Sheet music

Recitative & Chorus: "Und der Hohenpriester" (BWV 244 No. 36) for Winds & Strings

12 parts7 pages01:462 years ago147 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Recitative & Chorus: “Und der Hohenpriester antwortete und sprach zu ihm” (And the high priest answered and said to Him) for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Clarinets, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Recitative: "Und da sie den Lobgesang gesprochen hatten" (BWV 244 No. 14) for Flute & Strings

5 parts1 page00:362 years ago116 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Recitative: "Und da sie den Lobgesang gesprochen hatten" (And when they had spoken the benediction) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Chorale: "Erkenne mich, mein Hüter" (BWV 244 No. 15) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page01:012 years ago296 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Chorale: "Erkenne mich, mein Hüter" (Acknowledge me, my Guardian) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Quoniam tu Solus Sanctus" from the Mass in F Major (BWV 233 No. 5) for Double-Reed Trio

3 parts5 pages04:152 years ago296 views
Oboe(2), Bassoon
Church music in Latin by Johann Sebastian Bach comprises about ten compositions, all composed during his Leipzig period. As a Lutheran church musician, Bach was more devoted to the composition of sacred music in German, writing hundreds of liturgical compositions in that language, and for instance also producing a German version of Pergolesi's Stabat Mater. Compared to Lutheran practice elsewhere, an uncharacteristic amount of Latin was however used in church services in Leipzig: it included music on Latin texts being performed on ordinary Sundays, on high holidays (Christmas, Easter, Pentecost), and the Magnificat also on Marian feasts (Annunciation, Visitation, Purification).

In Lutheran service, a Missa was a setting of only Kyrie and Gloria. Such a mass consisting of only Kyrie and Gloria is for that time period sometimes indicated as Missa brevis (literally: "short mass"). In 1733 Bach composed such a Missa brevis for the Catholic court in Dresden, however in an extended setting. In the late 1730s he again composed four Missae breves, mostly parodies of earlier cantata movements. At the end of his life he expanded the Missa for Dresden to his only setting of the complete Mass ordinary, the Mass in B minor.

Bach wrote four other settings of Kyrie and Gloria, sometimes called Missa brevis. The attribute brevis in this case means short in words, unlike the Missa brevis of the classical period which is short in duration. Sometimes the works are termed Lutheran mass, because the combination of only Kyrie and Gloria was used more frequently in the Lutheran liturgy.

They seem to have been intended for liturgical use, considering a performance time of about 20 minutes each, the average duration of a Bach cantata. They may have been composed around 1738/39. Possibly they were written for Count Franz Anton von Sporck or performed by him in Lysá.

Each Missa is in six movements, the Kyrie one choral movement in three sections, the Gloria in five movements. The first and last movement of the Gloria are also choral, framing three arias for different voice types. The music consists mostly of parodies of cantata movements. He changed the music slightly to adjust to the Latin words, but kept the original instrumentation. The opening chorus of Es wartet alles auf dich, BWV 187, became the final movement of the Missa in G minor, Cum sancto spiritu. Occasionally he switched a voice part, for example he asked for a tenor in the Quoniam of that Missa, a parody of the soprano aria Halt ich nur fest an ihm of that cantata.

For the Missa in F major, BWV 233, scored for horns, oboes, bassoon, strings, SATB, and basso continuo, Bach derived most of the six movements from earlier cantatas as parodies.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bach's_church_music_in_Latin#Settings_of_.28parts_of.29_the_Latin_mass_liturgy).

I created this arrangement of the "Quoniam tu solus sanctus" (For you alone are holy) for Double-Reed Trio (2 Oboes & Bassoon).

Chorale: "Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit" (BWV 244 No. 25) for Flute & Strings

5 parts1 page01:022 years ago227 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created a part for Solo Flute and created this arrangement of the Chorale: "Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit" (What my God wills always occurs) for Solo Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen" (BWV 244 No. 27a) for Woodwinds & Strings

6 parts6 pages03:292 years ago518 views
Flute, Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Aria: “So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen” (Thus my Jesus is now captured) for Woodwinds (Flute & Oboe) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Aria: "Du gibst mir Blut" (BWV 246 No 15) for Woodwinds & Strings
Video

Aria: "Du gibst mir Blut" (BWV 246 No 15) for Woodwinds & Strings

7 parts6 pages03:482 years ago182 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St Luke Passion (German: Lukas-Passion), BWV 246, is a Passion setting formerly attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach. It is included in the BWV catalog under the number 246. Now it appears in the catalogues under the heading apocryphal or anonymous.

A surviving manuscript of the St Luke Passion from about 1730 is partly in Bach's hand, though scholars believe that the music is certainly not his own. Presumably Bach performed it, or intended to perform it, in Leipzig. C. P. E. Bach and Agricola may have mistaken it for a work of Bach's and thus included it in their census. Of course, given his delight in exhaustive cycles, Bach should have composed a St Luke Passion. Apparently J. S. Bach took the anonymous St Luke Passion and arranged it for four voices, chorus, orchestra, and continuo to meet an urgent deadline for Good Friday in 1730.

With regard to the authorship of the passion, Felix Mendelssohn commented in a letter to Franz Hauser who had just paid a large sum of money to purchase the Lukaspassion: "I am sorry to hear you have given so much money for the St. Luke Passion." Mendelssohn repudiated Bach's authorship of the work upon the evidence of a single chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt' (No. 9). He continued, "No doubt, as an authentic autograph, it would be worth the price. But it is not by Bach. You ask, 'On what grounds do you maintain your opinion?' I answer, on intrinsic evidence, though it is unpleasant to say so, since it is your property. But just look at the chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt'! If that is by Sebastian, may I be hanged! It certainly is in his handwriting, but it is too clean. Evidently he copied it. 'Whose is it?' you ask; 'Telemann, or M. Bach, or Altnichol?' Jung Nichol or plain Nichol, how can I tell? It's not by Bach. Probably it is of North German origin."

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Luke_Passion,_BWV_246).

I created this arrangement of the Aria: "Du gibst mir Blut" (You give me blood) for Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe & English Horn) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sonata III in D Minor (BWV 527) for String Trio

3 parts13 pages14:542 years ago1,200 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Few composers in history have exerted such extraordinary and far-reaching influence on music as Johann Sebastian Bach. But while many audiences know and enjoy the “Brandenburg” Concertos, B-Minor Mass, Well-Tempered Clavier, and other prevalent works, not everyone is similarly acquainted with Bach’s vast output for the organ. Some of his most important compositions were written for that instrument, and becoming more familiar with them can only intensify our fervor for the great composer.

The Trio Sonatas (BWVs 525-530) were written for the organ or pedal clavichord (a practice instrument for organists), these sonatas require the right and left hands to play independently melodic lines on separate keyboards, while the feet play the basso continuo. According to Jacobs, “The organ sonatas are disarmingly attractive and immediately appealing to the listener, though they pose ferocious interpretive and technical demands for the player.” A significant challenge of performing these works is one of sheer coordination: playing three lines of music on two keyboards and pedal with all four limbs. “There isn’t much for the performer to cling on to,” Jacobs said. “It’s a little like walking on eggshells.” By contrast, in other weightier organ and keyboard works, Bach sometimes employs thicker four- or five-part counterpoint, offering a more idiomatically conceived keyboard texture.

Portions of this work pop up again in Bach's Triple Concerto (for flute, violin, harpsichord, and strings) as well as in arrangements by Mozart for string trio. The opening Andante begins with a spidery eight-bar theme in the upper register with, by the standards of these trio sonatas, a rather rudimentary pedal accompaniment. Soon a second melodic line arrives in imitation of the first, thereby establishing the work's credentials as a trio sonata (two melody lines plus accompaniment). The central Adagio e dolce shifts to F major for a measured, reserved yet uncloyingly sweet movement that may have influenced Mozart's later music for glass harmonica. The final Vivace, back in D minor, again offers two upper voices in imitation, now with a more elaborate pedal accompaniment in a deft triplet rhythm.

Source: Almusic.com (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/trio-sonata-for-organ-no-3-in-d-minor-bwv-527-bc-j3-mc0002364981).

I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).
8 Chorals (BWV 246 Nos 19-29) for Wind Quintet
Video

8 Chorals (BWV 246 Nos 19-29) for Wind Quintet

5 parts5 pages06:412 years ago420 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
The St Luke Passion (German: Lukas-Passion), BWV 246, is a Passion setting formerly attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach. It is included in the BWV catalog under the number 246. Now it appears in the catalogues under the heading apocryphal or anonymous.

A surviving manuscript of the St Luke Passion from about 1730 is partly in Bach's hand, though scholars believe that the music is certainly not his own. Presumably Bach performed it, or intended to perform it, in Leipzig. C. P. E. Bach and Agricola may have mistaken it for a work of Bach's and thus included it in their census. Of course, given his delight in exhaustive cycles, Bach should have composed a St Luke Passion. Apparently J. S. Bach took the anonymous St Luke Passion and arranged it for four voices, chorus, orchestra, and continuo to meet an urgent deadline for Good Friday in 1730.

With regard to the authorship of the passion, Felix Mendelssohn commented in a letter to Franz Hauser who had just paid a large sum of money to purchase the Lukaspassion: "I am sorry to hear you have given so much money for the St. Luke Passion." Mendelssohn repudiated Bach's authorship of the work upon the evidence of a single chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt' (No. 9). He continued, "No doubt, as an authentic autograph, it would be worth the price. But it is not by Bach. You ask, 'On what grounds do you maintain your opinion?' I answer, on intrinsic evidence, though it is unpleasant to say so, since it is your property. But just look at the chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt'! If that is by Sebastian, may I be hanged! It certainly is in his handwriting, but it is too clean. Evidently he copied it. 'Whose is it?' you ask; 'Telemann, or M. Bach, or Altnichol?' Jung Nichol or plain Nichol, how can I tell? It's not by Bach. Probably it is of North German origin."

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Luke_Passion,_BWV_246).

I created this arrangement of 8 Chorals (19-29):

19: "Ich werde dir zu Ehren alles wagen" (I will dare you to risk all)
21: "Der heiligen zwölf Boten Zahl" (The twelve blest commandments' full toll)
22a: "Nie keinen, nie keinen!" (No, never! No, never!)
22b: "Die Jünger Jesu" (The Young Jesus)
23: "Wir armen Sünder bitten" (We wretched sinners pray thee)
25: "Mein Vater, wie du willt" (My father, as thou willt)
27: "Durch deines Todes Kampf" (Through thy great strife with death)
29: "Laß mich Gnade für dir finden" (May I favor find before thee)

for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

Recitative: "Erbarm es, Gott!" (BWV 244 No. 51) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts2 pages00:482 years ago103 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Recitative: "Erbarm es, Gott! Hier steht der Heiland angebunden” (Forgive this, God! Here stands the Savior bound) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sonata II in C Minor (BWV 526) for String Trio

3 parts13 pages12:422 years ago913 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
One of the two Bach trio sonatas from which Mozart drew movements to arrange for string trio, BWV 526 makes effective use of its C minor key, carrying an aural and emotional richness without suggesting pathos or high drama. The first movement, Vivace, has two upper parts often bubbling along together in thirds, with lively but never frantic support from the pedals. The Largo, with its gently flowing top voice over an accompaniment in a lower register and gentle bass progressions, would seem almost a pastorale if it progressed over a more rocking rhythm. Unexpectedly, the upper and lower parts eventually reverse their roles. The concluding, quietly determined Allegro is something of a study in fourths. The upper subject begins with an interval of a fourth, and this infects the bass line, with its obsessive, descending fourths.

Source: Almusic.com (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/trio-sonata-for-organ-no-2-in-c-minor-bwv-526-bc-j2-mc0002365468).

I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Wer hat dich so geschlagen" (BWV 244 No. 37) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page00:492 years ago242 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Chorale: “Wer hat dich so geschlagen” (Who has struck you thus) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Befiehl du deine Wege" (BWV 244 No. 44) for Brass Quartet

4 parts1 page01:012 years ago426 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Chorale: “Befiehl du deine Wege” (Commit your path) for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & F Tuba).

Aria: "Dein Leib, das Manna meiner Seele" (BWV 246 No 13) for Woodwinds & Strings

6 parts6 pages05:062 years ago182 views
Flute, Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St Luke Passion (German: Lukas-Passion), BWV 246, is a Passion setting formerly attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach. It is included in the BWV catalog under the number 246. Now it appears in the catalogues under the heading apocryphal or anonymous.

A surviving manuscript of the St Luke Passion from about 1730 is partly in Bach's hand, though scholars believe that the music is certainly not his own. Presumably Bach performed it, or intended to perform it, in Leipzig. C. P. E. Bach and Agricola may have mistaken it for a work of Bach's and thus included it in their census. Of course, given his delight in exhaustive cycles, Bach should have composed a St Luke Passion. Apparently J. S. Bach took the anonymous St Luke Passion and arranged it for four voices, chorus, orchestra, and continuo to meet an urgent deadline for Good Friday in 1730.

With regard to the authorship of the passion, Felix Mendelssohn commented in a letter to Franz Hauser who had just paid a large sum of money to purchase the Lukaspassion: "I am sorry to hear you have given so much money for the St. Luke Passion." Mendelssohn repudiated Bach's authorship of the work upon the evidence of a single chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt' (No. 9). He continued, "No doubt, as an authentic autograph, it would be worth the price. But it is not by Bach. You ask, 'On what grounds do you maintain your opinion?' I answer, on intrinsic evidence, though it is unpleasant to say so, since it is your property. But just look at the chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt'! If that is by Sebastian, may I be hanged! It certainly is in his handwriting, but it is too clean. Evidently he copied it. 'Whose is it?' you ask; 'Telemann, or M. Bach, or Altnichol?' Jung Nichol or plain Nichol, how can I tell? It's not by Bach. Probably it is of North German origin."

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Luke_Passion,_BWV_246).

I created this arrangement of the Aria: "Weide mich und mach' mich satt" (Thy Body, the Manna of my spirit) for Woodwinds (Flute & Oboe) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sonata I in G Major (BWV 1027) for String Trio

3 parts13 pages12:262 years ago867 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Sonata No. 1 in G major, BWV 1027, Sonata No.2 in D major, BWV 1028, and Sonata No.3 in G minor, BWV 1029, respectively, are three sonatas that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote for viola da gamba and harpsichord.

There is no certainty as to when Bach wrote his three viola da gamba sonatas. Various musicologists suggest that they were composed as early as 1720, during Bach's Köthen period, at the court of Prince Leopold, where the Court Capelle included the well-known gamba player Christian Ferdinand Abel. Other evidence suggests that the sonatas were composed in Leipzig around 1740, where Bach was cantor at the St. Thomas Church, as well as director of the Collegium Musicum from 1723 onwards.

For this, the Sonata in G Major, BWV 1027, musicologists generally agree that Bach's first viola da gamba sonata is based on his Sonata in G major for Two Flutes and Basso Continuo, BWV 1039. The first movement begins in a style similar to the other two sonatas: the gamba introduces the theme which is then carried in the harpsichord. The weaving pattern continues. The second movement, however, begins with the harpsichord stating the theme, joined by the gamba in the dominant key. The last two movements continue in a similar way as well. The sublime, poetic andante is built over slow arpeggiations built over an eighth note base line. The last movement is a bright and lively fugue.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_da_Gamba_Sonatas_(Bach)).

Although originally written for viola da gamba and harpsichord, I created this arrangement for String trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Prelude: "Herr Gott, nun schleuß den Himmel auf" (BWV 617) for Guitar Duet

2 parts3 pages01:402 years ago450 views
Guitar(2)
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.

Though this is a tiny piece of organ music, its expressive power is undiminished. In this chorale arrangement, Bach aptly illustrated the text from the 1713 Geistreiches Gesangbuch from Weimar: ‘I have suffered and fought, but now my life is at an end and I can die in peace’. These are the words of the aged Simeon, who has seen his Saviour, as God had promised him. The legato yet persistent melody is played on the upper keyboard, while the left hand represents the restless feet anxious to enter the next world. Meanwhile, the pedal knocks steadily at the gates of heaven, in the firm conviction that the reward for earthly labours is close at hand.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

Although originally created for Organ, I created this Interpretation of Choral Prelude (BWV 617) "Herr Gott, nun schleuß den Himmel auf" (Lord God, now unlock Heaven) for Classical Guitar Duet.

The Trumpet Shall Sound (From Handel's "Messiah Oratorio" HWV 56, Part III, Scenes I and II)

14 parts51 pages05:472 years ago592 views
Voice, Trumpet(2), French Horn(2), Flute(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tuba
All credit for writing "The Trumpet Shall Sound" goes to my friend, Mike Magatagan [GO CHECK HIS ACCOUNT OUT! musescore.com/mike_magatagan]. I arranged the pitch and the Intro [Behold, I Shew You A Mysery].

"Kyrie Eleison" from the Mass in G Major (BWV 236 No. 1) for Oboe & Strings

6 parts6 pages03:312 years ago333 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Between 1737 and 1748 Johann Sebastian Bach wrote at least five Masses, four of which survive in their entirety. (The C Minor Mass exists only as a fragment.) These are known as the Missa brevis (plural is Missae brevis), meaning brief Masses or Lutheran Masses, in contrast to the Mass in B Minor, Bach's only Latin work following the complete Catholic Mass structure. But none of these Masses gets much attention in either Bach scholarship or performances, suffering first from being in the shadow of the Mass in B Minor - called by Georg Nägeli one of the "greatest musical works of art of all times and all peoples" - and second by the fact that each of these four Masses are "parody" works. A parody work is one based on preexisting music. Parody Masses were common in the Renaissance, whereby a composer would create a new musical work out of old material. Normally, that "old material" was a chant or popular song, some musical element that would be recognizable to the choir and congregation. For two famous examples, see Josquin's Missa pange lingua (based on the chant "Pange lingua", still used today in the Catholic Church), or Machaut's Missa l'homme armé (which is based on a popular song).

Bach's Masses, however, are parodies of his own work. In modern times, we tend to think of the word "parody" in terms of comedy; but the original use of the word in music had no such connotations. In fact, parody was a common technique that was often a form of flattery - if your work proved to be the source of the parody, then your music had to be fairly well known, perhaps even well respected. In the present case, Bach's Mass in G Major is largely based on his own earlier cantatas:

- The "Kyrie Eleison" is derived from Cantata 179
- the opening movement of the "Gloria in Excelsis" comes from Cantata 79
- the "Gratias agimus tibi" movement is derived from Cantata 138
- continuing in the Gloria, the movement "Domine Deus" also comes from Cantata 79
- "Quoniam tu solus sanctus" comes, like the Kyrie, from Cantata 179
- the final movement of the Gloria, "Cum Sancto Spiritu", originates from Cantata 17

The Kyrie of Mass in G Major begins with a lovely, meditative fugue - a real "throw-back" movement, drawing on the contrapuntal tradition of the Renaissance motet and Mass, relying entirely on the voices to drive the music. There is a continuo part written, but one can easily see that this is not an entirely independent part; rather, the continuo often doubles the bass voices of the choir, and throughout provides harmonic support for the singers. It does not, however, take part in the unveiling of the fugue.

Source: Bach.org (http://www.bach.org/bwv236.php).

I created this arrangement of the "Kyrie Eleison" (Lord have Mercy) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Choral: "Es wird in der Sünder Hände" (BWV 246 No 56) for Brass Quartet

4 parts1 page01:152 years ago220 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
The St Luke Passion (German: Lukas-Passion), BWV 246, is a Passion setting formerly attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach. It is included in the BWV catalog under the number 246. Now it appears in the catalogues under the heading apocryphal or anonymous.

A surviving manuscript of the St Luke Passion from about 1730 is partly in Bach's hand, though scholars believe that the music is certainly not his own. Presumably Bach performed it, or intended to perform it, in Leipzig. C. P. E. Bach and Agricola may have mistaken it for a work of Bach's and thus included it in their census. Of course, given his delight in exhaustive cycles, Bach should have composed a St Luke Passion. Apparently J. S. Bach took the anonymous St Luke Passion and arranged it for four voices, chorus, orchestra, and continuo to meet an urgent deadline for Good Friday in 1730.

With regard to the authorship of the passion, Felix Mendelssohn commented in a letter to Franz Hauser who had just paid a large sum of money to purchase the Lukaspassion: "I am sorry to hear you have given so much money for the St. Luke Passion." Mendelssohn repudiated Bach's authorship of the work upon the evidence of a single chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt' (No. 9). He continued, "No doubt, as an authentic autograph, it would be worth the price. But it is not by Bach. You ask, 'On what grounds do you maintain your opinion?' I answer, on intrinsic evidence, though it is unpleasant to say so, since it is your property. But just look at the chorale, 'Weide mich und mach' mich satt'! If that is by Sebastian, may I be hanged! It certainly is in his handwriting, but it is too clean. Evidently he copied it. 'Whose is it?' you ask; 'Telemann, or M. Bach, or Altnichol?' Jung Nichol or plain Nichol, how can I tell? It's not by Bach. Probably it is of North German origin."

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Luke_Passion,_BWV_246).

I created this arrangement of the Choral: "Es wird in der Sünder Hände" (Over to the hands of sinners) for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Euphonium).

Prelude & Fugue in A Major (BWV 896) for Pipe Organ

1 part4 pages03:122 years ago357 views
Organ
Johann Sebastian Bach was a member of a family that had for generations been occupied in music. His sons were to continue the tradition, providing the foundation of a new style of music that prevailed in the later part of the eighteenth century. Johann Sebastian Bach himself represented the end of an age, the culmination of the Baroque in a magnificent synthesis of Italian melodic invention, French rhythmic dance forms and German contrapuntal mastery.

Born in Eisenach in 1685, Bach was educated largely by his eldest brother, after the early death of his parents. At the age of eighteen he embarked on his career as a musician, serving first as a court musician at Weimar, before appointment as organist at Arnstadt. Four years later he moved to Mühlhausen as organist and the following year became organist and chamber musician to Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar. Securing his release with difficulty, in 1717 he was appointed Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and remained at Cöthen until 1723, when he moved to Leipzig as Cantor at the School of St.Thomas, with responsibility for the music of the five principal city churches. Bach was to remain in Leipzig until his death in 1750.

J.S. Bach was one of the most renowned keyboardists of his day, and he left a rich legacy of music for harpsichord originally intended for instruction and ‘spiritual refreshment’. This recording of mostly lesser-known works includes several early examples which afford fascinating insights into the young composer’s experimentation with counterpoint, harmony and form. They are all compelling, emotionally powerful works in their own right, with virtuoso content and an expressive range that easily matches that of Bach’s more famous keyboard pieces.

The early fugues show that Bach posed difficult compositional challenges for himself and on the whole, met those challenges successfully. The Prelude & Fugue in A Major (BWV 896) exists as a short prelude (likely copied by Bach's older brother however lacking in the later copy from which the Bach-Gesellschaft Ausgabe [BGA] edition was made) and the two movements did not appear together in print until John Walter Hill's 1991 edition. Neither movement calls for pedals although I have added them in this arrangement. The fugue is one of Bach's strongest early efforts in a strictly contrapuntal idiom, and this might account for its having been furnished with a prelude. The inspiration for this type of fugue might have come from Reinken's fugal gigues, which offered a model for the strict contrapuntal writing outside the 'stile antico'. But unlike Reinken's guigues, BWV 896 offsets rigorous expository passages with episodes. The latter, although short and restrained, are just sufficiently distinct in style to set the expository sections in relief. The episodes suggest another possible model, the dance movements in Kuhnau's Biblical Sonatas, which the fugue seems to quote at several points. As noted above, the authenticity of the prelude is not known However, the Fugue is well documented in the BGA archives.

Source: The Keyboard Music of J.S. Bach by By David Schulenberg.

Although originally written for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Interpretation of the Prelude & Fugue in A Major (BWV 896) for Pipe Organ.