"Cum Sancto Spiritu" from the Mass in G Major (BWV 236 No. 6) for Winds & Strings


Uploaded on Aug 16, 2016

Between 1737 and 1748 Johann Sebastian Bach wrote at least five Masses, four of which survive in their entirety. (The C Minor Mass exists only as a fragment.) These are known as the Missa brevis (plural is Missae brevis), meaning brief Masses or Lutheran Masses, in contrast to the Mass in B Minor, Bach's only Latin work following the complete Catholic Mass structure. But none of these Masses gets much attention in either Bach scholarship or performances, suffering first from being in the shadow of the Mass in B Minor - called by Georg Nägeli one of the "greatest musical works of art of all times and all peoples" - and second by the fact that each of these four Masses are "parody" works. A parody work is one based on preexisting music. Parody Masses were common in the Renaissance, whereby a composer would create a new musical work out of old material. Normally, that "old material" was a chant or popular song, some musical element that would be recognizable to the choir and congregation. For two famous examples, see Josquin's Missa pange lingua (based on the chant "Pange lingua", still used today in the Catholic Church), or Machaut's Missa l'homme armé (which is based on a popular song).

Bach's Masses, however, are parodies of his own work. In modern times, we tend to think of the word "parody" in terms of comedy; but the original use of the word in music had no such connotations. In fact, parody was a common technique that was often a form of flattery - if your work proved to be the source of the parody, then your music had to be fairly well known, perhaps even well respected. In the present case, Bach's Mass in G Major is largely based on his own earlier cantatas:

- The "Kyrie Eleison" is derived from Cantata 179
- the opening movement of the "Gloria in Excelsis" comes from Cantata 79
- the "Gratias agimus tibi" movement is derived from Cantata 138
- continuing in the Gloria, the movement "Domine Deus" also comes from Cantata 79
- "Quoniam tu solus sanctus" comes, like the Kyrie, from Cantata 179
- the final movement of the Gloria, "Cum Sancto Spiritu", originates from Cantata 17

Source: Bach.org (http://www.bach.org/bwv236.php).

I created this arrangement of the "Cum Sancto Spiritu in gloria Dei Patris" (With the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Baroque

Pages 32
Duration 04:03
Measures 110
Key signature 1 sharp
Parts 10
Part names Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Privacy Everyone can see this score
License None (All rights reserved)
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