederick, whose musical reputation rested on a genuine if narrow basis, gave him a splendid theme on which to extemporize; and on that theme Bach afterwards wrote Das musikalische Opfer. Two years after this event his sight began to fail, and before long he shared the fate of Handel in becoming perfectly blind.

Bach died of apoplexy on the 28th of July 1750. His loss was deplored as that of one of the greatest organists and clavier players of his time. Of his compositions comparatively little was known. At his death his manuscript works were divided amongst his sons, and many of them have been lost; only a small fraction of his greater works was recovered when, after the lapse of nearly a century, the verdict of his neglectful posterity was reversed by the modern upholders of polyphonic art. Even now some important works are still apparently irrecoverable.

The rediscovery of Bach is closely connected with the name of Felix Mendelssohn, who was among the first to proclaim by word and deed the powers of a genius too gigantic to be grasped by three generations. By the enthusiastic endeavors of Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann and others, and in England still earlier by the performances and publications of Wesley and Crotch, the circle of Bach's worshippers rapidly increased. In 1850, a century after his death, a society was started for the correct publication of all Bach's remaining works. Robert Franz, the great songwriter, did good service in arranging some of Bach's finest works for modern performance, until the experience of a purer scholarship could prove not only the possibility but the incomparably greater beauty of a strict adherence to Bach's own scoring. The Porson of Bach-scholarship, however, is Wilhelm Rust (grandson of the interesting composer of that name who wrote polyphonic suites and fantasias early in the 19th century). During the fourteen years of his editorship of the Bach-Gesellschaft he displayed a steadily increasing insight into Bach's style which has never since been rivalled. In more than one case he has restored harmonies of priceless value from incomplete texts, by means of research and reasoning which he sums up in a modest footnote that reads as something self-evident. His prefaces to the Bach-Gesellschaft volumes are perhaps the most valuable contributions to the criticism of 18th-century music ever written, Spitta's great biography not excepted.

Bach's importance in the history of music cannot be exaggerated. His art, neglected as old-fashioned and crabbed by his younger contemporaries, survived only in certain limited aspects as the subject of a desultory and unintelligent academic study, until its rediscovery by Mendelssohn. And yet, whatever disguise may have been foisted on it by corrupt traditions and ignorance of its idioms, whenever any fragment of it gained the inner ear of a true composer the effect on the history of music was immediate and profound. Indeed his influence is by no means chiefly manifested in the time when his work became known in its larger aspects, though the Bach-revival is very obviously connected with certain tendencies in the "Romantic" movement in music. But, however clear we may consider Bach's claim to the title of "the first of Romanticists", the full influence of his whole work has hardly yet begun to show itself. Schumann died before even such enthusiasts as the editors of the Bach-Gesellschaft began to find more beauty than extravagance in Bach's ordinary musical language, or, indeed, to grasp the main features of his designs. The labors of the Bach-Gesellschaft have occupied more than fifty years, during which about four-fifths of Bach's choral works have been published for the first time; and it would be surprising if another fifty years sufficed to make these adequately known to the world at large. It is difficult to make an anthology of such bulky works as church-cantatas, nor does an anthology meet the purpose where the whole work so constantly attains that excellence for which the anthologist seeks. Except for practical difficulties (as when Bach writes for obsolete instruments) the only reason why some cantatas are better known than others is that a beginning must be made somewhere.

It is clear, then, that the influence of Bach's art as an understood whole is still undeveloped. In the past history of music his part was hardly suspected except by the great composers themselves; and, to any one contemplating the art of the generation after him, it might have seemed that both he and Handel had worked in vain. Yet his was the most subtle and universal force in the development of music, even when his musical language seemed hopelessly forgotten. Mozart, when rapidly advancing to the height of his mastery, had but to read the Baron von Swieten's manuscript copies of the motets and of the Wohltemperirtes Klavier, and his style, quite apart from his immediate essays in the old art forms, and apart also from the influence of his study of Handel, developed a new polyphonic richness and depth of harmony which steadily increased until his untimely death. Beethoven studied all the accessible works of Bach profoundly, and frequently quoted them in his sketchbooks, often with a direct bearing on his own works. His rendering of the Wohltemperirtes Klavier is said to be recorded in the marks of expression and tempo given in Czerny's edition; and if that record is true, Beethoven must have been completely in the dark as to Bach's meaning in many important respects; but art is full of such illustrations of the way in which great minds influence each other in spite of every barrier which diversity of language and time can set. Beethoven's great Thirty-three Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli were actually described in the publisher's puff as worthy of their kinship with the "Goldberg Variations" of Bach; and that kinship is revealed in its truest light by a comparison between Beethoven's 31st variation and Bach's 25th; for here, just where the resemblance is most obvious, each composer utters his most intimate expression of feeling.

In the same way, Chopin is nowhere more characteristic than where he shows his love of the Wohltemperirtes Klavier in his Études and Preludes; and so subtle is the influence of polyphonic style even over a writer so little apt to make direct use of it as Chopin, that one of Schumann's few plagiarisms occurs in his use of a phrase from Chopin's F minor Étude (written for the Méthode des méthodes) as the subject of a fugue (Op. 72, No. 3). And, apart from fugues, which Schumann cultivated assiduously at a late stage in his career, the influence of Bach pervades the texture and rhythm of his work in more ways than can easily be followed.

In a more external, but not less significant way, the Passion according to St. Matthew made its mark on Mendelssohn from the time when he discovered it at the age of twelve, and suggested to him many features in the general design of oratorios, by means of which he rescued that branch of art from the operatic influences that ruined Beethoven's Mount of Olives. Without the example of Bach, Wagner's schemes of Leitmotif would never in his lifetime have become woven into that close polyphonic texture which secures for his music a flow as continuous as that of drama itself -- and intimately connected with this is the whole subject of Wagner's harmonization, which in many of its boldest characteristics was foreshadowed by Bach. A close study of the texture of Brahms's work shows that he develops Bach's and Beethoven's artistic devices pari passu, and that the result is a complete unification of that opposition between polyphony and form which in the infancy of the sonata (as in every transitional stage in musical history) threatened to wreck the art as a false antithesis wrecks a philosophy. Perhaps the only great composers who escaped the direct influence of Bach are Gluck and Berlioz. Even Gluck reproduced in every detail of harmony and figure the first twelve bars of the Gigue of Bach's B flat Clavier-Partita in the aria "Je t'implore et je tremble" in Iphigénie en Tauride. But plagiarism, however unconscious, is a very different thing from that profound indebtedness which makes a great man attain his truest originality; and Gluck's training practically deprived him of Bach's direct influence, useful as that would have been to the attainment of his aims in harmonic and choral expression. The indirect influence no one could escape, for whatever in modern music is not traceable to Sebastian Bach is traceable to his sons, who were encouraged by their father in the cultivation of those infant art forms which were so soon to dazzle the world into the belief that his own work was obsolete.

Bach's place in music is thus far higher than that of a reformer, or even of an inventor of new forms. He is a spectator of all musical time and existence, to whom it is not of the smallest importance whether a thing be new or old, so long as it is true. It is doubtful whether even the forms most peculiar to him (such as the arpeggio-prelude) are of his invention. Yet he left no form as he found it -- not even that most conventional of all, the Da Capo Aria, which he did not outwardly alter in the least. On the other hand, with every form he touched he said the last word. All the material that could be assimilated into a mature art he vitalized in his own way, and he had no imitators. The language of music changed at his death, and his influence became all-pervading just because he was not the prophet of the new art, but an unbiased seeker of truth. Whether so great a man becomes "progressive" or "reactionary" depends on the artistic resources of his time. He will always work at the kind of art that is most complete and consistent in all its aspects. The same spirit of truthfulness that makes Sebastian Bach hold himself aloof from the progressive art which he encourages in his sons, drives Beethoven to invent new forms and new means of expression with every work he writes. Gluck abolished the Da Capo Aria, because it was unfit for dramatic music. Bach did not abolish it, because he did not intend to write dramatic music in the strict sense of the term. Mature musical art in Bach's time could not be dramatic, except in the loose sense in which the term may be applied to an epic poem. Dramatic expression, properly so called, can only be attained in music by the full development of resources that do not blend with those of Bach's art at all. Meanwhile there are many things unsuitable for the stage which are nevertheless valuable on purely musical grounds; and the Da Capo Aria was one. Bach developed it in a great variety of ways, while retaining even the minor details of what in other hands had long before become its conventional form; but the one thing he did not do was to abuse it according to time-honored custom as the staple form for opera. For that he had too much dramatic insight.

Father: Johann Ambrosius Bach (b. 1645, d. 1695)
Mother: Elisabeth Lämmerhirt (b. 1644, d. 1694)
Brother: Johann Christoph
Brother: Johann Jacob
Wife: Maria Barbara (m. 17-Oct-1707, d. 1720, seven children)
Wife: Anna Magdalena Wilcken (m. 11-Dec-1721, thirteen children)
Daughter: Catharina Dorothea (b. 1708)
Son: Wilhelm Friedemann (b. 22-Nov-1710)
Son: Carl Philipp Emanuel (b. 8-Mar-1714)
Son: Johann Gottfried Bernhard
Son: Gottfried Heinrich
Son: Johann Christoph Friedrich (b. 1732)
Son: Johann Christian (b. 1735)
Daughter: Elisabeth Juliane Friederica

Original Classical Composers Club

117 discussions • 2.2K scores • 532 members

Welcome to the Original Classical Composers Club (OCCC). This is NOT a board for posting arranged or transcribed music by classical composers. This is a club dedicated to original compositions that have a classical "flair" to them.

BTS

50 discussions • 78 scores • 525 members

Welcome, first time with BTS?

Please feel free to contribute BTS songs! Any mashups, remakes or original songs from BTS are totally fine - it just has to be BTS related.

Let's be friendly to each other!

Counterpoint and Fugue

43 discussions • 2.4K scores • 442 members

This is a group for counterpoint and fugue. Music that would be welcome here would include contrapuntal works by masters such as Bach or Palestrina, or your own contrapuntal compositions. Unfinished works are welcome if you intend to finish them and want comments by other musicians.

If you have a composition you would like the members to look at, just post it to the group. DO NOT post to the discussion board "I've written a new piece, take a look!" The discussion board is a resource for those who want to know more about counterpoint and fugue, where questions and answers are welcome.

Original Music of any Kind

110 discussions • 2.3K scores • 387 members

Title says it all :D
GO ORIGINAL MUSIC!!!!! ;P
Feel Free to add a discussion! just keep it clean ;)

*AND CHECK THE WEBSITE AREA for FREE custom made soundfonts!*

Legend of Zelda Music

16 discussions • 305 scores • 282 members

Be nice. Be friendly. Offer advice. No bullying.

laugh silly (bizarre, nonsense, joke, inanity, crazy, humor, absurd, jokes, fun, and serious too)

92 discussions • 1.5K scores • 269 members

2025 not sure about the DYDD, there's something about his eyes, the way he is looking at me, must be careful must be caref

2024 the DYDD rescued me from the zombies by forcing me to breathe smoked banana skins. Not sure how long we can avoid them, must not fall asleep

2023 I have no complaints, we will absorb you, there is no where you can hide, join us, be free of ..

2022 hiding out in a basement living on canned goods and recycled water, they can't find me here, someone's coming...

2021 attacked by brain-sucking zombies, the world seems doomed

2020 with perfect vision It is clear what is in store, and I don't mean grocery store.

2019 back from distant lands, I am not doing contests but any member may start one here especially if the are giving away money prizes or free bananas.

2019 not running any contests anymore, ran out of banana prizes, sorry
take the time to compose something silly

2016 begin again another year, more silliness, musescore discussions, contests, laughs, and serious music

2015
We have lots of contests and tend to write fun and silly original compositions. We try to have a contest every month or so. Contest currently open include:
The Musical Signature Contest ending Jan 15-create a composition based on your name, a sort of cryptogram, assigning notes to letters. It's fun, try it.
New Year contest ending Jan 31- write a composition celebrating the new year just for fun. It can be serious or silly.
Love Song contest ending in mid February- write an original love song. It can have lyrics if you want and can be serious or silly.
March Madness contest ending April 1 appropriately- Anything goes for this contest, be creative and silly and wild and totally mad (in a nice way). Everyone welcome.
We also have a Film Music contest ending April 30. That should be fun.
Solo Instrument contest ending June 30- write an original composition for the instrument of your choice. It can be unaccompanied or with piano or orchestra if you like or, what the hey, it can be a duet or quartet or 50 harmonica band piece just so it focuses on one shining instrument.
Now, we have a Halloween Music Contest ending Oct 31 of course and already have some great entries. So join in the fun.
We also have a guess the melody contest in which you can try to name the composer and title of music from an arrangement we put together. And we have a Famous composer challenge in which you can match up the names of composers to brief descriptions about the composer. All in fun.
Members are welcome to start their own contests or discussions in this group as well.

The administrator, Chinadoll, writes comments to every composition submitted to the group and tries to include encouragement and positive critical advice or suggestions. Anyone is welcome to join.

Visit our websites at http://chinadoll123.wix.com/laugh-silly to vote for the best music composition and composer in our group and also visit the DYDD site for pure silliness and mayhem featuring the adventures of the Downy Yellow Dinge Dork, a nearly (some would say, hopefully soon) extinct bird http://chinadoll123.wix.com/dingle-dork1
Listen to more Chinadoll music (under the name dshostakovich) at https://soundcloud.com/dshostakovich

The Beethoven Piano Sonatas

9 discussions • 129 scores • 256 members

Get involved in submitting MuseScore versions of the Beethoven Piano Sonatas as a way to feature MuseScore in several media outlets, such as YouTube, SoundCloud, Facebook and others.

A great way for teachers to help their students learn notation, and for others who are bored and have nothing else to do.

Instructions:

In the discussion area where the Sonatas are listed, simply choose a Sonata that has not already been "taken" and submit a post stating: "Sonata No. _____, Opus ____ has been taken."

Then work on notating your chosen sonata as a MuseScore file and upload it to this group when completed. Each movement should have a separate file.

Others can help (if they don't want to notate) by working on playback or video scores for these pieces once they are uploaded.

By joining, you agree that the piece you notate can be uploaded by others with whatever corrections or additions are necessary for playback and video score purposes. So the same score may be uploaded by several people who are working on the final product.

Discussions may center around questions and answers regarding notation, playback and where/how to post these works for easy access on other sites. This is a group effort, but those who notate may place their name on the work, or remain anonymous.

All works must include the opus number and the composer as follows:

Sonate (Beethoven's sonatas use the German spelling)
No. ______, Opus _______ (or Nr. __________, Opus __________)
Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Be careful regarding copyright issues and use scores that are public domain. Even though the music itself is public domain, certain printed/published scores are not. Generally, fingering and some dynamic markings may be copyrighted, as well as pedal markings and other articulations. If you're not certain about this, then simply set the marking as invisible, or use an alternate marking (hairpins as opposed to text, for example for crescendos and diminuendos/decrescendos).

PLEASE DO NOT UPLOAD ANYTHING OTHER THAN BEETHOVEN PIANO SONATAS TO THIS GROUP. ANY OTHER WORKS WILL BE REMOVED WITHOUT NOTICE.

I've already submitted a sample Beethoven Sonata for you to view to get an idea of what we want. It isn't complete.

What should I name this group...

164 discussions • 86 scores • 254 members

RULES:

1: Worship Me*
2: Post a couple times a week**
3: Brush your teeth twice a day
4: Wear your seatbelt
5: Don't swear to much (if you feel the need to swear)
6: No insulting people
7: Have fun

*Okay you don't have to do that...yet
**I'm saying this so that we can keep this group active

If you don't follow these rules, especially 5 and 6, I will consider kicking you, or banning you. And I don't wanna do that

And, feel free to spam

GROUP HISTORY (UPDATED EVERY WEEK):
https://musescore.com/groups/4980408/discuss/5037528

Phoenix Council

94 discussions • 1.3K scores • 239 members

We will sometimes hold contests, code hunts and word hunts for bonus points (if possible), members showdowns, doing your roles well and other events and everybody can compose for the fun of it and you don;t have to enter the contests or member showdowns, they are all optional and if you are new to word hunts, gibberish code hunts or the like, please check out this tutorial here: (NEW TUTORIAL COMING SOON)

Hans Zimmer

8 discussions • 159 scores • 230 members