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Chorus: "Auf meinen lieben Gott" (BWV 188 No 6) for Clarinet Quartet
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Chorus: "Auf meinen lieben Gott" (BWV 188 No 6) for Clarinet Quartet

4 parts1 page01:014 years ago490 views
Ich habe meine Zuversicht (I have placed my confidence), BWV 188, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the solo cantata in Leipzig for the 21st Sunday after Trinity and probably first performed it on 17 October 1728.

Bach composed this cantata for the 21st Sunday after Trinity. However, the score was "cut to pieces and sold to private individuals" in the 1800s; the work as it now exists is a reconstruction. The prescribed readings for the day were Ephesians 6:10--17, and John 4:46--54 . The text for movements 2 to 5 was written by Picander. The sixth movement is an anonymous chorale written before 1603.

The opening sinfonia derives from Bach's keyboard concerto in D minor, BWV 1052. The tenor aria has been compared to movements from both the French Suite and the Fifth English Suite. It opens with a string ritornello doubled by oboe; the two parts move into counterpoint after the tenor enters. Formally, the movement has an extended two-part A section before moving to a B section remarkable for its emphasis on instrumental arpeggiation. The bass recitative is secco and concludes with a pastoral arioso. The alto aria is "dark and dramatic", in E minor with cello and organ obbligato. The organ line is complex, contributing to a movement that is "a complex and ever-changing kaleidoscope of richly entwined rhythms and melodies". The soprano recitative is short and accompanied by chordal strings. The final movement is a four-part setting of the chorale tune, doubled by oboe, taille, and strings.

Although originally composed for four solo voices (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, taille, two violins, viola, organ, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Clarinet Quartet (3 Bb Clarinets & Bass Clarinet) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) and using the Clarinet soundfont from SoundFont Downloads at (http://www.soundfontdownloads.com).

Concerto in B Minor (BWV 979) for Piano

1 part17 pages12:53a year ago492 views
Piano
The concerto transcriptions of Johann Sebastian Bach date from his second period at the court in Weimar (1708–1717). Bach transcribed for organ and harpsichord a number of Italian and Italianate concertos, mainly by Antonio Vivaldi, but with others by Alessandro Marcello, Benedetto Marcello, Georg Philipp Telemann and the musically talented Prince Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar. It is thought that most of the transcriptions were probably made in 1713–1714. Their publication by C.F. Peters in the 1850s and by Breitkopf & Härtel in the 1890s played a decisive role in the Vivaldi revival of the twentieth century.

Bach's transcription BWV 979 was long considered as being after a Violin Concerto in D minor Giuseppe Torelli, but a more trustworthy source ascribes the original to Antonio Vivaldi (RV Anh. 10). Indeed, this exciting piece is much more typical of Vivaldi, and is clearly an early work, written in the freely-flowing, 'fantastic' concerto manner closely related to the style of Vivaldi's L'Estro Armonico from 1711, with which Bach was also familiar. The transcription for the harpsichord has been carried out with great flair.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concerto_transcriptions_for_organ_and_harpsichord_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Transcription of the Concerto in B Minor (BWV 979) for Piano.
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Aria: "Wie jammern mich doch die verkehrten Herzen" (BWV 170 No 3) for Clarinet Quartet

4 parts10 pages09:474 years ago490 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn
Vergnügte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust (Delightful rest, beloved pleasure of the soul), BWV 170, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the solo cantata for alto in Leipzig for the sixth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 28 July 1726.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the sixth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 28 July 1726. The brevity of this cantata, compared to the cantatas in two parts written before and after, such as Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot, BWV 39, can be explained assuming that in the same service also a cantata Ich will meinen Geist in euch geben of Johann Ludwig Bach was performed. The prescribed readings for the Sunday are from the Epistle to the Romans, "By Christ's death we are dead for sin" (Romans 6:3--11), and from the Gospel of Matthew a passage from the Sermon on the Mount about better justice than the justice of merely observing laws and rules (Matthew 5:20--26). The text of the cantata is drawn from Georg Christian Lehms' Gottgefälliges Kirchen-Opffer (1711) and speaks of the desire to lead a virtuous life and so enter heaven and avoid hell.

The first aria is a da capo aria in a pastoral rhythm.

The second aria is set without continuo, symbolic of the lack of direction in the lives of those who ignore the word of God, as spoken about in the text. The organ plays two parts, the violins and viola in unison a third.

The second recitative is accompanied by the strings and continuo. The strings play mostly long chords but illustrate the words "bei Gott zu leben, der selbst die Liebe heißt" (to live with God, whose name is love) by more lively movement.

The final aria is a triumphant song of turning away from the world and desiring heaven. The words "Mir ekelt" (I feel revulsion) are expressed by an unusual tritone opening the melody. The voice is ornamented by figuration in the organ, which Bach set for flauto traverso for a performance in his last years.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vergn%C3%BCgte_Ruh,_beliebte_Seelenlust,_BWV_170).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Wie jammern mich doch die verkehrten Herzen" (How the perverted hearts afflict me) for Clarinet Quartet (4 Bb Clarinets).

Aria: "Der alte Drache brennt vor Neid" (BWV 130 No 3) for Tuba & Strings

5 parts5 pages05:274 years ago489 views
French Horn, Strings(4)
Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir (Lord God, we all praise you), BWV 130, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1724 for Michaelis, the feast of Michael, the archangel, on 29 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Paul Eber (1554).

Bach composed the cantata in his second year in Leipzig for the St. Michael's Day. That year, Bach composed a cycle of chorale cantatas, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724. The feast celebrated the Archangel Michael and all the angels each year on 29 September. In Leipzig, the day coincided with a trade fair.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Book of Revelation, the Michael fighting the dragon (Revelation 12:7–12), and from the Gospel of Matthew, heaven belongs to the children, the angels see the face of God (Matthew 18:1–11). The cantata is based on a song in twelve stanzas by Paul Eber (1554), a paraphrase of Philipp Melanchthon's Latin "Dicimus grates tibi". Each stanza has four lines. The melody was first printed in the Geneva Psalter in 1551. It is attributed to Loys Bourgeois and is known as the famous tune of the Doxology "Praise God, from whom all blessings flow".

The hymn is only distantly related to the readings, concentrating on the thought that the Christians sin and deserve bad treatment, but may be raised to joy in a "seliger Tod" (blessed death). An unknown poet kept the first and the last two stanzas as movements 1, 5 and 6 of the cantata. He derived movement 2, a recitative, from stanzas 2 and 3, movement 3, an aria, from stanzas 4 to 6, movement 4, a recitative, from stanzas 7 to 9, and movement 5, an aria, from stanza 10. The theme of the song, praise and thanks for the creation of the angels, is only distantly related to the readings. In movement 3, a connection can be drawn from the mentioning of Satan as the "alter Drachen" (old dragon), to Michael's fight. Movement 4 shows examples of angelic protection in the Bible, of Daniel (Daniel 6:23), and of the three men in the fiery furnace (Daniel 3). Prayer for protection by angels, as Elijah taken to heaven (2 Kings 2:11), continues the text, concluded by general praise, thanks and the request for future protection.

In the opening chorus, Bach illustrates the singing of angels in different choirs by assigning different themes to the strings, the oboes and the trumpets, in a rich scoring typical only for the most festive occasions of the liturgical year such as Christmas. Mincham compares the movement to the 15 opening movements preceding it in the second annual cycle: "it is the most lavishly scored chorus so far and certainly the most extrovertly festive in character".

In movement 3, trumpets and timpani accompany the bass voice in a description of the battle against Satan. A soft duet of soprano and tenor recalls guardian angels saving Daniel in the lions' den and the three men in the furnace. John Eliot Gardiner compares the flute line in a gavotte for tenor to "perhaps the fleetness of angelic transport on Elijah's chariot". The closing choral again includes "the angelic trumpets".

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, flauto traverso, three oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for F Tuba & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) at the request of a user and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Prelude: "Vom Himmel hoch da komm'ich her" (BWV 700) for Flute & Strings

5 parts3 pages03:362 years ago489 views
Flute, Violin, Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Johann Sebastian Bach was a member of a family that had for generations been occupied in music. His sons were to continue the tradition, providing the foundation of a new style of music that prevailed in the later part of the eighteenth century. Johann Sebastian Bach himself represented the end of an age, the culmination of the Baroque in a magnificent synthesis of Italian melodic invention, French rhythmic dance forms and German contrapuntal mastery.

Born in Eisenach in 1685, Bach was educated largely by his eldest brother, after the early death of his parents. At the age of eighteen he embarked on his career as a musician, serving first as a court musician at Weimar, before appointment as organist at Arnstadt. Four years later he moved to Mühlhausen as organist and the following year became organist and chamber musician to Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar. Securing his release with difficulty, in 1717 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and remained at Cöthen until 1723, when he moved to Leipzig as Cantor at the School of St.Thomas, with responsibility for the music of the five principal city churches. Bach was to remain in Leipzig until his death in 1750.

As a craftsman obliged to fulfil the terms of his employment, Bach provided music suited to his various appointments. It was natural that his earlier work as an organist and something of an expert on the construction of organs, should result in music for that instrument. At Cöthen, where the Pietist leanings of the court made church music unnecessary, he provided a quantity of instrumental music for the court orchestra and its players. In Leipzig he began by composing series of cantatas for the church year, later turning his attention to instrumental music for the Collegium musicum of the University, and to the collection and ordering of his own compositions.

The so-called Kirnberger Collection (BWV 690-713), a title now generally ignored in recent editions, is a collection of music by Bach copied by or for his pupil Johann Philipp Kirnberger. The latter was born in Saalfeld in 1721 and educated in Coburg and Cotha, before, in 1739, travelling to Leipzig for lessons in composition and performance with Bach. After a period spent in Poland, he returned to Dresden, moving then to Berlin as a violinist in the Prussian royal service. In 1754 he entered the service of Prince Heinrich of Prussia and four years later that of Princess Anna Amalia, remaining in this last position until his death in Berlin in 1783. Kirnberger had the highest regard for Bach, and did his utmost to bring about the posthumous publication of the latter's four-part chorale settings.

This is another chorale prelude that was a part of the Kirnberger Collection. Johann Philipp Kirnberger (1721 -- 1783) began collecting Bach manuscripts after the composer's death and amassed a significant number. This one, "Vom Himmel hoch, da komm ich her" (From Heaven Above to Earth I Come), is a bright, stately piece originally written during the earlier years of Bach's career when his style was still evolving. That observation in no way is meant to demean this work: it is a well-crafted setting of the chorale theme and imaginatively captures the spirit of its text. The theme to this chorale, written by Valentin Schumann and Martin Luther in 1539, is quite the same in its latter half as the one to the famous "Ein feste Burg." Like many Bach chorale preludes, this one begins modestly, single notes stating a chorale theme that grows into larger sonorities as it proceeds and sprouts contrapuntal lines. The pedal enters several times to proclaim the theme in husky roaring tones. Throughout the work, the mood is joyous and triumphant and the ending is glorious, the similarity to the "Ein feste Burg" most noticeable here in the big pedal sonorities.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/vom-himmel-hoch-da-komm-ich-her-ii-chorale-prelude-for-organ-bwv-700-bc-k156-mc0002371946).

Although originally written for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Fughetta (BWV 700) "Vom Himmel hoch, da komm ich her" (From Heaven Above to Earth I Come) for Flute & Strings (Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Sonata in F Major (BWV 1022) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts8 pages09:16a year ago490 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
Johann Sebastian Bach was born in Eisenach, the capital of the duchy of Saxe-Eisenach, in present-day Germany, on 21 March 1685 O.S. (31 March 1685 N.S.). He was the son of Johann Ambrosius Bach, the director of the town musicians, and Maria Elisabeth Lämmerhirt. His son Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, (born March 8, 1714, Weimar, Saxe-Weimar [Germany]—died Dec. 14, 1788, Hamburg), a second surviving son of J.S. Bach and his wife Maria Barbara Bach, and the leading composer of the early Classical period. A precocious musician who remained successful.

Recent J. S. Bach research has given rise to the theory that in this the Sonata in F Major (BWV1022), the bass is from another hand and that both sonatas are the results of compositional experiments. But while Bach’s authorship of the violin sonata is ascertained, a number of theories have arisen regarding the trio sonata: the work is often held to have been written not by Bach but by one of his composition pupils, whereby Bach’s son Carl Philipp Emanuel has been repeatedly advanced for several reasons. Such speculations have been nurtured by the fact that Johann Sebastian Bach’s copy of the parts of the trio contains no mention of the composer; strictly speaking, the traditional attribution of the work to Bach is based solely on his authorship of the parts. On the other hand, the copy (albeit a late one) of the F major version BWV 1022 unequivocally ascribes the work to Johann Sebastian Bach.

Source: IMSLP (http://ks.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/e/e9/IMSLP264438-PMLP428708).

Although originally written for Violin & continuo , I created this Arrangement of the Sonata in F Major (BWV 1022) for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon).

Sinfonia: "Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen" (BWV 12 No 1) for Oboe & Strings

6 parts4 pages02:093 years ago488 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello
Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen (Weeping, lamenting, worrying, fearing), BWV 12,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for Jubilate, the third Sunday after Easter, and led the first performance on 22 April 1714 in the Schlosskirche, the court chapel of the Schloss in Weimar.

Bach was appointed Konzertmeister in Weimar in the spring of 1714, a position that called for the performance of a church cantata each month. He composed Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen as the second cantata in the series, on a text probably written by court poet Salomon Franck. The work is structured in seven movements, an instrumental Sinfonia, a choral passacaglia, a recitative on a Bible quotation, three arias and, as the closing chorale, the last stanza from Samuel Rodigast's hymn "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" (1674). The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists, a four-part choir, trumpet, oboe, bassoon, two violins, two violas, and basso continuo.

Bach performed the cantata again in his first year as Thomaskantor – director of church music – in Leipzig, on 30 April 1724. He reworked the first section of the first chorus to form the Crucifixus movement of the Credo in his Mass in B minor. Franz Liszt based extended keyboard compositions on the same material.

The cantata in seven movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir SATB, trumpet (Tr), oboe (Ob), bassoon (Fg), two violins (Vl), two violas (Va) and basso continuo (Bc).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weinen,_Klagen,_Sorgen,_Zagen,_BWV_12).

The cantata is opened by a Sinfonia, marked adagio assai, which resembles the slow movement of an oboe concerto, with an expressive and plaintive solo.

I created this transcription of the opening Sinfonia: "Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen" (Weeping, lamenting, worrying, fearing) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, 2 Violas & Cello).

Magnificat for Oboe, Strings & Organ

4 parts4 pages04:372 years ago487 views
Oboe, Violin, Viola, Organ
Peter Benoit (17 August 1834 – 8 March 1901), was a Flemish composer of Belgian nationality born in Harelbeke, Flanders, Belgium in 1834. He was taught music at an early age by his father and the village organist. In 1851 Benoit entered the Brussels Conservatoire, where he remained till 1855, studying primarily with FJ Fétis. During this period he composed music to many melodramas, and to the opera Le Village dans les montagnes for the Park Theatre, of which in 1856 he became the resident conductor. In 1857 he won the Belgian Prix de Rome for his cantata Le Meurtre d'Abel. The accompanying money grant enabled him to travel through Germany. In the course of his journings he found time to write a considerable amount of music, as well as an essay called L'École de musique flamande et son avenir.

Fétis loudly praised his Messe solennelle, which Benoit composed in Brussels on his return from Germany. In 1861 he visited Paris for the production of his opera Le Roi des Aulnes ("The Erl King"), which, though accepted by the Théâtre Lyrique, was never performed. (He also composed a work for piano and orchestra called Le Roi des Aulnes.) While there he conducted at the Théâtre des Bouffes Parisiens. Again returning home, he astonished the musical community with the production in Antwerp of a sacred tetralogy, consisting of his Cantate de Noël, the above-mentioned Mass, a Te Deum and a Requiem, in which were embodied to a large extent his theories about Flemish music.

Benoit passionately pursued the founding of an entirely separate Flemish school, and to that purpose even changed his name from the French "Pierre" to the Dutch equivalent "Peter". Through prodigious effort he succeeded in gathering a small group of enthusiasts who recognized with him the potential for a Flemish school that would differ completely from the French and German schools. However these intentions failed, as the school's faith was tied too closely to Benoit's music, which was hardly more Flemish than it was French or German.

Benoit's most important compositions include the Flemish oratorios De Schelde (The river Scheldt) and Lucifer (which met complete failure when it was staged in London in 1888), the operas Het Dorp in 't Gebergte (The village in the mountains) and Isa, and the Drama Christi, a huge body of songs, choruses, small cantatas and motets. Benoit also wrote a great number of essays on musical matters.

The Magnificat is possibly one of 20 motets for equal voices by the composer.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Benoit).

Although originally written for 3-part Chorus (STB) and Organ, I created this arrangement of the Magnificat for Oboe, Violin, Viola & Pipe Organ.

Viola Sonata (Opus 1 No 2) for Viola & Strings

5 parts9 pages06:483 years ago487 views
Viola(2), Violin(2), Cello
Charles John Stanley (1712 -- 1786) was an English composer and organist.

Blinded at age 2, John Stanley began desultory music lessons when he was 7 and, after a false start, progressed so quickly that he was made organist at a nearby church when he was only 12. Stanley would grow up to become the leading English organist of his day and a major figure in London's musical scene, not only as an instrumentalist but also as a composer in the Handel style.

Stanley rose quickly in the English organ world; already a veteran of the loft at age 22, he was made organist to the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple in 1734. His performances of his own organ voluntaries there and at other churches drew large audiences more curious about the music than the liturgy. He had academic credentials, too; in 1729 he had become the youngest person ever to have received a bachelor's of music degree from Oxford.

Stanley married well in 1738; not only did his wife bring a substantial dowry, but she brought a sister who would eventually work as Stanley's amanuensis. Stanley would write a fair amount of his own music, but he supported himself mainly as a performer. He conducted several Handel oratorios during the final decade of that composer's life, and succeeded Handel in 1759 as co-director of the Lenten oratorio season at Covent Garden (oratorios replaced operas during Lent). Stanley provided a couple of his own oratorios for this series, but they were too imitative of the dead Handel to achieve much success. Among his other appointments and honors was succeeding William Boyce as Master of the King's Band of Musicians in 1779, which led him to compose more than a dozen birthday and New Year odes for official ceremonies.

In his compositional style, Stanley was a transitional figure between Handel and J.C. Bach; the change can be seen by comparing Stanley's Opus 2 concertos, which very much followed the Handel/Corelli model, to his more elegant, less fugal, pre-Classical Opus 10 concertos of some three decades later. His organ voluntaries, on the other hand, all composed fairly early in his career, are clearly creatures of the English Baroque era, hewing to standard formats and requiring instruments of only modest resources.

Although this piece was originally written for Flute (Recorder) and continuo, I created this arrangement for Solo Viola and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Romanian Folk Dance No. 3 (BB68/SZ56) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts1 page00:55a year ago488 views
Flute, Guitar
Béla Viktor János Bartók (1881 -- 1945) was a Hungarian composer and pianist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Liszt are regarded as Hungary's greatest composers (Gillies 2001). Through his collection and analytical study of folk music, he was one of the founders of ethnomusicology.

Romanian Folk Dances, Sz. 56, BB 68 is a suite of six short piano pieces composed by Béla Bartók in 1915. He later orchestrated it for small ensemble in 1917 as Sz. 68, BB 76.

It is based on seven Romanian tunes from Transylvania, originally played on fiddle or shepherd's flute. The original name for the piece was titled Romanian Folk Dances from Hungary but was later changed by Bartók when Transylvania joined Romania in 1918. It is nowadays available in the 1971 edition which is written with key signatures although Bartok rarely ever wrote key signatures.

The melody of the first movement, according to Bartók, came from Mezőszabad (present-day Voiniceni) village that was part of Mezőcsávás (present-day Ceuașu de Câmpie) commune which was located in the Maros-Torda administrative county within Transylvania, and he first heard it when two gypsy violinists were playing it. The second movement is a typical dance from Romania called Brâul, for which traditionally a sash or a waistband was used. This melody came from Egres (present-day Igriș), in the Banat region. The third dance comes also from Egres (Igriș), but its theme is much darker and its melody recreates Middle Eastern instruments, such as the flute. The fourth dance came from Bucsony (present-day Bucium), in the district of Torda-Aranyos (today Alba county in Romania). The fifth dance is an old Romanian dance similar to the Polka and comes from Belényes (present-day Beiuş, in Bihor county), near the border between Hungary and Romania. The sixth and last dance is formed by two different melodies: the first one comes from Belényes (present-day Beiuș) and the second one comes from the then named Nyagra (present-day Neagra) village within the Palotailva (present-day Lunca Bradului) commune. Both on the orchestral version and on the original piano version, these two dances are performed without a discernible pause, the reason for which is anyone's guess.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_Folk_Dances).

Although originally written for Piano, I created this interpretation for Flute & Classical Guitar.

Arioso: "Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe" (BWV 22 No 1a) for Oboe, Horn & Strings

6 parts7 pages05:093 years ago487 views
Oboe, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe (Jesus gathered the twelve to Himself), BWV 22,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach composed for Quinquagesima, the last Sunday before Lent. Bach composed it as an audition piece for the position of Thomaskantor in Leipzig and first performed it there on 7 February 1723.

The work, which is in five movements, begins with a scene from the Gospel reading in which Jesus predicts his suffering in Jerusalem. The unknown poet of the cantata text took the scene as a starting point for a sequence of aria, recitative, and aria, in which the contemporary Christian takes the place of the disciples, who do not understand what Jesus is telling them about the events soon to unfold, but follow him nevertheless. The closing chorale is a stanza from Elisabeth Cruciger's hymn "Herr Christ, der einig Gotts Sohn". The music is scored for three vocal soloists, a four-part choir, oboe, strings and continuo. The work shows that Bach had mastered the composition of a dramatic scene, an expressive aria with obbligato oboe, a recitative with strings, an exuberant dance, and a chorale in the style of his predecessor in the position as Thomaskantor, Johann Kuhnau. Bach directed the first performance of the cantata during a church service, together with another audition piece, Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn, BWV 23. He performed the cantata again on the last Sunday before Lent a year later, after he had taken up office.

The cantata shows elements which became standards for Bach's Leipzig cantatas and even the Passions, including a "frame of biblical text and chorale around the operatic forms of aria and recitative", "the fugal setting of biblical words" and "the biblical narrative ... as a dramatic scena".

The cantata has five movements and is scored for three vocal soloists (an alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir (SATB), and for a Baroque orchestra of an oboe (Ob), two violins (Vl), viola (Va) and basso continuo. The duration is given as c.?20 minutes.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_nahm_zu_sich_die_Zw%C3%B6lfe,_BWV_22).

I created this arrangement of the opening Arioso: "Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe" (Jesus gathered the twelve to Himself) for Oboe, French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Amore Traditore" (BWV 203 No. 1) for Bassoon Duet

2 parts3 pages07:535 years ago485 views
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist of the Baroque period. He enriched many established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Mass in B minor, the The Well-Tempered Clavier, his cantatas, chorales, partitas, Passions, and organ works. His music is revered for its intellectual depth, technical command, and artistic beauty.

"Amore Traditore" ("Treacherous Love" BWV 203), is a secular cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in Weimar between 1718 and 1723. Bach composed this cantata in Weimar between 1718 and 1723 for an unknown occasion. Its librettist and first performance is also unknown. Unusually for Bach, the text is Italian; only one other cantata (BWV 209) has Italian text.

It is based on the Italian solo cantata tradition and is in three movements for singer and keyboard (and possibly cello or viola da gamba). The first aria includes a flowing bass line and strong ritornello theme. The movement is in da capo form and features long melismas and a very high vocal range.

Although originally composed for bass voice and continuo, I created this arrangement for Bassoon duet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Wie furchtsam wankten meine Schritte" (BWV 33 No 3) for Viola & Harp

2 parts9 pages06:293 years ago485 views
Viola, Harp
Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ (Only upon You, Lord Jesus Christ,), BWV 33,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1724 for the thirteenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 3 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Konrad Hubert (1540).

Bach composed the cantata in his second year in Leipzig for the Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity. That year, Bach composed a cycle of chorale cantatas, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Galatians, Paul's teaching on law and promise (Galatians 3:15–22), and from the Gospel of Luke, the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:23–37).

The cantata is based on the hymn by Konrad Hubert which was published in Nürnberg in 1540 with an added fourth stanza. Each of the stanzas consists of nine lines. For the cantata text, an unknown poet kept the words of stanzas 1 and 4 unchanged for movements 1 and 6. He transcribed the ideas of the inner stanzas, each to a sequence of recitative and aria. Due to the splitting of each stanza in two movements, the paraphrasing is a more independent from the original than for the previous cantatas of the cycle, last Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut, BWV 113. The hymn, concentrating on the sinner asking Jesus for redemption, is only generally connected to the Gospel. The poet connects to the Gospel in movement 4, "Gib mir nur aus Barmherzigkeit / den wahren Christenglauben" (Of your mercy grant me / the true Christian faith), addressing God as the true "Good Samaritan", also in movement 5, "Gib, daß ich aus reinem Triebe / als mich selbst den Nächsten liebe" (Grant that my purest impulse may be / to love my neighbour as myself"), citing the central line of the parable. The poet also refers to other Bible passages, in movement 2 to Job 9:3, "If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one of a thousand.", and in movement 4 to both Psalms 51:13, "Then will I teach transgressors thy ways; and sinners shall be converted unto thee." and Galatians 5:6, "Then will I teach transgressors thy ways; and sinners shall be converted unto thee."

The chorale melody "Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ" of unknown authorship was documented in a 1541 Wittenberg publication. It was used extensively, for example by Sethus Calvisius and Michael Praetorius. According to Klaus Hofmann, it was composed in 1512 for a secular song by Paul Hofhaimer. In the cantata, Bach uses the melody completely in a chorale fantasia in movement 1 and in the closing chorale, while he alludes to it in movement 5, a duet.

In his first year in Leipzig, Bach had composed for the same occasion Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben, BWV 77, opening with a chorus on important law, on which, according to the parallel Matthew 22:34–40, "hang all the law and the prophets": "You shall love God, your Lord, with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself".

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists—alto, tenor and bass—a four-part choir, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allein_zu_dir,_Herr_Jesu_Christ,_BWV_33).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "Wie furchtsam wankten meine Schritte" (How fearfully my steps wander) for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Chorus: "In allen meinen Taten" (BWV 97 No 1) for Winds & Strings

10 parts23 pages05:013 years ago485 views
Flute, Oboe, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Strings(3), Cello
In allen meinen Taten (In all that I do / In all my undertakings), BWV 97, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1734 for an unspecified occasion. The text consists of the unchanged words of the hymn by Paul Fleming (1642).

Bach wrote the chorale cantata in 1734, about a decade after his annual cycle of cantatas, in the same year as his Christmas Oratorio, one year after Kyrie and Gloria of his later Mass in B minor. He dated the manuscript himself, but the occasion is unspecified. The work may have originally been composed for a wedding, because the score shows on top of movement 7 the crossed-out words "nach der Trauung" (after the wedding). A later copy mentions the fifth Sunday after Trinity. The text consists of nine unchanged stanzas of the chorale by Paul Fleming, published in 1642. The six lines of each stanza rhyme in pairs: 1 and 2, 4 and 5, 3 and 6. The text was written in 1633 at the outset of a "long and hazardous journey" to Moscow and reflects a "beginning in God's name". Bach structured nine stanzas in as many movements, framing a sequence of arias and recitatives by an opening chorus and a closing chorale. At least two later performances between 1735 and 1747 are documented.

In the two choral movements, Bach used the melody of the hymn, but composed music unrelated to the melody in the other cantata movements. The poet wrote the words to fit the well-known tune of "Innsbruck, ich muß dich lassen" by Heinrich Isaac. Bach had used it twice in his St Matthew Passion, in movements 10 (Ich bin's, ich sollte büßen) and 37 (Wer hat dich so geschlagen).

In keeping with a beginning, Bach set the opening chorale fantasia in the style of a French overture, in a sequence slow – fast (fugue), as he had done already as early as in 1714 in Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61, beginning a new liturgical year. The slow section, marked grave, in dotted rhythm is instrumental, in the fast section, marked vivace, the orchestra plays a fugue, to which the soprano sings the cantus firmus of the melody line by line in long notes, whereas the lower voices take part in the imitation of the instrumental motifs. After the last line all voices join in an "urgent homophonic concluding statement".

Bach structured the inner movements, named "versus" (Latin for stanza), as five arias and two recitatives, using the voices from the lowest to the highest, increasing the instrumentation from continuo to obbligato instruments. He kept the structure of the text, two even parts, in all of these movements but the duet which shows a modified da capo form. The recitatives are kept simple, the first (versus 3) is secco, the second (versus 5) is accompanied by the strings. Versus 2 is introduced by a ritornello of the continuo on a theme which the bass picks up. Versus 4 is brightened by a virtuoso violin part, possible as an image of God's grace in "Ich traue seiner Gnaden" (I trust His grace). John Eliot Gardiner compares the writing for the violin to that in his sonatas and partitas for solo violin. The strings open versus 6 with motifs illustrating rest and motion, which is obvious when the alto sings: "Leg ich mich späte nieder" (Late do I lie me down), "erwache" (wake up), "lieg oder ziehe fort" (lie still or go forth). Versus 7 is set as a duet with continuo. The ritornello begins with a theme later also used by the voices and ends on a characteristic motif illustrating the resolution of "... then will I uncomplaining unto my fate press on". In the last aria the oboes support the soprano singing in extended melismas "I have surrendered myself to Him".

In the closing chorale, the strings play three independent parts in addition to the four vocal parts, while the oboes play the choral melody, termed "augmenting the luminescent harmony" by Gardiner. Called by Dürr "hymnische Krönung" (hymnal crowning), the movement balances the first movement and adds weight to the summarising text of the final stanza, "To thee be true, o spirit, and trust in Him alone now who hath created thee".

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Euphonium) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

"Alles, was ihr tut" (BuxWV 4) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts10 pages14:106 years ago485 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

In this cantata Buxtehude sets a whole conglomeration of texts. The work includes texts from the Old and New Testaments, portions of a Lutheran chorale text, and a bit of German poetry. It is scored for soprano, alto, tenor, bass, three violins, viola, violone, and continuo. The cantata combines all three of Buxtehude's most common cantata types: the concerto type, which usually sets a prose biblical text; the strophic aria type, setting a strophic poem; and the chorale cantata, borrowing both text and melody from a chorale. The cantata opens and closes with Buxtehude's setting of Colossians 3:17, sung by the full chorus and strings. This passage from Colossians was part of the Epistle reading for the fifth Sunday after Epiphany, and it is entirely likely that the cantata was intended for performance on that particular Sunday in the Lutheran church calendar. The aria portion of the cantata is a three-verse strophic aria sung by all four voices. Each phrase of the aria is punctuated by an incursion from the strings, and the verses are separated by brief string ritornellos. The cantata also includes a brief solo for bass and continuo, setting Psalm 37:4. The chorale portion of the cantata sets verses five and six of the chorale Aus meines Herzens Grunde by Georg Niege, from about 1587. First the soprano sings the melody and the words to the fifth verse of the chorale, accompanied by a five-part web of string polyphony in a manner reminiscent of the first verse of Buxtehude's chorale cantata Herzlich Lieb hab ich dich, o Herr BuxWV 41. The choir sings the sixth verse of the chorale, with the melody in the soprano.

Although it was originally scored for five voices with basso continuo (2 sopranos, alto, tenor and bass accompanied by organ), I adapted this work for the traditional Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet (Bb) French Horn and Bassoon) to accentuate their warm rich tones.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Ich ende behende mein irdisches Leben" (BWV 57 No 7) for Flute & Harp

2 parts7 pages04:384 years ago485 views
Flute, Harp
Selig ist der Mann (Blessed is the man), BWV 57, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the Christmas cantata in Leipzig in 1725 for the Second Day of Christmas, which was celebrated that year as St. Stephen's Day, and first performed it on 26 December 1725.

Bach wrote the cantata in his third year in Leipzig for the Second Day of Christmas. That year, as every other year in Leipzig, the day was the feast of the martyr St. Stephanus (Stephen). The prescribed readings for the day are from the Acts, the Martyrdom of Stephen (Acts 6:8–7,22, Acts 7:51–59), and from the Gospel of Matthew, Jerusalem killing her prophets (Matthew 23:35–39). The cantata text was written by Georg Christian Lehms, who drew on all the readings and connected them to more biblical allusions. The first line is taken from James 1:12, the crown mentioned is in Greek "stephanos". Lehms set the development as a dialogue of "Jesus" and the Soul ("Anima"). He intended to use as a closing chorale a verse from Johann Heermann's "Gott Lob, die Stund ist kommen", but Bach instead chose the 6th verse of Ahasverus Fritsch's "Hast du denn, Jesus, dein Angesicht gänzlich verborgen", called Seelengespräch mit Christus (Talk of the soul with Christ), in order to continue the dialogue.

The music for the dialogue of Jesus and the Soul is more dramatic than in other church cantatas of Bach. Most of the recitatives are secco, as in the opera of the time, driving the action. John Eliot Gardiner sees Bach here as the "best writer of dramatic declamation (recitative in other words) since Monteverdi". The first aria is dominated by long vocal phrases. In the second aria the longing for death is expressed by an upwards line followed by a wide interval down. The third aria shows Jesus as the victor by fanfare-like broken triads. In the last aria the line of the solo violin can be interpreted as the passionate movement of the Anima into the arms of Jesus. After a mystical union is reached in the second part of the aria, "Mein Heiland, ich sterbe mit höchster Begier" ("My Savior, I die with the greatest eagerness"), no da capo is possible; the aria ends on the question "was schenkest du mir?" ("what will You give me?"), answered by the final four-part chorale on the tune of "Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren".

Although originally written for soprano and bass soloists, two oboes, oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, and continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Menuet 1 from "Deux Menuets" for Harp

1 part2 pages03:096 years ago484 views
In 1683, Jean-Philippe Rameau, the seventh of eleven children, was born into a musical family in Dijon. His father played the organ at two churches there. At eighteen he decided to become a musician, although his father preferred that he enter the legal profession. He traveled to Italy and spent a few months in Milan, playing violin with a group of itinerant musicians. Subsequently, he held various organ posts in Dijon (replacing his father), Lyons, Clermont, and Paris. Two years after settling in Paris at the age of forty-two, he married a nineteen-year old girl, Marie-Louise Mangot. They had four children. He composed cantatas and motets, and he published books and articles on music theory and several small collections of solo harpsichord works. All the while he longed to compose for the operatic stage. He sublimated this desire in his harpsichord works, lavishing on them all the imagination, passion, and drama that would later enliven his great operas.

The minuet, also spelled menuet, is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3/4 time. The word was adapted from Italian minuetto and French menuet, and may have been from French menu meaning slender, small, referring to the very small steps, or from the early 17th-century popular group dances called branle à mener or amener.

Although originally composed for period instruments (possibly Lute), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Fugue in C Major (BWV 952) for String Trio

3 parts2 pages01:51a year ago486 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.

As this fugue is not part of Bach’s great keyboard cycles, it disappeared from sight, along with many other ‘separate fugues’. And yet this lively piece with tastefully harmonic twists and turns would not look out of place in the Wohltemperirte Clavier. While Bach did include other ‘separate’ fugues in the series later on, this one got away.

Since the late nineteenth century, BWV 952 has often been included in editions of ‘little preludes and fugues’. This led to the fugue becoming unjustly sidelined. It went from being not-quite-WTC to ‘minor’ exercise material for beginners. Context is everything.

Fortunately, Bach’s ‘separate’ harpsichord and organ music also continued to be played. And in the hands of a harpsichordist like Pierre Hantaï, the quality of this fugue becomes suddenly clear again, and we realise why the music has survived. It is easy to imagine that Bach may indeed have considered including this fugue in the Wohltemperirte Clavier. And it might actually be a good test to listen to BWV 952 in the place of one of the two C major fugues in the Wohltemperirte Clavier.

Source: AllofBach (http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-952/).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Interpretation of the Fugue in C Major (BWV 952) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"Singe Seele, Gott zum Preise" (HWV 206) for Oboes & English Horn

3 parts4 pages03:305 years ago484 views
George Frederick Handel was born in the German city of Halle on February 23, 1685. His father noted but did not nurture his musical talent, and he had to sneak a small keyboard instrument into his attic to practice. As a child he studied music with Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow, organist at the Liebfrauenkirche, and for a time he seemed destined for a career as a church organist himself. After studying law briefly at the University of Halle, Handel began serving as organist on March 13, 1702, at the Domkirche there. Dissatisfied, he took a post as violinist in the Hamburg opera orchestra in 1703, and his frustration with musically provincial northern Germany was perhaps shown when he fought a duel the following year with the composer Matheson over the accompaniment to one of Matheson's operas. In 1706 Handel took off for Italy, then the font of operatic innovation, and mastered contemporary trends in Italian serious opera. He returned to Germany to become court composer in Hannover, whose rulers were linked by family ties with the British throne; his patron there, the Elector of Hannover, became King George I of England. English audiences took to his 1711 opera Rinaldo, and several years later Handel jumped at the chance to move to England permanently. He impressed King George early on with the Water Music of 1716, written as entertainment for a royal boat outing.

"Singe, Seele, Gott zum Preise" is the fifth of a set of nine songs that Handel wrote to the German-language texts of Barthold Heinrich Brockes from his collection Irdisches Vergnuegen in Gott (Contentment on Earth through God). The tone of the text is religious in an easygoing manner. All of these songs are in ABA form with vocal declamation that is lyrical, sometimes melismatic, and never virtuosic. The instrumentation of the accompaniment is flexible, and the performers are allowed to choose whichever instruments are appropriate and available for the continuo and instrumental obbligato.

This song, whose title translates as "Sing, O my soul, sing in praise of God" states, "Sing, my soul, in praise of God, who in so many ways makes all the world so beautiful. let him who delights our ears, let him who enchants our eyes with his flowering woods and meadows be braised and magnified".

Although originally written for strings (violin) and continuo, I created this arrangement for double-reed Trio (Oboes (2) & English Horn) and It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Jesu, Brunnquell aller Gnaden" (BWV 162 No 3) for Oboe & Cello

2 parts2 pages04:504 years ago483 views
Ach! ich sehe, itzt, da ich zur Hochzeit gehe, BWV 162 (Ah! I see, now, when I go to the wedding), BWV 162, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 20th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it in 1715 or 1716.

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. He wrote the cantata for the 20th Sunday after Trinity, first performed on 3 November 1715 (according to the musicologist Alfred Dürr) or on 25 October 1716. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, "walk circumspectly, ... filled with the Spirit" (Ephesians 5:15--21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the great banquet (Matthew 22:1--14). The cantata text was provided by the court poet Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer (1715). He refers to the gospel and reflects how essential it is to follow the loving invitation of the Lord. Franck's language is rich in contrasts, such as Seelengift und Himmelsbrot (poison for the soul and bread of heaven), and of images derived from the Bible, such as Der Himmel ist sein Thron (Heaven is his throne) after Isaiah 66:1. The closing chorale is stanza 7 of "Alle Menschen müssen sterben" of Johann Rosenmüller (1652).

Bach performed the cantata again on 10 October 1723 in his first year in Leipzig in a revised version, including a corno da tirarsi, a baroque wind instrument mentioned only in Bach's music and thought to have been similar to the slide trumpet (tromba da tirarsi). Bach's score is lost, and some parts seem to be missing as well.

The cantata opens with a bass aria, accompanied by three instruments in a polyphonic setting, the two violins and the viola (with the corno). The motif for the first words is present most of the time. The soprano aria seems to lack a part for an obbligato instrument. For the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage of the Monteverdi Choir (and John Eliot Gardiner), Robert Levin reconstructed a version for flauto traverso and oboe d'amore. The duet is also accompanied only by the continuo, but seems complete. The melody of the closing chorale is rare elsewhere, but appeared in Weimar not only in this work, but also in a chorale prelude of Johann Gottfried Walther.

Although this cantata is scored for a small ensemble, four soloists, corno da tirarsi (likely added in Leipzig), two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Oboe & Cello and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).