Sheet music

"Jesu Christ, mein's Lebens Licht" (BWV 118) for Winds & Strings

10 parts19 pages03:384 years ago533 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Strings(5)
Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht (O Jesus Christ, light of my life), BWV 118, is a church cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach, intended for a funeral. This work was written around 1736 or 1737 and was performed at the grave-side ceremony for Count Friedrich von Flemming on October 11, 1740.

This work, along with Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden, BWV 230 is included as a motet in the Neue Bach-Ausgabe, though both of the works fall partly outside the norms of the motet genre. "O Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht" has been characterized as "something between a cantata movement and a motetic choral transcription." The text is a 1610 hymn by Martin Behm.This work is a motet version of the chorale Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid. The lower voices of the choir sing counterpoint to the chorale melody line in the soprano. The accompaniment includes an ascending string motive.

This motet was originally scored for four-part choir. There are two versions of the instrumental scoring: one includes two litui, cornetto, three trombones, and organ; the other is two litui, strings, organ continuo, and optionally three oboes and bassoon.I created this arrangement for Winds (Bb Cornet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & French Horn) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Prelude: "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (BWV 727) for Pipe Organ

4 parts2 pages02:042 years ago531 views
Recorder, Other Woodwinds, Organ, English Horn
As organist at Weimar, Johann Sebastian Bach was charged with providing a harmonic underpinning for the singing of Lutheran chorale tunes chosen for each day. Bach wrote out many of these harmonizations, in part as instruction for younger composers (they are still used for this purpose). A derivation of this practice, Bach's conception of the organ chorale, as manifested in the chorale preludes, dates from 1713 -1714, about the time he became familiar with Vivaldi's concertos.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) contains chorale preludes for the church year written during the composer's service at Weimar (1708 - 1717). In about 1713, Bach began assembling the Orgel-Büchlein, and his earliest entries seem to be Her Christ, der ein'ge Gottes-Sohn, BWV 601, In dulci jubilo, BWV 608, Christ ist erstanden, BWV 627, and Heut' triumphieret Gottes Sohn, BWV 630. These were very original compositions, highly expressive miniatures based on a chorale melody, supported with refined counterpoint, and featuring highly condensed motivic writing.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein was essentially complete by 1716. Only the fragment O Traurigkeit and the chorale prelude, Helft mir Gottes Güte preisen, BWV 613, were added later. "Complete" is used with some reservation here, because Bach originally projected 164 pieces but completed fewer than 50. In Bach's manuscript, pages with finished pieces alternate with blank ones intended for other chorale preludes. The later pieces differ from Bach's earlier chorale elaborations, in that they contain only one statement of the melody and are intended to demonstrate how to accompany a chorale with contrapuntally proper figurations that support the meaning of the text.

In the early 1740s Bach assembled a number of chorale preludes, possibly with the intention of publishing them as a set. These Achtzehn Choräle (Eighteen Chorales) BWV 651 - 668 were almost certainly written before 1723 and revised later. The Fantasia super Komm, heiliger Geist, BWV 651 is an especially impressive, extended elaboration of the chorale melody, which is in the pedal. The tune is treated in a less ornate fashion in the next prelude of the set (BWV 652). The highly convoluted Von Gott will ich nicht lassen, BWV 658 also contains the chorale melody in the pedal.

The six Schübler chorales (BWV 645 - 650) are derived from Bach's cantatas and contain one of his most popular chorale preludes, on the melody Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, BWV 645.

The third part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, published in Leipzig in 1739, contains 21 chorale preludes (not all appear in every publication), many of which are for manuals only. Nine of these are meant for use during the Mass, while the others are for the catechism. Among the most impressive is Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, BWV 671, which is in five voices with the chorale melody in the pedal. More complex is the first of two preludes on Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 686, which is in six parts, including two pedal parts.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/herzlich-tut-mich-verlangen-chorale-prelude-for-organ-bwv-727-bc-k109-mc0002372335).

I created this Transcription of the Chorale Prelude (BWV 727) "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (I yearn from my heart) for Pipe Organ.
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Aria: "Ach, wo hol ich Armer Rat" (BWV 25 No 3) for Viola & Cello

2 parts2 pages02:353 years ago531 views
Viola, Cello
Es ist nichts Gesundes an meinem Leibe (There is nothing sound in my body), BWV 25,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the 14th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 29 August 1723.

Similar to Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben, BWV 77, composed a week before, Bach creates the opening chorus as a chorale fantasia on a complete instrumental quotation of a chorale tune. The melody is known as "Herzlich tut mich verlangen nach meinem selgen End". But probably Bach had in mind the words of "Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder" which he used later in his chorale cantata Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder, BWV 135, a paraphrase of Psalm 6 which begins in stanza 2 "Heil du mich, lieber Herre, denn ich bin krank und schwach" (Heal me, dear Lord, because I am sick and weak). In a complex structure, Bach combines an instrumental introduction with the chorale tune in long notes in the continuo with figuration of strings and oboes, a choral double fugue, and the presentation of the choral by a choir of trombones with the cornetto as the soprano instrument, reinforced by three recorders which play an octave higher. John Eliot Gardiner regards the unusual use of the trombones, playing the chorale tune independent of the voices, as an "anticipation of the finale to Beethoven's Fifth Symphony".

The following three movements are all only accompanied by the continuo. A new perspective is opened in movement 5 in dance music for a concerto of strings and oboes, echoed by the recorders. The music relates to the text "im höhern Chor werde mit den Engeln singen" (in the exalted choir I shall sing with the angels). The closing chorale is set for four parts.

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, and a colourful orchestra of cornetto, three trombones, three recorders, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Es_ist_nichts_Gesundes_an_meinem_Leibe,_BWV_25).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "Ach, wo hol ich Armer Rat?" (Ah, from where shall I, wretch, receive counsel?) for Viola & Cello.

"Tant Que Vivray" for Clarinet Quartet

4 parts1 page01:515 years ago534 views
Claudin de Sermisy (c. 1490 - October 13, 1562) was a French composer of the Renaissance. Along with Clément Janequin he was one of the most renowned composers of French chansons in the early 16th century; in addition he was a significant composer of sacred music. His music was both influential on, and influenced by, contemporary Italian styles.

Tant Que Vivray i based on a poem by Clément Marot and was was published as one of about 175 chansons in "Chansons Nouvelles" in 1527 in Ballard, Paris.


Although originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for B♭ Clarinet Quartet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Prélude & Fugue" No. 3 in Eb Major (Opus 99) for Harp

1 part11 pages07:346 years ago528 views
Harp
Paris-born Charles Camille Saint-Saëns was a child prodigy, composing his first piece for piano at the age of three. He was a private student of Gounod and entered the Paris Conservatory at age 13. Saint-Saëns had total recall; any book he read or tune he heard was forever committed to his memory.

The Trois Préludes et Fugues, Op 99 were written in 1894 and are Saint-Saëns' first significant organ pieces for nearly thirty years. Dedicated to Widor, Guilmant and Gigout respectively. They combine characterful preludes with well-worked fugues which Saint-Saëns expressed some hesitation in writing. He was clearly satisfied with the results however as he included them in his 1899 recital in front of the academics at Trinity College, Cambridge. Preludes Nos 1 and 2 are both gentle and graceful.

Although originally created for Organ, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp to highlight the light and airy arpeggios of the prelude as well as the delicate interplay between the voices in the fugue.

Allemande from the French Suite No. 1 in D Minor (BWV 812 No. 1) for String Trio

3 parts2 pages03:162 years ago528 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
The French Suites, BWV 812–817, are six suites which Johann Sebastian Bach wrote for the clavier (harpsichord or clavichord) between the years of 1722 and 1725. Although Suites 1–4 are typically dated to 1722, it is possible that the first was written somewhat earlier.

The suites were later given the name 'French' (first recorded usage by Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg in 1762). Likewise, the English Suites received a later appellation. The name was popularised by Bach's biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel, who wrote in his 1802 biography of Bach, "One usually calls them French Suites because they are written in the French manner." This claim, however, is inaccurate: like Bach's other suites, they follow a largely Italian convention. There is no surviving definitive manuscript of these suites, and ornamentation varies both in type and in degree across manuscripts. The Courantes of the first (in D minor) and third (in B minor) suites are in the French style, the Courantes of the other four suites are all in the Italian style. In any case Bach also employed dance movements (such as the Polonaise of the Sixth suite) that are foreign to the French manner. Usually, the swift second movement after the Allemande is named either Courante (French style) or Corrente (Italian style), but in all these suites the second movements are named Courante, according to the Bach catalog listing, which supports the suggestion that these suites are "French". Some of the manuscripts that have come down to us are titled "Suites Pour Le Clavecin", which is what probably led to the tradition of calling them "French" Suites.

Two additional suites, one in A minor (BWV 818), the other in E-flat Major (BWV 819), are linked to the familiar six in some manuscripts. The Overture in the French style, BWV 831, which Bach published as the second part of Clavier-Übung, is a suite in the French style but not connected to the French suites. Some manuscripts have movements not found in other copies, which are probably spurious.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Suites_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Allemande from the French Suite No. 1 in D Minor (BWV 812 No. 1) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"Oh Salutaris Hostia" for Oboes & Piano

3 parts3 pages02:485 years ago528 views
Jan Antonín Koželuh (1738 -- 1814) was a renowned Bohemian composer from Velvary. He was a pupil of Josef Seger. He studied in Vienna and was a concert master in St. Vitus Cathedral for thirty years; his work includes both church and concert works. As one of the most respected Czech authors of his time, he also composed serious Italian opera: Allesandro nell' Indie was performed in 1769 and Demofoonte in 1772. He was the organist at the Strahov Monastery for almost forty years.

O salutaris Hostia (Latin, "O Saving Host"), is a section of one of the Eucharistic hymns written by St Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi. He wrote it for the Hour of Lauds in the Divine Office. It is actually the last two stanzas of the hymn Verbum supernum prodiens, and is used for the Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. The other two hymns written by Aquinas for the Feast contain the famous sections Panis angelicus and Tantum ergo.

Although this work was written for Chorus (SATB) and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Oboe Duet and Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Alleluia" Harp Duet

2 parts6 pages01:456 years ago528 views
"Alleluia" is a traditional 19th century melody of unknown origin that I have arranged for 2 Harps.

In the Roman Rite, the word "Alleluia" is associated with joy and is especially favoured in Paschal time, the time between Easter and Pentecost, perhaps because of the association of the Hallel (Alleluia psalms) chanted at Passover. During this time, the word is added widely to verses and responses associated with prayers, to antiphons of psalms, and, during the Octave of Easter and on Pentecost Sunday, to the dismissal at the end of Mass ("Ite missa est").

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Auf ihn magst du es wagen" (BWV 107 No 3) for Cello & Strings

5 parts6 pages04:194 years ago527 views
Cello, Strings(4)
Was willst du dich betrüben (Why do you want to distress yourself), BWV 107,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the seventh Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 23 July 1724. The chorale cantata is based on the unchanged words of Johann Heermann's hymn in seven stanzas "Was willst du dich betrüben" (1630).

The cantata is based on Johann Heermann's hymn in seven stanzas, "Was willst du dich betrüben" (1630), which is focused on trust in God, even when facing adversaries including the devil. Trust in God is also a theme of the Gospel. Unusual for a chorale cantata of the second cycle is the fact that the text is not changed in the middle movements, but kept "per omnes versus" (for all stanzas). The middle movements are, however, composed as a recitative and four arias. The treatment was decidedly old-fashioned in Bach's time. He had used it once much earlier in Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4 (1707), and then again later, as in Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott, BWV 129 (1726), though it was not repeated during the second cycle.

The chorales in Heermann's 1630 publication Devoti musica cordis (Music of a devoted heart), which also included "Herzliebster Jesu, was hast du verbrochen", the first chorale in Bach's St Matthew Passion, have been described as "the first in which the correct and elegant versification of Opitz was applied to religious subjects, … distinguished by great depth and tenderness of feeling, by an intense love of the Saviour, and earnest but not self-conscious humility".

The opening chorus is a chorale fantasia, the vocal part embedded in an independent concerto of the instruments. The cantus firmus on the melody of "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen" is in long notes, partly embellished, in the soprano and horn; the lower voices are mostly set in homophony. The lines of the chorale are not rendered separately, but accenting the bar form (Stollen–Stollen–Abgesang) of the text, 1 and 2 are combined, 3 and 4 are combined, 5 is single and 6 to 8 are combined. The scoring is rich in woodwinds.

The only recitative is accompanied by the oboes d'amore, shows an extended melisma on the word "Freuden" (joy) and culminates in an arioso in the final line, with a melisma on "retten" (rescue). The following four stanzas are composed as arias, not as the typical da capo arias, but mostly in two parts, due to the bar form of the poetry. Bach achieves variation by changing voice type, key and time signature. He also varies the mode, alternating major and minor keys, expresses different Affekts, and he successfully "blurs" the bar form of the stanzas.

The first aria depicts a "hunting scene" for bass and strings. Bach plays on the double meaning of the German word "erjagen", which in the text has the sense "achieve by great exertion", but he expresses the word's literal meaning ("to hunt") by an "outrageous hunting call trill" of the bass. The second aria for tenor and continuo begins with strong words on Satan as an enemy: "Wenn auch gleich aus der Höllen / der Satan wollte sich / dir selbst entgegenstellen / und toben wider dich" ("Even if, out of hell, Satan wishes to set himself against you, and vent his rage on you"). The music is termed by Gardiner "a vivid pen-portrait of Satan and his wiles, delivered with typically Lutheran relish". The rhythm alternates between 6/8 and 3/4 one measure to the next, but the change is irregular and unpredictable. The bass line (marked "organo e continuo") is "extravagantly animated and angular. Albert Schweitzer likens it to the contortions of a huge dragon".

The third aria for soprano and the two oboes d'amore begins with an embellished version of the chorale tune, and the last line quotes the tune exactly on the words "was Gott will, das geschicht" ("What God wants, that happens"). The fourth aria is scored for tenor, the flutes in unison and muted violin.

The closing chorale is set in four parts for the voices, but embedded in a rich orchestral Siciliano concerto. The lines of the chorale are grouped as in the first stanza, again highlighting line 5, "O Vater, Sohn und Geist" ("Oh Father, Son and Spirit") as a miniature doxology.

The cantata in seven movements is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, corno da caccia, two flauti traversi, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Was_willst_du_dich_betr%C3%BCben,_BWV_107).

I created this arrangement of the opening Aria: "Auf ihn magst du es wagen" (In Him you can dare all) for Solo Cello & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"But Thanks be to God" (HWV 56 Nos. 50-51) for Winds & Strings

9 parts12 pages03:314 years ago527 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

From the gentle falling melody assigned to the opening words ("Comfort ye") to the sheer ebullience of the "Hallelujah" chorus and the ornate celebratory counterpoint that supports the closing "Amen", hardly a line of text goes by that Handel does not amplify".

"O death, where is thy sting?" is sung as a duet in E flat major of alto and tenor on a walking bass of the continuo, without strings. The movement is based on the duet for soprano and alto "Se tu non lasci amore" (HWV 193, 1722). Such a movement would remind the London listeners of love duets concluding operas, such as the final scene of "Giulio Cesare." The chorus answers in the same key and tempo "But thanks be to God".

Although originally written for Vocal soloists (2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass), Chorus, Orchestra and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Doch Jesus will auch bei der Strafe" (BWV 46 No 5) for Flute Quartet

4 parts6 pages03:433 years ago527 views
Flute(4)
Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein Schmerz sei (Behold and see, if there be any sorrow), BWV 46, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the tenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 1 August 1723.

The cantata is part of Bach's first annual cycle of cantatas, which he began when he took up office as Thomaskantor in May 1723. The topic is based on the prescribed reading from the gospel of Luke, Jesus announcing the destruction of Jerusalem and cleansing of the Temple. The librettist is unknown. The cantata is structured in six movements: two choral movements frame a sequence of alternating recitatives and arias. The opening movement is based on a verse from the Book of Lamentations, a lament of the destructed Jerusalem, related to the announcement from the gospel. The text moves from reflecting God's wrath in the past to the situation of the contemporary Christian. The closing chorale, a stanza from Johann Matthäus Meyfart's hymn "O großer Gott von Macht", is a prayer culminating in the thought "do not repay us according to our sins".

The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, a slide trumpet, two recorders, two oboes da caccia, strings and basso continuo.[2] This is an unusually rich instrumentation for an ordinary Sunday. Bach created in the opening chorus an unusual "uncompromising" fugue for up to nine parts. The bass aria with an obbligato trumpet, depicting God's wrath compared to a thunderstorm, has been regarded as "more frightening" than any contemporary operatic 'rage' arias. The closing chorale is not the usual simple four-part setting, but includes instrumental interludes reminiscent of motifs used before.

Bach used music of the first section of the opening chorus for Qui tollis peccata mundi of his Mass in B minor. He made considerable changes when he adapted the lamenting music to depict the Lamb of God carrying the sins of the world.

As with other cantatas Bach composed in his first years in Leipzig, we do not know the identity of the librettist. It is the third in a group of ten cantatas following the same structure of biblical text (in this case from the Old Testament) – recitative – aria – recitative – aria – chorale. The ten cantatas were dedicated to the 8th to 14th and 21st to 22nd Sunday after Trinity and the second Sunday after Easter.

The words for the first movement are taken from the Book of Lamentations (Lamentations 1:12), a lament about the historic destruction of Jerusalem. The text, suitable in connection with the announcement by Jesus, is among the prescribed readings for Good Friday and has been set to music often. The text for the inner movements 2 to 5 were written by the unknown poet, who dedicated a pair of recitative and aria to the memory of the historic event, another pair to the warning that the contemporary Christian is threatened in a similar way. The final chorale is the ninth stanza of "O großer Gott von Macht" by Johann Matthäus Meyfart.

The cantata is structured in six movements and scored for three vocal soloists (alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir (SATB), a slide trumpet (Zugtrompete, Tr), mostly doubling the choir soprano, two recorders (Fl), two oboes da caccia (Oc), two violins (Vl), viola (Va) and basso continuo (Bc). This is an unusually rich instrumentation for an ordinary Sunday.[6] The title on the original parts reads: "10 post Trinit: / Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein etc. / a / 4 Voci / 1 Tromba / 2 Flauti / 2 Hautb: da Caccia / 2 Violini / Viola / con / Continuo / di Sign: / J.S.Bach".

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schauet_doch_und_sehet,_ob_irgend_ein_Schmerz_sei,_BWV_46).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Doch Jesus will auch bei der Strafe" (Yet Jesus will, even in punishment) for Flute Quartet (2 Flutes, Alto Flute & Bass Flute).

"Litany to the Blessed Virgin Mary" for Wind & Strings

9 parts47 pages13:255 years ago527 views
Anton Cajetan Adlgasser (1729 -- 1777) was a German organist and composer at Salzburg Cathedral and at court, and composed a good deal of liturgical music (including eight masses and two requiems) as well as oratorios and orchestral and keyboard works.

Born in Inzell, Bavaria, he moved to Salzburg, where he studied under Johann Ernst Eberlin. From 1750 he was organist at the Salzburg Cathedral, where he remained the rest of his life. After a visit to Italy in 1764-5 he set Metastasio's La Nitteti (his only opera) performed in Salzburg (1767), and in 1767 he collaborated with Mozart and Michael Haydn on the oratorio Die Schuldigkeit des ersten Gebots. Mozart, who had a high regard for Adlgasser's music, succeeded him as Organist at Salzburg Cathedral in 1777. Adlgasser's first marriage, in 1752, was to Maria Josepha, the daughter of his predecessor, J.E. Eberlin, at Salzburg Cathedral. Four years later he married Maria Barbara Schwab, and in 1769 the court singer Maria Anna Fesemayer (1743--82), who sang in Die Schuldigkeit and created the role of Ninetta in La finta semplice. Leopold Mozart stood witness to the third wedding.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and String Quartet (Violins (2), Viola & Cello).

Sonata V (Opus 2 No 5 WB 47) for Viola & Piano

2 parts10 pages09:423 years ago526 views
Viola, Piano
Johann Christian Bach (1735 -- 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh child and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is sometimes referred to as "the London Bach" or "the English Bach", due to his time spent living in the British capital, where he came to be known as John Bach. He is noted for influencing the concerto style of Mozart.

Johann Christian Bach was born to Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena Bach in Leipzig, Germany. His distinguished father was already 50 at the time of his birth, which would perhaps contribute to the sharp differences between his music and that of his father. Even so, his father first instructed him in music and that instruction continued until his death. After his father's death, when Johann Christian was 15, he worked with his second-oldest half brother Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, who was twenty-one years his senior and considered at the time to be the most musically gifted of Bach's sons.

He enjoyed a promising career, first as a composer then as a performer playing alongside Carl Friedrich Abel, the notable player of the viola da gamba. He composed cantatas, chamber music, keyboard and orchestral works, operas and symphonies.

Johann Christian Bach's father died when Johann Christian was only fifteen. This is perhaps one reason why it is difficult to find points of similarity between the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and that of Johann Christian. By contrast, the piano sonatas of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Johann Christian's much older half brother, tend to invoke certain elements of his father at times, especially with regard to the use of counterpoint. (C.P.E. was 36 at the time J.S. died.)

Johann Christian's highly melodic style differentiates his works from those of his family. He composed in the Galante style incorporating balanced phrases, emphasis on melody and accompaniment, without too much contrapuntal complexity. The Galante movement opposed the intricate lines of Baroque music, and instead placed importance on fluid melodies in periodic phrases. It preceded the classical style, which fused the Galante aesthetics with a renewed interest in counterpoint.

Although originally written for Violin and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Viola & Piano.

Chorus: "Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort" (BWV 126 No 1) for Flute & Strings

5 parts6 pages03:013 years ago526 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort (Uphold us, Lord, within thy word), BWV 126, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the chorale cantata in his second year in Leipzig for Sexagesimae and first performed it on 4 February 1725. This means that it was performed only two days after the cantata Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin, BWV 125, for the Purification of Mary on 2 February.

A characteristic feature of the opening chorus is a four-note trumpet signal, which is derived from the beginning of the chorale melody, as if to repeat the words "Erhalt uns, Herr" (Uphold us, Lord) again and again. The motif consists of the three notes of the A minor chord in the sequence A C A E, with the higher notes on the stressed syllables, the highest one on "Herr". The cantus firmus of the chorale is sung by the soprano, the other voices sing in imitation, embedded in an independent concerto of the orchestra.

The first aria is a prayer, intensified by two oboes. In the middle section the words "erfreuen" (delight) and "zerstreuen" (scatter) are illustrated by fast runs in the tenor. The second aria, movement 4, is dramatic, especially in the restless continuo. John Eliot Gardiner quotes W. G. Whittaker: Bach’s "righteous indignation at the enemies of his faith was never expressed more fiercely than in this aria". Movement 3 presents the recitative in the alternating voices alto and tenor, but the ornamented chorale as a duet. The chorale melody switches also, given to the voice which enters, whereas the other one continues its recitative by accompanying material. Movement 6 combines the two stanzas from different chorales in a four-part setting.

The cantata i six movemets is scored for alto, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, trumpet, two oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erhalt_uns,_Herr,_bei_deinem_Wort,_BWV_126).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus "Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort" (Sustain us, Lord with your word) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal" (BWV 146 No 2) for Winds & Strings

9 parts15 pages03:324 years ago525 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal (We must [pass] through great sadness), BWV 146, is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the third Sunday after Easter. Bach composed it in Leipzig in 1726 or 1728.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the third Sunday after Easter, called Jubilate. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle of Peter, "Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man" (1 Peter 2:11–20), and from the Gospel of John, Jesus announcing his second coming in a Farewell discourse (John 16:16–23). Bach contrasted sorrow and joy in earlier cantatas for the same occasion, first in Weimar in 1714, Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12, then in Leipzig in 1725, Ihr werdet weinen und heulen, BWV 103. The unknown poet chose a quote from Acts 14:22 to begin the cantata, "We must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God", which Salomon Franck had already used for the first recitative of "Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen". The three following movements deplore the sufferings in the world, whereas three more movements depict the joyful hope for a better life in the Kingdom of God. The theme throughout his texts is a longing for death. Movement 5 is a paraphrase of Psalms 126:5–20, which Brahms also chose for his Requiem, "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy". Movement 6 refers to Romans 8:18, "For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us". Only the music but not the words of the closing chorale is extant. The ninth stanza of Gregorius Richter's hymn "Lasset ab von euren Tränen" has been suggested by Alfred Dürr as a possible text for this closing chorale. Klaus Hofmann suggested "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele" by Christoph Demantius.

Two movements of the cantata, the Sinfonia and the first movement, are related to Bach's Harpsichord Concerto in D minor, BWV 1052, which was possibly derived from a lost violin concerto. The original music for the cantata is also lost, but scholars are convinced that it is a work of Bach. He used an instrumental concerto in a similar way for movements of his cantatas Gott soll allein mein Herze haben, BWV 169 and Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49, where his authorship is beyond doubt.

Bach reworked the first movement of the harpsichord concerto to an organ concerto, expanding the strings by woodwind instruments. He changed the second movement to a choral movement by embedding vocal parts in the music, but this time without additional woodwinds. The opening chorus is superimposed onto the deeply moving slow movement of the concerto, the anguish of the repeated (ostinato) bass line ideally underlining a text concerned with the tribulation that must be endured before the kingdom of heaven is attained.

The original thirteen-bar throbbing ritornello theme is retained but its function has changed. The voices soar above it from the very first bar and continue to enhance it throughout its six appearances in different tonal environments. The ritornello theme has virtually become a free "ground bass" throughout. The tortuous melodic line, the main focus of attention in the concerto setting, has now become an obbligato melody of secondary significance. It is played by the organ, the first time Bach has used the instrument in this way in a chorus. The choir rises magnificently above everything else establishing itself as the dominant musical force, even appearing to disregard the phrasing of the original composition. All that was of primary importance in the concerto is now secondary to the chorus and its message. This momentous adagio, seemingly complete in its version for strings and harpsichord, has taken on a whole new dimension of musical meaning.

Filled with lamenting in the spirit of the Passion, the movement gains its intensity from the dense and dissonant harmonic expressiveness, and incorporates ostinato phrases whose regular appearances seem to illustrate inevitability.

The third movement is an alto aria with violin obbligato, which transcends "dem Himmel zu" (towards Heaven). The following recitative, a lament on the persecution in the world, is accompanied by long chords of the strings. Movement 5 illustrates in two sections the opposition of sowing with tears and reaping with joy, accompanied by a flute and two oboes d'amore. Movement 7 is probably derived from a secular dance-like movement in da capo form. A ritornello frames the first section, continuo only accompanies the middle section. The final chorale is set for four parts on the melody Werde munter, mein Gemüte.

Although the cantata was scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, flauto traverso, two oboes d'amore, taille (tenor oboe), organ, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Hark! How the Songsters of the Grove" for Harp and Woodwinds

3 parts5 pages01:416 years ago524 views
The flute (recorder) has long been used to imitate birds in music, as many of the references to Purcell and Handel and their contemporaries demonstrate. Lines like "Hark how the songsters of the air", "Hark how the lark and linnet sing", "Hark! how the songsters of the grove", "Hush ye pretty warbling quire" say it all.

Henry Purcell's "Timon of Athens" (1694) calls for "a Symphony of Pipes [ie alto recorders] imitating the Chirping of Birds".

Although originally written for Chorus and Recorders, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwinds (2 Flutes & 2 Oboes) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorale: "Lob, Ehr und Dank sei dir gesagt" (BWV 121 No 6) for Brass Quartet

4 parts1 page02:103 years ago525 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
Christum wir sollen loben schon (We should already be praising Christ), BWV 121, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed this Christmas cantata in Leipzig in 1724 for the second day of Christmas and first performed it on 26 December 1724. The chorale cantata is based on the hymn by Martin Luther, and the librettist is unknown.

The source for the melody is Martin Luther's setting of the hymn "Christum wir sollen loben schon", a German translation of the Latin "A solis ortus cardine" (c. 430). The opening chorus is its first verse and the closing chorale is its eighth verse, both unchanged. The hymn's other verses are freely adapted as madrigalian recitatives and arias.


The opening choral motet is built on a quasi-church mode cantus firmus in the soprano, with an archaic effect underscored by a full four-part brass accompaniment. The instruments, other than the continuo, largely double the vocal lines; these and the continuo assume a contrapuntal role. Bach uses fugal techniques and an extended final cadence. It begins in E minor and, unusually, closes a tone higher in F-sharp minor.

The tenor aria is composed as a modern da capo aria, in which the symmetrical scheme is broken up by irregular periodising and harmonization. It includes a very prominent oboe d'amore part. The movement is largely in B minor. Craig Smith remarks that the aria is "marvelously off-kilter".

The third movement is an alto recitative. It ends with a "startling enharmonic progression – a symbolic transformation" to C major.

The bass aria is almost dance-like, playing with the harmony and portraying jumps, reflecting the movement's text's references to John the Baptist's jumping in his mother's womb during the Visitation of Mary. The binary-form string ritornello repeats four times during the aria, framing three separate vocal sections of the da capo aria.

The penultimate movement is a soprano recitative, short and arioso-like. It is remarkable for its extended range.

The closing chorale movement presents the doxology in a four-part setting, illuminating the early-church melody in a modern major-minor tonality. Unusually, the piece ends on a B minor imperfect cadence.

The piece is scored for alto, tenor and bass vocal soloists with four-part choir. The instrumental parts are cornett, three trombones, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christum_wir_sollen_loben_schon,_BWV_121).


I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "Lob, Ehr und Dank sei dir gesagt" (Praise, honor, and thanks be said to You) for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Euphonium).

Prelude & Fugue on the name "B-A-C-H" (BWV 898) for Pipe Organ

1 part7 pages05:19a year ago526 views
Organ
Johann Sebastian Bach was a member of a family that had for generations been occupied in music. His sons were to continue the tradition, providing the foundation of a new style of music that prevailed in the later part of the eighteenth century. Johann Sebastian Bach himself represented the end of an age, the culmination of the Baroque in a magnificent synthesis of Italian melodic invention, French rhythmic dance forms and German contrapuntal mastery.

Born in Eisenach in 1685, Bach was educated largely by his eldest brother, after the early death of his parents. At the age of eighteen he embarked on his career as a musician, serving first as a court musician at Weimar, before appointment as organist at Arnstadt. Four years later he moved to Mühlhausen as organist and the following year became organist and chamber musician to Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar. Securing his release with difficulty, in 1717 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and remained at Cöthen until 1723, when he moved to Leipzig as Cantor at the School of St.Thomas, with responsibility for the music of the five principal city churches. Bach was to remain in Leipzig until his death in 1750.

The Prelude & Fugue on the name B-A-C-H (BWV 898) is not considered to be the work of Bach. Only a single manuscript copy from the second half of the 18th century exists. All other copies and printed music of it come from the 19th century. The NBA KB discusses the differences between all the different sources: In order to avoid the appearance of supporting this work as genuinely by J. S. Bach (there are no exterior or interior reasons supporting this contention), it was placed this time in this reissue in the appendix, so that the purchasers of this volume would not have to do without finding this work which they may have come to love. The critical voice regarding this composition is very likely that of Johann Nikolaus Forkel who, in 1810, wrote to the Leipzig publishing firm Hoffmeister und Kühnel, that was preparing to publish Bach’s keyboard works: The Fugue on Bach’s Name which you have sent to me for consideration is definitely not a work by J. S. Bach. You should not dishonor a collection of his works with such a common, schoolmasterly effort.

In the same letter Forkel mentions that he has already received at least 20 such fugues on B-A-C-H that have been described as ‘great musical rarities’. In contrast to Forkel and Griepenkerl, Philipp Spitta is the only Bach expert who thought that he saw indications that this might have been a youthful work from the early Weimar period. All other experts since Spitta’s time have brought forth various arguments against Bach’s authorship. One might have to agree with Griepenkerl that externally the provenance of the sources for this work are highly questionable. Internally (stylistically) the only characteristics that might point into the direction of J. S. Bach are the use of the French ouverture in the Präludium and the virtuosic insertion at the end of the fugue, but the latter was commonplace among many masters of the North German style. Frieder Rempp suspects that the almost too frequent use of parallel thirds and sequential structures might be closer to the style exhibited in the A minor Fugue BWV 897/2. This along with the idiosyncratic final statement of the fugal subject in octaves would point more in the direction of Johann Christoph Kellner (1736-1803) as the possible composer of BWV 898.

Source: Frieder Rempp (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Arran/BWV898.pdf).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Transcription of the Prelude & Fugue on the name B-A-C-H (BWV 898) for Pipe Organ.

Sonata III (Opus 2 No 3) for Flute & Harp

2 parts10 pages11:125 years ago525 views
Johann Christian Bach (1735 -- 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh child and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is sometimes referred to as "the London Bach" or "the English Bach", due to his time spent living in the British capital, where he came to be known as John Bach. He is noted for influencing the concerto style of Mozart.

Johann Christian Bach was born to Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena Bach in Leipzig, Germany. His distinguished father was already 50 at the time of his birth, which would perhaps contribute to the sharp differences between his music and that of his father. Even so, his father first instructed him in music and that instruction continued until his death. After his father's death, when Johann Christian was 15, he worked with his second-oldest half brother Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, who was twenty-one years his senior and considered at the time to be the most musically gifted of Bach's sons.

He enjoyed a promising career, first as a composer then as a performer playing alongside Carl Friedrich Abel, the notable player of the viola da gamba. He composed cantatas, chamber music, keyboard and orchestral works, operas and symphonies.

Johann Christian Bach's father died when Johann Christian was only fifteen. This is perhaps one reason why it is difficult to find points of similarity between the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and that of Johann Christian. By contrast, the piano sonatas of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Johann Christian's much older half brother, tend to invoke certain elements of his father at times, especially with regard to the use of counterpoint. (C.P.E. was 36 at the time J.S. died.)

Johann Christian's highly melodic style differentiates his works from those of his family. He composed in the Galante style incorporating balanced phrases, emphasis on melody and accompaniment, without too much contrapuntal complexity. The Galante movement opposed the intricate lines of Baroque music, and instead placed importance on fluid melodies in periodic phrases. It preceded the classical style, which fused the Galante aesthetics with a renewed interest in counterpoint.

Although originally written for Violin and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Viola Sonata (Opus 1 No 7) for Viola & Strings

5 parts10 pages06:593 years ago523 views
Viola(2), Violin(2), Cello
Charles John Stanley (1712 -- 1786) was an English composer and organist.

Blinded at age 2, John Stanley began desultory music lessons when he was 7 and, after a false start, progressed so quickly that he was made organist at a nearby church when he was only 12. Stanley would grow up to become the leading English organist of his day and a major figure in London's musical scene, not only as an instrumentalist but also as a composer in the Handel style.

Stanley rose quickly in the English organ world; already a veteran of the loft at age 22, he was made organist to the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple in 1734. His performances of his own organ voluntaries there and at other churches drew large audiences more curious about the music than the liturgy. He had academic credentials, too; in 1729 he had become the youngest person ever to have received a bachelor's of music degree from Oxford.

Stanley married well in 1738; not only did his wife bring a substantial dowry, but she brought a sister who would eventually work as Stanley's amanuensis. Stanley would write a fair amount of his own music, but he supported himself mainly as a performer. He conducted several Handel oratorios during the final decade of that composer's life, and succeeded Handel in 1759 as co-director of the Lenten oratorio season at Covent Garden (oratorios replaced operas during Lent). Stanley provided a couple of his own oratorios for this series, but they were too imitative of the dead Handel to achieve much success. Among his other appointments and honors was succeeding William Boyce as Master of the King's Band of Musicians in 1779, which led him to compose more than a dozen birthday and New Year odes for official ceremonies.

In his compositional style, Stanley was a transitional figure between Handel and J.C. Bach; the change can be seen by comparing Stanley's Opus 2 concertos, which very much followed the Handel/Corelli model, to his more elegant, less fugal, pre-Classical Opus 10 concertos of some three decades later. His organ voluntaries, on the other hand, all composed fairly early in his career, are clearly creatures of the English Baroque era, hewing to standard formats and requiring instruments of only modest resources.

Although this piece was originally written for Flute (Recorder) and continuo, I created this arrangement for Solo Viola and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).