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"On the Seashore" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 53 No. 1) for Oboe & Guitar


Uploaded on Nov 18, 2018

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

The eight volumes of Songs Without Words, each consisting of six "songs" (Lieder), were written at various points throughout Mendelssohn's life, and were published separately. The piano became increasingly popular in Europe during the early nineteenth century, when it became a standard item in many middle-class households. The pieces are within the grasp of pianists of various abilities and this undoubtedly contributed to their popularity. This great popularity has caused many critics to under-rate their musical value. He composed Book 4 (Opus 53) between 1839–41

The first song is "On the Seashore" (Andante con moto). Suitably it opens with sempre tenuto e legato. Each of the melody notes should be given their full value. Mendelssohn is given the opportunity to show off his talent with being able to supply the perfect undertones with the main body of melody lines. "On the Seashore" provides a clear, tender, and concise style that is typical with Mendelssohn.

"Clouds" (Allegro non troppo) is also known as "The Fleecy Clouds". Thought to have been written for his sister Fanny as Mendelssohn truly thought that his music would speak in larger volumes than his words. Compare this song with Book Three No. 3, and there appears to be some common resemblance. The piece is impulsive and is very much influenced by Schumann.

"Agitation" (Presto Agitato). Not until the Ninth measure is the subject of this piece loudly apparent. There lies the effective monotony that is prevalent throughout this song. In measure 69, he inserts additional notes on the weaker beat with the left hand.

"Sadness of Soul" (Adagio) is expressive, but perhaps overly sentimental. It is a prime example of a cantabile (singing) style of playing. The song is very similar to his composition of "On wings of Son" op.34 No. 2. The use of the sustain pedal adds an ingenious third hand.

"Folk Dance" (Allegro con Fuoco) is certainly his best out of this book. As the term "Fuoco" is implied, it is to be played with fire and passion. Felix composes with this fury, and has an almost patriotic march. Basically, this song has been elaborated on from the forth song in book One. This has none of Mendelssohn's usual traits of politeness and gentle mannerisms, but is attacked with more aggression and roughness.

"Flight" (Molto allegro vivace). Instead of using cadence forms as was used in No. 5, Mendelssohn's use of chromatic seconds give the listener a sense of being caught up in a hurricane. Later in the piece, it presents a pure display of raw technical power. The piece builds, until the last few measures dwindle down to a surprising diminuendo.

The book on a whole is certainly worth mentioning. Mendelssohn shrugs off his polite way of being, and occasionally opts to be somewhat more aggressive. The piece contrasts in mood, showing that even this composer can be found in his own kind of personal tug of war, and leave the comfort that is his nature.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-4-op-53-mc0002393259 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "On the Seashore" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 53 No. 1) for Oboe & Classical Guitar.

Romantic

Pages 3
Duration 03:17
Measures 65
Key signature 4 flats
Parts 2
Part names Oboe, Guitar
Privacy Everyone can see this score
License None (All rights reserved)
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