Sheet music

Violin Concerto in D Major (RV 204 Op. 4 No. 11) for String Quartet

4 parts17 pages06:144 years ago4,549 views
Violin, Strings(3)
Although Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) had already accomplished himself as a composer of violin sonatas and of sacred music, nothing propelled his career more than his first set of concertos -- L'estro armonico (Op.3) -- which first appeared in 1711. Besides being widely popular with both musicians and audiences of the day, L'estro armonico had a significant impact on the development of the relatively new solo-concerto. The set's influence was felt all across Europe -- no less a figure than J.S. Bach transcribed six of the Op.3 concertos for keyboard.

La Stravaganza (Op. 4) appeared shortly after, in around 1713, and was dedicated to Vettor Dolfin (the surname given in its Tuscan form, Delfino), a young Venetian noble to whom Vivaldi had taught the violin. While enormously successful in it's own right, this set of twelve concertos was a complete departure from Op.3. While the influence of the Corellian concerto grosso had been significant in L'estro armonico, in La Stravaganza Vivaldi severed himself completely from past traditions. The Op.4 set is characterized by harmonic daring, passage work bordering on the bizarre, and a new, uniquely flexible, solo-concerto "form" that would become so typical of Vivaldi. The originality and variety of material is also noteworthy; each work seems to systematically refute a different aspect of the traditional concerto, and even some standards of composition at the time. All this is not without its own sense of musical humor. However, the set also demonstrates the care the composer took over the selection and grouping of works destined for publication; i.e. grouping the concertos into pairs -- one major, one minor -- with an adjustment made to ensure that the whole set ends in major.

The Op.4 concertos are the earliest examples of a theatri al conception of the solo concerto to be offered to international audiences of music lovers. This, even more than Vivaldi's daring writing for the solo violin, is the true significance of the word stravaganza in the title. Indeed, among Vivaldi's printed works, the road to the future is marked by the Stravaganza concerti rather than those of L'estro armonico. Vivaldi would never retrace his steps in the direction of Op.3, and the collections which followed Op.4 further develop the concept of the instrumental solo as outlined in Op.4.

This Concerto in D Major for violin (RV 204 Op. 4 No. 11), is eleventh in the Op.4 set and although originally scored for Violin and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass & Continuo), I created this arrangement for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Fantasy" for Flute & Piano

2 parts7 pages05:046 years ago4,494 views
Flute, Piano
Inspired after rediscovering the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto "No. 5" in E minor, I created this Fantasy for Flute & Piano. The title reflects this pieces imagery rather than the musical form, as it is not an actual fantasy.

It should be noted that Soviet émigré Alexander Warenberg, a composer for film and television, arranged Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 as a concertante work for piano and orchestra. The work contains majority of the source material from Rachmaninoff's Second Symphony with some original scoring by Warenberg, modification of the original score and a change to many of the score’s harmonies "to improve the sound and balance". Technically, it is Warenberg's work that I refer to here; only peripherally Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2.

This work still feels somewhat “rough” within the confines of MuseScore and I consider it a "work in progress" and I welcome your constructive comments and suggestions.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"Red is the Rose" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts6 pages02:556 years ago4,439 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lomond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song (Roud No. 9598). It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland.

This is the Irish variant of the song called "Red Is the Rose" and is sung with the same melody but different (although similarly themed) lyrics. It was popularized by Irish folk musician Tommy Makem. Even though many people mistakenly believe that Makem wrote "Red is the Rose", it is a traditional Irish folk song.

There remains today a general debate is which is older "Red Is The Rose" or "Loch Lomond", because one clearly borrowed the other's tune. To date, no one has found the answer, but Some of "older" Irish singers swear that "Red Is The Rose" is the original. Others in Scotland respond that tune had been well known in Scotland since the middle of the 18th century as "Kind Robin Lo'es Me". I do not know.

I created this arrangement for Flute Duet & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Peace by the River" for Alto Sax & Piano

2 parts6 pages05:056 years ago4,438 views
Alto Saxophone, Piano
I created the reflective and tranquil "Peace by the River" from the music I Quo Vis by Patrice Douriaux for Piano & Alto Saxophone. The melody of the piece uses a deliberate, but mild, dissonance against the harmony. This interpretation is meant to invoke visions of reflective solace at the edge of a peaceful river.

The piece starts calm after a short piano introduction reinforcing the calm tranquility that exists at the river’s edge. The listener is carried into this carefree environment and allowed to ponder the large expanse of the world as well as the transient gift of peace that exists in this place. Inspiration follows as the listener is moved by this gift and expresses joy and praise and the will to spread the peace of Christ to others. Reflection soon follows as the listener is drawn to quiet mediation within and realizes in proud epiphany that like the word of our Lord, one small stone cast into a peaceful river spreads the gift of its message in all directions; even back to the source. The piece concludes with a joyful exclaim that the peace we feel can truly only be appreciated by sharing this peace with others.
"Solfeggietto" No 2 (H.220, W.117) for Acoustic Piano
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"Solfeggietto" No 2 (H.220, W.117) for Acoustic Piano

1 part3 pages01:096 years ago4,420 views
This very short piece is one of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's best-known pieces; one of three 'solfeggios' written in 1770. It is probably learned by every aspiring pianist, and is sometimes used in examination syllabuses (including ABRSM). Solfeggietto means little study. I have used a public domain edition apparently edited by Hans von Bulow, and have retained his octave doublings. I have included the few notes he suggested in the last bar to give a conventional ending. This piece is played at many different tempi, and always provides a challenge for the player to get the semiquavers even. When played at a prestissimo tempo, it requires well-trained and dextrous fingers.


This work is intended for piano and I incorporated what I believe are accurate baroque articulations and ornaments. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Concerto II" for Oboe & Strings in D Minor

5 parts13 pages09:316 years ago4,412 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Alessandro Marcello (1669 - 1747) was an Italian nobleman, poet, philosopher, mathematician and musician. A contemporary of Tomaso Albinoni, Marcello was the son of a senator in Venice. As such, he enjoyed a comfortable life that gave him the scope to pursue his interest in music. He held concerts in his hometown and also composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello, being a slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747.

The Concerto for Oboe and Strings in D minor by Alessandro Marcello is one of the most performed oboe concertos in the repertory. It was written in the early 18th century and has become Marcello's most famous work. In the past, and continuing to the present, it has been mistakenly attributed to both Alessandro Marcello's brother Benedetto Marcello and to Antonio Vivaldi. Johann Sebastian Bach made the piece famous by writing a transcription of the piece in C minor for harpsichord (BWV 974).

I have also ccreated an arrangement of the adagio (Movement 2) for English Horn & Harp at: http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/adagio-from-concerto-ii-for-english-horn-and-harp

"Going Home" from the "New World" Largo Op. 95, B. 178 Movement 2 For Organ

1 part2 pages02:126 years ago4,385 views
"Goin' Home" is based on a folk spiritual penned in 1893 by William Arms Fisher from "The New World Symphony" Largo Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 Movement 2 by Antonín Leopold Dvořák.

I created this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) for Organ to highlight the somber mantra for use during prelude.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Badinerie from the Orchestral Suite No. 2 (BWV 1067) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:333 years ago4,375 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
The four orchestral suites (called ouvertures by their author), BWV 1066–1069 are four suites by Johann Sebastian Bach. The name ouverture refers only in part to the opening movement in the style of the French overture, in which a majestic opening section in relatively slow dotted-note rhythm in duple meter is followed by a fast fugal section, then rounded off with a short recapitulation in triple meter of the opening music. More broadly, the term was used in Baroque Germany for a suite of dance-pieces in French Baroque style preceded by such an ouverture. This genre was extremely popular in Germany during Bach's day, and he showed far less interest in it than was usual: Robin Stowell writes that "Telemann's 135 surviving examples represent only a fraction of those he is known to have written"; Christoph Graupner left 85; and Johann Friedrich Fasch left almost 100. Bach did write several other ouverture (suites) for solo instruments, notably the Cello Suite no. 5, BWV 1011, which also exists in the autograph Lute Suite in G minor, BWV 995, the Keyboard Partita no. 4 in D, BWV 828, and the Overture in the French style, BWV 831 for keyboard. The two keyboard works are among the few Bach published, and he prepared the lute suite for a "Monsieur Schouster," presumably for a fee, so all three may attest to the form's popularity.

Scholars believe that Bach did not conceive of the four orchestral suites as a set (in the way he conceived of the Brandenburg Concertos), since the sources are various. The Badinerie (literally "jesting" in French; in other works Bach used the Italian word with the same meaning, "Scherzo") has become a show-piece for solo flautists because of its quick pace and difficulty.

Joshua Rifkin has argued, based on in-depth analysis of the partially autograph primary sources, that this work is based on an earlier version in A minor in which the solo flute part was scored instead for solo violin. Rifkin demonstrates that notational errors in the surviving parts can best be explained by their having been copied from a model a whole tone lower, and that this solo part would venture below the lowest pitches on the flutes Bach wrote for (the transverse flute, which Bach called flauto traverso or flute traversiere). Rifkin argues that the violin was the most likely option, noting that in writing the word "Traversiere" in the solo part, Bach seems to have fashioned the letter T out of an earlier "V", suggesting that he originally intended to write the word "violin" (the page in question can be viewed here, p. 6) Further, Rifkin notes passages that would have used the violinistic technique of bariolage. Rifkin also suggests that Bach was inspired to write the suite by a similar work by his second cousin Johann Bernhard Bach.

Flautist Steven Zohn accepts the argument of an earlier version in A minor, but suggests that the original part may have been playable on flute as well as violin. Oboist Gonzalo X. Ruiz has argued in detail that the solo instrument in the lost original A minor version was the oboe, and he has recorded it in his own reconstruction of that putative original on a baroque oboe. His case against the violin is that: the range is "curiously limited" for that instrument, "avoiding the G string almost entirely," and that the supposed violin solo would at times be lower in pitch than the first violin part, something that is almost unheard of in dedicated violin concertos. By contrast, "the range is exactly the range of Bach's oboes"; scoring the solo oboe occasionally lower than the first violin was typical Baroque practice, as the oboe still comes through to the ear; and the "figurations are very similar to those found in many oboe works of the period."

Although originally scored for Chamber Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Jesus My Lord" For Organ

1 part1 page03:066 years ago4,371 views
Have You Seen Jesus My Lord? was written in 1970 by John Fischer. I transcribed this piece from Guitar to Organ for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC).
"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio
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"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:206 years ago4,356 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
The Flower Duet (Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. The Hindus go to perform their rites in a sacred Brahmin temple under the high priest, Nilakantha. Nilakantha's daughter Lakmé (which derives from the Sanskrit Lakshmi) and her servant Mallika are left behind and go down to the river to gather flowers where they sing the famous "Flower Duet."

I created this simplified version of the main theme for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) to highlight as well as provide haunting undertones.
"Clair de Lune" for Harp
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"Clair de Lune" for Harp

1 part7 pages03:466 years ago4,356 views
Claude-Achille Debussy (1862 – 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures working within the field of impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions In France, he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903. A crucial figure in the transition to the modern era in Western music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.

Beginning in the 1890s, Debussy developed his own musical language largely independent of Wagner's style, colored in part from the dreamy, sometimes morbid romanticism of the Symbolist Movement. Debussy became a frequent participant at Stéphane Mallarmé's Symbolist gatherings, where Wagnerism dominated the discussion. In contrast to the enormous works of Wagner and other late-romantic composers, however, around this time Debussy chose to write in smaller, more accessible forms. The Deux Arabesques is an example of one of Debussy's earliest works, already developing his musical language. Suite bergamasque (1890) recalls rococo decorousness with a modern cynicism and puzzlement. This suite contains (this) one of Debussy's most popular pieces, "Clair de Lune".

His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch. Often Debussy's work reflected the activities or turbulence in his own life. In French literary circles, the style of this period was known as symbolism, a movement that directly inspired Debussy both as a composer and as an active cultural participant.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Carnival of Venice" (Opus 10 MS 59) Theme & Variations for Harp

1 part7 pages03:476 years ago4,328 views
Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini (1782 – 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. He was one of the most celebrated violin virtuosi of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique.

Paganini composed his own works to play exclusively in his concerts, all of which had profound influences on the evolution of violin techniques. His 24 Caprices were probably composed in the period between 1805 to 1809, while he was in the service of the Baciocchi court. Also during this period, he composed the majority of the solo pieces, duo-sonatas, trios and quartets for the guitar. These chamber works may have been inspired by the publication, in Lucca, of the guitar quintets of Boccherini. Many of his variations (and he has become the de facto master of this musical genre), including "Le Streghe", "The Carnival of Venice" (this), and "Nel cor più non mi sento", were composed, or at least first performed, before his European concert tour.

In 1855, Thomas Aptommas created this arrangement was created entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Invention 4 by J.S. Bach (BWV 775) for Piano

1 part2 pages00:496 years ago4,328 views
Piano
The Inventions and Sinfonias, BWV 772–801, also known as the Two and Three Part Inventions, are a collection of thirty short keyboard compositions composed by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750), consisting of fifteen inventions (two-part contrapuntal pieces) and fifteen sinfonias (three-part contrapuntal pieces). They were originally written by Bach as exercises for the musical education of his students.

Bach titled the collection: "Honest method, by which the amateurs of the keyboard – especially, however, those desirous of learning – are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligate parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style in playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition.

Bach Invention #4 in D minor - Upper Voice for Mandolin w TAB

2 parts3 pages00:493 years ago2,160 views
Guitar(2)
I adapted this Bach Invention for keyboard to be played by 2 mandolins. There are two scores: one for the lower voice (left hand) and one for the upper voice (right hand). This is the upper voice which is in the original voicing. Now my son and I just have to practice it a little more so we can play it together. Thanks to Mike Magatagan for doing the original keyboard transcription and posting it to MuseScore.

"Joy to the World" for String Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:582 years ago4,288 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
"Joy to the World" is a popular Christmas carol based on music by Georg Friedrich Händel. The words are by English hymn writer Isaac Watts, based on the second half of Psalm 98 in the Bible. The song was first published in 1719 in Watts' collection; The Psalms of David: Imitated in the language of the New Testament, and applied to the Christian state and worship. Watts wrote the words of "Joy to the World" as a hymn glorifying Christ's triumphant return at the end of the age, rather than a song celebrating his first coming. The nations are called to celebrate because God's faithfulness to the house of Israel has brought salvation to the world.

The music's origins are unclear. The name "Antioch" is generally used for the tune. It is often attributed to George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) on the grounds of a 'chance resemblance' to choruses in the oratorio Messiah (premiered 1742), not least because a theme of the refrain (And heaven and nature sing...) appears similar to the orchestral opening and accompaniment of the recitative Comfort ye. Likewise, the first four notes seem to match the beginning of the choruses Lift up your heads and Glory to God from the same oratorio. However, there is no autographed score by Handel and no currently known documentary evidence to suggest that Handel wrote it, so 'Antioch' remains, at best, a skillful collection of borrowings from Handel.

Other hymnals credit the tune to Lowell Mason (1792-1872), who introduced it to America (US) in 1836 as 'arranged from Handel'. But, in 1986, John Wilson showed that 'Joy to the World' was first published in two English collections, one firmly dated 1833. Being three years earlier, this is thought to exclude Lowell Mason from being the composer, but his original attribution remains a likely cause of the often-stated link to Handel.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joy_to_the_World).

I created this Interpretation for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Allegro for a Flute Clock" for Flute Trio

3 parts2 pages02:295 years ago4,274 views
Flute(3)
The events of Beethoven's life are the stuff of Romantic legend, evoking images of the solitary creator shaking his fist at Fate and finally overcoming it through a supreme effort of creative will. Born in the small German city of Bonn on or around December 16, 1770, he received his early training from his father and other local musicians. As a teenager, he earned some money as an assistant to his teacher, Christian Gottlob Neefe, then was granted half of his father's salary as court musician from the Electorate of Cologne in order to care for his two younger brothers as his father gave in to alcoholism. Beethoven played viola in various orchestras, becoming friends with other players such as Antoine Reicha, Nikolaus Simrock, and Franz Ries, and began taking on composition commissions. As a member of the court chapel orchestra, he was able to travel some and meet members of the nobility, one of whom, Count Ferdinand Waldstein, would become a great friend and patron to him. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 to study with Haydn; despite the prickliness of their relationship, Haydn's concise humor helped form Beethoven's style. His subsequent teachers in composition were Johann Georg Albrechtsberger and Antonio Salieri. In 1794, he began his career in earnest as a pianist and composer, taking advantage whenever he could of the patronage of others. Around 1800, Beethoven began to notice his gradually encroaching deafness. His growing despondency only intensified his antisocial tendencies. However, the Symphony No. 3, "Eroica," of 1803 began a sustained period of groundbreaking creative triumph. In later years, Beethoven was plagued by personal difficulties, including a series of failed romances and a nasty custody battle over a nephew, Karl. Yet after a long period of comparative compositional inactivity lasting from about 1811 to 1817, his creative imagination triumphed once again over his troubles. Beethoven's late works, especially the last five of his 16 string quartets and the last four of his 32 piano sonatas, have an ecstatic quality in which many have found a mystical significance. Beethoven died in Vienna on March 26, 1827.

These five pieces surfaced after Beethoven's death, bringing with them several very puzzling mysteries. Most challenging of them all was the instrument for which they were written. Piano, strings, harp and most other common instruments were instantly ruled out, building on the perplexing mystery and adding to the frustration. Eventually, Albert Kopfermann set forth a convincing argument that their strange scoring seemed a perfect fit for the Flötenuhr or Spielühr, a mechanical organ or clock. He observed that the notation in No. 1, in F, matched that in Mozart's K. 608 Fantasia (for Flötenuhr), the score of which Beethoven possessed. Other circumstantial factors pointed to the Flötenuhr as the instrument Beethoven designed these pieces for.

A second mystery regarding these five works is the time of their composition. It appears that Nos. 4 and 5, both in C, were written as early as 1794 or perhaps slightly later. The others were likely written in 1799-1800. No. 1, marked Adagio, features a very attractive theme, which Beethoven deftly develops. He obviously took this music very seriously, despite the unorthodox instrumentation. The Scherzo (No. 2), in G, is also well crafted, as is the delightful Minuet (No. 5).

None of these five pieces was published until the twentieth century, and, not surprisingly, all are rarely heard. This arrangement is the Allegro from No. 3 in G Major and although originally written for Mechanical Organ (or Flute Clock), I created this arrangement for Flute Trio.

"March of the Grenadier Guards" (HWV 20) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages02:145 years ago4,219 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
George Frideric Handel (1685 – 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Scipione was the eighth of the full-length operas Handel composed for the Royal Academy of Music, the London promoters of Italian opera at the King's Theatre. Even for a composer famed for the speed with which he composed, it was written in considerable haste. According to Handel's librettist, Paolo Antonio Rolli, it was composed in only three weeks, with Handel completing the score just ten days before the opening night, March 12, 1726. Handel had good reason to be in such a hurry. It had been his intention to open the season with Alessandro, composed as a showpiece to display the talents of three of the greatest singers of the day, the castrato Senesino, and the rival sopranos, Francesca Cuzzoni and Faustina Bordoni, newly engaged by the Royal Academy. When it became obvious Bordoni would not arrive in England in time, Handel, obviously feeling he needed a new opera with which to open the season, turned to Scipione.

Rolli's text, cast in the usual three acts, is based on an earlier libretto by Antonio Salvi, Publio Cornelio Scipione (1704). In keeping with many of the operas Handel composed during this period, the plot has a historical context, in this instance the capture of the Spanish port of Cartagena by the young Roman general Publius Cornelius Scipio in 209 B.C. The opera opens with the famous March that accompanies Scipio's triumphant entry into the city, but the subsequent plot is centered around his love for Berenice (soprano), a captured princess. Berenice, however is already betrothed to the prince Luceius (a role taken by Senesino in the first performances), who disguises himself as a Roman in a vain attempt to rescue her. After much misunderstanding and imbroglio, Luceius is revealed as Berenice's lover. Scipio, true to the magnanimous character of opera seria heroes, renounces his claim to Berenice. Most commentators agree that Scipione shows signs of the haste with which it was written, the Handel authority Winton Dean suggesting that, with the exception of Floridante of 1721, it is the weakest of all his Royal Academy operas. Nevertheless, it contains some fine music particularly in Act II, where the drama reaches a peak in the confrontation between Scipio and Luceius, and Berenice's avowal of constancy articulated in her aria "Scoglio d'immota fronte." The scoring is lightweight, largely being restricted to strings with a pair of flutes included in one aria and two recorders in another. Although the opera achieved a respectable initial run of 13 performances, it was revived by Handel only once, in 1730, when the composer made extensive alterations.

Although originally written for Brass, Woodwinds & Strings, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).
"Arabesque" No. 1 for Concert Harp
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"Arabesque" No. 1 for Concert Harp

1 part8 pages04:326 years ago4,183 views
The Two Arabesques (Deux arabesques), L. 66, is a pair of arabesques composed by Claude Debussy. They are two of Debussy's earliest works, composed between the years 1888 and 1891, when he was still in his twenties.

Although quite an early work, the arabesques contain hints of Debussy's developing musical style. The suite is one of the very early impressionistic pieces of music, following the French visual art form. Debussy seems to wander through modes and keys, and achieves evocative scenes through music.

The Arabesque No. 1 (Andantino con moto) is in the key of E major and begins with parallelism of triads in first inversion, a composition technique very much used by Debussy and the impressionist movement. It leads into a larger section beginning with a left hand arpeggio in E major and a descending right hand E major pentatonic progression.

The second quieter (Rubato) section is in A major, which starts with a gesture (E-D-E-C♯), briefly passes through E major, returns to A major and ends with a bold pronouncement of the E-D-E-C♯ gesture, but transposed to the key of C major, played forte.

In the last section (a recapitulation of the first section), the music moves to a higher register and descends, followed by a large pentatonic scale ascending and descending, and resolving back to E major.

The vocabulary of Debussy's music is rich in harmonic dimension. The composer uses 7ths, 9ths, 11th and more, while he intersperses whole tone progressions that are so characteristic of his writing. If density, or volume ever applied to musical performance, this piece meets all requirements for a slow entry into notes, and a swimming motion through them therefore although originally written for Piano (and variations thereof), I chose to create this arrangement for concert harp to accentuate these characteristics of the original work.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes
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"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes

3 parts4 pages02:216 years ago4,152 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Carrickfergus" is an Irish folk song, named after the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, "Do bhí bean uasal" ("There Was a Noblewoman"), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in County Clare.

The song appears on a ballad sheet in Cork City in the mid Nineteenth Century in macaronic form.

I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Concert (Pedal) or Celtic Harp.
"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes
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"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:446 years ago4,117 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Gloria in excelsis Deo" (Latin for "Glory to God in the highest") is a hymn known also as the Greater Doxology (as distinguished from the "Minor Doxology" or Gloria Patri) and the Angelic Hymn. The name is often abbreviated to Gloria in Excelsis or simply Gloria.

It is an example of the psalmi idiotici ("private psalms", i.e. compositions by individuals in imitation of the biblical Psalter) that were popular in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Other surviving examples of this lyric poetry are the Te Deum and the Phos Hilaron.

The hymn begins with the words that the angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds in Luke 2:14. Other verses were added very early, forming a doxology, which in the 4th century became part of morning prayers, and is still recited in the Byzantine Rite Orthros service.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote several settings of the Gloria. RV 589 is the most familiar and popular piece of sacred music by Vivaldi; however, he was known to have written at least three Gloria settings. Only two survive (RV 588 and RV 589) whilst the other (RV 590) is presumably lost and is only mentioned in the Kreuzherren catalogue. The two were written at about the same time (it is disputed which came first) in the early 18th century.

Although originally composed for voice and orchestra, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).