Sheet music

Choral Prelude: "Es spricht der unweisen Mund wohl" (BuxWV 187) for Violin & Piano

2 parts3 pages03:068 hours ago14 views
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This is another of Buxtehude's chorale preludes with the embellished chorale melody in the soprano. The chorale deals with the subject of hypocrisy. The first verse reads as follows, "The unwise tongue speaks plenty, "We mean to belong to the righteous God." But their heart is full of disbelief, and they deny him in their deeds. Their existence is corrupted, and it is an abomination before God, and doesn't achieve any good for anybody." The embellishment of the chorale is fairly active in this piece often lapsing into continuous sixteenth notes. It is also curious in the first half of the chorale how often the pedal stays out of the texture. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chorale-prelude-for-organ-in-g-major-buxwv-187-es-spricht-der-unweisen-mund-wohl-mc0002369442 ). Although originally created for Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Choral Prelude: "Es spricht der unweisen Mund wohl" (BuxWV 187) for Violin & Piano using the Violin SoundFont provided by Arianna Cunningham.

Choral Prelude: "Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder" (BuxWV 178) for Oboe, Classical Guitar & Bassoon

3 parts1 page02:06a day ago29 views
Oboe, Guitar, Bassoon
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. In this chorale prelude, Buxtehude sets the chorale tune in the soprano with simple but expressive ornamentation. The chorale tune is the same as the Passion chorale O Sacred Head Now Wounded, but the text is not related to the subject matter of Holy Week. Instead it deals with the subject of sin and forgiveness. The text of the first verse reads as follows, "O Lord, don't punish me poor sinner in thy anger, with thy earnest wrath, otherwise I am lost, O Lord I would that thou mightest forgive my sins and be merciful, so that I might live eternally and escape the pains of Hell." The prelude is in the mature Buxtehude style. The setting is gently expressive with some chromaticism. Also Buxtehude breaks the third line of the chorale in the soprano with some brief rests peppering the music with a bit of rhetorical poignancy. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chorale-prelude-for-organ-in-phrygian-mode-buxwv-178-ach-herr-mich-armen-s%C3%BCnder-mc0002355164 ). I created this Interpretation of the Choral Prelude: "Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder" (BuxWV 178) for Oboe, Classical Guitar & Bassoon.
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Aria: "Mein Herze glaubt und liebt" (BWV 75 No 12) for Trumpet, Horn & Strings

6 parts12 pages04:012 days ago21 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Die Elenden sollen essen (The miserable shall eat), BWV 75, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the cantata for the first Sunday after Trinity and first performed it in Leipzig on 30 May 1723. It is the first cantata of his first annual cycle of cantatas. Bach composed the cantata for the First Sunday after Trinity and first performed it in the service in the Nikolaikirche on 30 May 1723, to take up his position as Thomaskantor. From then he was responsible for the education of the Thomanerchor, performances in the regular services in the Thomaskirche and the Nikolaikirche, and until 1725 also for one of two services in the Paulinerkirche. He started a project of composing one cantata for each Sunday and holiday of the liturgical year, termed by Christoph Wolff "an artistic undertaking on the largest scale". The autograph score is written neatly on non-Leipzig paper, probably while Bach lived still in Köthen. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle of John, "God is Love" (1 John 4:16–21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the parable of the Rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19–31). The unknown poet begins the cantata with a verse from a psalm, Psalms 22:26 (verse 27 in the Luther Bible), "The meek shall eat and be satisfied: they shall praise the Lord that seek him: your heart shall live for ever", connecting the gospel to the Old Testament as a starting point. The later cantata for the same occasion, Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot, BWV 39, (Break your bread for the hungry) started similarly with a quotation from the Old Testament. The poet expands the contrast of "Reichtum und Armut" (wealth and poverty, rich and poor) in fourteen elaborate movements, arranged in two parts to be performed before and after the sermon. The focus of the second part is to be poor or rich in spirit. Both parts are concluded by a stanza of Samuel Rodigast's hymn "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan", stanza 2 in movement 7, stanza 6 in movement 14. A Leipzig chronicle, "Acta Lipsiensium academica", reported the social event: "... führte ... Hr. Joh. Sebastian Bach ... mit gutem applauso seine erste Music auf" (... performed ... with good applause his first music). "Good applause" means "great approval" rather than clapping of hands. A different translation renders the note as "... the new Cantor and Director of the Collegium Musicum, Herr Johann Sebastian Bach, who has come hither from the Prince's court of Cöthen, produced his first music here with great success." Bach marked the occasion, creating the opening chorus reminiscent of a French overture, with a slow first section in dotted rhythm and a fast fugue. He chose the same form one year later to begin his second annual cycle with the chorale cantata O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20. The composition can also be seen as a prelude and fugue on a large scale. The prelude is again in two sections separated by a short interlude, in the way of a motet according to the different ideas of the text. In the fugue on the words "Euer Herz soll ewiglich leben" (your heart shall live for ever), the subject is developed three times, again separated by interludes. Four of the recitatives are "secco", accompanied only by the continuo, but the first one of each part is "accompagnato", brightened by the strings. In the arias, the voice and the instruments mostly share the themes. The arias can be considered as a suite of French dance movements, the tenor a Polonaise, the soprano aria a Minuet, the alto aria a Passepied and the bass aria a Gigue. In the last aria, the trumpet opens the setting and then accompanies the bass in virtuoso figuration, adding splendour to the words "Mein Herze glaubt und liebt" (My heart believes and loves). The music of the two stanzas of the chorale is identical. The tune is not a simple four-part setting as in most of Bach's later cantatas, but the voices are embedded in a concerto of the orchestra, lead by violin I and oboe I. The instrumental theme is derived from the first line of the chorale tune. The sinfonia beginning Part II, rare in Bach's cantatas, is especially remarkable because it is a chorale fantasia on the same chorale melody. The tune is played by the trumpet which was silent throughout Part I, as the cantus firmus against a polyphonic string setting, emphasizing once more "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" (What God does is well done). Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, trumpet, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo including bassoon, I created this arrangement for Bb Trumpet, French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Prelude & Fugue in F Major (BuxWV 144) for Harp Duet

2 parts6 pages02:583 days ago27 views
Harp(2)
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This praeludium in F major looks much more like a prelude and fugue than the typical Buxtehude praeludium. It consists of two section, a free toccata-like section and a fugue section. Unlike the typical Buxtehude fugue section, the fugue never breaks down into free rhapsodic material. Also the free section comes to a full stop before the fugue starts. Buxtehude's fondness for motivic connections between sections is still manifest in the piece in that the material from the second measure of the fugue subject is not all too dissimilar from the opening of the free section. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/praeludium-for-organ-in-f-major-buxwv-144-mc0002374625). I created this Interpretation the Prelude & Fugue in F Major (BuxWV 144) for Concert (Pedal) Harp Duet.

Aria: "O Mensch, errette deine Seele" (BWV 20 No 6) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts3 pages02:114 days ago26 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort (O eternity, you word of thunder), BWV 20,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the first Sunday after Trinity Sunday and first performed it on 11 June 1724. It is the first chorale cantata from his second annual cycle, of chorale cantatas, based on the hymn (1642) by Johann Rist on a melody by Johann Schop. Bach composed the cantata for the First Sunday after Trinity. The Sunday marks the beginning of the second half of the liturgical year, "in which core issues of faith and doctrine are explored". The year before, Bach had taken office as Thomaskantor in Leipzig. He was responsible for the education of the Thomanerchor, performances in the regular services in the Thomaskirche, the Nikolaikirche and others. He had started the project of composing one cantata for each Sunday and holiday of the liturgical year, termed by Christoph Wolff "an artistic undertaking on the largest scale". In 1724 he started a project on the first Sunday after Trinity to exclusively compose chorale cantatas, based on the main Lutheran hymn for the respective occasion, beginning with this cantata. Leipzig had a tradition of concentrating on the hymns. In 1690, the minister of the Thomaskirche, Johann Benedikt Carpzov, had announced that he would preach also on songs and that Johann Schelle, then the director of music, would play the song before the sermon. Bach composed some forty chorale cantatas in his second cycle. The opening chorus, beginning not only the cantata but also the second annual cantata cycle, is in the style of a solemn French Overture in the typical three sections slow – fast (vivace) – slow. The French Overture was designed to mark the entry of the king. The melody is sung by the soprano as a cantus firmus in long notes, doubled by the slide trumpet. The chorale is in bar form. The first Stollen of three lines is handled in the slow section, the second Stollen of lines 4 to 6 in the fast section, the Abgesang of lines 7 an 8 in the concluding slow section. The lower voices are mostly in homophony. The development of themes happens in the orchestra. The rising theme of the slow section in dotted rhythm is derived from the beginning of the chorale tune, whereas the theme of the fast section is not related to the tune. The fast section is not a strict fugue. Bach seems mostly interested in illustrating the text, Ewigkeit (eternity) is rendered in long notes in the lower voices and the instruments, Donnerwort (thunderous word) appears as a sudden change to short notes with a melisma in the bass, on the words große Traurigkeit (great sadness) a downward chromatic line, a counterpoint in the fast section, also appears in the voices, erschrocken (terrified) is rendered in jarred rhythms interrupted by rests, first in the orchestra, then also in the voices, klebt (cleave) is a long note in the voices. John Eliot Gardiner describes: "The fragmentation and disjointed nature of the discourse is uncompromising and leaves no room for hope", and summarizes regarding the cantata: "Confronted by the baffling and disquieting subject of eternity, and specifically the eternity of hell, Bach is fired up as never before". The recitatives are mostly secco, with an arioso only in movement 9 on the words Pracht, Hoffart, Reichtum, Ehr, und Geld (splendor, pride, riches, honor, and wealth) from the chorale. The arias contrast, interpreting the text in its affekt and in single phrases. In movement 8, the call to wake up is intensified by trumpet signals and fast scales, evoking the Last Judgement. The first motif in movement 10 is sung by the two singers of the duet on the words O Menschenkind ("o child of man") and are repeated instrumentally as a hint of that warning. Both parts of the cantata are concluded by the same four-part chorale setting, asking finally Nimm du mich, wenn es dir gefällt, Herr Jesu, in dein Freudenzelt! (Take me, Jesus, if you will, into the felicity of your tent).. The cantata is festively scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, tromba da tirarsi to double the cantus firmus, three oboes, two violins, viola, and continuo. The work contains eleven movements in two parts, to be performed before and after the sermon. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_Ewigkeit,_du_Donnerwort,_BWV_20). I created this arrangement of the third Aria: "O Mensch, errette deine Seele" (O man, save your soul) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Vocalise" (Opus 34 No. 14) for Violin & Organ

5 parts5 pages04:544 days ago53 views
Violin, Percussion, Piano(3)
Sergei Rachmaninov wrote Vocalise for voice and piano, not setting a text to it, unlike the other songs in the Op. 34 set. It immediately became popular, and the composer fashioned several transcriptions of the work, including one for piano and another for orchestra. In a sense, the orchestral version is the better of these two, because its string-dominated scoring more effectively captures the sustained sonorities of the original. That said, Rachmaninov, a brilliant composer of piano music and virtuoso pianist himself, compensated for his instrument's non-sostenuto tone by the scaling down textures and adding pedal runs and other coloristic effects. Heard in any of the versions, the main theme is lovely, but here its long-breathed, soaring beauty and ecstatic sense of melancholy come across with a more straightforward and even simple expressive manner. Not that the piano sonorities are scrawny or the textures skeletal and inappropriate: indeed, the music takes well to the tender, more intimate dressing Rachmaninov deftly provides here. In the first half the music remains gentle and flowing, but around the midpoint turns intense and more passionate, developing a strong sense of yearning, almost of anger. The main theme returns in much the same intimate mood it appeared in at the opening and closes out this lovely work. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/vocalise-transcription-for-piano-op-34-14-mc0002440316 ). I created this Interpretation of the Vocalise (Opus 34 No 14) for Violin & Pipe Organ (2 Manuals w/Pedals) with the help and soundfonts of friend Arianna Cunningham (https://musescore.com/user/5012316).

Chaconne in E Minor (BuxWV 160) for Oboe & Strings

4 parts9 pages05:505 days ago44 views
Oboe, Violin, Viola, Cello
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This Ciacona -- lasting just under six minutes -- may be a brief work, but it is a substantial one nonetheless, offering more than modest evidence to bolster the commonly held view that Buxtehude was the most important composer for organ before Bach. This masterly piece, written in 3/4 time, presents a stately theme and a highly imaginative series of variations, following the pattern of a Baroque ciacona (or chaconne). The theme is gentle and builds slowly from a recurring four-note germ of descending contour in the harmonies. Gradually the music develops a sense of momentum, and greater contrapuntal activity accrues, the whole always maintaining its hymn-like character, its worshipful feeling. Typically, a ciacona is slowly or moderately paced, but this E minor effort has a lively character, even if it does not move swiftly or have propulsive rhythms. It grows from a modest, almost somber mood at the outset to a brighter, stately character two minutes or so into the piece. By the midpoint, however, the music takes on a grandeur in its seriousness, with rich, bass-laden harmonies and often thick chords. The work ends gloriously and with a feeling of happy resolution, the whole imparting a sense of journey through tribulation and arrival at final triumph. Source: AllMusic (hhttps://www.allmusic.com/composition/ciacona-for-organ-in-e-minor-buxwv-160-mc0002356500 ). I created this Interpretation of the Chaconne in E Minor (BuxWV 157) for Oboe & Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Wir Christenleut" (BWV 1090) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:365 days ago13 views
Oboe, Harp
The Neumeister Collection is a compilation of 82 chorale preludes found in a manuscript copy produced by Johann Gottfried Neumeister (1757–1840). When the manuscript was rediscovered at the Yale University in the 1980s it appeared to contain 31 previously unknown early chorale settings by Johann Sebastian Bach, which were added to the BWV catalogue as Nos. 1090–1120 and published in 1985. This is the earliest of the three settings that Bach made of this chorale theme, but the last to become known. True, the composer undoubtedly performed the work during church services sometime in the early eighteenth century. And when Johann Gottfried Neumeister collected its manuscript, along with numerous others by Bach and several other composers in the 1790s, it may have gotten additional limited exposure at the time. But the work and all the others in the Neumeister Collection disappeared thereafter for almost two centuries, finally to be rescued in 1985 by organist and musicologist Christoph Wolff. "Wir Christenleut" comprises three sections, the first two using a cantus firmus and the last giving a fugal treatment to the theme. The joyous, busy music in the opening section resembles that in the BWV 612 version of this chorale Bach made for his Orgelbüchlein (1713 -- 1715). Gigue-like rhythmic features appear in the brief middle section, the theme remaining in the upper register. The fugal final episode takes on a somewhat jaunty manner, exhibiting less sense of flow than in the previous sections. This two-minute chorale setting offers a deft, lively combination of contrapuntal activity with perky rhythms. . Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/wir-christenleut-ii-chorale-prelude-for-organ-neumeister-chorale-no-1-bwv-1090-bc-k161-mc0002356871). Although originally written for Organ, I created this Interpretation of the "Wir Christenleut" (We Christian people) BWV 1090 for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Praeludium in A Major (BuxWV 151) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts11 pages07:016 days ago32 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This praeludium in A major is in four sections: two free toccata-like sections, and two fugues. The first toccata-like section is the more substantial of the two free sections. It features some of Buxtehude's wildest spasmodic passage work. Of the two fugues, the first is also the most substantial. It appears to be a double fugue at the outset, but the first of the two subjects fades out leaving what appeared to be the secondary subject as the true subject of the fugue. The second fugue works its way right to the conclusion rather than giving way to rhapsodic material as Buxtehude usually does in his fugues. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/praeludium-for-organ-in-a-major-buxwv-151-mc0002382401). I created this Interpretation of the Praeludium in A Major (BuxWV 151) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn & Bassoon).

"Feuillet d'Album" for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:457 days ago40 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Emmanual Chabrier (1841 - 1894) was born in Ambert, Puy-de-Dôme, France, a composer whose best works reflect the verve and wit of the Paris scene of the 1880s and who was a musical counterpart of the early Impressionist painters. Chabrier was attracted in his youth to both music and painting. He studied law in Paris from 1858 to 1862. During these years he also studied the piano and harmony and counterpoint. His technical training was, however, limited, and in the art of composition he was self-taught. From 1862 to 1880 he was employed at t he Ministry of the Interior, producing during this period the operas L'Étoile (1877 "The Star") and Une Éducation manquée ("A Deficient Education"), first performed with piano accompaniment in 1879 and with orchestra in 1913. Two unfinished operettas were sketched out between 1863 and 1865 in cooperation with the poet Paul Verlaine. He was closely associated with the Impressionist painters and purchased the celebrated "Bar at the Folies-Bergère" by his friend Édouard Manet.. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmanuel_Chabrier). Although originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of the "Feuillet d'album" (Albumleaf) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Toccata in F Major (BuxWV 156) for Clarinet & Strings

4 parts13 pages07:398 days ago40 views
Clarinet, Violin, Viola, Cello
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. Like the toccata BuxWV 155, this toccata in F major, works much like a praeludium in that it consists of an alternation of sections of free passage work and sections of imitative polyphony. Also even more than in BuxWV 155, the sections of free passagework appear to outweigh the sections of imitative polyphony in this piece. There are three fugal sections in the work, two lasting 12 measures each, the other lasting around 25 measures. The other 91 measures of the work are all segments of free unrestrained rhapsodic passagework. Altogether there is twice as much free material as there is imitative polyphony. The preponderance of free chaotic material in this toccata makes it a prime example of Buxtehude's work in the stylus phantasticus, as style noted for its wild improvisatory chaos. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/toccata-for-organ-in-f-major-buxwv-156-mc0002389188 ). I created this Interpretation of the Toccata in F Major (BuxWV 155) for Bb Clarinet & Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Coro: "Ritorni omai nel nostro core" from "Giulio Cesare" (HWV 17 A3S10N40) for Winds & Strings

12 parts11 pages03:129 days ago42 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Coro e Duetto: "Ritorni omai nel nostro core" from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 Act III Scene X No. 40) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, Bass Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Praeludium & Fugue in F# Minor (BuxWV 146) for Pipe Organ

1 part10 pages06:0610 days ago55 views
Piano
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This praeludium in F sharp minor is one of Buxtehude's most-played organ works. During Buxtehude's career in Lübeck, organs were just beginning to be tuned in temperaments that would make it possible to play in keys like F sharp minor. These tuning systems however left some of the more remote keys on the circle of fifths sounding somewhat sour. In this piece, the C sharp major triad which would occur over and over again as the dominant in F sharp minor would sound quite spicy due to the E sharp which would be tuned as an F rather than an E sharp. Buxtehude takes advantage of these tuning anomalies to create a very expressive and edgy work. The praeludium opens with 29 measures of free toccata-like material, followed by two fugues back to back without any intervening free material. The second fugue gives way to rhapsodic passage work borrowing motivic material from the fugue subject that Buxtehude plays with at least twice the duration of the fugue. While Buxtehude usually alternates toccata-like material with fugal material, in this case he sandwiches two fugues in between free toccata sections. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/praeludium-for-organ-in-f-sharp-minor-buxwv-146-mc0002363251). I created this Transcription of the Prelude & Fugue in F# Minor (BuxWV 146) for Pipe Organ (2 Manuals w/Pedals).

Duetto: "Caro!" from "Giulio Cesare" (HWV 17 A3S10N39) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts4 pages03:3610 days ago36 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Duetto: "Caro!" from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 Act III Scene X No. 39) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

March from "Giulio Cesare" (HWV 17 A3S10) for Flute & Strings

5 parts2 pages02:2911 days ago42 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the March (La Marche) from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 Act III Scene X) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Canarios" for Flute & Cello

2 parts3 pages02:1912 days ago68 views
Flute, Cello
Francisco Bartolomé Sanz Celma (1640 – 1710), better known as Gaspar Sanz, was a Spanish composer, guitarist, organist and priest born to a wealthy family in Calanda in the comarca of Bajo Aragón, Spain. He studied music, theology and philosophy at the University of Salamanca, where he was later appointed Professor of Music. He wrote three volumes of pedagogical works for the baroque guitar that form an important part of today's classical guitar repertory and have informed modern scholars in the techniques of baroque guitar playing. Canarios is a work for the five course baroque Spanish guitar, published as part of Instrucción de música sobre la guitarra española. The source I used from the Biblioteca Nacional de España was dated 1697; but the first volume of the three volume set may have been published separately in 1674 because I've seen that date associated with Canarios in several secondary sources. Although the notes of the five courses of the baroque guitar are the same as those of the upper five strings of today's Spanish guitar, the way the courses were tuned with respect to one another was inconsistent. A course may have been tuned an octave apart or in unison. When tuned an octave apart, which string in a course was higher or lower would vary. Furthermore, the lower two courses were sometimes tuned in unison an octave higher (on today's guitar that would be equivalent to tuning the open A string to A on the second fret of the open G string). Source: Savarese (https://www.savarese.org/music/Canarios.html ). I created this Interpretation of the "Canarios" for Flute & Cello.

Sinfonia from "Giulio Cesare" (HWV 17 A3S10) for Winds & Strings

9 parts7 pages02:4912 days ago26 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Sinfonia from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 Act III Scene X) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Handel – Prelude «Voi che mie fide ancelle» from "Giulio Cesare" for Sax soprano & Strings Synth.

3 parts2 pages01:3913 days ago32 views
Soprano Saxophone, Violin, Cello
This arrangement was made by Mike Magatagan. For Oboe and String Quartet: http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/5150444 My modest role here was to change the Oboe to a Saxophone and replace the String Quartet with a Synthesizer. Well, and to prepare the score for convenient using (clavier in concert pitch; party for the soloist; rehearsal marks).

"Cailin Deas Crúite na mBó" (a Pretty Maid Milking the Cow)

3 parts3 pages02:3913 days ago20 views
Recorder(2), Harp
The English title of this work triggered my interest, cows and milking in music? I was in for a pleasant surprise by Mike Magatagan, who has a bunch of very useful scores for recorder players, though you might need to change some instruments. Also don’t be put off by the Gaelic title Cailin Deas Crúite na mBó, it just means a pretty maid milking the cow. It is an old love song where a man muses about a pretty milk maid he has seen, so beautiful that he would forego all earthly riches provided he can spend his days at the side of this pretty girl milking the cow. The ¾ time stamp gives this tune a melancholy feeling; you don’t have to be a scholar in Gaelic to be touched by this song. I link a version in Gaelic on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=71&v=-u2nBBmOCn8 Mike's score: https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/118434