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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"O Come, All ye Faithful" (Easy) for Alto Sax & Bass Clarinet

2 parts1 page00:485 years ago7,815 views
The text to the Carol "O Come All Ye Faithful" was originally written in Latin (Adeste Fideles) and was intended to be a hymn, it is attributed to John Wade, an Englishman. The music to "O Come All Ye Faithful" was composed by fellow Englishman John Reading in the early 1700s. The tune was first published in a collection known as "Cantus Diversi" in 1751. In 1841 Rev. Frederick Oakley is reputed to have worked on the familiar translation of O Come All Ye Faithful which replaced the older Latin lyrics "Adeste Fideles".

Although traditionally sung as a hymn, I created this arrangement for my Kids Amy (Alto Sax) and Ian (Bass Clarinet) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fanfare" from the 1812 Overture for Clarinet Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:455 years ago7,761 views
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 – 1893), was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of The Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s. Tchaikovsky wrote many works which are popular with the classical music public, including his Romeo and Juliet, the 1812 Overture.

The Year 1812 (festival overture in E♭ major, Op. 49), popularly known as the 1812 Overture or the Overture of 1812 is an overture written by Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1880 to commemorate Russia's defense of their motherland against Napoleon's invading Grande Armée in 1812. It has also been co-opted as a patriotic hymn played in the United States in association with its Fourth of July celebrations. The overture debuted in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow in 1882, conducted by Ippolit Al'tani. The overture is best known for its climactic volley of cannon fire, ringing chimes, and brass fanfare finale.

The "Fanfare" from the Overture (as well as the composition) has no historical connection with the US-UK War of 1812, it is often performed in the US alongside other patriotic music and is a staple at Fourth of July celebrations.

Although originally scored for orchestra, I created this arrangement, at the request of my friend Dr Leonard Anderson, for B♭ Clarinet (3) and Bass Clarinet Quartet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Albinoni's Adagio" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages05:326 years ago7,686 views
Flute, Harp
The Adagio in G minor for strings and organ continuo is believed to be a neo-baroque composition by Remo Giazotto. It is usually referred to as "Albinoni's Adagio", or "Adagio in G minor by Albinoni, arranged by Giazotto", but many scholars believe it is an entirely original work by Giazotto.

It was supposedly based on a fragment of a second-movement basso continuo line from a "Sonata in G minor" by Tomaso Albinoni purportedly found among the ruins of the old Saxon State Library, Dresden, after it was firebombed by the Allies during World War II, but since Giazotto's death in 1998 it has emerged that no such fragment has been found or recorded to have been in possession by the Saxon State Library, and it is presumed the piece is entirely his own composition.

The piece is most commonly orchestrated for string ensemble and organ, or string ensemble alone, but has achieved a level of fame such that it is commonly transcribed for other instruments.

The piece has also permeated popular culture, having been used as background music for such films as Gallipoli, television programs and in advertisements.

Although this Work was originally written for Strings, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Danse Macabre" for Pipe Organ
Video

"Danse Macabre" for Pipe Organ

2 parts18 pages08:136 years ago7,594 views
Organ, Percussion
The "Danse macabre", Op. 40, was written as a tone poem for orchestra in 1874 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. It started out in 1872 as an art song for voice and piano with a French text by the poet Henri Cazalis, which is based in an old French superstition. In 1874, the composer expanded and reworked the piece into a tone poem, replacing the vocal line with a solo violin. Normally heard as a symphonic performance, this piece is unusual as an organ concerto however, I created this arrangement to emphasize macab elements and uniquely dynamic range of the pipe organ. I took liberal license in my interpretation of the original score, and as such, this arrangement is uniquely my "vision" of how this piece should sound.

According to the ancient superstition, "Death" appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by strings on the Swell with its "E-string" tuned to an "E-flat" in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with MIDI Chimes playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight

I created this arrangement for the Pipe Organ.

"Hallelujah, Amen" from "Judas Maccabäus" (HWV 63) for Piano & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts5 pages01:255 years ago7,354 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Piano
"Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24. Morell's libretto is based on the deuterocanonical 1 Maccabees (2-8), with motives added from the Antiquitates Judaicae by Flavius Josephus.

The events depicted in the oratorio are from the period 170-160 BC when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid Empire which undertook to destroy the Jewish religion. Being ordered to worship Zeus, many Jews obeyed under the threat of persecution, however some did not. One who defied was the elderly priest Mattathias who killed a fellow Jew who was about to offer a pagan sacrifice. After tearing down a pagan altar, Mattathias retreated to the hills and gathered others who were willing to fight for their faith.

"Hallelujah, Amen" is from ACT III depicting Victory that has finally been achieved for the Jewish people. News arrives that Rome is willing to form an alliance with Judas against the Seleucid empire. The people rejoice that peace has at last come to their country (O lovely peace).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Acoustic Piano & Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon).

"Spanish Dance" No. 1 for Flute & Harp

2 parts11 pages03:346 years ago7,038 views
Flute, Harp
The Spanish Dance No. 1 is from the opera "La Vida Breve" and was composed by Manuel de Falla in 1905 and was first performed in 1913. The Opera was styled after a libretto of Carlos Fernández Shaw.

Manuel de Falla y Matheu (1876 – 1946) was a Spanish Andalusian composer. With Isaac Albéniz, Enrique Granados and Joaquín Turina he is one of Spain's most important musicians of the first half of the 20th century.

"La Vida Breve" always has captivated musicians all over the world. It has been arranged for solo guitar, guitar duo, solo piano, piano duo, and violin and piano. The opera was a turning point for classical music in Spain; for the first time, Falla sought to bring elements of Spanish folk music, flamenco, and especially the gypsy 'cante jondo', or 'deep song', to the classical stage. "La Vida Breve" won first prize in a competition for Spanish opera sponsored by the Royal Academy in 1905.

Although originally written for orchestra (an later arranged for solo Piano), I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

"Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (BWV 147 No 10) for String Trio

3 parts2 pages03:123 years ago6,635 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach's sacred Cantata No. 147 "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben" (BWV 147) (Heart and Mouth, Deeds and Life), was written for the feast of the Visitation of the Virgin Mary and first performed in its final definitive form in Leipzig to mark the feast day, July 2, 1723. Much of the work originated during the composer's tenure as Konzertmeister in Weimar, where upon his appointment in 1714 he also assumed responsibility for the provision of a new cantata each month for services held in the Duke's chapel. In its earliest form (BWV 147a), this cantata was intended to be given on the fourth Sunday of Advent, 1716. This version contained four main arias and an opening chorus, but no recitative sections, three of which were added later, along with the great chorale, which brings each of the main sections to its close. The autograph of the Leipzig version survives intact, but all except the opening movement of the first version has perished. Interestingly, the composer's original design for the Advent feasts at Weimar would have been considered entirely unsuitable by the church authorities in Leipzig, who had forbidden the performance of all concert music during this period of the liturgical year. Bach managed to overcome this restriction by incorporating references to the "Magnificat" (Luke 1: 39-56) into the score, thus tailoring the cantata specifically to the Feast of the Visitation.

The final version begins with an elaborate chorus in C major, in which the celebratory tone is established by the fanfare-like opening section for orchestra. Part I concludes with the famous chorale known in English as "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring." Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th movement of the cantata.

Although it is the 32nd surviving cantata that Bach composed, it was assigned the number BWV 147 in the complete catalogue of his works. Bach wrote a total of 200 cantatas during his time in Leipzig, largely to meet the Leipzig Churches' demand for about 58 different cantatas each year.

Contrary to the common assumption, the violinist and composer Johann Schop, not Bach, composed the movement's underlying chorale melody, Werde munter, mein Gemüthe; Bach's contribution was to harmonize and orchestrate it. The frequent use of arrangements of the piece in modern weddings is in no way related to its scope or Bach's intent for it. Rather, it was one segment of an extended, approximately 20-minute treatment of a traditional Church hymn, as is typical of cantatas of the Baroque period.

Although originally composed as a choral cantata, I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).
"Silent Night" (A Variation for Sax) for Saxophone Quartet
Video

"Silent Night" (A Variation for Sax) for Saxophone Quartet

4 parts1 page01:143 years ago6,410 views
Soprano Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone
Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 – 7 June 1863), was an Austrian primary school teacher and church organist in the village of Arnsdorf. At the same time he was organist and choirmaster at St Nicholas Church in the neighboring village of Oberndorf bei Salzburg and then in later years moved on to Hallein, Salzburg.

Together with Joseph Mohr, a Catholic priest who wrote the original German lyrics, Gruber composed the music for the Christmas carol Silent Night. On Christmas Eve of 1818, Mohr, an assistant pastor at St Nicholas, showed Gruber a six-stanza poem he had written in 1816. He asked Gruber to set the poem to music. The church organ had broken down so Gruber produced a melody with guitar arrangement for the poem. The two men sang "Stille Nacht" for the first time at Christmas Mass in St Nicholas Church while Mohr played guitar and the choir repeated the last two lines of each verse.

Although this carol was originally arranged by Miguel Astor for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement from my earlier work (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/111310) for a friend and It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The First Noël" for Organ and Choir (SATB)

5 parts3 pages04:416 years ago6,280 views
Voice(4), Organ
"The First Noël" is a traditional classical English carol, most likely from the 18th century, although possibly earlier.

The original version of The First Noel dates back to at least the 17th century. In 1823, William B. Sandys (1792-1874), and Davies Gilbert (1767-1839) edited and added lyrics to create the version we sing today. The origin of the current melody is uncertain.

This arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) highlights the range of the Choir and adds organ accompaniment.

Corelli Concerto Grosso op. 6 n. 8

7 parts24 pages13:562 years ago3,138 views
Violin(2), Cello, Strings(4)
The well known "Fatto per la notte di Natale" (Christmas Concerto) by Arcangelo Corelli.
I think this is the original version though I've seen another "original" with basso continuo (harpsichord).
1st Mov. - Vivace, Grave
2nd Mov. - Allegro
3rd Mov. - Adagio, Allegro, Adagio
4th Mov. - Vivace
5th Mov. - Allegro
6th Mov. - Pastorale ad libitum (Largo)
Though I've inputted notes mostly from a version on paper, I also had the benefit of using MuseScore version from others, namely the excellent one by Mike Magatagan.

"Scotland the Brave" for Steel Orchestra

6 parts6 pages03:154 years ago6,248 views
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I created this arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessible to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan, Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums & Percussion (Bass Drum & Snare Drum) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fossils" from the "Carnival of the Animals" for Winds & Strings

13 parts7 pages01:212 years ago3,102 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Carnival of the Animals" is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

It was composed in February 1886 while Saint-Saëns was vacationing in a small Austrian village. It was originally scored for a chamber group of flute/piccolo, clarinet (B flat and C), two pianos, glass harmonica, xylophone, two violins, viola, cello and double bass, but is usually performed today with a full orchestra of strings, and with a glockenspiel substituting for the rare glass harmonica. The term for this rare 11-piece musical ensemble is a "hendectet" or an "undectet."

Saint-Saëns, apparently concerned that the piece was too frivolous and likely to harm his reputation as a serious composer, suppressed performances of it and only allowed one movement, Le cygne, to be published in his lifetime. Only small private performances were given for close friends like Franz Liszt.

Saint-Saëns did, however, include a provision which allowed the suite to be published after his death. It was first performed on 26 February 1922, and it has since become one of his most popular works. It is a favorite of music teachers and young children, along with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. In fact, it is very common to see any combination of these three works together on modern CD recordings.

Movement 12. Fossiles (Fossils)

Strings, two pianos, clarinet, and xylophone: Here, Saint-Saëns mimics his own composition, the Danse macabre, which makes heavy use of the xylophone to evoke the image of skeletons playing card games, the bones clacking together to the beat. The musical themes from Danse macabre are also quoted; the xylophone and the violin play much of the melody, alternating with the piano and clarinet. The piano part is especially difficult here - octaves that jump in quick thirds. Allusions to "Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman" (better known in the English-speaking world as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star), the French nursery rhymes "Au clair de la lune", and "J'ai du bon tabac" (the piano plays the same melody upside down), the popular anthem Partant pour la Syrie, as well as the aria Una voce poco fa from Rossini's The Barber of Seville can also be heard.


Although originally written for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Jesus Loves the Little Children"

1 part2 pages00:206 years ago6,127 views
Clare Herbert Woolston (1856-1927) was a preacher in Chicago Illinois. He wrote the words for Jesus Loves the Little Children. The music was written by George F. Root (1820-1895), who wrote the words and music for several well known hymns, including Behold the Bridegroom Cometh!. Root originally wrote the tune for Jesus Loves the Little Children to accompany an American Civil War song called Tramp, Tramp, Tramp

The United Methodist Church, since its formation in 1968, has aspired to promote racial inclusion and end centuries of segregation that divided black and white churchgoers. "Jesus Loves the Little Children" is sung to usher-in children's time and is meant to inspire inter-ratial equality at the youngest level.
Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo
Video

Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo

1 part7 pages06:406 years ago6,025 views
The baroque composer George Frideric Händel, was born in Germany on the 23rd February 1685 and died on the 14th April 1759. He was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. He spent most of his adult life in England and his most well known works are Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks.

He wrote the Op 4 No 6 in B flat major as a Harp Concerto. In that guise it was first performed on 19 February 1736 along with the Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1 at the premiere of Alexander’s Feast.

Handel composed the music in January 1736, and the work received its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 19 February 1736. In its original form it contained three concertos: a concerto in B flat major in 3 movements for "Harp, Lute, Lyrichord and other Instruments" HWV 294 for performance after the recitative Timotheus, plac'd on high.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:046 years ago5,945 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, this piece has been adapted to the standard Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) configuration.

Bourrée in E Minor (BWV 996) for Violin & Viola

2 parts1 page01:524 years ago5,908 views
Violin, Viola
Bourrée in E minor is a popular lute piece, the fifth movement from Suite in E minor for Lute, BWV 996 (BC L166) written by Johann Sebastian Bach. This piece is arguably one of the most famous pieces among guitarists.

A bourrée was a type of dance that originated in France with quick duple meter and an upbeat. Though the bourrée was popular as a social dance and shown in theatrical ballets during the reign of Louis XIV of France, the Bourrée in E minor was not intended for dancing. Nonetheless, some of the elements of the dance are incorporated in the piece. Bach wrote his lute pieces in a traditional score rather than in lute tablature, and some believe that Bach played his lute pieces on the keyboard. No original script of the Suite in E minor for Lute by Bach is known to exist. However, in the collection of one of Bach's pupils, Johann Ludwig Krebs, there is one piece ("Praeludio - con la Suite da Gio: Bast. Bach") that has written "aufs Lauten Werck" ("for the lute-harpsichord") in unidentified handwriting. Some argue that despite this reference, the piece was meant to be played on the lute as demonstrated by the texture. Others argue that since the piece was written in E minor, it would be incompatible with the baroque lute which was tuned to D minor. Nevertheless, it may be played with other string instruments, such as the guitar, mandola or mandocello, and keyboard instruments, and it is especially well-known among guitarists. The tempo of the piece should be fairly quick and smooth, since it was written to be a dance. It also demonstrates counterpoint, as the two voices move independently of one another. Furthermore, the Bourrée in E minor demonstrates binary form.

Although originally written for Lute, I created this arrangement for Violin & Viola.
"Scotland the Brave" for Wind Quintet
Video

"Scotland the Brave" for Wind Quintet

5 parts3 pages03:145 years ago5,866 views
Flute(2), Trumpet, Clarinet(2)
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I arranged it especially for the Physicians of "Music of the Heart" (http://www.hfmhealth.org/musicfromtheheart) Wind Quintet (2 Flutes, Bb Clarinet, Trumpet & Bass Clarinet).

"Brian Boru's March" for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts2 pages01:205 years ago5,784 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
"Brian Boru's March" is a traditional Irish tune typically played with the Celtic Harp.

Brian Boru (c. 941 – 1014, Old Irish: Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig; Middle Irish: Brian Bóruma; modern Irish: Brian Bóroimhe) was an Irish king who ended the domination of the High Kingship of Ireland by the Uí Néill. Building on the achievements of his father, Cennétig mac Lorcain, and especially his elder brother, Mathgamain, Brian first made himself King of Munster, then subjugated Leinster, making himself ruler of the south of Ireland. He is the founder of the O'Brien dynasty. His name is remembered in the title of one of the oldest tunes in Ireland's traditional repertoire: "Brian Boru's March". It is still widely played by traditional Irish musicians.

Although this work was originally written for Voice and Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.