"Laudate Dominum" for Winds & Strings

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Uploaded on Jan 28, 2014

Johann(es) Simon Mayr (also spelled Majer, Mayer, Maier), also known in Italian as Giovanni Simone Mayr or Simone Mayr (1763 --1845) was a German composer.

He was born in Mendorf near Altmannstein, Landkreis Eichstätt, Bavaria, and studied theology at the University of Ingolstadt, continuing his studies in Italy from 1787. He was closely associated with the Bavarian Illuminati of Adam Weishaupt while a student in Ingolstadt, and the ideals of the French Enlightenment were a strong influence on his philosophy as a musician as corroborated by his famed Zibaldone or "Notebooks" compiled toward the end of his career.

Shortly thereafter, he took music lessons with Carlo Lenzi, and later with Ferdinando Bertoni. He moved to Bergamo in 1802 and was appointed maestro di cappella at the Cathedral of Bergamo, succeeding his old teacher Lenzi. He held the post until his death, and became a central figure in the city's musical life, organizing concerts and introducing Ludwig van Beethoven's music there. He was music teacher to Gaetano Donizetti. By the end of his life, he was blind. He died in Bergamo and is buried in the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore there, just in front of the tomb of his famous pupil.

Mayr's works, among which there are almost seventy operas, are rarely performed today.

Psalm 117 is the 117th psalm of the Book of Psalms. With just two verses and sixteen words in Hebrew, it is the shortest of all 150 psalms. It is the 595th of the 1,189 chapters of the King James Version of the Bible making it the middle chapter. It is also the shortest chapter in this version of the Bible. Psalm 117, known by the opening words in Latin as "Laudate dominum" (translated "O, Praise the Lord" or "Praise ye the Lord"), has been set to music by a number of composers, including William Byrd and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

As with the other Psalms, "Laudate Dominum" is concluded with a trinitarian doxology (Gloria Patri) when used in the Roman rite. In Catholic churches, the Psalm may be sung after the blessing at the devotional service called Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.

The title "Laudate Dominum" can also refer to Psalm 150 which begins with identical text. The exhortations to praise God through music in Psalm 150 have inspired settings from a number of composers.

Although originally composed for Chorus and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (Violins, Violas, Cellos & Basss) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Classical

Pages 10
Duration 02:31
Measures 88
Key signature 2 flats
Parts 10
Part names
Privacy Everyone can see this score
License None (All rights reserved)
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