Sheet music

Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 2) for Violin & Cello

2 parts2 pages02:039 months ago487 views
Violin, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England.

Handel published his first volume of Suites for keyboard in London in 1720. The works had already been published without his permission in Amsterdam the previous year and Handel published them himself in London to protect his royalties. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites most often are sets of stylized dances. The Suite in F major, however, is not a set of dances, but rather a stylized church sonata in four movements: Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, and Fuga. The opening Adagio is a thoughtful and expansive movement with an exquisitely embellished melody above wide-ranging modulations starting in F major, but ending in A minor. The following Allegro is a rapid, racing movement in F major with few modulations. The following Adagio is a dramatic movement in D minor with a highly expressive melody above widely spaced chords. The closing Fuga Allegro is in four independent voices with an aggressive subject.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no2-in-f-major-hwv-427-mc0002405533).

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 2) for Violin & Cello.

Courante from the English Suite No. 3 in G Minor (BWV 808 No. 3) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts2 pages01:582 years ago484 views
Flute, Guitar
The English Suites, BWV 806–811, are a set of six suites written by the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach for harpsichord and generally thought to be the earliest of his 19 suites for keyboard, the others being the six French Suites, BWV 812–817, the six Partitas, BWV 825-830 and the Overture in the French style, BWV 831.

These six suites for keyboard are thought to be the earliest set that Bach composed. Originally, their date of composition was thought to have been between 1718 and 1720, but more recent research suggests that the composition was likely earlier, around 1715, while the composer was living in Weimar.

Bach's English Suites display less affinity with Baroque English keyboard style than do the French Suites to French Baroque keyboard style; the name "English" is thought to date back to a claim made by the 19th-century Bach biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel that these works might have been composed for an English nobleman, but no evidence has emerged to substantiate this claim. It has also been suggested that the name is a tribute to Charles Dieupart, whose fame was greatest in England, and on whose Six Suittes de clavessin Bach's English Suites were in part based.

Surface characteristics of the English Suites strongly resemble those of Bach's French Suites and Partitas, particularly in the sequential dance-movement structural organization and treatment of ornamentation. These suites also resemble the Baroque French keyboard suite typified by the generation of composers including Jean-Henri d'Anglebert, and the dance-suite tradition of French lutenists that preceded it.

In the English Suites especially, Bach's affinity with French lute music is demonstrated by his inclusion of a prelude for each suite, departing from an earlier tradition of German derivations of French suite (those of Johann Jakob Froberger and Georg Boehm are examples), which saw a relatively strict progression of the dance movements (Allemande, Courante, Sarabande and Gigue) and which did not typically feature a Prelude. Unlike the unmeasured preludes of French lute or keyboard style, however, Bach's preludes in the English Suites are composed in strict meter.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Suites_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this arrangement of the Courante of the English Suite No. 3 in G Minor (BWV 808 No. 3) for Flute & Guitar.
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"Misty Mourne Shore" for Oboe & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:445 years ago485 views
The folk music of Ireland (also known as Irish traditional music, Irish trad, Irish folk music, and other variants) is the generic term for music that has been created in various genres in Ireland. In Topographia Hibernica (1188), Gerald de Barri conceded that the Irish were more skilled at playing music than any other nation he had seen. He claimed that the two main instruments used at this time were the "harp" and "tabor" (see bodhrán), that their music was fast and lively, and that their songs always began and ended with B-flat.

Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "In meinem Gott bin ich erfreut" (BWV 162 No 5) for String Trio

3 parts5 pages07:354 years ago483 views
Viola(2), Cello
Ach! ich sehe, itzt, da ich zur Hochzeit gehe, BWV 162 (Ah! I see, now, when I go to the wedding), BWV 162, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 20th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it in 1715 or 1716.

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. He wrote the cantata for the 20th Sunday after Trinity, first performed on 3 November 1715 (according to the musicologist Alfred Dürr) or on 25 October 1716. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, "walk circumspectly, ... filled with the Spirit" (Ephesians 5:15--21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the great banquet (Matthew 22:1--14). The cantata text was provided by the court poet Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer (1715). He refers to the gospel and reflects how essential it is to follow the loving invitation of the Lord. Franck's language is rich in contrasts, such as Seelengift und Himmelsbrot (poison for the soul and bread of heaven), and of images derived from the Bible, such as Der Himmel ist sein Thron (Heaven is his throne) after Isaiah 66:1. The closing chorale is stanza 7 of "Alle Menschen müssen sterben" of Johann Rosenmüller (1652).

Bach performed the cantata again on 10 October 1723 in his first year in Leipzig in a revised version, including a corno da tirarsi, a baroque wind instrument mentioned only in Bach's music and thought to have been similar to the slide trumpet (tromba da tirarsi). Bach's score is lost, and some parts seem to be missing as well.

The cantata opens with a bass aria, accompanied by three instruments in a polyphonic setting, the two violins and the viola (with the corno). The motif for the first words is present most of the time. The soprano aria seems to lack a part for an obbligato instrument. For the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage of the Monteverdi Choir (and John Eliot Gardiner), Robert Levin reconstructed a version for flauto traverso and oboe d'amore. The duet is also accompanied only by the continuo, but seems complete. The melody of the closing chorale is rare elsewhere, but appeared in Weimar not only in this work, but also in a chorale prelude of Johann Gottfried Walther.

Although this cantata is scored for a small ensemble, four soloists, corno da tirarsi (likely added in Leipzig), two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for 2 Violas & Cello and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Das Blut, so meine Schuld durchstreicht" (BWV 78 No 4) for Flute, Horn & Cello

3 parts3 pages05:263 years ago482 views
Flute, French Horn, Cello
Jesu, der du meine Seele (Jesus, You, who my soul), BWV 78, is a church cantata of Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 14th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 10 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Johann Rist.

Bach wrote the cantata in his second year in Leipzig, when he composed an annual cycle of chorale cantatas. For the 14th Sunday after Trinity, 10 September 1724, he chose the chorale of Johann Rist (1641) in 12 stanzas. Rist set the words and probably also the melody. An unknown librettist wrote the poetry for seven movements, keeping the first and last stanza and quoting some of the original lines as part of his own writing in the other movements. Movement 2 corresponds to stanza 2 of the chorale, 6 to 11, 3 to 3–5, 4 to 6–7, and 5 to 8–10.

The cantata is remarkable for its widely contrasting affects: meditative profundity in the opening chorus, nearly joyful though hesitant bouncing in the second movement, and despair in the third.

This, the "Das Blut, so meine Schuld durchstreicht" () aria is accompanied by flute motifs to express the relief of the heart.

Source: Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesu,_der_du_meine_Seele,_BWV_78)

Although originally scored for tenor, flauto traverso, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute, French Horn & Cello).

Sonata in G Major (BWV 1021) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts6 pages06:22a year ago485 views
Flute, Guitar
When taking up Johann Sebastian Bach's various sonatas for accompanied violin, it is important not to confuse those written for violin and harpsichord with those written for violin and continuo. The distinction might at first seem small, but it is in fact quite significant. Beyond the simple question of whether or not one is to include a cello, gamba, or some other bass instrument in addition to the harpsichord -- as would be appropriate in the case of continuo -- Bach's six Sonatas for violin and harpsichord, BWV 1014 - 1019 contain, fully realized keyboard parts, rather than just a figured bass line. And so, while the style may today sound to most people quite identical, those six pieces are quite forward-looking in design, while the two authentic sonatas for violin and continuo, composed in the years before 1720, are quite backward-looking, at least in terms of superficial layout. Such a piece is the Sonata for violin and continuo in G major, BWV 1021, composed sometime during the late Weimar or early Cöthen days (ca.1715 - 1720).

BWV 1021 has the usual four movements of a sonata da chiesa type of piece, "Adagio," "Vivace," "Largo," "Presto," the latter three quite brief by comparison with the corresponding movements in the somewhat later violin/harpsichord sonatas. The opening Adagio is a truly splendid binary-form piece in which the violin weaves in and around a lightly strolling bass line at will; a fine continuo hand is required, even more so than is the norm, to fill out the harmonies without obtruding on either of the two already present characters. The following wisp of a Vivace seems almost an addendum to the spacious opening movement, but its elegant triple meter and graceful violin multiple-stops move it forward into a space, albeit a small one, all its own. In the E minor Largo, the violin again muses free-form over an all-defining bass; the movement ends, as is usual, in a half-cadence from which the final Presto springs.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/sonata-for-violin-continuo-in-g-major-bwv-1021-mc0002365453).

Although originally written for Violin & continuo , I created this Arrangement of the Sonata in G Major (BWV 1021) for Flute & Classical Guitar.

Chorale: "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" (BWV 67 No 6) for Brass & Strings

7 parts15 pages05:513 years ago481 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Halt im Gedächtnis Jesum Christ (Keep Jesus Christ in mind), BWV 67, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the cantata in his first year in Leipzig, when he first performed his St John Passion, for the First Sunday after Easter, called Quasimodogeniti. The prescribed readings for that Sunday were from the First Epistle of John, "our faith is the victory" (1 John 5:4–10), and from the Gospel of John, the appearance of Jesus to the Disciples, first without then with Thomas, in Jerusalem (John 20:19–31). The unknown poet begins with a verse from the Second Epistle to Timothy, "Remember that Jesus Christ … was raised from the dead" (2 Timothy 2:8). The poet sees Thomas as similar to the doubtful Christian in general whose heart is not at peace. The center of the cantata is the Easter hymn "Erschienen ist der herrlich Tag" (The glorious day has appeared) by Nikolaus Herman (1560), praising the day of the resurrection. In contrast, movement 5 recalls the danger by the enemies, until in movement 6 Jesus appears as to his disciples in Jerusalem, finally bringing peace. The line "Friede sei mit euch" (Peace be with you) is repeated four times, framing three stanzas of a poem. The closing chorale is the first stanza of "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" (Thou Prince of Peace, Lord Jesus Christ) by Jakob Ebert (1601).

The cantata in seven movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, corno da tirarsi, a slide horn that Bach scored for a short period, flauto traverso, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo.

The tenor aria Mein Jesus ist erstanden (My Jesus is arisen) is accompanied by an obbligato oboe d'amore. The theme is presented in the opening by the strings and later picked up by the voice, illustrating the word "auferstanden" by an upward run. The Easter chorale "Erschienen ist der herrlich Tag" marks the center of the composition. In symmetry, it is framed by two alto recitatives, the second a reprise of the first. The idea of a solo singer alternating with a chorus is extended in the following movement, the bass aria with chorus Friede sei mit euch (Peace be with you). A string introduction depicts in agitated forte passages in 4/4 time the attack of the enemies. John Eliot Gardiner describes it as "a dramatic scena in which the strings work up a storm to illustrate the raging of the soul's enemies". In sharp contrast the bass as the vox Christi (voice of Christ) sings the greeting of Jesus from verse 19 of the Gospel, "Peace be with you", three times, accompanied by woodwinds in dotted rhythm in 3/4 time, marked piano. Musicologist Julian Mincham describes the music as serene, a "gentle, rocking, almost cradle-like rhythm creating a perfect atmosphere of peaceful contemplation". The upper voices of the choir (without basses) answer to the music of the introduction, seeing Jesus as help in the battle ("hilft uns kämpfen und die Wut der Feinde dämpfen"). The greeting and answering is repeated two more times in two stanzas of the poem, reflecting the strengthening of the weary in spirit and body ("erquicket in uns Müden Geist und Leib zugleich"), and finally overcoming death ("durch den Tod hindurch zu dringen"). The following fourth appearance of "Peace be with you" is accompanied by both woodwinds and strings, and peace is finally achieved. Klaus Hofmann describes the movement as an "operatic scene" and continues "Bach resorts to unconventional means; he shows himself as a musical dramatist and, in the process, stresses the element of contrast: he comments upon the words of the faithful with agitated, tumultuous string figures, whilst Jesus' peace greeting sounds calmly and majestically, embedded in pastoral wind sonorities." Bach adapted this movement as the Gloria of his Missa in A major, BWV 234. The closing chorale "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" is a four-part setting.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halt_im_Ged%C3%A4chtnis_Jesum_Christ,_BWV_67).

I created this arrangement of the tenor aria Mein Jesus ist erstanden (My Jesus is arisen) for Brass (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn & French Horn) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sinfonia: "Wer Dank opfert, der preiset mich" (BWV 18 No 1) for Flute & Strings

6 parts8 pages03:073 years ago484 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Gleichwie der Regen und Schnee vom Himmel fällt (Just as the rain and snow fall from heaven), BWV 18,[a] is an early church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the Sunday Sexagesimae, the second Sunday before Lent, likely by 1713.

Bach worked for the court in Weimar from 1708. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. Bach composed this cantata for the second Sunday before Ash Wednesday, called Sexagesima.

The cantata falls relatively early in Bach's chronology of cantata compositions. It was possibly composed for 24 February 1715, but more likely a year or two earlier. Christoph Wolff states: "The original performing material has survived and allows us to date the work to 1713". Bach performed the cantata again in Leipzig in 1724, with an expanded scoring in a different key. It was then probably performed in the same service as the newly composed Leichtgesinnte Flattergeister, BWV 181.

The keys in this section refer to the Weimar version, although the recording by Masaaki Suzuki, with commentary by Klaus Hofmann, uses the Leipzig keys. Hofmann notes the work's "Lutheran character", quoting Luther's litany inserted in the third movement, and sees it as a "recitative study, exploring the secco recitative of the Italian opera, introduced by Erdmann Neumeister, and also the accompagnato with rich instrumental accompaniment. Gardiner finds all three cantatas for the occasion, dealing with God's word, "characterised by his vivid pictorial imagination, an arresting sense of drama, and by music of freshness and power that lodges in the memory".

The cantata opens with a sinfonia in G minor, which illustrates falling rain and snow in descending phrases. In da capo form, is reminiscent both of a chaconne and a concerto. The four violas and continuo, with bassoon and cello parts specified, create an unusual sound, termed "magically dark-hued sonority" by Gardiner.

The quotation from Isaiah is sung by the bass, the vox Christi (voice of Christ), in a secco recitative. This is Bach's first adaptation of recitative in a church cantata, not following operatic patterns, but "a lucid presentation of the text in a dignified, highly personal style".

The central movement is unique in Bach's cantatas, the choir soprano interrupts the prayer of the male soloists four times, followed by a conclusion of the full choir "Erhör uns, lieber Herre Gott!" (Hear us, dear Lord God!). The recitatives are marked adagio in E-flat major, while the interspersed litany is presented dramatically (allegro in C minor). Gardiner compares the imagery of the recitatives: "all adds up to a vivid, Brueghel-like portrayal of rural society at work – the sower, the glutton, the lurking devil, as well as those pantomime villains, the Turks and the Papists.

Like other cantatas written in Weimar, the cantata is scored for a small ensemble, composed of soprano, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, four violas, cello, bassoon and basso continuo. The setting for four violas is unusual. In a similar orchestration, the Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 also omits violins. The second version of this cantata for a performance in Leipzig adds two recorders, which double viola I and II an octave higher. John Eliot Gardiner compares the effect to a four-foot stop on a pipe organ. The cantata begins in G minor in the Weimar version, in A minor in the Leipzig version.

The only aria, for soprano in E-flat major, is accompanied by the four violas in unison. The cantata closes with a four-part setting of Spengler's hymn stanza, Bach's first of many to come as the typical conclusion of his cantatas.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleichwie_der_Regen_und_Schnee_vom_Himmel_f%C3%A4llt,_BWV_18).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Sinfonia: "Gleichwie der Regen und Schnee vom Himmel fällt" (Just as the rain and snow fall from heaven) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Sonata III (Opus 2 No 3 WB 45) for Viola & Piano

2 parts11 pages11:123 years ago481 views
Viola, Piano
Johann Christian Bach (1735 -- 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh child and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is sometimes referred to as "the London Bach" or "the English Bach", due to his time spent living in the British capital, where he came to be known as John Bach. He is noted for influencing the concerto style of Mozart.

Johann Christian Bach was born to Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena Bach in Leipzig, Germany. His distinguished father was already 50 at the time of his birth, which would perhaps contribute to the sharp differences between his music and that of his father. Even so, his father first instructed him in music and that instruction continued until his death. After his father's death, when Johann Christian was 15, he worked with his second-oldest half brother Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, who was twenty-one years his senior and considered at the time to be the most musically gifted of Bach's sons.

He enjoyed a promising career, first as a composer then as a performer playing alongside Carl Friedrich Abel, the notable player of the viola da gamba. He composed cantatas, chamber music, keyboard and orchestral works, operas and symphonies.

Johann Christian Bach's father died when Johann Christian was only fifteen. This is perhaps one reason why it is difficult to find points of similarity between the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and that of Johann Christian. By contrast, the piano sonatas of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Johann Christian's much older half brother, tend to invoke certain elements of his father at times, especially with regard to the use of counterpoint. (C.P.E. was 36 at the time J.S. died.)

Johann Christian's highly melodic style differentiates his works from those of his family. He composed in the Galante style incorporating balanced phrases, emphasis on melody and accompaniment, without too much contrapuntal complexity. The Galante movement opposed the intricate lines of Baroque music, and instead placed importance on fluid melodies in periodic phrases. It preceded the classical style, which fused the Galante aesthetics with a renewed interest in counterpoint.

Although originally written for Violin and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Viola & Piano.

Aria: "Den soll mein Lorbeer schützend decken" (BWV 207 No 5a) for Cello Duet

2 parts4 pages05:493 years ago481 views
Cello(2)
Vereinigte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten (United discord of quivering strings), BWV 207,[a] is a secular cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach and first performed on 11 December 1726 in Leipzig.

Bach composed this cantata to celebrate the appointment of Gottlieb Kortte as professor of Roman Law at Leipzig University. The librettist of the work is unknown: it may have been Picander, who had been providing libretti for Bach from at least the previous year when they collaborated on another academic cantata Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft, BWV 205.

Bach incorporated music from his first Brandenburg Concerto, which was composed years earlier. The third movement of the concerto is used for the opening chorus with trumpets replacing the concerto's horns and some of the instrumental music given to the choir.

There is a related work Auf, schmetternde Töne der muntern Trompeten, BWV 207a.

The cantata features four solo singers: Glück (soprano), Dankbarkeit (alto), Fleiß (tenor), and Ehre (bass). It is also scored for four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two flutes, two oboes d'amore, taille, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vereinigte_Zwietracht_der_wechselnden_Saiten,_BWV_207).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Den soll mein Lorbeer schützend decken" (My laurel shall cover him protectively) for Cello Duet.

Allemande from the French Suite No. 2 in C Minor (BWV 813 No. 1) for Viola & Guitar

2 parts2 pages02:232 years ago481 views
Viola, Guitar
The French Suites, BWV 812–817, are six suites which Johann Sebastian Bach wrote for the clavier (harpsichord or clavichord) between the years of 1722 and 1725. Although Suites 1–4 are typically dated to 1722, it is possible that the first was written somewhat earlier.

The suites were later given the name 'French' (first recorded usage by Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg in 1762). Likewise, the English Suites received a later appellation. The name was popularised by Bach's biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel, who wrote in his 1802 biography of Bach, "One usually calls them French Suites because they are written in the French manner." This claim, however, is inaccurate: like Bach's other suites, they follow a largely Italian convention. There is no surviving definitive manuscript of these suites, and ornamentation varies both in type and in degree across manuscripts. The Courantes of the first (in D minor) and third (in B minor) suites are in the French style, the Courantes of the other four suites are all in the Italian style. In any case Bach also employed dance movements (such as the Polonaise of the Sixth suite) that are foreign to the French manner. Usually, the swift second movement after the Allemande is named either Courante (French style) or Corrente (Italian style), but in all these suites the second movements are named Courante, according to the Bach catalog listing, which supports the suggestion that these suites are "French". Some of the manuscripts that have come down to us are titled "Suites Pour Le Clavecin", which is what probably led to the tradition of calling them "French" Suites.

Two additional suites, one in A minor (BWV 818), the other in E-flat Major (BWV 819), are linked to the familiar six in some manuscripts. The Overture in the French style, BWV 831, which Bach published as the second part of Clavier-Übung, is a suite in the French style but not connected to the French suites. Some manuscripts have movements not found in other copies, which are probably spurious.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Suites_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Allemande from the French Suite No. 2 in C Minor (BWV 813 No. 1) for Viola & Classical Guitar.

Prelude: "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten" (BWV 691a) for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages02:322 years ago480 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach was a member of a family that had for generations been occupied in music. His sons were to continue the tradition, providing the foundation of a new style of music that prevailed in the later part of the eighteenth century. Johann Sebastian Bach himself represented the end of an age, the culmination of the Baroque in a magnificent synthesis of Italian melodic invention, French rhythmic dance forms and German contrapuntal mastery.

Born in Eisenach in 1685, Bach was educated largely by his eldest brother, after the early death of his parents. At the age of eighteen he embarked on his career as a musician, serving first as a court musician at Weimar, before appointment as organist at Arnstadt. Four years later he moved to Mühlhausen as organist and the following year became organist and chamber musician to Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar. Securing his release with difficulty, in 1717 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and remained at Cöthen until 1723, when he moved to Leipzig as Cantor at the School of St.Thomas, with responsibility for the music of the five principal city churches. Bach was to remain in Leipzig until his death in 1750.

As a craftsman obliged to fulfil the terms of his employment, Bach provided music suited to his various appointments. It was natural that his earlier work as an organist and something of an expert on the construction of organs, should result in music for that instrument. At Cöthen, where the Pietist leanings of the court made church music unnecessary, he provided a quantity of instrumental music for the court orchestra and its players. In Leipzig he began by composing series of cantatas for the church year, later turning his attention to instrumental music for the Collegium musicum of the University, and to the collection and ordering of his own compositions.

The so-called Kirnberger Collection (BWV 690-713), a title now generally ignored in recent editions, is a collection of music by Bach copied by or for his pupil Johann Philipp Kirnberger. The latter was born in Saalfeld in 1721 and educated in Coburg and Cotha, before, in 1739, travelling to Leipzig for lessons in composition and performance with Bach. After a period spent in Poland, he returned to Dresden, moving then to Berlin as a violinist in the Prussian royal service. In 1754 he entered the service of Prince Heinrich of Prussia and four years later that of Princess Anna Amalia, remaining in this last position until his death in Berlin in 1783. Kirnberger had the highest regard for Bach, and did his utmost to bring about the posthumous publication of the latter's four-part chorale settings.

It is suggested that the Partite diverse, chorale variations, date from about 1700, when Bach was at the Michaelisschule in Lüneburg. The first of these, the Partite diverse sopra Christ, du bist der helle Tag, BWV 766, is based on a chorale that is a Lutheran translation of the hymn Christe, qui lux es et dies, used as an evening hymn. In Partita I the chorale is harmonized, followed by Partita II, a bicinium. The second variation, Partita III, brings a rhythmic change in accompaniment figuration and Partita IV has further embroidery of the melody. In Partita V the chorale melody is in the tenor part, while in Partita VI the metre is 12/8. Partita VII, con pedale se piace, perhaps doubling the left hand, ends the set of variations.

The first of the Kirnberger Chorales, Wit nur den lieben Gott läßt walten, BWV 690, takes as its basis the hymn by Georg Neumark, published in 1641 and generally to be sung on the Fifth Sunday after Trinity. It probably dates from the Weimar period, with the simpler version, BWV 691, written out by Bach in his note-book for his son Wilhelm Friedemann. The first, more contrapuntal version, like the second, has its chorale melody in the upper part. Ach Gott und Herr, BWV 692 and BWV 693, although included in his collection by Kimberger, are thought to be by Johann Gottfried Walther, a cousin and friend of Bach, since both versions seem to form part of Walther' s partita on the same melody. Wo soll ich fliehen hin, BWV 694 is dated to the period before Weimar and is for two manuals and pedals. It is based on a penitential hymn of 1630 by J. Heermaann. Here the chorale melody is played by the pedals, while there is a suggestion of the text (Whither shall I flee) in the running notes of the music.

Source: Naxos (http://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.553134&catNum=553134&filetype=About+this+Recording&language=English).

Although originally written for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Chorale Prelude (BWV 691a) "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten" (Who only lets dear God rule) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Immerhin, immerhin, wenn ich gleich verstoßen bin" (BWV 52 No 3) for String Quartet

4 parts7 pages07:464 years ago480 views
Strings(4)
Falsche Welt, dir trau ich nicht (False world, I don't trust you), BWV 52, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the solo cantata for soprano in Leipzig for the 23rd Sunday after Trinity and it was first performed on 24 November 1726.

Bach composed the cantata, a solo cantata for a soprano, in 1726 in Leipzig for the 23rd Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Philippians, "our conversation is in heaven" (Philippians 3:17–21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the question about paying taxes, answered by "Render unto Caesar..." (Matthew 22:15–22). The unknown poet takes from the gospel the idea that the world is false and that man should concentrate on God. He refers to the murder of Abner by Joab, described in 2 Samuel 3:27, as an example for the world's falseness. The closing chorale is the first verse of Adam Reusner's "In dich hab ich gehoffet, Herr" (1533). The beginning line is the last idea of the "Te Deum". Bach used verse 4 of the chorale, "Mir hat die Welt trüglich gericht't", in his St Matthew Passion.

The cantata is set for just one singer, but the instrumentation is rich. Similar to other cantatas of the later Leipzig period, Bach used an instrumental movement from an earlier period as a sinfonia, in this case the opening movement of his first Brandenburg Concerto, dominated by horns and oboes, in its early version without a violino piccolo. In the first aria the soprano is accompanied by two violins, in the second aria of dance character, by three oboes.

The two horns of the sinfonia return in the closing chorale, horn 1 supporting the soprano, horn 2 playing a fifth part.

The cantata in six movements is scored for a soprano soloist, a four-part choir (only for the final chorale), two horns, three oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsche_Welt,_dir_trau_ich_nicht,_BWV_52).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "Immerhin, immerhin, wenn ich gleich verstoßen bin" (It's all the same, it's all the same, even if I am repudiated!) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Erschrecke doch, du allzu sichre Seele" (BWV 102 No 5) for Flute, Viola & Cello

3 parts6 pages06:413 years ago480 views
Flute, Guitar, Cello
Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben (Lord, Your eyes look for faith), BWV 102, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the tenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed on 25 August 1726.

The cantata of Bach's third annual cycle in Leipzig was written for the tenth Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, different gifts, but one spirit (1 Corinthians 12:1–11), and from the Gospel of Luke, Jesus announcing the destruction of Jerusalem and cleansing of the Temple (Luke 19:41–48). The words of the cantata are only generally connected to the readings, asking the soul to return immediately to God's ways. Two movements are based on Bible words, the opening chorus on Jeremiah 5:3, movement 4 on Romans 2:4–5. The cantata is closed by verses 6 and 7 of the hymn "So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Gott" by Johann Heermann (1630), sung on the melody of Martin Luther's "Vater unser im Himmelreich" based on the Lord's Prayer. The words of the free poetry have been attributed to different authors: C.S. Terry suggests Christian Weiss Sr, Werner Neumann suggests Christiana Mariana von Ziegler, and Walther Blankenburg suggests Christoph Helm.

The opening chorus is a mature work containing an intricate combination of instrumental and vocal parts and a variety of expressive devices depicting the words. The opening sinfonia is in two parts which are repeated separately and together throughout the movement. The words Herr, deine Augen are repeated three times. Bach used the music for the Kyrie of his Missa in G minor.

The bass voice in movement 4, marked arioso by Bach himself, is treated similarly to the vox Christi, the voice of Jesus in Bach's Passions and cantatas. The bass part has been recorded by singers who do not specialise in Baroque music, such as Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau with conductor Benjamin Britten at the Aldeburgh Festival.

Although originally scored for alto, tenor and bass soloists and a four-part choir (SATB), flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute, Viola & Cello and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Vesperae IV: "Brevissima de Confessore" for Piano & Strings

5 parts25 pages18:075 years ago479 views
P. Gregor Schreyer (1719 - 1767) was a German composer, Music Teacher, Organist and Andechs monk. He ccomposed eight masses and among other events helf a major theological disputation at the Andechs pilgrimage church.

On weekdays that are not major feasts Vespers features hardly any ceremonies and the celebrant wears the usual choir dress. However, on Sundays and greater feasts Vespers may be solemn. Solemn Vespers differ in that the celebrant wears the cope, he is assisted by assistants also in copes, incense is used, and two acolytes, a thurifer, and at least one master of ceremonies are needed. On ordinary Sundays only two assistants are needed while on greater feasts four or six assistants may be used. The celebrant and assistants vest in the surplice and the cope, which is of the color of the day. The celebrant sits at the sedile, in front of which is placed a lectern, covered with a cloth in the color of the day. The assistants sit on benches or stools facing the altar, or if there are two assistants, they may sit at the sedile next to the celebrant (the first assistant in the place of the deacon and the second assistant in place of the subdeacon).

The psalms and hymns of the Vespers service have attracted the interest of many composers, including Claudio Monteverdi, Antonio Vivaldi, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Anton Bruckner. (Sergei Rachmaninoff's "Vespers" is really a setting of the Eastern Orthodox all-night vigil.)

Although this work was originally written for Chorus and Organ, I created this arrangement for Strings (Violins (2), Viola & Cello) & Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Prelude from the English Suite No. 5 in E Minor (BWV 810 No. 1) for String Trio

3 parts7 pages05:152 years ago479 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
The English Suites, BWV 806–811, are a set of six suites written by the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach for harpsichord and generally thought to be the earliest of his 19 suites for keyboard, the others being the six French Suites, BWV 812–817, the six Partitas, BWV 825-830 and the Overture in the French style, BWV 831.

These six suites for keyboard are thought to be the earliest set that Bach composed. Originally, their date of composition was thought to have been between 1718 and 1720, but more recent research suggests that the composition was likely earlier, around 1715, while the composer was living in Weimar.

Bach's English Suites display less affinity with Baroque English keyboard style than do the French Suites to French Baroque keyboard style; the name "English" is thought to date back to a claim made by the 19th-century Bach biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel that these works might have been composed for an English nobleman, but no evidence has emerged to substantiate this claim. It has also been suggested that the name is a tribute to Charles Dieupart, whose fame was greatest in England, and on whose Six Suittes de clavessin Bach's English Suites were in part based.

Surface characteristics of the English Suites strongly resemble those of Bach's French Suites and Partitas, particularly in the sequential dance-movement structural organization and treatment of ornamentation. These suites also resemble the Baroque French keyboard suite typified by the generation of composers including Jean-Henri d'Anglebert, and the dance-suite tradition of French lutenists that preceded it.

In the English Suites especially, Bach's affinity with French lute music is demonstrated by his inclusion of a prelude for each suite, departing from an earlier tradition of German derivations of French suite (those of Johann Jakob Froberger and Georg Boehm are examples), which saw a relatively strict progression of the dance movements (Allemande, Courante, Sarabande and Gigue) and which did not typically feature a Prelude. Unlike the unmeasured preludes of French lute or keyboard style, however, Bach's preludes in the English Suites are composed in strict meter.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Suites_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Prelude from the English Suite No. 5 in E Minor (BWV 810 No. 1) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Herr Gott Vater, mein starker Held" (BWV 37 No 3) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages05:063 years ago479 views
Piccolo, Flute, Bassoon
Wer da gläubet und getauft wird (He who believes and is baptised), BWV 37,[a] is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the feast of the Ascension. He composed it in Leipzig and first performed it on 18 May 1724.

The work is Bach's first cantata composition for the feast of the Ascension. Surprisingly for a high feast day, it is modestly scored; only two oboes d'amore add to the sound of the regular stings and basso continuo, accompanying four vocal parts. An anonymous poet derived thoughts from the prescribed Gospel, even quoting a verse, but excluded the Ascension itself and concentrated on the Lutheran idea of justification by faith alone. The poet structured the six movements of the cantata in two parts, each concluded by a chorale.

Although the text for the first movement is a quotation of Jesus, it is not given to the bass as the vox Christi but to the choir. John Eliot Gardiner notes that Bach treats it as a "statement by the faithful, as though to demonstrate that they had already absorbed its message to 'go into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature". The movement begins with an extended instrumental Sinfonia which introduces three melodic lines that occur simultaneously. The first motif is played by the oboes and later taken by the choir, According to Gardiner, it suggests "steadfastness of faith". The second motif in the violins is reminiscent of Luther's hymn "Dies sind die heiligen zehn Gebot (These are the holy Ten Commandments), which opened two other cantatas. Gardiner describes it as "emollient and graceful, a halfway house between a minuet and a waltz, affirming a more serene side to faith." The third motif is part of the hymn "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" and appears in the continuo. In two vocal sections, the voices are embedded in a repetition of the Sinfonia.

Movement 2 is an aria with a solo violin part missing, as the Neue Bach-Ausgabe reported. In movement 3, the chorale appears in the form of a chorale concerto, an Italianate form that Johann Hermann Schein had used a century earlier. The chorale melody is changed according to the meaning of the words, only the continuo accompanies two voices. The following recitative is accompanied by the strings. They appear also in the last aria, in which an oboe comes and goes, with interesting effects. The closing chorale is a four part setting

The cantata in six movements is scored rather modestly: the four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass) and a four-part choir are accompanied only by two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo. Bach's cantatas for the occasion in later years, Auf Christi Himmelfahrt allein, BWV 128, and Gott fähret auf mit Jauchzen, BWV 43, and his Ascension Oratorio use a more festive orchestra including horns or trumpets.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wer_da_gl%C3%A4ubet_und_getauft_wird,_BWV_37).

I created this Arrangement of the first Chorale: "Herr Gott Vater, mein starker Held!" (Lord God Father, my mighty champion!) for Woodwind Trio (Piccolo, Flute & Bassoon).

"Am Tage Aller Seelen" (D. 343) for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page02:195 years ago478 views
Franz Peter Schubert (1797–1828) was an Austrian composer. In his short lifespan of less than 32 years, he was a prolific composer, writing some 600 Lieder, nine symphonies (including the famous "Unfinished Symphony"), liturgical music, operas, some incidental music and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. Appreciation of Schubert's music during his lifetime was limited, but interest in his work increased significantly in the decades following his death. Franz Liszt, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn, among others, discovered and championed his works in the 19th century. Today, Schubert is seen as one of the leading exponents of the early Romantic era in music and he remains one of the most frequently performed composers.

It is impossible to say exactly how Schubert achieved the spiritual depth and the emotional profundity of his setting of Johann Jacobi's Am Tage aller Seelen (Litanei) (On All Soul's Day [Litany]) (D. 343) from August 1816. A single page of exquisitely wrought melody setting the three verses of Jacobi's poem as a strophic song, there is little about Am Tage aller Seelen which requires comment. The vocal melody is a seemingly effortless fusion of Italian bel canto and German innigkeit. The harmonies are for the most part simple but with a few suspensions and secondary dominants all articulated over smoothly moving arpeggiated triplets in the piano accompaniment. On paper, it looks like nothing special: but in performance Am Tage aller Seelen is one of the handful of the very greatest Schubert songs of quiet consolation and rapturous repose.

I transcribed this piece for Harp and Flute for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorale: "Ach, ich habe schon erblicket" (BWV 162 No 6) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page01:294 years ago477 views
Ach! ich sehe, itzt, da ich zur Hochzeit gehe, BWV 162 (Ah! I see, now, when I go to the wedding), BWV 162, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 20th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it in 1715 or 1716.

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. He wrote the cantata for the 20th Sunday after Trinity, first performed on 3 November 1715 (according to the musicologist Alfred Dürr) or on 25 October 1716. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, "walk circumspectly, ... filled with the Spirit" (Ephesians 5:15--21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the great banquet (Matthew 22:1--14). The cantata text was provided by the court poet Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer (1715). He refers to the gospel and reflects how essential it is to follow the loving invitation of the Lord. Franck's language is rich in contrasts, such as Seelengift und Himmelsbrot (poison for the soul and bread of heaven), and of images derived from the Bible, such as Der Himmel ist sein Thron (Heaven is his throne) after Isaiah 66:1. The closing chorale is stanza 7 of "Alle Menschen müssen sterben" of Johann Rosenmüller (1652).

Bach performed the cantata again on 10 October 1723 in his first year in Leipzig in a revised version, including a corno da tirarsi, a baroque wind instrument mentioned only in Bach's music and thought to have been similar to the slide trumpet (tromba da tirarsi). Bach's score is lost, and some parts seem to be missing as well.

The cantata opens with a bass aria, accompanied by three instruments in a polyphonic setting, the two violins and the viola (with the corno). The motif for the first words is present most of the time. The soprano aria seems to lack a part for an obbligato instrument. For the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage of the Monteverdi Choir (and John Eliot Gardiner), Robert Levin reconstructed a version for flauto traverso and oboe d'amore. The duet is also accompanied only by the continuo, but seems complete. The melody of the closing chorale is rare elsewhere, but appeared in Weimar not only in this work, but also in a chorale prelude of Johann Gottfried Walther.

Although this cantata is scored for a small ensemble, four soloists, corno da tirarsi (likely added in Leipzig), two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Concerto in Bb Major (BWV 982) for Mandolin & Guitar

2 parts9 pages07:57a year ago478 views
Guitar(2)
The concerto transcriptions of Johann Sebastian Bach date from his second period at the court in Weimar (1708–1717). Bach transcribed for organ and harpsichord a number of Italian and Italianate concertos, mainly by Antonio Vivaldi, but with others by Alessandro Marcello, Benedetto Marcello, Georg Philipp Telemann and the musically talented Prince Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar. It is thought that most of the transcriptions were probably made in 1713–1714. Their publication by C.F. Peters in the 1850s and by Breitkopf & Härtel in the 1890s played a decisive role in the Vivaldi revival of the twentieth century.

In this, the Keyboard Concerto no. 11 in B-flat Major (BWV 982) Bach created a transcriptiion after the No.1 of the 6 Violin Concertos, Op.1, by Prince Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concerto_transcriptions_for_organ_and_harpsichord_(Bach))

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Concerto in Bb Major (BWV 982) for Mandolin & Classical Guitar.