Silver Star (1910)

1 part4 pages02:586 hours ago15 views
Piano
I don't really understand why any of Johnson's "Indian" pieces are called that -- they don't sound Indian at all (in either a real or a stereotypical capacity). I will give him this, though: at least he's internally consistent. This sounds very much like his previous Indian intermezzo, "Iola" -- in fact, almost suspiciously so...

Lady Slippers (1910)

1 part4 pages03:173 days ago35 views
Piano
Here's one of Johnson's first "characteristic rags" in a while. (I say "characteristic" not in the sense in which it was used in 1910, but in its current meaning -- characteristic of his signature style.) Once again, I don't have much else to say, so here it is.

Heart Fancies (1910)

1 part6 pages05:303 days ago43 views
Piano
Surprise! It's another waltz! I am getting a little sick of waltzes now -- especially after "Polonia"... There's not too much to say about this piece, besides the fact that its original cover looks strangely familiar (remember "Golden Spider"?), so I'll leave it at that.

Darktown-Coon (1904)

1 part3 pages02:096 days ago50 views
Piano
Putting aside this piece's rather questionable title (which reads something like a Canadian parody of American music titles -- "We need a good title! It looks like the Americans use 'Darktown' and 'Coon' a lot -- just throw them together"), we arrive at some rather questionable music as well. The formatting here is very strange, especially because passages that would ordinarily constitute a strain are written instead in two repeating eight-bar halves, with massive voltas added to make up for the fact that the halves really don't reuse much of the same material. This is another one from "Le Passe-Temps"; transcribing it did help me pass the time, so I guess it did its job.

Allonzo, Allons-y! (1903)

1 part3 pages02:436 days ago47 views
Piano
Here's another cakewalk from the Quebeckish magazine "Le Passe-Temps." Its similarities to "Deo Gratias, Lucien!!!" are fairly obvious... though in my opinion it doesn't quite attain the same level of quality as that piece. Still, it's reasonably entertaining and interesting to listen to.

Deo Gratias, Lucien!!! (1903)

1 part3 pages03:024 months ago68 views
Piano
I don't know how this evaded my notice until now, but it seems ragtime music was popular in Canada as well; in fact, there was a Quebeckish magazine (Le Passe-Temps) that was similar to the American Melody in that it often included piano sheet music for assorted popular pieces. This piece came from that magazine.

The Englishman's Favorite

1 part4 pages04:078 days ago85 views
Piano
This Lamb-style piece is dedicated to my (and I'd reckon all of my fellow transcribers and composers) friend John, (or IAPL). He's indespensable in this community, and it's really great to have such a skilled proofreader and commentator as he.

I named this piece for his love of Joe Lamb's works, which I have tried my best to replicate (along with some Keenlyside, Johnson, and Bolcom elements thrown in there!)

Bonus: See if you can spot the references to "Cascades" and "American Beauty"!

Enjoy!
Such a Night
Custom audio

Such a Night

12 parts58 pages02:499 days ago81 views
Percussion(2), Piano(5), Guitar(2), Voice, Baritone Saxophone, Bass
A great song composed by Lincoln Chase. this song was singing by Clyde McPhatter(54) and 10 years after Elvis Presly make a great succes (64) with this score. I hoppe that my arrangement enjoy you.

The_Midnight_Whirl

1 part4 pages02:2812 days ago15 views
Piano
Re upload because the update was not working. Sorry about that.

A Rag "Intermezzo" 1909 Malvin M Franklin and Anatol Friedland

Huckleberry Finn (1900)

1 part4 pages02:5812 days ago65 views
Piano
One of my favorite cakewalks, even with its lack of editing. Interestingly, the cover shows two African-American couples cakewalking. Either it was the name of a maneuver, or the composer wanted to capitalize on the popularity of Twain's book (which was still wildly popular 15 years after its original publishing.

Enjoy!

Golden Spider (1910)

1 part4 pages02:5813 days ago74 views
Piano
Johnson's second and final piece published by Vandersloot Music. He claimed that the firm was doing a bad job of advertising his pieces and getting them out to stores too slowly; his complaints may well have been warranted. (Also, look at Vandersloot casually "blowing his cover" and listing "Powder Rag" under Johnson's real name!)

Lassus Trombone

1 part5 pages02:5916 days ago68 views
Piano
Okay, I lied. As I was browsing through my old band music, I found this well-loved (and really fun) one-step. I wanted to play it, but there was not (besides the unplayable director's score) a means to.

So, I headed to Walter Cosand's website, downloaded the director's score, and arranged this today. I believe this is the first readily available piano version, but I'm not sure if the one Tom Brier reads is his handiwork or the director's score.

Anyway, now you can play this rag on your own, free of a brass band!

Enjoy!

The New Russian Rag (1923)

1 part4 pages03:2117 days ago82 views
Piano
I apologize for this, crono23... but I have two good reasons to post this score. First and foremost, your current transcription of "The New Russian Rag," which you uploaded over a year ago, no longer seems to meet either of our standards of quality (which have improved considerably since that time), and it also takes up six whole pages, whereas the original music was printed onto only four. Second, you know how I am with sets! If I didn't transcribe this piece, I would never be able to finish uploading every work ever written by Cobb, and you know what that means...

Anyway, to anyone else reading this, please enjoy "The New Russian Rag." I refer you to crono23's transcription of the piece for any other information about it you may wish to learn: https://musescore.com/crono23/the-new-russian-rag
Bluebottle Rag
Custom audio

Bluebottle Rag

1 part4 pages02:5418 days ago133 views
Piano
Here is another hybrid rag. This time a blues/rag hybrid.
It’s in the form of Intro-AA-B-CC-B-A.
The strains A and B are written in a way to be reminiscent of song singing and the bridge B to be more like an instrumental solo

The Blizzard

1 part7 pages03:2418 days ago83 views
Piano
A Paull-style march inspired by today's onslaught of snowmageddon.

Enjoy!

The Tipster (1927)

1 part3 pages0319 days ago61 views
Piano
I thought I was done with Cobb for a while -- but then I found this (on its original Melody magazine page, which I got on loan from the Bagaduce Music Lending Library). You may be wondering how it is that I'm uploading a piece from 1927 when pieces from that year shouldn't be entering the public domain until 2023. If a piece was never registered for copyright, it might be possible to transcribe legally -- but this one was. If a piece registered for copyright in 1927 never had its copyright renewed, it would also be legal to upload -- but this one was renewed. So how, then, is it legal to upload the piece?

The answer is that Walter Jacobs made a monumental error when registering the copyright for this particular piece: He entered it under the name "The Tippler." (You can look in the records and see for yourself.) Moreover, it was renewed under this same incorrect name, debunking any possible claim that the mistake was just a one-off typo. Due to the presence of a factual error in its registration that negatively impacts its ability to be identified, the piece's copyright is therefore void, and you get to hear it now instead of waiting four years for its copyright to expire.