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List of available jazz standards

Here is the alphabetical list of jazz standards lead sheets that are already done and available in our group. Titles that have been contributed by two or more different group members have additional links to the alternate versions of the leadsheets (noted with "alt chart").

Note that everything can be downloaded as .mscz file and transposed to the key of your choice.

After You've Gone || (alt chart) 
Ain't Misbehavin' || (alt chart, Eb)
All Alone
All of Me
All the Things You Are || (alt chart)
Among My Souvenirs
Angel Eyes || (alt chart)
April in Paris
As Time Goes By
Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes)
Bag's Groove
Begin the Beguine || (alt chart)
Body and Soul
But Not for Me
Ballin' the Jack
Best Thing for You
Born to Be Blue
Call Me Irresponsible
Caravan
Charleston
Cheek to Cheek
Cherokee
China Boy || (alt chart)
Come Rain or Come Shine
Crazy Rhythm
Christmas Song, The
Dream a Little Dream of Me || (Mamas & Papas arr.) 
Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans
Don't Be That Way
Don't Blame Me
Don't Get Around Much Anymore
Don't Take Your Love from Me
Drop Me Off in Harlem
East of the Sun
Embraceable You || (alt chart)
Estate
Fly Me to the Moon (4/4) || (3/4) || (alt 4/4 chart)
Flying Home
Foggy Day, A
Frim Fram Sauce, The
Georgia on My Mind
Ghost of a Chance, (I Don't Stand) A
Girl from Ipanema, The (Garota de Ipanema)
Groovin' High
Here's That Rainy Day
Honeysuckle Rose
How Am I to Know?
How Deep Is the Ocean?
I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me
I Can't Get Started
I Cover the Waterfront
I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)
I Got Rhythm
I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart
I Should Care
I Wish You Love
I Won't Dance || (alt chart)
If I Had You
I'll Remember April
I'll See You in My Dreams || (alt chart)
Indian Summer
Indiana
Isn't It Romantic
It Could Happen to You
It Had to Be You
It Might as Well Be Spring
Joint Is Jumpin', The
Just Friends
La Vie En Rose
Laura
Lester Leaps In
Let's Fall in Love
Let's Get Lost
Louisiana Fairytale
Love for Sale
Love Is Here to Stay || (alt chart)
Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)
Lush Life
Man I Loved, The
Manhã de Carnaval  (also known as A Day in the Life of a Fool)
Maple Leaf Rag
Memories of You
Misty
Mr. PC
My Funny Valentine
My Romance
My Ship
Nardis
Nearness of You, The
Night and Day
Night in Tunisia
Nightengale Sang in Berkeley Square, A
Oh, Lady Be Good
Old Country, The
On a Misty Night
On a Slow Boat to China
Only the Lonely (Jimmy Van Heusen song)
Over the Rainbow
Out of Nowhere
Perdido
Pick Yourself Up
Poinciana
Prelude to a Kiss
Puttin' on the Ritz
Que reste-t-il de nos amour?
Rosetta
Round Midnight
Royal Garden Blues
Satin Doll
Secret Love
Sentimental Journey
Shiny Stockings
Skylark
Smile
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes
Sophisticated Lady
Someone to Watch Over Me
Sonnymoon for Two
St. James Infirmary
St. Louis Blues
Stardust [with verse] || (alt chart)
Stars Fell on Alabama
Stella By Starlight
Stompin' at the Savoy
Summertime
Sunny Side of the Street, The
Sweet Lorraine
Take the 'A' Train
Taking a Chance on Love
Tea for Two
There Is No Greater Love
There Will Never Be Another You || (alt chart)
This Can't Be Love
Topsy
Turn Out the Stars
Two Sleepy People
Walkin My Baby Back Home
Way You Look Tonight, The
What Is This Thing Called Love?
What's New?
When You're Smiling
Where or When
Willow Weep for Me
Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams
Yesterdays
You Go to My Head || (alt chart)

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Chords Posture on guitar

 
The posture that we mean here is the placement of the position of the finger in the area of the finger board. Postures Visually can be imitated and classified harmoniously. The left hand posture on the guitar identifies harmony movements. In the context of instrument technique the effectiveness and efficiency of the introduction repertoires are related to posture flexibility.
The basic posture with the 1-3-7 tone pattern confirms the gender triad directly. The term gender refers to minor, minor, seventh dominant and half dim. Neighbor tones are also introduced, so that position analysis and harmony can interact directly.
https://musescore.com/user/29306356/scores/5318673

chords Posture on guitar

  
The posture that we mean here is the placement of the position of the finger in the area of the finger board. Postures Visually can be imitated and classified harmoniously. The left hand posture on the guitar identifies harmony movements. In the context of instrument technique the effectiveness and efficiency of the introduction repertoires are related to posture flexibility.
The basic posture with the 1-3-7 tone pattern confirms the gender triad directly. The term gender refers to minor, minor, seventh dominant and half dim. Neighbor tones are also introduced, so that position analysis and harmony can interact directly.

https://musescore.com/user/29306356/scores/5318673

Getting chord symbol playback, manually

Lead sheets are of course disappointing to listen to in MuseScore because there is no built-in facility for generating accompaniment based on the chord symbols.  Programs like Impro-Visor, iReal Pro, and others excel at this, and maybe some day MuseScore will have this ability.  Meanwhile, I have created a resource you might find useful.  It's a "cheat sheet" score with typical jazz piano voicings (as well as more generic voicings for folk/pop etc) for a wider variety of chords.  Just add a piano part to your lead sheet (using Edit / Instruments), copy and paste from the "cheat sheet" to the piano, then mark the piano invisible (also in Edit / Instruments).

Here is the "cheat sheet":

Looking for big band charts

Hi!  Some of you may recognize me, I've been involved with jazz and MuseScore education online forever, but for whatever reason, it only just occurred to me to turn here for music to play :-).

I direct a big band of adult amateur musicians.  We have a library full of the typical charts by Nestico, Mantooth, etc.  I figure some people here have probably created some really great music for conventional (5+4+4+4) big band instrumentation and spent time getting the part to look and all so they are all ready to print and perform, but don't have access to a big band.  If that's you, hit me up!  If your music is for that format and the parts are in good readable shape, we'd love to try them out!  Respond here with links - whether your own music or others' you think we should check out.  My band isn't the Basie band and won't sound like that :-), but I'm happy to make a recording of us doing our best!

This isn't a competition, although who knows, maybe some day we'll organize one.

Jazz standards transcription plan

Below are song titles from a "transcription plan" that was being pursued by this group in 2017-2018. The idea was to take the top 100 jazz standards appearing on the jazzstandards.com list and provide lead sheets. The jazzstandards.com list was  compiled statistically, and is ordered by frequency of recording (see the site for more details).

As of this writing, lead sheets for about 2/3 of the top 100 songs on the Jazzstandards.com list have been submitted to the group. (The full jazzstandards.com list includes 1,000 tunes, in case you were wondering.) At the bottom of this message are the titles that have not been done.

You are welcome to work on the remaining titles, or any other titles considered to be jazz standards (or popular song standards from the classic jazz/swing era--roughly 1910 to 1960). If your song isn't one of the 1,000 songs on the full jazzstandards.com list, it's probably not what most musicians and jazz fans would consider a jazz standard. That doesn't mean it's not a great tune, but in most cases it means the tune is not widely performed. (Perhaps we need a Musescore group dedicated to overlooked and under-appreciated  jazz tunes and traditional popular songs.) We will try to be as inclusive as possible when adding submissions to the group, while still keeping the focus on tunes that you might hear played and sung in jam sessions or on gigs by relatively mainstream jazz performers.

You are also welcome to submit improved versions of any songs that have already been done for the group. Perhaps a song previously submitted is missing lyrics, or missing the introductory verse, or has chord changes that are not widely used by musicians in performance. So far, the group has not been flooded by multiple versions of any given song--if we were to get, say, 10 charts for "I Got Rhythm," we might need to pick the best 2 or 3 for the main listing, but currently that's not an issue.

Note that if you are starting a new chart, you may save yourself some time by working with an existing "Wikifonia Archive" chart and adding your own corrections, improved formatting, and missing sections / lyrics as needed. See the following discussion for more details: https://musescore.com/groups/jazz-standards-leadsheets/discuss/5019538

To add a score to the group's collection, open the score in Musescore.com or find it in your account's list of scores, click the "three dots" action icon at the top right, and then choose type in "Jazz Standards Lead Sheets" to search for and choose this group. You can then leave a comment here with the song title and the URL for the link to let us know you've added a new score. If your chart has notable features or corrections, add a note about it when you post, and consider adding the details to the comments on the score page as well.

Jazz standards not currently in the collection of this group (ranking from jazzstandards.com)

16. Sweet Georgia Brown
19. In a Sentimental Mood
21. How High the Moon
25. On Green Dolphin Street
26. Tenderly
28. These Foolish Things
48. Stompin' At the Savoy
53. You Don't Know What Love Is
55. On the Sunny Side of the Street
69. Lover Come Back to Me
70. Darn That Dream
72. More Than You Know
74. Just One of Those Things
75. Mean to Me
76. September Song
79. Polka Dots and Moonbeams
80. Easy Living
81. Pennies from Heaven
82. I Didn't Know What Time It Was
84. It Don't Mean a Thing
86. They Can't Take That Away from Me
87. Star Eyes
89. Alone Together
90. Just You, Just Me
92. Things Ain't What They Used to Be
93. Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me
94. Blue Moon
95. I Surrender Dear
96. You Stepped Out of a Dream
97. My One and Only Love
98. 'S Wonderful!

Resources for creating leadsheets

The following are resources that might be useful when creating a jazz leadsheet.

Song Indexes

* The fakebook tune index at Seventhstring.com is a very comprehensive and user-friendly index of many commercial and non-commercial fakebooks. It can be useful to compare various existing leadsheets when making one of your own.
https://www.seventhstring.com/fbindex.html

Other indexes:
https://library.buffalo.edu/music/collections/fake-book/
Several other fakebook indexes are listed at the bottom of the following page:
https://www.cs.hmc.edu/~keller/jazz/TheJoyOfFakebooks.htm

Song Lists

* The website JazzStandards.com has a list of the top 1000 most commonly recorded jazz tunes (a mix of popular song standards and jazz pieces written specifically for jazz performance). The website doesn't say exactly how the recordings used as the data set were chosen (for example, whether or not "jazz adjacent" artists like Frank Sinatra were included), but the resulting list will certainly be recognizable to anyone familiar with the mainstream jazz repertoire as it was played and recorded from the 1920s to the 1960s. This group's "transcription plan" is based on the top 100 songs on this list.
http://www.jazzstandards.com/compositions/index.htm 

JazzStandards.com also has articles and book reviews, including articles like "Performance Practice vs. Composer’s Intention" and "Harmony and Form of Jazz Standards" that would be of interest to people learning about how to document a tune in a leadsheet.
http://www.jazzstandards.com/theory/overview.htm

* The website Cafe Songbook has a "Catalog of The Great American Songbook" that documents several hundred songs commonly performed by jazz and cabaret artists, giving composer details and background information on them in many cases. They don't claim to have any kind of criteria for inclusion beyond the judgment of the editors (unlike JazzStandards.com, which has a list based on how frequently songs made it to commercial recordings). 
http://greatamericansongbook.net/pages/cat_pages/title.html

Background Information

* The Joy of Fakebooks (web page): This is an illustrated historical overview of fakebooks, written by Bob Keller, going back to "Tune-Dex" cards used by gigging musicians of the 1940s. 
https://www.cs.hmc.edu/~keller/jazz/TheJoyOfFakebooks.htm

This page also contains a link to a Google Docs spreadsheet by Keller that ranks fakebooks by all kinds of criteria. For example:
# number of tunes
# consistency of layout
# presence of song verses (introductory sections)
# readabilty
# chord substitutions
...and many others. 

The spreadsheet reviews some 120 fakebooks. Just by reading the criteria Keller uses to evaluate fakebooks, you can learn a lot about what stylistic decisions you will be making as you put together a leadsheet. 
http://spreadsheets1.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?hl=en_US&key=tqfLbKzNkWhtm4GW97PljIw&hl=en_US#gid=0

* "It’s Time to Get Rid of Your Real Book" (blog post)
Experienced jazz musicians are well aware of the fact that the original 1970s Real Book has many errors in the charts. But younger musicians, and musicians in places where jazz is not very common, might not know this. This blog post makes the case that it's time to get rid of the Real Book and use other, more accurate alternatives when learning jazz tunes (or creating a lead sheet yourself).
http://blog.danreitz.com/?p=1128

Musescore Tools

Chord Symbol Voicings for Playback - This resource created by Marc Sabatella provides you with  copy and paste chord voicings that you can use in in your own score to get basic chord symbol playback. Leave a comment below if you have incorporated chord playback into a lead sheet (successfully or unsuccessfully), and tell us the way you went about it.


Tutorials

* A two-part tutorial exists for creating a leadsheet in MuseScore. This tutorial was written by Marc Sabatella prior to the release of the 2.0 software, and is slightly out of date (particularly regarding the need for plugins), but most of the information remains current.
https://musescore.org/en/node/11723 (Part 1: The Basics)
https://musescore.org/en/node/11726 (Part 2: Advanced Topics)

Marc is responsible for coding many of the nice features currently available in MuseScore for creating jazz charts, including the software's jazz chord symbol features. Marc also wrote a user guide to Musescore 2.0 (Mastering MuseScore), if you want to get something a little more refined than the community-authored user guide on MuseScore.org. Marc tirelessly answers new users' questions (including many of mine) on the MuseScore.org forums. His MuseScore user's manual is available for puchase here: 
https://masteringmusescore.com/go/books/

* Poor Butterfly and 'What Makes a Good Chart?' (blog post): In this two-part article, Peter Spitzer offers guidance on the art of creating a successful 'vanilla' leadsheet, using the standard 'Poor Butterfly' as an example. He starts with the original 1916 sheet music, then moves on to discuss leadsheets and chord changes published by Hal Leonard, Jamey Aebersold, Ralph Patt, and Dick Hyman. He then looks at the chord changes used on recordings by several jazz greats, comparing these arrangements to the leadsheet chords. It's an excellent demonstration of the kind of analysis and background research that can be used to create an accurate, general-purpose leadsheet that reflects both the composer's intentions and jazz as it is actually played in the real world. It's also very similar to the process used by the music editor of Chuck Sher's New Real Book series for putting together jazz charts of traditional popular songs, as described in Vol. 1 of that series.
http://peterspitzer.blogspot.com/2012/06/poor-butterfly-and-what-makes-good.html (part 1)
http://peterspitzer.blogspot.com/2012/06/poor-butterfly-and-what-makes-good_07.html (part 2)  
 
Jazz Theory

* Jazz musician and educator Stuart Smith has put his text Jazz Theory: 4th Revised Edition online for free. This text can be useful when you are trying to understand and make decisions about things like enharmonic equivalents  (e.g. "Is this chord a D#7 or an Eb7? Why does it matter?")
http://www.cs.uml.edu/~stu/JazzTheory.pdf  (.pdf file)

* The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine (Sher Music Co.). Available for purchase at Amazon and many other books stores and music stores. "A required text in universities world-wide, translated into five languages, endorsed by Jamey Aebersold, James Moody, Dave Liebman, etc." says the Amazon copy. Also recommended by jazz pianist and educator Billy Taylor and this group's Paul Ukena.
https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine-ebook/dp/B004KA9UX4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1532956037&sr=8-1&keywords=jazz+theory+book+levine&pldnSite=1

* Jazz Theory Resources (Volumes 1 & 2) by Burt Ligon (Houston Publishing, Inc.) is another well-reviewed resource for jazz theory.
https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Resources-Bert-Ligon/dp/0634038613/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1532985698&sr=1-1&keywords=Bert+Ligon+-+JAZZ+THEORY+RESOURCES

* MuseScore's own Marc Sabatella has written a book titled The Harmonic Language of Jazz Standards that may be useful to helping you understand why certain harmonies or chord substitutions are used by practicing jazz musicians, and what chords to choose when creating a leadsheet. Marc is a college-level jazz educator, and an excellent writer and communicator. His book is available for purchase here:
https://outsideshore.com/product/the-harmonic-language-of-jazz-standards/

Scores online

If you have an interest in popular songs written prior to 1960 (which most jazz musicians do!), there are many online collections of sheet music, including the following: 
https://library.stanford.edu/music/digital-scores
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/search/index?filters%5Btype%5D=notated+music&keywords= 
https://www.loc.gov/collections/historic-sheet-music/about-this-collection/
http://digital.library.msstate.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/SheetMusic
http://library.indstate.edu/rbsc/kirk/popsong.html

Most online archives feature only public-domain works, which in the United States tends to mean works published prior to 1923 (so, a few early-jazz age pop standards like "After You've Gone" and "Alexander's Ragtime Band", but don't expect to find "All the Things You Are" or "'Round Midnight")

Miscellaneous

* "Review: The Story of Fake Books and the 6th Edition Real Book": A book review on Jazz musican and writer Peter Spitzer's blog concerning two works: a book chronicling the history of fakebooks, and the Hal Leonard Real Book (6th Ed.). Interesting nuggets taken from the history book included the fact that there was no known 4th edition of the Real Book (the 5th edition was apparently produced by parties not responsible for the first three Real Book volumes), and the fact that the FBI investigated the publication of the Real Book.
http://peterspitzer.blogspot.com/2011/04/review-story-of-fake-books-and-6th.html

* "The Vocabulary of Tin Pan Alley Explained" (journal article): A 1949 glossary of terminology related to the popular sheet music industry, with a few definitions related to jazz (including 'leadsheet', and one for the brand-new movement of be-bop). One amusing footnote: around the time this article was published, Downbeat had a contest to see who could come up with the best name to replace the old-fashioned term "jazz". The winner received $1000 ($10,000+ in 2018 dollars). The winning entry? "Crew-cut".
https://photos.app.goo.gl/KS3tUMUF57YFYvP78

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More resources to be added to this list as I come across them. Suggestions are welcomed.

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