Self-introduction!!!

Hi everyone!

Since this group is about learning composition from each other, I feel that it would be great if y'all could introduce yourselves in this group so that we could better learn from each other!

Probably just mention your composition experience/why and what (and how) you compose/instruments you play/hobbies/basically anything

So i'll start...

I recently graduated from high school last year, and I've been composing since around 12 yo. I started composition seriously in high school during my 'A' level music studies. I normally compose in the classical genre, ranging from Baroque to Modern styles, and I'm still in the pursuit to find my distinct aesthetic. Also I play the piano, and clarinet (self-taught), and own a couple of other instruments (including toy instruments) :)

(since i'm admin i shall pin this thread haha)

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a month ago
25

What is your composition style and who inspires you?

The composer that influenced me the most is definitely Claude Debussy. I compose in an impressionistic style, which means that my pieces evoke imagery and a sense of story when listening, with some unique chords and controlled dissonance.

Some other compositional styles (not all of them, but some general ones):

Baroque - very structured, rule-abiding, very much single note voices, court dances.
Classical - sonata, orchestral pieces, structured and with set phrases, repetition and controlled expression.
Romantic - feeling-evoking, dramatic, freedom of expression, strong and contrasting note choices.
Impressionistic - image-evoking, a flowing and free tone, more dissonance, more chord choices.
Contemporary, modern, post-modern - jazz, blues, rag, that kinda music, lots of dissonance
Popular/good sounding - repetitive chord structure, very easy to listen to
Technical - compose for the purpose of exercising the fingers

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19 days ago
32

Something I found While Browsing reddit music theory.

 Form mapping. This is less a tool for learning to compose and more for  facilitating easier composing, but it's still useful. Take a piece of  paper (or a word processor/image creation software, if you like), and  lay out the total time you expect your piece to take (say, a 5 minute  string quartet movement?). Draw a timeline from 0:00 to 5:00, and divide  it up into some guidepost-type chunks (maybe 30 second ticks?). Then,  take a pencil and start sketching out your ideas. Where is the climax?  Where will you repeat/develop a theme (if at all)? Do you want a  contrasting B section? How long do you want to transition between  sections? Do you want a coda? The trick isn't to be specific, but just  to draw out some lines to figure out where you might want to go. It's  nice so that you don't have to compose start to finish - you can work on  a section in the middle, fit it into your form map, and work around it  as you are inspired to do so.  

Just thought It was a cool idea.

The entire string here.
https://www.reddit.com/r/musictheory/comments/16zqxl/what_are_some_good_composing_exercises/

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16 days ago
2

A Composition Exercise

I came across this thread about a composition exercise ---> https://musescore.com/groups/29328/discuss/5032409 and found it rather interesting and worth a try.

Basically...

Composition exercise by the Polish composer Karol Szymanowski(1882-1937) given to his student.

It goes as follows:
16 bars divided into 4x4 bar segments
Tonic chord at the beginning
At bars 7/8 modulate to dominant(in major) or relative major(in minor)
In bars 9/10 write a sequence
In bars 11/12 write another sequence
In bars 13/14 thematic return should occur
In bar 16 coda
And at the bottom: "best subdominant, dominant and tonic, perfect cadence."

Do upload your scores should you try them out!
 

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a month ago
2

Question...

How important, in your opinion, is a professional teacher/organized classes to developing one's compositional talent?
There's a lot of wonderful self-taught composers and musicians out there, but is there a point where "self-taught" can become an excuse to be lazy and undisciplined, just writing whatever sounds good to you whenever you feel like it?
On the other hand, can traditional classes interfere with one's ability to compose freely, where you can pour your time and energy into the music you love without going through the motions to get a good grade? 

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a month ago
1

Competition.

Well... I am not sure if this will work but let's give it a shot. You guys must compose a new song, ( not reuse an old one). And if you win, you'll get something. Probably just moderator, but still we'll work on prizes. Songs due by new year.

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2 months ago
25

..........

I know how to add discussion just too lazy to add one so I just stick around commenting EthanHarris@2018... Well... He was the one who wanted me to make a discussion so I did so...

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2 months ago
2