Sheet music

"Spirit of the Living God" Prelude Medley for Organ

1 part2 pages02:117 years ago3,049 views
A quiet prelude arranged for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) consisting of an adaptation of the "Call to Prayer" by Thurlow Weed (1929) with the "Spirit of the Living God" by Daniel Iverson (1926). The composite hymn text is a prayer for the Holy Spirit to work renewal in the individual heart and to make these renewed people one in love and service. Best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"Joy to the World" for String Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:582 years ago3,051 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
"Joy to the World" is a popular Christmas carol based on music by Georg Friedrich Händel. The words are by English hymn writer Isaac Watts, based on the second half of Psalm 98 in the Bible. The song was first published in 1719 in Watts' collection; The Psalms of David: Imitated in the language of the New Testament, and applied to the Christian state and worship. Watts wrote the words of "Joy to the World" as a hymn glorifying Christ's triumphant return at the end of the age, rather than a song celebrating his first coming. The nations are called to celebrate because God's faithfulness to the house of Israel has brought salvation to the world.

The music's origins are unclear. The name "Antioch" is generally used for the tune. It is often attributed to George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) on the grounds of a 'chance resemblance' to choruses in the oratorio Messiah (premiered 1742), not least because a theme of the refrain (And heaven and nature sing...) appears similar to the orchestral opening and accompaniment of the recitative Comfort ye. Likewise, the first four notes seem to match the beginning of the choruses Lift up your heads and Glory to God from the same oratorio. However, there is no autographed score by Handel and no currently known documentary evidence to suggest that Handel wrote it, so 'Antioch' remains, at best, a skillful collection of borrowings from Handel.

Other hymnals credit the tune to Lowell Mason (1792-1872), who introduced it to America (US) in 1836 as 'arranged from Handel'. But, in 1986, John Wilson showed that 'Joy to the World' was first published in two English collections, one firmly dated 1833. Being three years earlier, this is thought to exclude Lowell Mason from being the composer, but his original attribution remains a likely cause of the often-stated link to Handel.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joy_to_the_World).

I created this Interpretation for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"O'Carolan's Concerto" for Violins & Cello

4 parts2 pages02:185 years ago3,041 views
Strings(4)
Turlough O'Carolan was born in Nobber in Co Meath in 1670 and is regarded as one of the finest composers and harpists that Ireland has ever produced. Dr. Douglas Hyde in his literary history of Ireland stated:

"Although many distinguished harpers flourished during the first quarter of the 18th century, yet Turlough O'Carolan stands pre-eminently as the representative Irish musician of that period."

Seán O'Riada was primarily responsible for reviving the music of O'Carolan, as his solo recordings and recordings with Ceoltóirí Chualann testify. 'O'Carolan's Concerto' was recorded on the disc 'Ceol na Nuasal' (The Music of the Nobility).

The story behind 'O'Carolan's Concerto' is an interesting one. It is said that it was a response to a compositional challenge by Francesco Geminiani, the Italian violinist and composer, during his visit to Dublin.

Many of O'Carolan's compositions are still performed by Irish musicians, such as Planxty, The Chieftains and The Dubliners. Derek Bell, who was a musician with The Chieftains and the first to record two albums of O'Carolan's music, commented on this piece:

"'Carolan's Concerto' could be described as a two-part bouree. It isn't a concerto. You could call it his symphony or concerto if several musicians are sounding together in it."

Although this work was originally written for Celtic Harp, I created this arrangement at the request of a user for Violins (3) and Cello.
Three Gymnopédies for Flute & Piano
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Three Gymnopédies for Flute & Piano

2 parts18 pages07:516 years ago3,034 views
Satie's Gymnopedies are what many consider to be the groundwork for today's ambient music; it's as ignorable as it is interesting (although, I find it hard to ignore such great music). These three beautiful pieces for acoustic piano and flute are calming, reflective, ethereal, relaxing, soothing, and elegant.

Gymnopedie No. 1 - Lent et douloureux (slow and mournfully):


With a hollow, but eerily warm melody gently floating atop an accompaniment of steady short-long rhythms, Gymnopedie No. 1 is as expressive as it is transparent. Its simplicity and openness masterfully disguises its apparent dissonances.

Gymnopedie No. 2 - Lent et triste (slow and sad):


Gymnopedie No. 2, although sharing the same short-long accompaniment in the left hand, the mood of this piece is entirely different from No. 1 and 3. Its lack of a commitment to a steady key leads the melody on a nebulous path wandering aimlessly through a series of chords.

Gymnopedie No. 3 - Lent et grave (slowly and solemnly):


Similar in melodic structure, Gymnopedie No. 3 is a minor key version of Gymnopedie No. 1. Its hypnotic-like accompaniment leads the listener in an almost out of body experience. If played as it is intended, the texture of this piece is as smooth as silk.

Adagio in D Minor (Opus 9 No. 2) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts4 pages04:482 years ago3,023 views
Oboe, Piano
Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (1671 – 1751) was an Italian Baroque composer. While famous in his day as an opera composer, he is mainly remembered today for his instrumental music, such as the concertos.

12 Concerti a cinque (op. 9) is a collection of concertos by the Italian composer Tomaso Albinoni, published in 1722.

The most famous piece from Albinoni's Opus 9 is the Concerto in D minor for oboe (Opus 9, Number 2). It is known for its slow movement. This concerto is probably the second best-known work of Albinoni after the Adagio in G minor (which was once believed to be a reconstruction based on a fragment by Albinoni). The concertos were dedicated to Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, and were first published in Amsterdam. It is possible, but not certain, that they were written in the Elector's court during a 1722 visit there by Albinoni during performances of his theatrical compositions

This concerto in D minor for oboe and strings (Op 9 No 2) was originally composed for Oboe, 2 Violins, Viola and Cello or Continuo and is considered to be Albinoni’s best solo concerto. After an energetic first movement, characterized by dotted rhythms, comes this ravishing Adagio movement. Accompanied by repeated chords in the lower strings and a harp-like configuration in the first violin, the soloist has a soaring line: here is Albinoni at his most appealingly melodic. The concluding movement keeps both soloist and orchestra busy with an imitative arpeggiated figure and plenty of counterpoint.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12_Concerti_a_cinque_%28Albinoni%29).

I created this arrangement of an earlier arrangement for Trumpet & Organ by Michael Rondeau for Solo Oboe and Piano.

"Londonderry Air" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:536 years ago3,014 views
Flute, Harp
Londonderry Air is an air that originated from County Londonderry in Ireland (now Northern Ireland). It is popular among the Irish diaspora and is very well known throughout the world. The tune is played as the victory anthem of Northern Ireland at the Commonwealth Games. "Danny Boy" is a popular set of lyrics to the tune.

The title of the air came from the name of County Londonderry in Ireland. The air was collected by Jane Ross of Limavady. Ross submitted the tune to music collector George Petrie, and it was then published by the Society for the Preservation and Publication of the Melodies of Ireland in the 1855 book The Ancient Music of Ireland, which Petrie edited. The tune was listed as an anonymous air, with a note attributing its collection to Jane Ross of Limavady.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:224 years ago3,013 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(5)
Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory to God in the Highest), BWV 191, is a church cantata written by the German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, and the only one of his church cantatas set to a Latin text. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig probably in 1745 to celebrate the end of the Second Silesian War on Christmas Day. The composition's three movements all derive from the Gloria of an earlier Missa written by Bach in 1733, which the composer would later use as the Gloria of his Mass in B minor.

Gloria in excelsis Deo was written in Leipzig for Christmas Day, as indicated by the heading on the manuscript in Bach's own handwriting, "J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti." (Jesu Juva Festo Nativitatis Christi -- Celebration for the birth of Christ), to be sung around the sermon. Recent archival and manuscript evidence suggest the cantata was first performed not in 1743, but in 1745 at a special Christmas Day service to celebrate the Peace of Dresden, which brought to an end the hardships imposed on the region by the Second Silesian War.

Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Unlike Bach's other church cantatas, the words are not in German, taken from the bible, a chorale or contemporary poetry, but in Latin, taken from the Gloria and the Doxology. This late work is the only Latin cantata among around 200 surviving sacred cantatas in German. It is based on an earlier composition, the Missa in B minor (Kyrie and Gloria) which Bach had composed in 1733 and that would, in 1748, become part of his monumental Mass in B minor. The first movement (Gloria) is an almost identical copy of the earlier work, while the second and third movements are close parodies. Parts, for instance, of the fugal section of Sicut erat in principio, taken from the Cum sancto spiritu of the 1733 setting, are moved from a purely vocal to an instrumentally accompanied setting. The modifications Bach made to the last two movements of BWV 191, however, were not carried over into the final manuscript compilation of the Mass in B minor, leaving it a matter of speculation whether or not these constitute "improvements" to Bach's original score.

The cantata bears the heading ::J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti. Gloria in excelsis Deo. à 5 Voci. 3 Trombe Tymp. 2 Trav 2 Hautb. 2 Violini Viola e Cont. Di J.S.B. in Bach's own handwriting. The cantata is festively scored for soprano and tenor soloists and an unusual five-part choir (with a dual soprano part), three trumpets, timpani, two flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Mass in B minor structure#Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_in_excelsis_Deo,_BWV_191).

I created this arrangement of the opening Coro: "Gloria in excelsis Deo. Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis" (Glory to God in the highest, and peace on earth to men of good will) for Small orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Double Basses).

"The Young Prince & Princess" for Flute & Piano

2 parts2 pages02:036 years ago3,002 views
Flute, Piano
As far as stories go, it's hard to top Nikolai Rimsky Korsakov's Scheherazade. It's a treasure trove—a story about one of history's greatest storytellers and the tales she weaves.

Scheherazade is the young bride of the Sultan. After one of his wives cheats on him, he decides to take a new wife every day and have her executed the next morning. But it all stops with Scheherazade. She marries the Sultan in order to save all future young women from this fate. She tells the Sultan fascinating stories, leaving him in such suspense each night that he can't execute her the next morning for fear of not hearing the end of the story. After 1,001 of these well-told tales, the Sultan relents.

Rimsky-Korsakov wrote Scheherazade (a symphonic suite) in the summer of 1888. The piece opens with the Sultan, a big and burly theme (audio) filled with gravitas and ego, almost saying "Here I am, strong and powerful. What do you have to say for yourself?"

The main love story in Scheherazade is found in this, the third movement, called "The Young Prince and the Young Princess." Although originally written for Orchestra, I created this simplified adaptation for Flute and Piano as a recital piece.

"La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:496 years ago2,981 views
The eighth number in Claude Debussy's first book of piano Preludes, a volume the composer worked on between about 1907 and 1910, is the celebrated "La fille aux cheveux de lin" (The Girl with the Flaxen Hair), two pages of delicate, superbly-crafted music that rival the Clair de lune from the Suite bergamasque and the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun as the most widely recognized entry in the composer's catalog.

One of Debussy's happiest decisions when composing his Preludes is, sadly, one that has been all but undone by publishers. Nowadays one finds the Preludes' picturesque little descriptions (such as "girl with the flaxen hair") at the top of each piece in bold, assertive type. When Debussy put the pieces to paper, however, he placed the descriptions at the end of each piece, as hints, even questions -- these are not the miniature, concrete-subjected tone poems we are sometimes led to believe. Indeed, the title La fille aux cheveux de lin is so famous that it can sometimes distract from the fact that the piece is as perfectly poised and flawlessly balanced a work of piano music as one might hope for.
The unaccompanied melody at the opening glistens (it is really just an arpeggio, so guilelessly drawn that one marvels at the effect it has). The mild climax in the middle of the piece is fine china -- radiant but ever so brittle, always in danger of being irreparably cracked or even smashed by an over-zealous pianist. The uncertain parallel fourths of the final pianissimo "murmuring" (called thus by Debussy) are turned on their heads after four bars, rising up into the warm sun of one last sonorous G flat major chord.

Although originally written for Solo Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Allegro from the Trumpet Concerto (Hob.VIIe:1 Mvt. 1) for Trumpet & Piano

2 parts10 pages06:215 years ago2,983 views
Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

A favorite of the trumpet repertoire and possibly Haydn's most popular concerto, this work was composed in 1796 while the composer was working on the Creation. In the final years of his career Haydn seemed to prefer large choral works to instrumental pieces, but he was intrigued by a request for a concerto from Anton Weidinger, the trumpeter in the Vienna Court Orchestra. The valveless trumpets of the time could play only notes derived from a fundamental pitch and its related harmonic series, and so trumpet music tended to be melodically limited. Weidinger invented a keyed trumpet along the lines of a woodwind instrument; with drilled holes in the body of the instrument, the player could easily raise the pitch in half-tone steps, enabling them to play chromatic passages. The modern trumpet has been greatly refined since Weidinger's time, but the principle remains the same. Weidinger did not perform the Concerto in public until 1800. Surviving in a single manuscript copy, this extraordinary work wasn't performed again until 1929.

Splendidly orchestrated, Haydn's concerto fully exploits the trumpet's new technical abilities. The opening Allegro is festive and radiant, with the orchestra introducing the main themes before they're taken up by the soloist. There's a motif that initially rises, subsequently allowing the trumpet to show off its new stock of notes in the low register. This motif evolves into a fanfare-like subject, which the soloist enriches with effective trills and other ornamentation. The development section requires the trumpeter to play in different keys, which would have been impossible on a valveless trumpet. Opening with a lovely, expansive melody in siciliano style, the second movement reveals the full lyrical and expressive potential of the new trumpet. In addition, this movement, which exemplifies the consummate melodic artistry of Haydn's late works, showcases the instrument's ability to easily modulate from key to key. Written in a sonata rondo form, the concluding Allegro begins with an angular, fanfare-like theme, continuing with material which calls upon the soloist's dexterity in handling trills and other technical effects. Following a concise, brief development section which mainly negotiates primary thematic material, a recapitulation leads the trumpeter to a higher, brighter tessitura. A spirited combination of technical brilliance and musical élan, the third movement ends with a gleaming, celebratory coda.

Although originally written for Orchestra with solo Bb Trumpet, this simplified arrangement pairs the Trumpet with Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Stille Nacht" for Piano

1 part1 page02:015 years ago2,969 views
Robert Führer (1807 - 1861) was born in Praha, he became the Director of Music at the Dome in 1839 at the age of 32. He was deemed to be most talented, but he lived a most expensive style of life. To support this extravagant lifestyle he sold a valuable Stradivarius violin which was owned by the Dome. This fact was discovered in 1843, when he was dismissed for the crime. Without a church to call home he wandered through several different towns and villages, but never stayed in any one place for too long. During this period he had to support himself from sales of his church music compositions. Luckily this was successful because his music was well loved. No other composer's works enjoyed as widespread performance amongst the choirs in South Germany and Austria. His musical style varies from a composer such as Mozart, and is more in keeping with that of an early Caecilian. His works were often written for rural choirs, meaning that they were not too musically demanding. In spite of this, larger and more difficult works can be found in his repertoire. Although his works were sometimes judged to not have been "carefully" composed, he surely was a talented and experienced composer, well loved by his public, and had an innate sense for composing a beautiful melodic line.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Solo Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land" for Solo Harp
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"Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land" for Solo Harp

1 part7 pages08:356 years ago2,966 views
Welsh harpist John Thomas was one of the most acclaimed harpist-composers of his time. His career culminated as official harpist to Queen Victoria. John Thomas' Welsch background, combined with classical training in London led him to composer a multitude of works in classical style, all imbued with Welsh folk melodies.

Attributed birth and death dates for John Thomas seem approximate, with some references listing the former as 1826 and the latter as 1914. The Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land is one of John Thomas' most famous works, written for harp but sounding like an appropriate background theme for just about every touring player. The Welsh title of this masterwork is Ffarwell y Telynor, and the piece was originally concocted for the private harpist of Queen Victoria.

Yoonee van den Eynde and Judy Loman are among the many harpists who have since interpreted Thomas' works for the instrument. Geneviève Chevallier and Christine Fleischmann presented his Grand Duet for Two Harps in E flat major on an early-'90s collection of tandem harp twanging. Early new age advocates have also brought Thomas' music in line with the spacy genre's Celtic harp connection.

This piece is written entirely for Solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Panis Angelicus" for Clarinet & Piano

2 parts3 pages02:055 years ago2,958 views
César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 – 1890) was a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life. He was born at Liège, in what is now Belgium (though at the time of his birth it was under the Netherlands' control). In that city he gave his first concerts in 1834. He studied privately in Paris from 1835, where his teachers included Anton Reicha. After a brief return to Belgium, and a disastrous reception to an early oratorio Ruth, he moved to Paris, where he married and embarked on a career as teacher and organist. He gained a reputation as a formidable improviser, and travelled widely in France to demonstrate new instruments built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

In 1858 he became organist at Sainte-Clotilde, a position he retained for the rest of his life. He became professor at the Paris Conservatoire in 1872; he took French nationality, a requirement of the appointment. His pupils included Vincent d'Indy, Ernest Chausson, Louis Vierne, Charles Tournemire, Guillaume Lekeu, and Henri Duparc. After acquiring the professorship Franck wrote several pieces that have entered the standard classical repertoire, including symphonic, chamber, and keyboard works.

Franck purchased a practice pedalboard from Pleyel et Cie for home practice to improve his pedal technique, as well as spending many hours at the organ keyboard. The beauty of its sound and the mechanical facilities provided by the instrument assisted his reputation as improviser and composer, not only for organ music but in other genres as well. Pieces for organ, for choir, and for harmonium began to circulate, among the most notable of which is the Messe à 3 voix (1859). The quality of the movements in this work, composed over a number of years, is uneven, but from it comes one of Franck's most enduring compositions, the communion anthem "Panis angelicus" ("Bread of Heaven").

Although originally written for tenor solo with organ and string accompaniment, I created this arrangement for Bb Clarinet & Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) and using the Clarinet soundfont from SoundFont Downloads at (http://www.soundfontdownloads.com).
"Carol of the Bells" in G Minor for English Handbells
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"Carol of the Bells" in G Minor for English Handbells

2 parts1 page01:237 years ago2,921 views
"Carol of the Bells" is a choral miniature work composed by the Ukrainian Mykola Leontovych. Leontovych's composition, is characterised by the use of a four note motif as an ostinato figure throughout the work. This ostinato figure is an ancient pagan Ukrainian New Year's (originally celebrated in April) magical chant known in Ukrainian as "Shchedryk" [the Generous One]. I developed this arrangement of the "Carol of the Bells" to accentuates it's original composition using modern 5-Octave English Handbells. Best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"Molly Malone" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:545 years ago2,916 views
"Molly Malone" (also known as "Cockles and Mussels" or "In Dublin's Fair City") is a popular song, set in Dublin, Ireland, which has become the unofficial anthem of Dublin City.

The song tells the fictional tale of a beautiful fishmonger who plied her trade on the streets of Dublin, but who died young, of a fever. In the late 20th century a legend grew up that there was a historical Molly, who lived in the 17th century. She is typically represented as a hawker by day and part-time prostitute by night. In contrast she has also been portrayed as one of the few chaste female street-hawkers of her day. However, there is no evidence that the song is based on a real woman, of the 17th century or at any other time. The name "Molly" originated as a familiar version of the names Mary and Margaret. While many such "Molly" Malones were born in Dublin over the centuries, no evidence connects any of them to the events in the song. Nevertheless, in 1988 the Dublin Millennium Commission endorsed claims about a Mary Malone who died on 13 June 1699, and proclaimed 13 June to be "Molly Malone day".

The English Lyrics:

In Dublin's fair city,
Where the girls are so pretty,
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone,
As she wheeled her wheel-barrow,
Through streets broad and narrow,
Crying, "Cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh!"

Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Trumpet Tune & March" in C Major for Brass Quartet

4 parts2 pages024 years ago2,915 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674–1707) was an English baroque composer, organist and, pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark's March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes's Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke's piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has featured in royal weddings.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell), was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Although originally written for Pipe Organ, I Arranged this piece for Brass Quartet (2 Bb Trumpets, French Horn & Tuba).

"Tabhair dom do Lámh" (Give Me Your Hand) for Harp

1 part1 page01:395 years ago2,896 views
Harp
Ruaidri Dall Ó Catháin (fl. late 16th/early 17th century) was an Irish harper and composer. As with many medieval and early modern Irish musicians, Ruaidri was blind (hence his nickname, Ruaidri "Dall", blind Ruaidri). Captain Francis O'Neill exhibits some uncertainty concerning his lifetime, stating he was born in 1646 but died in 1653. All that can be said is that he was alive during the first half of the 17th century.

"Give Me Your Hand" (Tabhair dom do Lámh in Irish) is a tune from the early 17th century by Ruaidri Dáll Ó Catháin (c.1570-c.1650), perhaps in honour of a lady. It is one of the most widely recorded pieces of Irish and Scottish traditional music. This tune, revived by Seán Ó Riada, was originally a composition of the blind Derry harpist Ruaidri Dáll Ó Catháin. He wrote it while in Scotland, where he had a disagreement with a Lady Eglington. He composed the tune for her when she apologized. The tune is sometimes claimed to be written by the famous harpist [O'Carolan], who lived some years later. However there is no reference in the Bunting collection of O Carolan’s music. Nor should Ruaidhrí 'Dall' Ó Catháin be confused with another blind poet at around the same time, Rory 'Dall' Morrison.

I created this arrangement for Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Je te Veux" (Music Box Version) for Handchimes
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"Je te Veux" (Music Box Version) for Handchimes

2 parts13 pages07:076 years ago2,890 views
"Je te veux" (French for I want you) is a song composed by Erik Satie to a text by Henry Pacory. A sentimental, slow waltz, it was originally written for the singer Paulette Darty, whose accompanist Satie had been for a period of time.

During the 1900's, Erik Satie produced several first rate cafe songs and music hall pieces, which include "Je te veux" - (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/je-te-veux-for-solo-piano) a graceful French waltz and "Le Piccadilly" (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/le-piccadilly) - with a strong Scott Joplin ragtime flavour.

This song was registered on November 1902, but some argue it had actually been composed in 1897. Satie composed various versions of the Je te veux waltz, this being the Music Box version.

Although originally written for Solo Piano (and in this version, Music Box recording), I created this arrangement for Handchimes (or English Handbells) and it is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"The Rose and the Nightingale" for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages036 years ago2,877 views
Flute, Piano
The Rose and the Nightingale (Роза и Соловей - Roza i Solovey) was composed in 1866 by the young and not yet famous Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The composer used the words of Alexei Koltsov's poem Nightingale: Pushkin's Imitation, which was written in 1831. "The Rose and The Nightingale" was written for someone called Malvina Kyui, most likely Rimsly-Korsakov's romantic interest. The music tells the story of Nightingale, who fell in love with [a] Rose and sings to her all day and night, but [the] Rose just silently listens to his songs.

The translation of the song is, "Nightingale fell in love with Rose, and sings to her all days and nights, but Rose silently listens to his songs. Other singer plays the lyre for young maiden, but sweet maiden doesn't know, to whom he sings and why his songs are so solemn".

This is a haunting and elegant arrangement for solo Flute Acoustic Piano.