Sheet music

Coro: "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (BWV 38 No 1) for Horn & Strings

6 parts6 pages04:213 years ago441 views
French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir (Out of deep distress I cry to you), BWV 38,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1724 in his second annual cycle for the twenty-first Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 19 October 1724.

Bach composed this chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1724. Written for the twenty-first Sunday after Trinity, it was part of his second annual cycle of cantatas. The work was first performed on 19 October 1724.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, "take unto you the whole armour of God" (Ephesians 6:10–17), and from the Gospel of John, the healing of the nobleman's son (John 4:46–54).

The cantata is based on the Martin Luther's chorale Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, a paraphrase of Psalm 130. The texts of the chorale is unchanged for the first and last movements. An unknown poet paraphrased the other three stanzas of the chorale for movements 2 to 5.

The opening choral fantasia combines the structure of a motet with chromatic and dissonant Phrygian harmonies. The trombones double the vocal lines, creating an "unearthly Stygian quality of sound". Although the lower voices have the initial melodic presentation, it is adopted by the soprano as a cantus firmus. Each phrase appears in imitative counterpoint, a "portrayal of the individual cries of distress which coalesce to form a combined human clamour".

Like the fantasia, the alto recitative is stylistically archaic. Its "semi-chaotic" form may reflect the tumult of evil and sin. The tenor aria is expressive with a prominent rhythmic motive. It sits in a four-part texture between the oboes and continuo part. The fourth movement, a soprano recitative, adopts the chorale melody as the continuo. The trio aria uses a descending sequential ritornello based on the circle of fifths, contrasting with the "serpentine" vocal lines. The closing chorale is striking, with an "enigmatic" final cadence.

The piece is scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) and four-part choir, two oboes, four trombones, two violins, viola, and basso continuo (specifically including fagotto, violone, violoncello, and organ).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aus_tiefer_Not_schrei_ich_zu_dir,_BWV_38).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Coro (choral fantasia) "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Out of deep distress I cry to you) for French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Animationem" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts1 page01:165 years ago441 views
Thomas Ravenscroft (c. 1582 or 1592 – 1635) was an English musician, theorist and editor, notable as a composer of rounds and catches, and especially for compiling collections of British folk music.

Little is known of Ravenscroft's early life. He probably sang in the choir of St. Paul's Cathedral from 1594, when a Thomas Raniscroft was listed on the choir rolls and remained there until 1600 under the directorship of Thomas Giles. He probably received his bachelor's degree in 1605 from Cambridge.

Ravenscroft's principal contributions are his collections of folk music, including catches, rounds, street cries, vendor songs, "freeman's songs" and other anonymous music, in three collections: Pammelia (1609), Deuteromelia or The Seconde Part of Musicks Melodie (1609) and Melismata (1611). Some of the music he compiled has acquired extraordinary fame, though his name is rarely associated with the music; for example "Three Blind Mice" first appears in Deuteromelia. He also published a metrical psalter (The Whole Booke of Psalmes) in 1621. As a composer, his works are mostly forgotten but include 11 anthems, 3 motets for five voices and 4 fantasias for viols.

As a writer, he wrote two treatises on music theory: A Briefe Discourse of the True (but Neglected) Use of Charact'ring the Degrees (London, 1614), and A Treatise of Musick, which remains in manuscript (unpublished).

Although this piece was originally created for Voice (SATB), I created this arrangement for Wind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

3 Marienlieder Aus (Opus 54) for Violin, Viola & Piano

3 parts6 pages05:104 years ago441 views
Joseph Gregor Zangl (1821 - 1897) was an Austrian (Tyrol) composer from the 19th century. His religious compositions numbered almost 20 in the form of Masses and non-secular works. Very little has been written about his life or compositions.

"3 Marienlieder Aus" ("3 Songs about Mary") contains 3 individual pieces for accompanied Male Voice: 1 "Blick vom Himmelsthron" ("View from the Throne of Heaven"), 2 "Maria, Jungfrau Rein" ("Mother, Virgin mary") and 3 "Oh Maria, Meine Hife" ("Help Me Mary").

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Violin, Viola & Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Wenn kömmt der Tag, an dem wir ziehen" (BWV 70 No 3) for Oboe, Viola & Cello

3 parts4 pages03:053 years ago441 views
Oboe, Viola, Cello
Wachet! betet! betet! wachet! (Watch! Pray! Pray! Watch!) is the title of two church cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed a first version, BWV 70a, in Weimar for the second Sunday in Advent of 1716 and expanded it in 1723 in Leipzig to BWV 70, a cantata in two parts for the 26th Sunday after Trinity.

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. Bach originally wrote this cantata in his last year there, for the Second Sunday of Advent.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Romans, call of the Gentiles (Romans 15:4–13), and from the Gospel of Luke, the Second Coming of Christ, also called Second Advent (Luke 21:25–36). The cantata text was provided by the court poet Salomon Franck, published in Evangelische Sonn- und Fest-Tages-Andachten in 1717. Bach wrote five movements, a chorus and four arias, and concluded with the fifth verse of the chorale "Meinen Jesum laß ich nicht" by Christian Keymann.

Bach first performed the cantata on 6 December 1716.

In Leipzig, Advent was a quiet time (tempus clausum), thus no cantata music was performed in services from Advent II to Advent IV. In order to use the music again, Bach had to dedicate it to a different liturgical event and chose the 26th Sunday after Trinity with a similar theme. The prescribed readings for this Sunday were from the The Second Epistle of Peter, "look for new heavens and a new earth" (2 Peter 3:3–13), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Second Coming of Christ, also called Second Advent (Matthew 25:31–46). An unknown poet kept the existing movements and added recitatives and a chorale to end part 1 of the new cantata, the final verse of "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele" by Christoph Demantius.

Bach performed the extended cantata first on 21 November 1723, and a second time on 18 November 1731.

Bach shaped the opening chorus in a da capo form and used a technique to embed the vocal parts in the concerto of the orchestra. A characteristic trumpet calls to wake up, initiating figurative movement in the other instruments and the voices. The choir contrasts short calls "Wachet!" and long chords "betet!".

All instruments accompany the recitative, illustrating the fright of the sinners, the calmness of the chosen ones, the destruction of the world, and the fear of the ones called to be judged.

Part I is closed by the final verse of "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele" in a four-part setting.

The recitative in movement 9 opens with a Furioso depicting the "unerhörten letzten Schlag" (the unheard-of last stroke), while the trumpet quotes the hymn "Es ist gewisslich an der Zeit" (Indeed the time is here). This chorale had been used as kind of a Dies irae during the Thirty Years' War. The recitative ends on a long melisma on the words "Wohlan, so ende ich mit Freuden meinen Lauf" (Therefore I will end my course with joy). The following bass aria begins immediately, without the usual ritornello, molt' adagio. After this intimate reflection of the thought "Jesus führet mich zur Stille, an den Ort, da Lust die Fülle." (Jesus leads me to quiet, to the place where pleasure is complete) the closing chorale is set richly for seven parts, independent parts for the upper three strings forming a "halo" for the voices.

The instrumentation of the Weimar cantata is lost. The cantata in two parts of 7 and 4 movements was originally scored in Leipzig for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, trumpet, oboe, bassoon, two violins, two violas, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wachet!_betet!_betet!_wachet!_BWV_70).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "'Wenn kömmt der Tag, an dem wir ziehen" (When will the day come, on which we shall depart) for Oboe, Viola & Cello.

Courante in G Major (TWV 32:13/BWV 840) for Viola & Guitar

2 parts1 page01:52a year ago440 views
Viola, Guitar
Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.

The Suites and suite movements (BWV 832–845) are a miscellaneous collections of suites (partitas) and miscellaneous movements of authentic and spurious works.

The Courante in G Major (BWV 840) is taken from the Notebook for Wilhelm Friedemann Bach: 'Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach' (1720) and was later determined to be the work of Georg Phillipp Telemann (TWV 32:13).

Source: IMSLP (http://imslp.org/wiki/Suites_and_suite_movements,_BWV_832%E2%80%93845_(Bach,_Johann_Sebastian)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Courante in G Major (TWV 32:13/BWV 840) for Viola & Guitar.

Aria: "Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen" (BWV 244 No. 20) for Winds & Strings

8 parts9 pages04:532 years ago441 views
Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Aria: "Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen" (I will watch with my Jesus) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Fürst des Lebens, starker Streiter" (BWV 31 No 4) for Viola & Cello

2 parts3 pages02:202 years ago440 views
Viola, Cello
Der Himmel lacht! Die Erde jubilieret (Heaven laughs! Earth exults), BWV 31,[a] is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the first day of Easter. Bach composed the cantata in Weimar and first performed it on 21 April 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schloßkirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. Bach composed the cantata for Easter Sunday in 1715.

The festive character of the work is demonstrated by a sonata with a fanfare-like introduction, a concerto of the three groups brass, reeds and strings, all divided in many parts. The first choral movement, sung by a five-part chorus, evokes the "celestial laughter and worldly jubilation" of the text, according to John Eliot Gardiner.

The cantata in nine movements is festively scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a five-part choir (SSATB), three trumpets, timpani, three oboes, taille (tenor oboe), bassoon, two violins, two violas, two cellos and basso continuo. The scoring for five parts in the choir, five parts in the woodwinds and six parts in the strings is unusual.

Source; Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Himmel_lacht!_Die_Erde_jubilieret,_BWV_31).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "Fürst des Lebens, starker Streiter" (Prince of life, strong fighter) for Viola & Cello.

"Kyrie Eleison" from the Mass in A Major (BWV 234 No. 1) for Winds & Strings

10 parts32 pages05:212 years ago440 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Church music in Latin by Johann Sebastian Bach comprises about ten compositions, all composed during his Leipzig period. As a Lutheran church musician, Bach was more devoted to the composition of sacred music in German, writing hundreds of liturgical compositions in that language, and for instance also producing a German version of Pergolesi's Stabat Mater. Compared to Lutheran practice elsewhere, an uncharacteristic amount of Latin was however used in church services in Leipzig: it included music on Latin texts being performed on ordinary Sundays, on high holidays (Christmas, Easter, Pentecost), and the Magnificat also on Marian feasts (Annunciation, Visitation, Purification).

In Lutheran service, a Missa was a setting of only Kyrie and Gloria. Such a mass consisting of only Kyrie and Gloria is for that time period sometimes indicated as Missa brevis (literally: "short mass"). In 1733 Bach composed such a Missa brevis for the Catholic court in Dresden, however in an extended setting. In the late 1730s he again composed four Missae breves, mostly parodies of earlier cantata movements. At the end of his life he expanded the Missa for Dresden to his only setting of the complete Mass ordinary, the Mass in B minor.

Bach wrote four other settings of Kyrie and Gloria, sometimes called Missa brevis. The attribute brevis in this case means short in words, unlike the Missa brevis of the classical period which is short in duration. Sometimes the works are termed Lutheran mass, because the combination of only Kyrie and Gloria was used more frequently in the Lutheran liturgy.

They seem to have been intended for liturgical use, considering a performance time of about 20 minutes each, the average duration of a Bach cantata. They may have been composed around 1738/39. Possibly they were written for Count Franz Anton von Sporck or performed by him in Lysá.

Each Missa is in six movements, the Kyrie one choral movement in three sections, the Gloria in five movements. The first and last movement of the Gloria are also choral, framing three arias for different voice types. The music consists mostly of parodies of cantata movements. He changed the music slightly to adjust to the Latin words, but kept the original instrumentation. The opening chorus of Es wartet alles auf dich, BWV 187, became the final movement of the Missa in G minor, Cum sancto spiritu. Occasionally he switched a voice part, for example he asked for a tenor in the Quoniam of that Missa, a parody of the soprano aria Halt ich nur fest an ihm of that cantata.

For the Missa in A major, BWV 234, scored for flute, strings, SATB, and basso continuo, Bach parodied music from at least four earlier cantatas. In 1818 this was one of a very few of Bach's compositions for voices and orchestra to appear in print prior the Bach Gesellschaft complete edition in the second half of the 19th century.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bach's_church_music_in_Latin#Settings_of_.28parts_of.29_the_Latin_mass_liturgy).

I created this arrangement of the "Kyrie Eleison" (Lord have Mercy) for for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sonata V (Opus 2 No 5) for Viola & Harp

2 parts10 pages09:424 years ago440 views
Viola, Harp
Johann Christian Bach (1735 -- 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh child and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is sometimes referred to as "the London Bach" or "the English Bach", due to his time spent living in the British capital, where he came to be known as John Bach. He is noted for influencing the concerto style of Mozart.

Johann Christian Bach was born to Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena Bach in Leipzig, Germany. His distinguished father was already 50 at the time of his birth, which would perhaps contribute to the sharp differences between his music and that of his father. Even so, his father first instructed him in music and that instruction continued until his death. After his father's death, when Johann Christian was 15, he worked with his second-oldest half brother Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, who was twenty-one years his senior and considered at the time to be the most musically gifted of Bach's sons.

He enjoyed a promising career, first as a composer then as a performer playing alongside Carl Friedrich Abel, the notable player of the viola da gamba. He composed cantatas, chamber music, keyboard and orchestral works, operas and symphonies.

Johann Christian Bach's father died when Johann Christian was only fifteen. This is perhaps one reason why it is difficult to find points of similarity between the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and that of Johann Christian. By contrast, the piano sonatas of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Johann Christian's much older half brother, tend to invoke certain elements of his father at times, especially with regard to the use of counterpoint. (C.P.E. was 36 at the time J.S. died.)

Johann Christian's highly melodic style differentiates his works from those of his family. He composed in the Galante style incorporating balanced phrases, emphasis on melody and accompaniment, without too much contrapuntal complexity. The Galante movement opposed the intricate lines of Baroque music, and instead placed importance on fluid melodies in periodic phrases. It preceded the classical style, which fused the Galante aesthetics with a renewed interest in counterpoint.

Although originally written for Violin and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Passepied" from “Zémire et Azor” for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages02:196 years ago439 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The passepied (French [pasˈpje] 'passing feet') is a 17th- and 18th-century dance that originated in Brittany. The term can also be used to describe the music to which a passepied is set. The music is an example of a dance movement in Baroque music and is almost always a movement in binary form with a fast tempo and a time signature of three quavers (eighth notes) per bar, each section beginning with an upbeat of a single quaver.

This arrangement of the "Passepied" features a Woodwind Quartet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Concerto & Fugue in C Minor (BWV 909) for String Quartet

4 parts17 pages08:08a year ago439 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach was a member of a family that had for generations been occupied in music. His sons were to continue the tradition, providing the foundation of a new style of music that prevailed in the later part of the eighteenth century. Johann Sebastian Bach himself represented the end of an age, the culmination of the Baroque in a magnificent synthesis of Italian melodic invention, French rhythmic dance forms and German contrapuntal mastery.

Born in Eisenach in 1685, Bach was educated largely by his eldest brother, after the early death of his parents. At the age of eighteen he embarked on his career as a musician, serving first as a court musician at Weimar, before appointment as organist at Arnstadt. Four years later he moved to Mühlhausen as organist and the following year became organist and chamber musician to Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar. Securing his release with difficulty, in 1717 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and remained at Cöthen until 1723, when he moved to Leipzig as Cantor at the School of St.Thomas, with responsibility for the music of the five principal city churches. Bach was to remain in Leipzig until his death in 1750.

J.S. Bach was one of the most renowned keyboardists of his day, and he left a rich legacy of music for harpsichord originally intended for instruction and ‘spiritual refreshment’. This recording of mostly lesser-known works includes several early examples which afford fascinating insights into the young composer’s experimentation with counterpoint, harmony and form. They are all compelling, emotionally powerful works in their own right, with virtuoso content and an expressive range that easily matches that of Bach’s more famous keyboard pieces.

This composition has been attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach as BWV 909 but is of uncertain origin.

Source: IMSLP (http://imslp.org/wiki/Fantasia_and_Fughetta_in_B-flat_major_(Kirchhoff,_Gottfried)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Concerto & Fugue in G Minor (BWV 909) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Allemande & Courante in A Major (BWV 838) for Violin & Cello

2 parts2 pages02:46a year ago440 views
Violin, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.

The Suites and suite movements (BWV 832–845) are a miscellaneous collections of suites (partitas) and miscellaneous movements of authentic and spurious works.

Two movements from the Partita in A Major (GWV 849) by Johann Christoph Graupner were formerly catalogued as the Allemande and Courante in A major (BWV 838) and attributed to J. S. Bach.

Source: IMSLP (http://imslp.org/wiki/Suites_and_suite_movements,_BWV_832%E2%80%93845_(Bach,_Johann_Sebastian)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Allemande & Courante in A Major (BWV 838) for Violin & Cello.

"Esurientes implevit" from "Magnificat" (RV 610 No 6) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts2 pages03:083 years ago439 views
Oboe, Harp
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi nicknamed il Prete Rosso ("The Red Priest") because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Vivaldi is recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over 40 operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

Vivaldi composed several settings of the Magnificat hymn. The original setting for single choir, RV 610, is generally indicated when Vivaldi's Magnificat is performed and discussed.

The work is divided into nine movements. Performances require approximately 20 minutes. All movements are scored for four-part chorus, strings and continuo, unless indicated otherwise.

RV 610 was composed either before 1717 or in 1719. Set in G minor, and although originally scored for 2 soprano soloists, alto and tenor soloists, SATB choir, violin I and II, viola, and basso continuo (cello and organ), I created this arrangement for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sinfonia: "Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen" (BWV 49 No 1) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts11 pages10:123 years ago439 views
Oboe, Strings(4)
Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen (I go forth and seek with longing), BWV 49, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the solo cantata, a dialogue of soprano and bass, in Leipzig for the twentieth Sunday after Trinity. It is counted as part of his third annual cycle of cantatas.

The cantata is opened by a sinfonia for concertante organ and orchestra, probably the final movement of a lost concerto composed in Köthen, the model for the Concerto II in E major, BWV 1053, for harpsichord. Two weeks before, Bach had used the two other movements of that concerto in his cantata Gott soll allein mein Herze haben, BWV 169. The bass as the vox Christi sings the words of Jesus. In the soprano aria "Ich bin herrlich, ich bin schön" (I am glorious, I am beautiful) the bride reflects her beauty as dressed in "seines Heils Gerechtigkeit" (The justice of His salvation), accompanied by oboe d'amore and violoncello piccolo. The cantata ends not with the usual four-part chorale, but with a love duet of the Soul (soprano) and Jesus (bass). It incorporates a chorale, stanza 7 of Nicolai's hymn, ending with the line "Deiner wart ich mit Verlangen" (I wait for Thee with longing), while the bass responds: "I have always loved you, and so I draw you to me. I'm coming soon. I stand before the door: open up, my abode!" John Eliot Gardiner describes the mood of the music, accompanied by the obbligato organ, as "religious-erotic". Hofmann notes that the figuration of the organ expresses in sound what the cantus firmus words: "Wie bin ich doch so herzlich froh!" (How sincerely happy I am!) Musicologist Julian Mincham suggests that this cantata "exudes a greater degree of personal intensity" than the previous two for this day, BWV 162 and 180.

The cantata in six movements is scored for soprano and bass soloists, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, violoncello piccolo, organ and basso continuo. Klaus Hofmann summarizes: "Bach has clothed his music in the 'wedding garments' of exquisite scoring"

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ich_geh_und_suche_mit_Verlangen,_BWV_49);

I created this arrangement of the Opening Sinfonia "Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen" (I go forth and seek with longing) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Noël" (Opus 43 No. 1) for Viola & Guitar

2 parts3 pages02:49a year ago439 views
Viola, Guitar
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 - 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th century composers. Among his best-known works are his Nocturnes for piano, the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune", and his Requiem.

Faure composed "Noël" in 1885 clearly as an occasional piece; a little Christmas song destined for a performance where a harmonium was available to add a festive carillon color to the piano accompaniment.

The original text embraces a traditional religiosity to which Faure responds dutifully at the end of the piece, although a certain atypical unctuousness hovers uncomfortably over the music unless it is performed with open-hearted innocence.

Although this work was originally written for Piano, Harmonium and voice, I created this arrangement for Viola & Classical Guitar to retain it's color and elegance (sans harmonium).
Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings
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Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts8 pages03:0711 months ago442 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"Il trovatore" (The Troubadour) opera in four acts by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi that premiered at the Teatro Apollo in Rome on January 19, 1853. Verdi prepared a revised version in French, Le Trouvère, with added ballet music, which premiered at the Paris Opéra on January 12, 1857. Based on the 1836 play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, the opera is one of three considered to represent the culmination of Verdi’s artistry to that point. (The other two are Rigoletto and La traviata.)

Verdi was impressed with García Gutiérrez’s melodramatic play and engaged Cammarano (Verdi’s collaborator on three previous operas) to write a libretto based on it, although no theatre had commissioned the work. The librettist was reluctant, and Verdi’s correspondence with him reveals a struggle between them as Verdi sought a new way to present the drama on its own terms, without the constraints of operatic convention. He practically begged Cammarano to release him from the strictures of “cavatinas, duets, trios, choruses, finales, etc., etc.,” and to make “the entire opera…a single piece.”

The opera was a triumph from the first night. Themes of obsession, revenge, war, and family are conveyed through characters who present dramatic contrasts. The central character—and the one who seems to have attracted Verdi’s interest most strongly—is the gypsy Azucena. (He had considered naming the opera for her.) The composer, who by this time had mastered the Romantic and bel canto traditions, took so many aspects of the opera (including fiery characters, extreme dramatic situations, and virtuosic demands on singers) to the very limits of current possibilities that later critics ridiculed the characters and plot as being well beyond plausible. Yet the music was transcendent, and the opera continues to be widely performed. Act II features the “"Anvil Chorus"” (or “"Gypsy Chorus"”), which has become one of the best-known passages in the operatic repertoire.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anvil_Chorus).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Arrangement of the Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben" (BWV 248 No 54) for Small Orchestra

14 parts28 pages04:523 years ago439 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben” (Lord, when our proud enemies snarl) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"The Spinning Top" for Harp

1 part3 pages01:065 years ago438 views
Alexander Alexandrovich Ilyinsky (1859 – 1920) was a Russian music teacher and composer, best known for the Lullaby (Berceuse), Op. 13, No. 7, from his orchestral suite "Noure and Anitra", and for the opera The Fountain of Bakhchisaray set to Pushkin's poem of the same name. Alexander Ilyinsky was born in Tsarskoye Selo in 1859. His father was a physician in the Alexander Cadet Corps. His students included Vasily Kalinnikov, Anatoly Nikolayevich Alexandrov and Nikolai Roslavets.

This short "The Spinning Top" (Волчок) is meant to invoke the vision of a child's spinning top, wound, released and slowly wobbling toward rest. Although originally written for Piano, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Erleucht' auch meine finstre Sinnen" (BWV 248 No 47) for Oboe, Horn & Cello

3 parts6 pages04:104 years ago438 views
Oboe, French Horn, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

This is my arrangement of the Bass Aria 'Erleucht auch meine finstre Sinnen' ('Illumine my dark thoughts as well') and is arranged here for Oboe, French Horn & Cello.

"Le Soir" (The Evening) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages03:225 years ago439 views
Charles Gounod was a great French composer and a student of the Paris Conservatoire. In 1837, Gounod received the prestigious Prix de Rome. Gounod exercised an extremely powerful influence on generations of French composers from the second half of the 19th century. Gounod achieved an enormous success in the theatre, especially with his numerous operas that are still popular worldwide.

Gounod wrote several numbered 'songs without words', some as original piano pieces, others as arrangements of his own works for other combinations. This one, published in 1861, was an arrangement of an earlier (1840-2) song to a text by Lamartine (Liszt's early inspiration).

Drawn from Alphonse de Lamartine's Meditations poetiques from 1820, Gounod's setting of Le soir (The Evening) dates from his years at the Villa de Medici as a winner of the Prix de Rome. Written when the composer was still in his early twenties, Le soir is the quintessential Gounod melodie: a long, slow, rapturous song that is at once sensuous and chaste, humane, spiritual, and above all, romantic in expression and classic in form. Strophically setting Lamartine's six-verse poem, Gounod's legato melody effortlessly floats above the chromatic harmonies of the piano, blending the two together in an indissoluble unity. Gounod went on to compose dozens of other songs, but he never composed a better song. In 1866, he rewrote Le soir as one of his Romances sans paroles for piano.

Although originally composed for piano and voices (2), I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).