Sheet music

Ballade in G Minor (Op. 23 No. 1) for String Quartet

4 parts22 pages09:063 hours ago19 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

Chopin is credited with originating the Ballade genre for the piano. The Ballade had previously been associated exclusively with the literary world; it is found in the works of Goethe, Schiller, and other poets. In this Op. 23 effort, Chopin was said to have been inspired by the poem "Konrad Wallenrod" by Adam Mickiewicz. Mickiewicz, like Chopin and many other Polish artists, lived as an exile in Paris in the 1830s. Regardless of any programmatic comments associated with the Ballade No. 1, it is almost certainly not a depiction of specific events associated with this or any other Mickiewicz poem, but rather an expression of emotions associated with them.

The piece opens with a ponderous, somewhat hesitant introduction, and then the composer presents a melancholy theme that maintains the uncertain air of the opening. Gradually the tempo quickens, the emotional pitch turning fiery and passionate. Chopin then offers one of his most memorable melodies, a lovely, Romantic outpouring of rather simple, yet ingenious, construction: the theme revolves mainly around a three-note pattern, which sings and soars in its arch-like contour. The main theme returns briefly, but mostly to serve as a bridge; it builds up to a powerful statement of the alternate theme in one of Chopin's most passionate climactic moments in any of his works. The melody returns once again, now serene and confident in its demeanor. But a stormy and dark return of the main theme leads to a tragic and anxious ending, full of color and ambivalence. Without question, this is one of the composer's greatest compositions from his early Paris years. There would be three more Ballades, with perhaps only the Ballade No. 4, composed in 1842, equaling this first effort. Like many of Chopin's works, this First Ballade contains many technical and interpretive challenges for the soloist.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/ballade-for-piano-no-1-in-g-minor-op-23-ct-2-mc0002355786 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this interpretation of the Ballade in G Minor (Op. 23 No. 1) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Canon in E Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 75) for Violin & Viola
Video

Canon in E Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 75) for Violin & Viola

2 parts5 pages03:18a day ago24 views
Violin, Viola
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Etudes and exercises -- the musical equivalent of the multiplication tables -- have two extremes: either they are too repetitive and boring even for the performer to practice or they are so musical sounding that it's hard to believe the performer is learning anything from them. The latter type would be exemplified by the piano etudes of Chopin and Debussy; the former by Hanon. Muzio Clementi's celebrated and didactic Gradus ad Parnassum contains 44 exercises, and most listeners, and pianists definitely, will be happy to hear that they fall closer to the musical end of the spectrum.

Clementi is obviously training the pianist in a particular technique through repetition, but there is always some melodic element and often an element of compositional structure as well. Nos. 9-11 and Nos. 12-15 are suites, and each has a piece using fugal counterpoint. Nos. 16 and 17 are perpetual motion exercises that mirror each other by changing the dominant hand. While Clementi's etudes do not approach the level of appeal or memorability those of Chopin or Debussy, they are able to capture the player's interest. They are also quite substantive, as Marangoni seems to dig right into them as if he were tackling a large project that needs to be finished. Often, he sounds as if he is enjoying himself and the fact that he's able to handle the challenges, although there are spots, such as in No. 17, where he momentarily loses steam..

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/album/muzio-clementi-gradus-ad-parnassum-vol-1-mw0002045147 ).

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Canon in E Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 75) for Violin & Viola.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
"Grande Valse Brillante" in Eb Major (Opus 18) for String Quartet
Video

"Grande Valse Brillante" in Eb Major (Opus 18) for String Quartet

4 parts13 pages05:112 days ago34 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

Frédéric Chopin's published waltzes (actually valses -- a subtle but significant stylistic distinction) fall into two distinct categories: sparkling, highly ornamented jewels suitable, to at least some degree, for actual ballroom use; and more introspective, often rather melancholy, miniatures that are far removed from the fashionable Viennese waltzes of Joseph Lanner or Johann Strauss I. The earliest of the published waltzes (actually fifth in order of composition), the Grande Valse brillante in E flat major, Op.18, is an example of the former.

This aristocratic work presents its young composer in a particularly extroverted mood; surely the main theme of the work, introduced after a lively four-bar fanfare, is one of Chopin's most famous. The composer toys with a secondary, repeated-note gesture (marked leggieramente) before making a happily-chosen move to D flat major; the chromatic figure in parallel thirds that runs throughout a good part of this central section provides a good taste of the composer's more mature style. An extended version of the opening fanfare ushers in the reprise of the initial tune, which, upon reiteration some forty bars later, is broken up by the unexpected intrusion of two bar-long grand pauses.

While some, including the famous musicologist Huneker, have felt the (perhaps overly) effervescent quality of the Opus 18 Waltz to be vulgar, others see a kind of sly humor in the work's irrepressibly joyous tone. Whatever the Waltz's true sentiment is, Chopin, having visited Vienna and found the Viennese waltz to be entirely foreign to his nature (declaring, upon his return to Paris, that "I am still unable to play valses), seems wholly determined to reinvent the form in his own image.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/waltz-for-piano-no-1-in-e-flat-major-op-18-ct-207-mc0002368706 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this interpretation of the "Grande Valse Brillante" in Eb Major (Opus 18) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Butterfly" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 1) for Flute & Guitar
Video

"The Butterfly" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 1) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts3 pages01:383 days ago44 views
Flute, Guitar
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

Edvard Grieg's Lyric Pieces for solo piano consist of ten separate suites, each containing a number of relatively short character pieces. These ten suites were composed over the span of Grieg's compositional career and are representative of the composer's extraordinary gift for writing for the piano. Each of the 66 Lyric Pieces is an attempt to convey to the listener a certain scene or mood through lyrical means. Because of the relative lack of technical difficulty of many of the pieces, it is often believed that Grieg composed them for students of the piano.

Grieg composed Lyric Pieces Book III, Op. 43 in 1883. In the six pieces of this suite, the composer perfected the art of the short character piece for solo piano. The second piece, "The Solitary Traveler," tells the story of a lonesome person with no permanent home. The last movement of Lyric Pieces III is "To Spring," in which Grieg effectively conveys the beauty of the Norwegian springtime. The Lyric Pieces IV, Op. 47 (1888) are not as straightforward as the previous three suites. Many of the movements have a nervous quality. Also, it is difficult for the performer to keep a steady tempo throughout the pieces.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-for-piano-mc0002402561 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "The Butterfly" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 1) for Flute & Classical Guitar.
Étude in G♭ Major (Op. 10 No. 5) for Piano
Video

Étude in G♭ Major (Op. 10 No. 5) for Piano

1 part4 pages01:314 days ago48 views
Piano
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

Étude Op. 10, No. 5 in G♭ major is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 in France, Germany, and England as the fifth piece of his Études Op. 10. This work is characterized by the rapid triplet figuration played by the right hand exclusively on black keys. This melodic figuration is accompanied by the left hand in staccato chords and octaves.

Like all of Chopin's other études, this work is in ternary form ABA. The two eight-bar periods of the A section are characterized by frequent dynamic contrasts. Each reentry of the first bar, occurring every four bars, is marked by a forte, followed in the second bar by a piano restatement in a lower register. This capricious:106 opening in the tonic is replied by an upward movement and a syncopated accompaniment in the third and fourth bar. This pattern is repeated four times. The harmonic scheme of the A section is relatively simple, featuring tonic (first two bars) versus dominant (third and fourth bars), but the consequent of the first period shifts to |music|B♭ major (poco rallentando, pp), while the consequent of the second one modulates to the dominant key D♭ major.

D♭ major is also the key of the middle section which is exactly twice as long as the A section. Its 32 bars though do not subdivide into four eight-bar periods but into sections of (4 + 2) + 4 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 8 bars with six motivically distinct modifications of the original semiquaver triplet figure, thus offering an attractive break from the symmetry. An effective dynamic increase begins in bar 23 but does not end in a climax as the crescendo does not lead to fortissimo but eases off in diminuendos (bars 36 and 40). Harmonically the section (bars 23–41) may be interpreted as an extended and ornamented D♭ major cadence. Musicologist Hugo Leichtentritt (1874–1951) compares the left hand of bars 33–48 to horn signals. These "announce" the recapitulation of the A part which begins as a literal restatement in bar 49, seems to approach a climax and eases off with a sudden delicatissimo pianissimo smorzando passage, leading via a cadence to the coda. The coda consists of two periods, the last one stretched by three bars. The first one is a restatement of the middle section's opening transposed to the tonic G♭ major. The consequent of the second period contains a brilliantly swooshing, widely positioned arpeggio for both hands (bars 79(83) and is pianistically attractive. Its effect is based on the accent enforced by a third at the beginning of each triplet, as well as on the tenth and eleventh stretches of the left hand and the ascending bass line covering the entire range of the keyboard.:109 The piece ends with a rapid octave passage, ff and staccato, played by both hands on black keys, in a G♭ major pentatonic scale. Some prominent performers, including Horowitz and Rosenthal, choose to perform the final octave passage glissando.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tude_Op._10,_No._5_(Chopin) ).

I created this Transcription of the Étude in G♭ Major (Op. 10 No. 5) for Piano.
Sonatina in D Major (Op. 36 No. 6) for Piano
Video

Sonatina in D Major (Op. 36 No. 6) for Piano

1 part6 pages07:375 days ago114 views
Piano
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Every student of classical piano has learned at least one of Muzio Clementi's "Progressive" Sonatinas, Op. 36. The pieces were originally published in 1797 and have all but replaced his Gradus ad Parnassum as his most famous work. Clementi intended them as teaching tools, meant for the youth among the burgeoning amateur pianist public. It is a credit to him that they are still used just as he intended. They are "progressive" in that the difficulty of the sonatinas increases with each subsequent one. The first contains little for the left hand to do, but in the sixth, there are more complex rhythms, phrasing, and accompaniment, with the left hand taking the melody in a couple of spots. The emphasis throughout all is on basic piano skills: dynamic control, even touch, and melodic phrasing. However, within each one there are more specific lessons on ornamentation, arm and wrist motion, arpeggios, and more. When the set was re-published in 1803 as a supplement to Clementi's Introduction to the Art of Playing on the Piano Forte, he included specific instructions on how to play certain ornaments and interpret markings. For example, when discussing the use of staccato, he stated it should be reserved "to give spirit occasionally to certain passages, and to set off the higher beauties of the legato." Sonatina No. 1 in C major is the most widely known, with No. 3, also in C major, and No. 6 in D major following it in popularity. The theme of the opening of the first sonatina shows a strong resemblance to the opening of Scarlatti's Sonata K. 460. (Clementi had studied Scarlatti's works in his own youth.) The second movement of the Sonatina No. 2 introduces easy dotted rhythms to be played dolce, with the note "dolce means sweet, as in taste; now and then swelling some notes." No. 3 is a study of scalar runs, while sextuplet figures are extensively used in the final movement of Sonatina No. 4. No. 5 has an "Original Swiss Air" with six-bar phrases instead of the usual four-bar ones. No. 6 is just two movements, brief but lively. The sonatinas have distinct characters, formed by graceful, charming melodies without much drama and, surprisingly, without much of that bane of the Classical era: the Alberti bass.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/sonatinas-6-for-piano-progressive-sonatinas-op-36-mc0002375165 ).

I created this Transcription of the Sonatina in D Major (Op. 36 No. 6) for Piano.
Chorale: "Selig sind, die aus Erbarmen" (BWV 39 No 7) for String Quartet
Video

Chorale: "Selig sind, die aus Erbarmen" (BWV 39 No 7) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page02:096 days ago37 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot (Break your bread for the hungry), BWV 39,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig and first performed it on 23 June 1726, the first Sunday after Trinity. About three years earlier, on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1723, Bach had taken office as Thomaskantor and started his first cycle of cantatas for the occasions of the liturgical year, and on the first Sunday after Trinity 1724 he began his second cycle, consisting of chorale cantatas. As he composed no new work for the first Sunday after Trinity 1725, Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot is regarded as part of his third cantata cycle.

Bach set the opening movement as a complex choral structure, but the central movement as a simple solo for the bass voice, traditionally considered the voice of Jesus. The instrumentation is for woodwinds and strings, including recorders as a symbol of poverty, need and humility. It is possibly the last time that Bach scored recorders in his cantatas.

According to Christoph Wolff and Klaus Hofmann, the cantata text is taken from a 1704 collection which is attributed to Duke Ernst Ludwig von Sachsen-Meiningen. Works from this collection had been set to music by the court composer Johann Ludwig Bach, whose cantatas Bach had frequently performed in 1725. They all start with an Old Testament quotation, then focus on a New Testament passage in a central movement. The librettist organized the text in seven poetic movements, divided into two distinct parts. Both parts begin with a quotation from the Bible, but not, as in several other Bach cantatas, taken from the prescribed readings. Part I starts with a quotation from the Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 58:7–8), Part II begins with a quotation from the Epistle to the Hebrews (Hebrews 13:16), which forms the text for the central fourth movement. The first part derives from the words of the prophet a call to love one's neighbour and to share God's gifts, the second part similarly deals with thanks for God's gifts and makes a promise to love one's neighbour and share. The poet closed the cantata with stanza 6 from David Denicke's hymn "Kommt, laßt euch den Herren lehren" (1648), which summarizes the ideas. This hymn is sung to the melody of "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele", which was codified by Louis Bourgeois when setting the Geneva Psalm 42 in his collection of Psaumes octante trios de David (Geneva, 1551). Bourgeois seems to have been influenced by the secular song "Ne l'oseray je dire" contained in the Manuscrit de Bayeux published around 1510.

Bach first performed the cantata on 23 June 1726. It is considered to be part of Bach's third annual cantata cycle in Leipzig. While the first and second cycle lasted one year, according to Christoph Wolff, the cantatas of the third cycle date from a period beginning on the first Sunday after Trinity, 3 June 1725, and lasting for about three years. Musicologist Julian Mincham notes that "Bach attached personal significance to this particular day and consequently sought to parade a work of considerable substance".

The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, alto and bass), a four-part choir, two alto recorders, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. The recorders (flauti dolci) represent poverty, need and a "mood of humility". It is possibly the last time that Bach scored recorders in his cantatas.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brich_dem_Hungrigen_dein_Brot,_BWV_39).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "Selig sind, die aus Erbarmen" (Blessed are those who, out of mercy) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Nocturne" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 7) for String Quartet
Video

"Nocturne" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 7) for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages02:306 days ago53 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Though far from prolific as a composer -- by day he was a scientist noted for his research on aldehydes -- Alexander Borodin nevertheless earned a secure place in the history of Russian music. As a creative spirit, Borodin was the most accomplished of the Russian nationalists composers. He had a particular gift for the distinctive stripe of exoticism so evident in his most frequently performed work, the Polovtsian Dances from the opera Prince Igor.

The illegitimate son of a Georgian prince and a doctor's wife, Borodin enjoyed a comfortable upbringing. As a child he learned to play several instruments and tried his hand at composing, but other aptitudes directed his formal education. He studied chemistry at St. Petersburg's Medico-Surgical Academy, obtaining his doctorate in 1858 and pursuing further studies in Europe until 1862. Upon his return to Russia, he became a professor at his alma mater; but even as an academic career apparently loomed before him, he maintained a devotion to music.

Under the influence of Mily Balakirev, whom he met in 1862, Borodin became interested in applying elements of Russian folk music to works for the concert hall and stage. He joined a circle of like-minded composers -- Balakirev, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, and Cui -- famously dubbed "The Five" or "The Mighty Handful." The influence of Balakirev in particular is at once in evident in the Symphony No. 1 in E flat major (1867). Borodin began the much craggier Symphony No. 2 in B minor in 1869, the same year he commenced labor on his most important work, the opulent four-act opera Prince Igor. While it took Borodin more than five years to complete the symphony, work on Prince Igor dragged on for decades. Borodin, who had in the meantime completed a number of other works, left the opera unfinished at the time of his death. It was completed posthumously by Rimsky-Korsakov, a skillful craftsman and a particularly apt match for Borodin's colorful musical character, and Alexander Glazunov. Glazunov also completed the Symphony No. 3 in A minor, which the composer had been working on until the time of his death.

Aside from teaching chemistry and conducting research, Borodin helped found a series of medical courses for women in 1872. Such activities, as well as the poor health that plagued him in the 1880s, drained the energy that he might have devoted to composition. Still, as a part-time composer, Borodin jeft a significant oeuvre: more than a dozen worthy songs, miscellaneous piano pieces, two string quartets (the second of which contains a ravishing Nocturne often performed in an arrangement for string orchestra), and the popular tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880). He died while attending a ball in St. Petersburg on February 27, 1887.

Borodin wrote little enough -- an opera, a couple of symphonies, a tone poem for orchestra, a couple of string quartets, a string quintet for chamber musicians, and a handful of songs for voice and piano -- and next to nothing of any substance for the piano alone. The largest of his piano works is the Petite Suite, seven brief movements composed over a period of five years, dedicated to the Countess Louise de Merci d'Argenteau and published in 1885. Following Borodin's death in 1887, Glazunov edited and orchestrated a number of his works, including the Petite Suite. In Borodin's autograph, the score bears the dedication "Petit poeme d'amour d'une jeune fille" (Little poems on the love of a young girl). Each movement of the work also has a brief explanation following it. The austerely liturgical first "Au couvent" (At the Convent), "The Church's vows foster thoughts only of God"; the shyly charming second Intermezzo, "Dreaming of Society Life"; the grandly joyous "Mazurka I," "Thinking only of dancing"; the lyrically romantic "Mazurka II," "Thinking both of the dance and the dancer"; the voluptuously lyrical "Reverie" (Dreams), "Thinking only of the dance"; the sensually chaste Serenade, "Dreaming of love"; and the closing romantic Nocturne, "Lulled by the happieness of being in love." Clearly, Borodin had a specific program for the whole work, a work that is part dance, part dream, and all love.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/petite-suite-for-piano-mc0002375472 ).

Although originally composed for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Nocturne" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 7) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Wanderer" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 2) for String Quartet
Video

"The Wanderer" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 2) for String Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:406 days ago29 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

Edvard Grieg's Lyric Pieces for solo piano consist of ten separate suites, each containing a number of relatively short character pieces. These ten suites were composed over the span of Grieg's compositional career and are representative of the composer's extraordinary gift for writing for the piano. Each of the 66 Lyric Pieces is an attempt to convey to the listener a certain scene or mood through lyrical means. Because of the relative lack of technical difficulty of many of the pieces, it is often believed that Grieg composed them for students of the piano.

Grieg composed Lyric Pieces Book III, Op. 43 in 1883. In the six pieces of this suite, the composer perfected the art of the short character piece for solo piano. The second piece, "The Solitary Traveler," tells the story of a lonesome person with no permanent home. The last movement of Lyric Pieces III is "To Spring," in which Grieg effectively conveys the beauty of the Norwegian springtime. The Lyric Pieces IV, Op. 47 (1888) are not as straightforward as the previous three suites. Many of the movements have a nervous quality. Also, it is difficult for the performer to keep a steady tempo throughout the pieces.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-for-piano-mc0002402561 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "The Wanderer" from Lyric Pieces (Book 3 Op. 43 No. 2) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 45) for String Quartet
Video

Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 45) for String Quartet

4 parts11 pages05:227 days ago15 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Etudes and exercises -- the musical equivalent of the multiplication tables -- have two extremes: either they are too repetitive and boring even for the performer to practice or they are so musical sounding that it's hard to believe the performer is learning anything from them. The latter type would be exemplified by the piano etudes of Chopin and Debussy; the former by Hanon. Muzio Clementi's celebrated and didactic Gradus ad Parnassum contains 44 exercises, and most listeners, and pianists definitely, will be happy to hear that they fall closer to the musical end of the spectrum.

Clementi is obviously training the pianist in a particular technique through repetition, but there is always some melodic element and often an element of compositional structure as well. Nos. 9-11 and Nos. 12-15 are suites, and each has a piece using fugal counterpoint. Nos. 16 and 17 are perpetual motion exercises that mirror each other by changing the dominant hand. While Clementi's etudes do not approach the level of appeal or memorability those of Chopin or Debussy, they are able to capture the player's interest. They are also quite substantive, as Marangoni seems to dig right into them as if he were tackling a large project that needs to be finished. Often, he sounds as if he is enjoying himself and the fact that he's able to handle the challenges, although there are spots, such as in No. 17, where he momentarily loses steam..

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/album/muzio-clementi-gradus-ad-parnassum-vol-1-mw0002045147 ).

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 45) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Waltz" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 1) for Piano
Video

"Waltz" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 1) for Piano

1 part4 pages04:578 days ago96 views
Piano
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

The seven works that constitute Edvard Grieg's Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces, published as Op. 47 in 1888, were composed from 1885-88. By mid-1885, Grieg had reconciled with his wife Nina, and together they built a home outside Bergen at Troldhaugen ("Valley of the Trolls"). This would serve as home to the Griegs for the rest of their days. Once completed, the considerable expense of building this elaborate house would drive Grieg back to his worktable. In these years he shaped the First Peer Gynt Suite from his incidental music of 1874-5, revised his cantata Oleg Trygvason, and completed his Third Violin Sonata for the violinist Adolf Brodsky.

It was at Brodsky's in Leipzig on New Year's Day, 1888 that Grieg enjoyed lunch in the company of fellow composers Johannes Brahms and Peter Tchaikovsky. Also in Leipzig, Grieg met the young English composer Frederick Delius; the two became fast friends, and Delius rejoined Grieg at Troldhaugen for the summer of that year. In May, Grieg traveled to London where he performed his A minor Piano Concerto for the last time. Joyous news arrived in the form of a letter from Grieg's publisher Max Abraham with C.F. Peters; Abraham agreed to assume the remaining debt on Troldhaugen and pay it off, relieving Grieg of the responsibility of having to raise the funds to do so.

It was in this stimulating atmosphere of settling-in, reinvigorating his romance with Nina, cleaning up old business, and acquainting himself with his peers that Grieg composed the Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces.

He saved many of his freshest ideas for this set; immediately established through the bitter melodic tinge of the opening "Valse-Impromptu," almost bi-tonal in its constant tension between the E major melody in the right hand against the E minor tonality in which the piece is rooted. "Albumblad" (Album-leaf) has an ecstatic quality that is reminiscent of somewhat later works of Scriabin. "Melodie" is stated over a grave, minimal, and insistent quarter- and eighth-note figure (in 6/8 time) which is sometimes voiced only in bare fifths for long stretches of bars. In "Halling," a setting of a traditional duple-time Norwegian dance, the bare fifths in the accompaniment return decorated by dissonant passing tones. The melody is likewise peppered with dissonant grace notes and adjacent pitches; at one point Grieg achieves a minor ninth in the melody. "Melancoli," marked Largo, is somber, as indicated by the title, and largely serves to provide thematic contrast between the "Halling" and "Springdans" (Spring or Leaping Dance) which follows. The "Springdans," a triple time Norwegian dance, is similar in approach to the "Halling"; Grieg adds huge leaps in the left hand to the treble register and some tricky triplet figures in the right. The concluding "Elegie" centers around a drooping chromatic melody that is harmonized by thirds in the manner of Massenet's Elegie. Perhaps an ending more respectable than ideal in this context, this piece is nevertheless haunting in its own distinctive way.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-7-for-piano-book-4-op-47-mc0002361065 ).

I created this Transcription of the "Waltz" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 1) for Piano.
Sonatina in F Major (Op. 36 No. 4) for String Trio
Video

Sonatina in F Major (Op. 36 No. 4) for String Trio

3 parts7 pages06:209 days ago33 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Every student of classical piano has learned at least one of Muzio Clementi's "Progressive" Sonatinas, Op. 36. The pieces were originally published in 1797 and have all but replaced his Gradus ad Parnassum as his most famous work. Clementi intended them as teaching tools, meant for the youth among the burgeoning amateur pianist public. It is a credit to him that they are still used just as he intended. They are "progressive" in that the difficulty of the sonatinas increases with each subsequent one. The first contains little for the left hand to do, but in the sixth, there are more complex rhythms, phrasing, and accompaniment, with the left hand taking the melody in a couple of spots. The emphasis throughout all is on basic piano skills: dynamic control, even touch, and melodic phrasing. However, within each one there are more specific lessons on ornamentation, arm and wrist motion, arpeggios, and more. When the set was re-published in 1803 as a supplement to Clementi's Introduction to the Art of Playing on the Piano Forte, he included specific instructions on how to play certain ornaments and interpret markings. For example, when discussing the use of staccato, he stated it should be reserved "to give spirit occasionally to certain passages, and to set off the higher beauties of the legato." Sonatina No. 1 in C major is the most widely known, with No. 3, also in C major, and No. 6 in D major following it in popularity. The theme of the opening of the first sonatina shows a strong resemblance to the opening of Scarlatti's Sonata K. 460. (Clementi had studied Scarlatti's works in his own youth.) The second movement of the Sonatina No. 2 introduces easy dotted rhythms to be played dolce, with the note "dolce means sweet, as in taste; now and then swelling some notes." No. 3 is a study of scalar runs, while sextuplet figures are extensively used in the final movement of Sonatina No. 4. No. 5 has an "Original Swiss Air" with six-bar phrases instead of the usual four-bar ones. No. 6 is just two movements, brief but lively. The sonatinas have distinct characters, formed by graceful, charming melodies without much drama and, surprisingly, without much of that bane of the Classical era: the Alberti bass.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/sonatinas-6-for-piano-progressive-sonatinas-op-36-mc0002375165 ).

Although originally composed for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonatina in F Major (Op. 36 No. 4) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).
"Elegy" from Lyric Pieces (Book 2 Op. 38 No. 6) for Oboe & Strings
Video

"Elegy" from Lyric Pieces (Book 2 Op. 38 No. 6) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts2 pages02:2510 days ago48 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

Grieg published his Second Book of Lyric Pieces as Op. 38 in 1883. This group stands chronologically between Grieg's Cello Sonata and the Holberg Suite. At that time, Grieg was having a difficult time with his spouse, Nina, and infatuated with Elsie Schjelderup, a 26-year old "bohemian" painter living in Paris. Grieg left Nina in July 1883, though the intervention of friends brought the two back together over time.

The finished set contains eight pieces, and these differ from other sets of Lyric Pieces in Grieg's offhand and somewhat synthetic approach to their construction. Grieg's superficial attitude might reflect the tension at home; other sets of Lyric Pieces are suffused in emotional expressions, but not this one.

In the opening "Cradle Song" ("Vuggevise," or "Berceuse," not to be confused with the famous "Cradle Song" of Op. 68/6) a simple tune, decorated with gentle grace notes, is twice played. A more troubled middle section in the minor follows, rising to a climax which would surely "wake the baby." However, all is well as the first tune returns.

"Folk Song" ("Folkvise," or "Folk Melody") consists of a 3/4 dance step with stresses on the first and second beats of alternating bars. The melody is voiced mostly in sixths and thirds.

"Melodie" betrays the influence of Liszt's Libesträume, and is replete with C major arpeggios and harmonic rallentandi, typical identifying marks of nineteenth-century salon music.

More momentous are the two dances, "Halling" and "Springdans" ("Spring or "Leaping Dance"), that follow. These are based on traditional Norwegian dance forms associated with the playing of the Hardanger fiddle, the "Halling Dance" being in 2/4 time and the "Spring Dance" in a pattern similar to that of the "Folk Song." Part of "Halling" bears a resemblance to the first movement "bridge" in Grieg's Piano Concerto.

We find ourselves back in the salon again with "Elegy," which nonetheless has some interesting features, including a drooping, irregular chromatic figure that opens the tune and a diminished octave achieved by pitting an upward chromatic scale against a pedal tone.

The "Waltz" ("Vals") is only a minute long and is in obvious debt to Chopin, though not as floridly pianistic as the Polish master. The concluding "Canon" is not strict, but the melody of the first section is answered in canonic imitation. The second part harkens back to the "troubled section" of the "Cradle Song." The "Trio" of this piece is in the major and is set to the "Spring Dance" rhythm. There is a bit of editorial trouble here in that some editions lack a da capo indication at the end of the middle section; in truth, the minor section is repeated and a B flat minor chord is played at the end.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-8-for-piano-book-2-op-38-mc0002425977 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Elegy" from Lyric Pieces (Book 2 Op. 38 No. 6) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Exercitium in F Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 1) for Pipe Organ
Video

Exercitium in F Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 1) for Pipe Organ

1 part1 page01:1510 days ago36 views
Organ
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Etudes and exercises -- the musical equivalent of the multiplication tables -- have two extremes: either they are too repetitive and boring even for the performer to practice or they are so musical sounding that it's hard to believe the performer is learning anything from them. The latter type would be exemplified by the piano etudes of Chopin and Debussy; the former by Hanon. Muzio Clementi's celebrated and didactic Gradus ad Parnassum contains 44 exercises, and most listeners, and pianists definitely, will be happy to hear that they fall closer to the musical end of the spectrum.

Clementi is obviously training the pianist in a particular technique through repetition, but there is always some melodic element and often an element of compositional structure as well. Nos. 9-11 and Nos. 12-15 are suites, and each has a piece using fugal counterpoint. Nos. 16 and 17 are perpetual motion exercises that mirror each other by changing the dominant hand. While Clementi's etudes do not approach the level of appeal or memorability those of Chopin or Debussy, they are able to capture the player's interest. They are also quite substantive, as Marangoni seems to dig right into them as if he were tackling a large project that needs to be finished. Often, he sounds as if he is enjoying himself and the fact that he's able to handle the challenges, although there are spots, such as in No. 17, where he momentarily loses steam..

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/album/muzio-clementi-gradus-ad-parnassum-vol-1-mw0002045147 ).

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Exercitium in F Major from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 1) for Pipe Organ.
Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol 2 No 30) for Winds & Strings
Video

Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol 2 No 30) for Winds & Strings

9 parts15 pages06:5510 days ago31 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 – 1890) was a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life. He was born at Liège, in what is now Belgium (though at the time of his birth it was part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands). He gave his first concerts there in 1834 and studied privately in Paris from 1835, where his teachers included Anton Reicha. After a brief return to Belgium, and a disastrous reception to an early oratorio Ruth, he moved to Paris, where he married and embarked on a career as teacher and organist. He gained a reputation as a formidable improviser, and travelled widely in France to demonstrate new instruments built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

When César Franck’s son, Georges Franck, offered to Enoch the unknown collection of his father’s manuscripts, he described, that these pieces were composed „by the request of Franck’s friend, a village organist, who asked Franck to compose some nice, but simple pieces suitable for the village church service”.

Indeed, Auguste Sanches was an organ amateur in Azille, where Franck with his family spent the vacations. Franck composed his „simple pieces” mostly during August and September 1859, but also there are some older (1858) and later (up to 1866) additions, not necessary understood in the close connection with the pieces of 08-09 1859. Some of other pieces are extremely difficult and weren’t probably composed for the amateur organist.

This collection is extremally important for Franck’s legacy and art-work-understanding. This is main link between the early organ pieces (such as [Pieces] in E flat major or in A major, or Andantino in g minor, and "Six Pieces” published in 1868.

Only part of the pieces has signed the dates of composition, what is helpful in the way, that we know about quite long period of composition (9 years), and about the fact, that the Collection hasn’t chronological order. Moreover, the collection hasn’t quite no order at all, so, it is not a "collection” or a "cycle”, but just unordered set of more or less separate pieces.

Source: Ars Polonica (http://arspolonica.ocross.net/muzyka/cesar-franck-1822-1890/cesar-franck-1822-1890-the-pieces-posthumes-or-44-petites-pieces-or-lorganiste-ii/ ).

Although originally created for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol 2 No 30) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Lully Courante for Violin-Cello Duet

2 parts2 pages02:5011 days ago28 views
Violin, Cello
Courante from Keyboard Pieces Nr. 2 by Jean-Baptiste Lully, arranged for Violin & Cello duet. Based on an arrangement for Viola/Cello duet by MuseScore user Mike Magatagan.
Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 25) for String Quartet
Video

Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 25) for String Quartet

4 parts9 pages04:2411 days ago31 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Etudes and exercises -- the musical equivalent of the multiplication tables -- have two extremes: either they are too repetitive and boring even for the performer to practice or they are so musical sounding that it's hard to believe the performer is learning anything from them. The latter type would be exemplified by the piano etudes of Chopin and Debussy; the former by Hanon. Muzio Clementi's celebrated and didactic Gradus ad Parnassum contains 44 exercises, and most listeners, and pianists definitely, will be happy to hear that they fall closer to the musical end of the spectrum.

Clementi is obviously training the pianist in a particular technique through repetition, but there is always some melodic element and often an element of compositional structure as well. Nos. 9-11 and Nos. 12-15 are suites, and each has a piece using fugal counterpoint. Nos. 16 and 17 are perpetual motion exercises that mirror each other by changing the dominant hand. While Clementi's etudes do not approach the level of appeal or memorability those of Chopin or Debussy, they are able to capture the player's interest. They are also quite substantive, as Marangoni seems to dig right into them as if he were tackling a large project that needs to be finished. Often, he sounds as if he is enjoying himself and the fact that he's able to handle the challenges, although there are spots, such as in No. 17, where he momentarily loses steam..

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/album/muzio-clementi-gradus-ad-parnassum-vol-1-mw0002045147 ).

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Introduction & Fugue from "Gradus ad Parnassum" (Op. 44 No 25) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Melancholie" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 5) for Piano
Video

"Melancholie" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 5) for Piano

1 part2 pages02:3712 days ago48 views
Piano
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

The seven works that constitute Edvard Grieg's Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces, published as Op. 47 in 1888, were composed from 1885-88. By mid-1885, Grieg had reconciled with his wife Nina, and together they built a home outside Bergen at Troldhaugen ("Valley of the Trolls"). This would serve as home to the Griegs for the rest of their days. Once completed, the considerable expense of building this elaborate house would drive Grieg back to his worktable. In these years he shaped the First Peer Gynt Suite from his incidental music of 1874-5, revised his cantata Oleg Trygvason, and completed his Third Violin Sonata for the violinist Adolf Brodsky.

It was at Brodsky's in Leipzig on New Year's Day, 1888 that Grieg enjoyed lunch in the company of fellow composers Johannes Brahms and Peter Tchaikovsky. Also in Leipzig, Grieg met the young English composer Frederick Delius; the two became fast friends, and Delius rejoined Grieg at Troldhaugen for the summer of that year. In May, Grieg traveled to London where he performed his A minor Piano Concerto for the last time. Joyous news arrived in the form of a letter from Grieg's publisher Max Abraham with C.F. Peters; Abraham agreed to assume the remaining debt on Troldhaugen and pay it off, relieving Grieg of the responsibility of having to raise the funds to do so.

It was in this stimulating atmosphere of settling-in, reinvigorating his romance with Nina, cleaning up old business, and acquainting himself with his peers that Grieg composed the Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces.

He saved many of his freshest ideas for this set; immediately established through the bitter melodic tinge of the opening "Valse-Impromptu," almost bi-tonal in its constant tension between the E major melody in the right hand against the E minor tonality in which the piece is rooted. "Albumblad" (Album-leaf) has an ecstatic quality that is reminiscent of somewhat later works of Scriabin. "Melodie" is stated over a grave, minimal, and insistent quarter- and eighth-note figure (in 6/8 time) which is sometimes voiced only in bare fifths for long stretches of bars. In "Halling," a setting of a traditional duple-time Norwegian dance, the bare fifths in the accompaniment return decorated by dissonant passing tones. The melody is likewise peppered with dissonant grace notes and adjacent pitches; at one point Grieg achieves a minor ninth in the melody. "Melancoli," marked Largo, is somber, as indicated by the title, and largely serves to provide thematic contrast between the "Halling" and "Springdans" (Spring or Leaping Dance) which follows. The "Springdans," a triple time Norwegian dance, is similar in approach to the "Halling"; Grieg adds huge leaps in the left hand to the treble register and some tricky triplet figures in the right. The concluding "Elegie" centers around a drooping chromatic melody that is harmonized by thirds in the manner of Massenet's Elegie. Perhaps an ending more respectable than ideal in this context, this piece is nevertheless haunting in its own distinctive way.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-7-for-piano-book-4-op-47-mc0002361065 ).

I created this Transcription of "Melancholie" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 5) for Piano.
Sonatina in C Major (Op. 36 No. 3) for String Quartet
Video

Sonatina in C Major (Op. 36 No. 3) for String Quartet

4 parts10 pages05:2713 days ago56 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Born shortly after Handel wrote his oratorio Jephtha and dead shortly after Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique, Muzio Clementi failed to write anything equal to the originality of those two composers -- or, certainly, equal to the best of his closer contemporaries, Mozart and Haydn. Yet Clementi remains a significant figure for his pioneering work on behalf of the newfangled piano, that percussive, expressive instrument that quickly displaced the harpsichord at the end of the eighteenth century. His full-scale sonatas and small studies exploited the possibilities of the early piano and groomed the technique of early pianists, and led him to be known as "the father of the piano." His influence on Beethoven has likely been underestimated.

Clementi was a child prodigy, with an appointment as an organist at age 9 and an oratorio to his credit by the time he was 12. In 1766 Clementi's father was persuaded to take the boy to study in England, the country that would remain Clementi's base for the rest of his life. In the English countryside the youth undertook a rigid course of studies, emerging in 1773 for a spectacular debut in London as a composer and pianist. Had Clementi matured anywhere else in Europe, he might have limited himself to the organ and harpsichord; but the piano was enormously popular in England, and Clementi furthered his career by capitalizing on the instrument's expanded capabilities. In 1780, he went on tour to the Continental capitals; in Vienna, Emperor Joseph II instigated a friendly musical duel between Clementi and Mozart.

Every student of classical piano has learned at least one of Muzio Clementi's "Progressive" Sonatinas, Op. 36. The pieces were originally published in 1797 and have all but replaced his Gradus ad Parnassum as his most famous work. Clementi intended them as teaching tools, meant for the youth among the burgeoning amateur pianist public. It is a credit to him that they are still used just as he intended. They are "progressive" in that the difficulty of the sonatinas increases with each subsequent one. The first contains little for the left hand to do, but in the sixth, there are more complex rhythms, phrasing, and accompaniment, with the left hand taking the melody in a couple of spots. The emphasis throughout all is on basic piano skills: dynamic control, even touch, and melodic phrasing. However, within each one there are more specific lessons on ornamentation, arm and wrist motion, arpeggios, and more. When the set was re-published in 1803 as a supplement to Clementi's Introduction to the Art of Playing on the Piano Forte, he included specific instructions on how to play certain ornaments and interpret markings. For example, when discussing the use of staccato, he stated it should be reserved "to give spirit occasionally to certain passages, and to set off the higher beauties of the legato." Sonatina No. 1 in C major is the most widely known, with No. 3, also in C major, and No. 6 in D major following it in popularity. The theme of the opening of the first sonatina shows a strong resemblance to the opening of Scarlatti's Sonata K. 460. (Clementi had studied Scarlatti's works in his own youth.) The second movement of the Sonatina No. 2 introduces easy dotted rhythms to be played dolce, with the note "dolce means sweet, as in taste; now and then swelling some notes." No. 3 is a study of scalar runs, while sextuplet figures are extensively used in the final movement of Sonatina No. 4. No. 5 has an "Original Swiss Air" with six-bar phrases instead of the usual four-bar ones. No. 6 is just two movements, brief but lively. The sonatinas have distinct characters, formed by graceful, charming melodies without much drama and, surprisingly, without much of that bane of the Classical era: the Alberti bass.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/sonatinas-6-for-piano-progressive-sonatinas-op-36-mc0002375165 ).

Although originally composed for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonatina in C Major (Op. 36 No. 3) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Norwegian March" from Lyric Pieces (Book 5 Op. 54 No. 2) for Flute & Strings
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"Norwegian March" from Lyric Pieces (Book 5 Op. 54 No. 2) for Flute & Strings

5 parts6 pages03:0114 days ago70 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

It is the influence of folkloristic idioms which can be said to pervade many of Grieg's works for solo piano, including the piano sonata in E minor, Op. 7, of 1865, the Pictures from Country Life, Op. 19, and of course, the ten books devoted to Lyric Pieces, some 66 miniatures in all, which were published in the years 1867 - 1901. It was, wrote Grieg, the celebrated Norwegian violin virtuoso Ole Borneman Bull who "opened my eyes to the beauty and unspoilt nature of Norwegian music," although in these works, it would be hard to overlook the demonstrable impact that was exerted upon Grieg's creative processes by the seminal German Romantic miniaturists Mendelssohn and Schumann, while Chopin's expressive instincts are also closely mirrored.

Writing to his publisher, the head of Peters Edition Henri Hinrichsen, in 1901, the composer remarked that his Lyric Pieces were "an intimate slice of life," and indeed, it would be very hard to challenge such an assertion. Book 5, published as Grieg's Op. 54, comprises of the following numbers: 1) Shepherd Boy, 2) Norwegian March, 3) March of the Trolls, 4) Nocturne, 5) Scherzo, 6) Bell-Ringing.

Of particular interest is the third of the set "March of the Trolls." As Joachim Dorfmüller has written, "Trolls are quintessentially Norwegian creatures, and it was in their honour that Grieg and his wife Nina named the plot of land on which they built their house on the outskirts of Bergen in 1884 - 1885; 'Troldhaugen' or 'Troll Hill'." Op. 54 No. 5 is a scurrying, mercurial Scherzo reminiscent of Mendelssohn's in A Midsummer Night's Dream or the Octet for strings. Op. 54 No. 6, "Bell-Ringing," was written during 1891. As Dorfmüller points out, this was a full 16 years before Debussy composed his highly impressionistic tintinabulatory piece "Cloches à travers les feuilles," from his second book of Images. Grieg's previous example is also highly colored and often distinctly avant-gardist in feel. As Dorfmüller concludes, in his Lyric Pieces, and indeed in much of his remaining piano music, "Grieg thrust aside tradition -- no doubt, in the final analysis, to his own astonishment as much as to that of his contemporaries -- and in his last great creative period he set out on a virtually impressionistic path."

This the "Troldtog" (March of the Dwarfs) is usually translated as it appears to the left, but those familiar with Norwegian mythology often insist that trolls are something quite different from dwarfs. These puckish creatures are supposed to have a more corpulent torso and can be physically formidable. Still, they are small and full of mischief and fun, and that is how Grieg depicts their character in this charming and thoroughly delightful piece. The main theme here is among the composer's best known, one of those melodies probably recognizable to the man and woman on the street. It is a lively creation whose brisk, descending manner and playful character convey both a comical busyness and a sense of fantasy. Grieg supplies only a basic lively rhythm to underpin the melody, fully aware the quick-step march is one of those rare tunes that captures the essence of the work's title. In contrast, the middle section theme is lyrical and innocent, dreamy and sweet, as if the composer were depicting his little creatures as they slept. The main theme returns to close out this colorful little masterpiece. Performance of this work typically lasts three-and-a-half minutes.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-6-for-piano-book-5-op-54-mc0002361281 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Norwegian March" from Lyric Pieces (Book 5 Op. 54 No. 2) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).