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So this happened earlier today at my school. Basically, some dude in my grade took a pair of scissors, took them apart, and used them to attempt to stab 3 different people. The best he got was one of them was bleeding from the finger, but the point is that he didn’t exactly intend for them to leave in one piece. A few minutes later, where only the involved people have heard about this, half the school administration comes down to get him. From the rumors I’ve heard, he got 3 weeks of OSS and a Police Referral. Anyone had something like this happen at their school?
I have heard this question asked many times during my early professional career, and each time I recoil when I hear it. The fact is, this question is just a way for composers to point an accusatory finger because their art was not met with the glowing reception they crave. Although the question is inherently selfish, the sentiment behind it is legitimate; people do not respect new “intellectual” music anymore. That said, the question approaches the issue from the wrong angle. Composers should instead look inwards to search out what they could be doing to make the listener’s job easier, while at the same time not sacrificing their sense of artistry. It is the opinion of the author that all music lies on a spectrum of purely popular to purely intellectual. Although these definitions change with the times, all music, contemporary and ancient, fall on this spectrum. For instance, Katy Perry’s newest hit single would fall as close to the “purely popular” side of the spectrum as possible. This ensures that she has as much popularity as possible, but it limits the intellectual nature of the art. Similarly, Milton Babbit falls as close to the “purely intellectual” side of the spectrum as possible, crafting highly complex music that the average music lover would not enjoy. There is certainly a place for those composers in this day and age, and maybe someday that music will be accepted, but since the academic composer of the last eighty years has met with little success in this area, it would be a safe assumption to say that this scenario is unlikely. To get to the source of the issue, we must ask ourselves: “what is the role of music?” This question is deceptively simple, but ask the academic composer and the average listener alike, and they will come up with answers that may seem the same on the surface, but are in reality very different. The academic might say: “music is for the expression of the inward thought processes, shaped by personal experience and self-growth, managed by our interpretation of those experiences through our intellectual compositional paths,” while the average listener will probably say “music makes me feel good.” This satirical comparison aside, you can see that the listener listens to music to feel, while the academic thinks to compose. This is the author’s opinion of the state of the art. Composers have invested so much in their ability to think up something that no one has thought of before, while ignoring the listeners who love listening to a genre that bases itself upon music that is mostly creatively stagnant and alike to itself. The question composers should be asking is not pointed towards the audience, but rather towards themselves: “what can I do to reach the audience while not sacrificing my intellectual identity or artistic style?” If the academics ask themselves this question, they will begin to make a connection with the listener, even if the two do not agree completely on style, for at least then, the composer is working for the listener, and not the other way around. When classical music was at its peak, this was the preeminent mindset of the composer. There was no guaranteed second performance of their newest piece, so they wrote to please their audience, but in the case of Beethoven (and others), he still adjusted the musical language for his intellectual purposes. This is why classical music (referring to music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) and jazz are still the most popular recital hall concerts – the genres balance intellectual pursuits of the composer and the desires of the listener. New music of any intellectual degree will never eclipse the popularity of Katy Perry or the Rolling Stones. That is a given. However, when the composer removes himself from the listener, claiming that it is the listener who owes him and not the other way around, music will never again make a true connection with the listener. Only when the academic composer decides to reach out to the listener will the listener reach out in return, meeting each other in the middle, experiencing music through both the creative lens of the composer and the emotional heart of the listener. Until that happens, the listener owes the composer absolutely nothing. Sincerely, The Regressionist 
They have no idea what the true meanings of about half of the things they say

Africa by Toto

16 parts8 pages01:5010 days ago79 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Trumpet(2), French Horn(3), Trombone(2), Tuba, Percussion, Bass

What Makes You Beautiful

19 parts19 pages02:5110 days ago27 views
Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone(2), Tenor Saxophone(2), Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(8)

Lay all your love on me

15 parts11 pages01:4310 days ago14 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba(2), Percussion(3)

Stacy s Mom

16 parts19 pages02:1010 days ago26 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba(2), Percussion(4)

Mr Blue Sky

16 parts20 pages03:0210 days ago39 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba(2), Percussion(4)

Come Sail Away - Styx

16 parts15 pages02:2020 days ago44 views
Piccolo, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet(3), Trombone(2), Tuba(2), Piano, Guitar(2), Bass

Neck

13 parts10 pages00:39a month ago35 views
Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Brass Ensemble(3), French Horn, Percussion(4)

Game of Thrones

13 parts6 pages01:34a month ago44 views
Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn(3), Trombone, Tuba, Percussion

Half a Mile Away

8 parts24 pages02:47a month ago41 views
Trumpet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trombone, Guitar, Bass, Percussion

KahootLobbyMusic

11 parts8 pages01:282 months ago30 views
Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(3)

NFL Theme

8 parts1 page01:042 months ago30 views
Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone, French Horn, Tuba

Africa - Toto (Stand Tune)

13 parts9 pages01:102 months ago123 views
Flute(2), Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet(2), Trombone, Tuba, Piano

Sweet Victory

17 parts13 pages02:112 months ago478 views
Flute, Clarinet(3), Alto Saxophone(2), Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn(2), Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(4)

War

12 parts10 pages02:132 months ago51 views
Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn, Trumpet(2), Trombone, Tuba(2), Percussion

Flamingo

9 parts10 pages01:042 months ago84 views
Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone(2), Tuba

Hype

15 parts4 pages00:432 months ago43 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn(2), Tuba, Percussion(5)