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"Song of the Indian Guest" for Flute & Piano
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"Song of the Indian Guest" for Flute & Piano

2 parts4 pages03:046 years ago5,032 views
Flute, Piano
"Song of the Indian Guest" or, less accurately, "Song of India" from the Opera Sadko by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. It's sweet, peaceful and majestic.

Sadko (Russian: Садко, the name of the main character) is an opera in seven scenes by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The libretto was written by the composer, with assistance from Vladimir Belsky, Vladimir Stasov, and others. Rimsky-Korsakov was first inspired by the bīlina of Sadko in 1867, when he completed a tone poem on the subject, his Op. 5. After finishing his second revision of this work in 1892, he decided to turn it into a dramatic work. The opera was completed in 1896.

The music is highly evocative, and Rimsky-Korsakov's famed powers of orchestration are abundantly in evidence throughout the score. I created this arrangement or Flute & Acoustic Piano

"The King of the Færies" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:226 years ago4,943 views
Flute, Harp
A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural.

The Irish banshee (Irish Gaelic "bean sí" or Scottish Gaelic "bean shìth", which both mean "fairy woman") is sometimes described as a ghost

Historians believe that the fairy queens and kings are in fact the old pagan gods and goddesses 'in disguise' who have long been revered by the Irish. Once stated that, "the Celtic gods of Ireland had long been wiped out, buried under the sway of Catholicism". Many who have been to the Emerald Isle, or listened to many folk tales can see that the old gods live on in folk tales as the giants of the hill; the Gobhan Saor who built all the bridges of Ireland; the Gille Decair, a clown and trickster; the carl (serf) of the drab coat and many others. The old deities were once worshipped throughout Ireland, however it is in the west that they are best remembered now, the east having been more Christianized and anglicised, and subject to more invasions. By contrast, the west of Ireland, to which the native Irish were driven ("to hell or Connaught") has held on longer to her ancient heritage.

Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"A Baroque Theme" from "Suite Antique" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages02:456 years ago4,895 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
In 1979, John Rutter was commissioned to compose an instrumental piece for a musical festival in Berkshire. In Rutter's own words, he was inspired by the presence of Bach's Fifth Brandenburg Concerto on the concert program, and chose to pay homage to Bach's chosen musical forces in this piece, as well as the "forms and styles of Bach's day." In execution, the Suite antique does use solo flute with a string chamber orchestra (without the solo violin central to Bach's concept), and harpsichord (without the shocking and revolutionary solo voice Bach gives that instrument in his concerto); its forms and styles pay loose and perhaps winking homage to a variety of early dances and lyric styles.

As one would expect in a Baroque-era homage, a slow-tempo prelude opens the set.
Although originally composed for Flute, Harpsichord and Strings by John Rutter in 1979, it's 6 movements range in style from `a Bach-like Aria' to a 'Richard Rodgers-style Waltz'.

I created this arrangement for woodwind trio to accentuate the interplay between the baroque-style voices using the warm tones of the Flute, Oboe and Bassoon.

"I Vow To Thee, My Lord" for Flute & Piano

2 parts2 pages01:386 years ago4,854 views
Flute, Piano
Originally: "I Vow to Thee, My Country" was a British patriotic song created in 1921 when a poem by Sir Cecil Spring-Rice was set to music by Gustav Holst. Gustav Holst adapted the music from a section of Jupiter from his suite The Planets to create a setting for the poem. The music was extended slightly to fit the final two lines of the first verse.

I modified the Lyrics set by Sir Cecil Spring-Rice in the first verse and created the second verse in service to our lord, Jesus Christ and offer this arrangement as "I Vow to Thee, My Lord".

Wind Quintet (Opus 88 No. 1) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts43 pages24:285 years ago4,812 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Anton Reicha (1770 – 1836) was a Bohemian-born, later naturalized French composer of music very much in the German style. A contemporary and lifelong friend of Beethoven, he is now best remembered for his substantial early contributions to the wind quintet literature and his role as teacher of pupils including Franz Liszt and Hector Berlioz. He was also an accomplished theorist, and wrote several treatises on various aspects of composition. Some of his theoretical work dealt with experimental methods of composition, which he applied in a variety of works such as fugues and études for piano and string quartet.

Reicha was born in Prague. His town piper father died when the boy was just 10 months old, leaving him in custody of a mother who had no interest in educating him. The young composer ran away from home when only ten years old, and was subsequently raised and educated in music by his paternal uncle Josef Reicha. When they moved to Bonn, Josef secured for his nephew a place playing violin in the Hofkapelle electoral orchestra alongside the young Beethoven on viola, but for Reicha this was not enough. He studied composition secretly, against his uncle's wishes, and entered the University of Bonn in 1789. When Bonn was captured by the French in 1794 Reicha fled to Hamburg, where he made a living teaching harmony and composition and studied mathematics and philosophy. Between 1799 and 1801 he lived in Paris, trying to gain recognition as an opera composer, without success. In 1801 he moved on to Vienna, where he studied with Salieri and Albrechtsberger and produced his first important works. His life was once again affected by war in 1808, when he left Vienna when it was occupied by the French under Napoleon and returned to Paris, where he spent the rest of his life teaching composition and in 1818 was appointed professor at the Conservatoire.

Reicha's output during his Vienna years included large semi-didactic cycles of works such as 36 Fugues for piano (in a "new method of fugal writing"), L'art de varier (a set of 57 variations on an original theme), and exercises for the treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples). During the later Paris period, however, he focused his attention mostly on theory and produced a number of treatises on composition. Works of this period include 25 crucially important wind quintets which are considered the locus classicus of that genre and are his best known compositions. None of the advanced ideas he advocated in the most radical his music and writings (not used in the 25 great wind quintets), including polyrhythm, polytonality and microtonal music, were accepted or employed by nineteenth-century composers. Due to Reicha's unwillingness to have his music published (like Michael Haydn before him), he fell into obscurity soon after his death and his life and work have yet to be intensively studied.

Musically, the wind quintets represent a more conservative trend in Reicha's oeuvre when compared to his earlier work, namely the compositions of the Viennese period. Instead, Reicha was inspired by the supreme artistry of his players from the Opéra Comique to explore the technical limits of the five instruments comprising the wind quintet, with writing that combines elements from comic opera, folk tradition, military marches and fanfares with his lifelong interests in variation form and counterpoint. Technical wizardry also prevails in compositions that illustrate Reicha's theoretical treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples) of 1803, where techniques such as bitonality and polyrhythm are explored in extremely difficult sight-reading exercises. 36 fugues for piano, published in 1803, was conceived as an illustration of Reicha's neue Fugensystem, a new system for composing fugues. Reicha proposed that second entries of fugue subjects in major keys could occur in keys other than the standard dominant), to widen the possibilities for modulations and undermine the conservative tonal stability of the fugue. The fugues of the collection not only illustrate this point, but also employ a variety of extremely convoluted technical tricks such as polyrhythm (no. 30), combined (nos. 24, 28), asymmetrical (no. 20) and simply uncommon (no. 10 is in 12/4, no. 12 in 2/8) meters and time signatures, some of which are derived from folk music, an approach that directly anticipates that of later composers such as Béla Bartók. No. 13 is a modal fugue played on white keys only, in which cadences are possible on all but the 7th degree of the scale without further alteration. Six fugues employ two subjects, one has three, and No. 15 six. In several of the fugues, Reicha established a link with the old tradition by using subjects by Haydn (no. 3), Bach (no. 5), Mozart (no. 7), Scarlatti (no. 9), Frescobaldi (no. 14) and Handel (no. 15). Many of the technical accomplishments are unique to fugue literature.

Although originally written for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in C, Horn in E & Bassoon I created this arrangement forWoodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Trumpet Tune & March" in C Major for Organ

2 parts1 page016 years ago4,807 views
Organ, Trumpet
Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674–1707) was an English baroque composer, organist and, pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark's March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes's Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke's piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has featured in royal weddings.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell), was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Although originally written for Orchestra, I Arranged this piece for Pipe Organ.

"Ave Maria" (Arcadelt-Dietsch) for Piano

1 part1 page01:585 years ago4,784 views
Pierre-Louis Dietsch (1808 – 1865) was a French composer and conductor, perhaps best remembered for the much anthologized Ave Maria 'by' Jacques Arcadelt, which he loosely arranged from that composer's three part madrigal Nous voyons que les hommes.

He was born Pierre-Louis-Philippe Dietsch in Dijon.[3] Fétis has reported that Dietsch was a choirboy at the Dijon Cathedral, and beginning in 1822 studied at Choron's Institution Royale de Musique Classique et Religieuse in Paris. Later, after 1853, Dietsch was a teacher at the Ecole Niedermeyer (successor of Choron's Institution), a position he held up until his death. In 1830 Dietsch entered the Paris conservatory and studied with Anton Reicha. His subjects included double bass and counterpoint (with Reicha).

Dietsch composed church music as well as an opera Le vaisseau fantôme, ou Le maudit des mers ("The Fantom Ship, or The Accursed of the Sea"), which was first performed on 9 November 1842 at the Paris Opera. The libretto by Paul Foucher and H. Révoil was based on Walter Scott's The Pirate as well as Captain Marryat's The Phantom Ship and other sources, although Wagner thought it was based on his scenario for Der fliegende Holländer, which he had just sold to the Opera. The similarity of Dietsch's opera to Wagner's is slight, although Wagner's assertion is often repeated. Berlioz thought Le vaisseau fantôme too solemn, but other reviewers were more favourable.

This setting of "Ave Maria" is not by Jacques Arcadelt. It is an arrangement by Louis Dietsch (1808-1865) of Arcadelt's "nous voyons que les hommes", written for female voices. The bass part in particular is entirely Dietsch's work

Although this work was originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for Solo Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Romance" (Opus 37) for Flute & Harp
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"Romance" (Opus 37) for Flute & Harp

2 parts15 pages06:356 years ago4,677 views
One can hardly imagine a less likely memento of the Franco-Prussian War and its grisly aftermath than the sweetly yearning Romance for flute and piano in D flat.

Inevitably, Saint-Saëns composed other pieces specifically alluding to those events -- a cantata, Chants de guerre, for instance, recomposed as the orchestral Marche héroïque (1871) -- but it is the Romance that has proven evergreen. News of the French defeat at Sedan reached Paris on September 3, 1870. With his fellow composers Bizet, Duparc, d'Indy, Fauré, Widor -- to name the most prominent -- Saint-Saëns joined the National Guard (Fourth Seine Battalion) and served during the Siege of Paris, which ended with an armistice on January 28, 1871, and the Germans' triumphal parade down the Champs Elysées on March 1.

Toward the end of that bleak January, Saint-Saëns' close friend, the talented painter Henri Regnault, was killed by a stray German bullet. Redressing French humiliation -- culturally, at least -- Saint-Saëns and Conservatoire professor Romain Bussine met with Duparc at the latter's apartment February 25 to establish the Société Nationale de Musique, under the rubric "Ars Gallica," for the performance and promotion of French music. With the German withdrawal, a new revolutionary contingent within the French populace defied the Republican government and established the Paris Commune on March 18.

Knowing that the anti-bourgeois Commune did not speak for him, Saint-Saëns decamped on the last train to leave Paris for the Channel. On a visit to London in 1880 he was to play before Queen Victoria, but in 1871 he arrived a penniless émigré. Meanwhile, before or during his flight he completed the Romance in D flat -- the manuscript is dated March 25, 1871 -- lending a new facet to anecdotes of his famed facility. In May, as the Republic moved to crush the Commune, the Communards arrested and shot the Archbishop of Paris with Abbé Duguerry of the Madeleine, where Saint-Saëns was organist. By May 28 the Commune was over and Saint-Saëns returned to Paris in time for Duguerry's funeral. The Société Nationale gave its first concert in November, and the Romance received its première at an SNM concert in the Salle Pleyel with renowned flutist Paul Taffanel accompanied by Saint-Saëns on April 6, 1872. By 1878 the composer had scored the work for orchestra. In either version, the Romance has remained a repertoire staple, affording a winning epitome of Saint-Saëns' characteristic mixture of elegant melancholy with brilliance in easily graspable lied form, the caressing first and final strains enclosing a more animated elegy.

Although originally created for Flute and Piano, I created this orchestral harp arrangement to highlight the light and airy arpeggios (the word comes from the Italian word "arpeggiare" , which means "to play on a harp"). It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Spring" for Flute Duet

2 parts2 pages02:445 years ago1,542 views
Jenne Van Antwerpen (http://musescore.com/user/53615) and I wrote this short duet for flutes (2) in celebration of our respective country's breaking of spring.

It is interesting to note that "Spring" in Flemish means "Jump" which aptly describes some of the pieces more "jumpy" sections.

"Spring" is composed for Flute Duet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Jesus Loves Me" (UMC Hymn # 191) for Children's Handbell Choir

1 part1 page00:324 years ago4,554 views
Percussion
"Jesus Loves Me" is a Christian hymn written by Anna Bartlett Warner (1827–1915). The lyrics first appeared as a poem in the context of an 1860 novel called Say and Seal, written by her older sister Susan Warner (1819–1885), in which the words were spoken as a comforting poem to a dying child. The tune was added in 1862 by William Batchelder Bradbury (1816–1868). Along with his tune, Bradbury added his own chorus "Yes, Jesus loves me, Yes, Jesus Loves me..." After publication as a song it became one of the most popular Christian hymns in churches around the world.

I created this simplified arrangement from the United Methodish Hymnal (No. 191) for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The piece covers a single octave and is is octave-doubled for each member of the Children's Haldbell Choir. The purpose of this arrangement is to introduce the children to the basic concepts of ringing, note reading, timing and teamwork. This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).
"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" for Children's Handbell Choir
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"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" for Children's Handbell Choir

1 part1 page00:483 years ago4,541 views
Percussion
"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" is a popular sixteenth-century English carol from the West Country of England. The origin of this Christmas carol lies in the English tradition wherein wealthy people of the community gave Christmas treats to the carolers on Christmas Eve, such as figgy puddings that were very much like modern day Christmas puddings. It is one of the few English traditional carols that makes mentiogn of the New Year celebration and is often the last song carolers sing, wishing all good tidings and happy spirits at Christmastime.

I created this simplified arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The piece covers 2 octaves and is designed for three (3) members of the Children's Handbell Choir. The purpose of this arrangement is to introduce the children to the basic concepts of ringing, note reading, timing and teamwork. This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"O Mio Babbino Caro" from "Gianni Schicchi" for Viola & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:373 years ago4,456 views
Viola, Harp
“O Mio Babbino Caro” (“Oh my beloved father”) is a popular aria from Giacomo Puccini's 1918 opera Gianni Schicchi. It is sung by Lauretta after tensions between her father (Gianni Schicchi) and his prospective in-laws have reached a breaking point that threatens to separate her from Rinuccio, the boy she loves. The aria provides a contrasting interlude expressing lyrical simplicity and single-hearted love in the atmosphere of hypocrisy, jealousy and double-dealing of medieval Florence, where Puccini's only comedy is set.

All the most famous sopranos of the 20th century have performed this aria, including Maria Callas, Renata Tebaldi, Montserrat Caballé, Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Kathleen Battle, Renée Fleming and many others. It has also become in demand with popular music sopranos such as Sarah Brightman, Charlotte Church, and Hayley Westenra. Violinist Joshua Bell also has produced a recording of it. James Ivory's 1985 adaptation of E.M. Forster's novel A Room with a View uses the aria as the title theme.

I created this arrangement of the Aria for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Elephant" from "Carnival of the Animals" (No. 5) for Viola & Piano

2 parts2 pages01:183 years ago4,412 views
Viola, Piano
The Carnival of the Animals (Le carnaval des animaux) is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns. The work was written for private performance by an ad hoc ensemble of two pianos and other instruments, and lasts around 25 minutes.

Following a disastrous concert tour of Germany in 1885–86, Saint-Saëns withdrew to a small Austrian village, where he composed The Carnival of the Animals in February 1886. It is scored for two pianos, two violins, viola, cello, double bass, flute (and piccolo), clarinet (C and B♭), glass harmonica, and xylophone.

From the beginning, Saint-Saëns regarded the work as a piece of fun. On 9 February 1886 he wrote to his publishers Durand in Paris that he was composing a work for the coming Shrove Tuesday, and confessing that he knew he should be working on his Third Symphony, but that this work was "such fun" ("... mais c'est si amusant!"). He had apparently intended to write the work for his students at the École Niedermeyer, but in the event it was first performed at a private concert given by the cellist Charles Lebouc on Shrove Tuesday, 9 March 1886.

A second (private) performance was given on 2 April at the home of Pauline Viardot with an audience including Franz Liszt, a friend of the composer, who had expressed a wish to hear the work. There were other private performances, typically for the French mid-Lent festival of Mi-Carême, but Saint-Saëns was adamant that the work would not be published in his lifetime, seeing it as detracting from his "serious" composer image. He relented only for the famous cello solo The Swan, which forms the penultimate movement of the work, and which was published in 1887 in an arrangement by the composer for cello and solo piano (the original uses two pianos).

Saint-Saëns did specify in his will that the work should be published posthumously. Following his death in December 1921, the work was published by Durand in Paris in April 1922, and the first public performance was given on 25 February 1922 by Concerts Colonne (the orchestra of Édouard Colonne).

Carnival has since become one of Saint-Saëns's best-known works, played by the original eleven instrumentalists, or more often with the full string section of an orchestra. Normally a glockenspiel substitutes for the rare glass harmonica. Ever popular with music teachers and young children, it is often recorded in combination with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf or Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra.

No. 5 "L'éléphant" (The Elephant) was originally scored for Double bass and piano. In the opening section, it is marked Allegro pomposo, the perfect caricature for an elephant. The piano plays a waltz-like triplet figure while the bass hums the melody beneath it. Like "Tortues," this is also a musical joke—the thematic material is taken from the Scherzo from Mendelssohn's incidental music to A Midsummer Night's Dream and Berlioz's "Dance of the Sylphs" from The Damnation of Faust. The two themes were both originally written for high, lighter-toned instruments (flute and various other woodwinds, and violin, accordingly); the joke is that Saint-Saëns moves this to the lowest and heaviest-sounding instrument in the orchestra, the double bass.

Although originally scored for double bass and piano, I created this arrangement for Solo Viola & Piano.

Oboe Sonata I (Op. 1 No. 8 HWV 366) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts7 pages06:046 years ago4,396 views
Oboe, Piano
George Frideric Handel (German: Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

14 of the 20 sonatas published as Handel's "Op. 1" have a complex history. Composed at various stages in his career, they were first issued under that designation by the Amsterdam publisher Roger in the 1720s, a publication rapidly followed around 1726 by a "more correct" but equally unauthorized edition from Handel's London publisher, John Walsh. In fact, modern comparison with Handel's autograph of both publications has revealed serious errors. The Sonata in C minor for Oboe and Bass Continuo, which was published as No. 8 in the Roger and Walsh collections, is one of the earlier works included, being generally accepted by Handel scholars as having been composed during around 1711 or 1712, the period when he first settled in London following the sensational success of his opera Rinaldo in February 1711. During the early years of the eighteenth century, the oboe and recorder (both of which were at this time played by the same performer) challenged the previous hegemony of the violin as a solo instrument in sonatas, although this is the only oboe sonata included in "Op. 1." There are four short movements, an expressive Largo, an Allegro based on a chromatic theme, an Adagio, and a lively concluding Bourrée anglaise.

"Scotland the Brave" for Saxophone Quartet

4 parts3 pages03:142 years ago4,379 views
Soprano Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I created this arrangement for Saxophone Quartet (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bari Sax).
"Solfeggietto" No 2 (H.220, W.117) for Acoustic Piano
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"Solfeggietto" No 2 (H.220, W.117) for Acoustic Piano

1 part3 pages01:096 years ago4,342 views
This very short piece is one of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's best-known pieces; one of three 'solfeggios' written in 1770. It is probably learned by every aspiring pianist, and is sometimes used in examination syllabuses (including ABRSM). Solfeggietto means little study. I have used a public domain edition apparently edited by Hans von Bulow, and have retained his octave doublings. I have included the few notes he suggested in the last bar to give a conventional ending. This piece is played at many different tempi, and always provides a challenge for the player to get the semiquavers even. When played at a prestissimo tempo, it requires well-trained and dextrous fingers.


This work is intended for piano and I incorporated what I believe are accurate baroque articulations and ornaments. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fantasy" for Flute & Piano

2 parts7 pages05:046 years ago4,309 views
Flute, Piano
Inspired after rediscovering the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto "No. 5" in E minor, I created this Fantasy for Flute & Piano. The title reflects this pieces imagery rather than the musical form, as it is not an actual fantasy.

It should be noted that Soviet émigré Alexander Warenberg, a composer for film and television, arranged Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 as a concertante work for piano and orchestra. The work contains majority of the source material from Rachmaninoff's Second Symphony with some original scoring by Warenberg, modification of the original score and a change to many of the score’s harmonies "to improve the sound and balance". Technically, it is Warenberg's work that I refer to here; only peripherally Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2.

This work still feels somewhat “rough” within the confines of MuseScore and I consider it a "work in progress" and I welcome your constructive comments and suggestions.

"Ring, Christmas Bells" for Handbells, Handchimes & Choir (SATB)

7 parts4 pages01:324 years ago4,298 views
Voice(4), Piano(3)
"Carol of the Bells" is a choral miniature work composed by the Ukrainian Mykola Leontovych. Leontovych's composition, is characterised by the use of a four note motif as an ostinato figure throughout the work. This ostinato figure is an ancient pagan Ukrainian New Year's (originally celebrated in April) magical chant known in Ukrainian as "Shchedryk" [the Generous One]. I created this arrangement at the request of my friend Genevieve Kopping for Chorus (SATB), Handchimes & English Handbells using the non-secular lyrics by Minna Louise Hohman (1947). This arrangement of the "Carol of the Bells" uses modern 5-Octave English Handbells, Handchimes and full choir (SATB) and is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"Gigue" from the Partita for Violin No. 2 (BWV 1004 No 4) for Viola

1 part2 pages04:294 years ago4,297 views
Viola
The Partita in D minor for solo violin (BWV 1004) by Johann Sebastian Bach was written during 1717--1723.

In the preface to his 1955 transcription, John Cook writes: "The Chaconne is sublimely satisfying in its original form, yet many will agree that a single violin is only able to hint at the vast implications of much of this music ... It is perhaps not unreasonable to suppose that Bach would have chosen the organ, had he transcribed the Chaconne himself, as the instrument best suited to the scale of his ideas ... A good performance on the violin may be taken as the best guide to interpretation on the organ — the two instruments are not without their points in common, and both were beloved of Bach."

The earliest version for organ is by William Thomas Best. Further transcriptions are by John Cook, Wilhelm Middelschulte, Walter Henry Goss-Custard (1915--55), and Henri Messerer (1838--1923).

Since Bach's time, several different transcriptions of the piece have been made for other instruments, particularly for the piano (by Ferruccio Busoni and Joachim Raff), and for the piano left-hand (by Brahms). Johannes Brahms, in a letter to Clara Schumann, said about the ciaccona: On one stave, for a small instrument, the man writes a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind. Felix Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann each wrote piano accompaniments for the work.

Although this piece was originally written for Violin, I transcribed it for Solo Viola.