Sheet music

Sonate No. 14, Moonlight 3rd Movement

1 part12 pages06:467 years ago427,935 views
Piano
Last Movement of Moonlight Sonata written by Ludwig van Beethoven. The stormy final movement (C♯ minor), in sonata form, is the weightiest of the three, reflecting an experiment of Beethoven's (also carried out in the companion sonata, Opus 27, No. 1 and later on in Opus 101) placement of the most important movement of the sonata last. The writing has many fast arpeggios and strongly accented notes, and an effective performance demands lively and skillful playing.

It is thought that the C♯ minor sonata, particularly the third movement, was the inspiration for Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu, which manifests the key relationships of the sonata's three movements.

Of the final movement, Charles Rosen has written "it is the most unbridled in its representation of emotion. Even today, two hundred years later, its ferocity is astonishing."

Beethoven's heavy use of sforzando notes, together with just a few strategically located fortissimo passages, creates the sense of a very powerful sound in spite of the predominance of piano markings throughout. Within this turbulent sonata-allegro, there are two main themes, with a variety of variation techniques utilized.

Beethoven - Sonata No. 14 Op. 27 No. 2 (Mondschein/Moonlight)

1 part22 pages15:333 years ago9,681 views
Piano
Based on the edition Peters (Urtext)

The Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-sharp minor "Quasi una fantasia", Op. 27, No. 2, popularly known as the Moonlight Sonata, is a piano sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven. It was completed in 1801 and dedicated in 1802 to his pupil, Countess Giulietta Guicciardi.

This piece is one of Beethoven's most popular compositions for the piano, and it was a popular favorite even in his own day. Beethoven wrote the Moonlight Sonata in his early thirties, and did so after he had finished with some commissioned work; there is no evidence that he was commissioned to write this sonata.

The first edition of the score is headed Sonata quasi una fantasia, a title this work shares with its companion piece, Op. 27, No. 1. Grove Music Online translates the Italian title as "sonata in the manner of a fantasy". Translated more literally, this is "sonata almost a fantasy".

The name "Moonlight Sonata" comes from remarks made by the German music critic and poet Ludwig Rellstab. In 1832, five years after Beethoven's death, Rellstab likened the effect of the first movement to that of moonlight shining upon Lake Lucerne. Within ten years, the name "Moonlight Sonata" ("Mondscheinsonate" in German) was being used in German and English publications. Later in the nineteenth century, the sonata was universally known by that name.

Many critics have objected to the subjective, romantic nature of the title "Moonlight", which has at times been called "a misleading approach to a movement with almost the character of a funeral march" and "absurd". Other critics have approved of the sobriquet, finding it evocative or in line with their own interpretation of the work. Gramophone founder Compton Mackenzie found the title "harmless", remarking that "it is silly for austere critics to work themselves up into a state of almost hysterical rage with poor Rellstab", and adding, "what these austere critics fail to grasp is that unless the general public had responded to the suggestion of moonlight in this music Rellstab's remark would long ago have been forgotten."

Although no direct testimony exists as to the specific reasons why Beethoven decided to title both the Op. 27 works as Sonata quasi una fantasia, it may be significant that the layout of the present work does not follow the traditional movement arrangement in the Classical period of fast–slow–[fast]–fast. Instead, the sonata possesses an end-weighted trajectory, with the rapid music held off until the third movement. In his analysis, German critic Paul Bekker states that "The opening sonata-allegro movement gave the work a definite character from the beginning... which succeeding movements could supplement but not change. Beethoven rebelled against this determinative quality in the first movement. He wanted a prelude, an introduction, not a proposition.”

The sonata consists of three movements:
1. Adagio sostenuto
2. Allegretto
3. Presto agitato

Beethoven Sonata No. 14 – Op. 27, No. 2 “Moonlight” (Complete)

1 part14 pages12:49a year ago1,303 views
Piano
This sonata, in the key of C-sharp minor, is perhaps the best known piano sonata of Beethoven. Beethoven completed this sonata in 1801, in his early thirties. This sonata, along with its E-flat major companion, are given the title "Sonata quasi una Fantasia" by the composer, which means "sonata in the manner of a fantasy". Beethoven dedicated this sonata to his pupil Julie Guicciardi.

Both works of the Op. 27 break with tradition of sonata-writing. While the first work is played without interruption, in the manner of a fantasy, the second work puts the main weight and rapid melody till the last movement of the piece. Beethoven did not want a traditional sonata-allegro first movement which defines the character of the piece right in the beginning.

This work is in three movements:
1. Adagio sostenuto (C-sharp minor)
2. Allegretto (D-flat major)
3. Presto agitato (C-sharp minor)

moonlight sonata 3rd movement

1 part10 pages06:163 years ago28,435 views
Piano
the 3rd movement of the moonlight sonata in one of the most famous movments that beethoven has ever wrote. i hope you will enjoy from the score i write. it is also the only version who was write on musescore 2!

Sonata No. 14, Op. 27, No. 2 - Ludwig van Beethoven

1 part3 pages05:077 years ago24,803 views
The Piano Sonata No. 14 in C♯ minor "Quasi una fantasia", Op. 27, No. 2, by Ludwig van Beethoven, popularly known as the Moonlight Sonata (Mondscheinsonate in German), was completed in 1801.[1] It was dedicated in 1802 to his pupil, the then 20-year-old[2] Countess Julie Guicciardi, with whom Beethoven was, or had been, in love. It is one of Beethoven's most popular piano sonatas, as well as one of his most famous compositions for the piano.
The name "Moonlight" Sonata derives from an 1832 description of the first movement by music critic Ludwig Rellstab, who compared it to real moonlight shining upon Lake Lucerne.

Sonata No. 14 “Moonlight” 2nd Movement

1 part2 pages02:036 years ago37,486 views
The Piano Sonata No. 14 in C♯ minor “Quasi una fantasia”, Op. 27, No. 2, popularly known as the “Moonlight Sonata”, is a piano sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven. Completed in 1801 and dedicated in 1802 to his pupil, Countess Giulietta Guicciardi, it is one of Beethoven's most popular compositions for the piano.

The second movement is basically a relatively conventional scherzo and trio, a moment of relative calm written in D-flat major, the more easily-notated enharmonic equivalent of C♯ major, the parallel major of C♯ minor. Franz Liszt is said to have described the second movement as "a flower between two chasms". The slight majority of the movement is in piano, but a handful of sforzandos and forte-pianos helps to maintain the movement's cheerful disposition.

Fantaisie-Impromptu in C♯ Minor

1 part10 pages04:245 years ago55,291 views
Piano
Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu in C♯ minor, Opus posth. 66, is a solo piano composition. It was composed in 1834 and dedicated to Julian Fontana, who published the piece in spite of Chopin's request not to do so.

Some aspects of this piece are similar to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, which is also in C♯ minor. Two measures after the melody begins, an abrupt run up and down has exactly the same notes as the cadenza in movement 3 (Presto agitato) of that work. The climax on a six-four chord is similar in both pieces. Also, the Fantaisie-Impromptu's middle part and the second movement of the Moonlight Sonata are in D♭ major. The first and third movements are in C♯ minor.

For those reasons, and many others, Felix Salzer writes, “Chopin understood Beethoven to a degree that no one who has written on the C♯ minor Sonata or the Fantaisie-Impromptu has ever understood him. ... The Fantaisie-Impromptu is perhaps the only instance where one genius discloses to us — if only by means of a composition of his own — what he actually hears in the work of another genius”.

The piece uses many cross-rhythms (the right hand plays sixteenth notes against the left hand playing triplets) and a ceaselessly moving note figuration and is in cut time (2/2). The opening tempo is marked allegro agitato. The tempo changes to largo and later moderato cantabile when the key changes to D♭ major, the enharmonic equivalent of the more obscure tonic major key of C♯ major, that is, the parallel major of C♯ minor.

The piece then changes to presto (although some versions of the score incorporate a coda, meaning that the original tempo of allegro agitato is repeated) where it continues in C♯ minor as before. It concludes in an ambiguous fantasy-like ending, in a quiet and mysterious way, where the left hand replays the first few notes of the moderato section theme, while the right hand continues playing sixteenth notes (semiquavers). The piece resolves and gently ends on a C♯ major rolled chord.

Moonlight Sonata

4 parts8 pages06:544 years ago7,171 views
Moonlight Sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven arranged for String Quartet

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