Sheet music

"Spring Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 6) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Spring Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 6) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:21a day ago33 views
Flute, Harp
Far from the troubled, coarse libertine that has become an archetype of the Romantic composer, Felix Mendelssohn was something of an anomaly among his contemporaries. His own situation -- one largely of domestic tranquility and unhindered career fulfillment -- stands in stark contrast to the personal Sturm und Drang familiar to his peers. Mendelssohn was the only musical prodigy of the 19th century whose stature could rival that of Mozart. Still, his parents resisted any entrepreneurial impulses and spared young Felix the strange, grueling lifestyle that was the lot of many child prodigies. He and his sister Fanny were given piano lessons, and he also studied violin, and both joined the Berlin Singakademie.

The eminent German musicologist and Lieder scholar Karl Schumann once famously described Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte (Songs without words) as not simply "Pillars of the piano repertoire," but rather as "a household possession, as widespread in Germany as the Grimm brothers' fairy tales, Ludwig Richter's pictures, or Uhland's poetry ... and no less beloved in Victorian England." But these works were an absolutely typical Germanic reaction to the world of Romantic miniaturism, and especially, the growing interest among composers to encapsulate the mood of the moment in a keyboard gem.

While it has become fashionable in critical circles to denigrate Mendelssohn's fragile sensibilities as little more than the manifestation of a kind of upper-class dilettantism, in his own way, he was actually far ahead of the field when it came to recognizing the future direction that music, especially the keyboard miniature, would take. In this regard, Mendelssohn anticipated the new expressive directions to be pursued by Schumann (whose wife, Clara, did much to popularize the Songs in the concert hall) and Liszt.

Of the six Lieder ohne Worte of the fifth volume, Op. 62, no fewer than three pieces were given descriptive titles. Interestingly, Goethe (along with von Schiller the central figure of the German Romantic literary movement) had written "music begins where words end." No doubt, however, he would have been among the first to agree that the sombre mood of Op. 62 No. 3 in E minor "Trauermarsch" (Funeral March) needs no semantic prop to convey its sorrowful message. No. 5 in A minor is one of three Lieder to have the title "Venezianisches Gondollied" (Venetian Gondola Song).

The concluding Lied ohne Worte of the Op. 62 group is one of the most famous of all piano miniatures. This is the A major "Frühlingslied" or "Spring Song." The remaining untitled pieces are Op. 62 No. 1 in G (Andante espressivo), No. 2 in B flat (Allegro con fuoco), and No. 4 in G (Allegro con anima). Finally, while these beguiling, some would say simplistic, pieces have sometimes been slighted as representative of the worst kind of Romantic kitsch, the critic Joan Chissell rightly reminds us that "without all these pieces, how much poorer our understanding would have been of the impressionable heart behind the master-craftsman's façade."

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-5-op-62-mc0002379890 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Spring Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 6) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"The Morning Bell" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 9) for Violin & Guitar
Video

"The Morning Bell" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 9) for Violin & Guitar

2 parts2 pages01:44a day ago25 views
Violin, Guitar
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Morning Bell" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 9) for Violin & Classical Guitar.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
Chorale: "Laß dein' Engel mit mir fahren" (BWV 19 No 7) for Brass & Strings
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Chorale: "Laß dein' Engel mit mir fahren" (BWV 19 No 7) for Brass & Strings

7 parts2 pages01:142 days ago24 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Es erhub sich ein Streit (There arose a war), BWV 19,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig in 1726 for the Feast of Saint Michael and first performed it on 29 September 1726. The chorale theme is Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele, which was codified by Louis Bourgeois when setting the Geneva Psalm 42 in his collection of Pseaumes octante trios de David (Geneva, 1551). Bourgeois seems to have been influenced by the secular song "Ne l'oseray je dire" contained in the Manuscrit de Bayeux published around 1510.

As with other Bach cantatas written for the Feast of St. Michael, this work opens with an "imposing" chorus. The opening and closing section of this da capo movement focuses on a single line of text describing the battle against the forces of evil. The middle section sets the remaining five lines of the text. The movement includes no instrumental introduction, creating an "immediate dramatic effect". Craig Smith suggests that the "vaulting high-energy fugue theme is the perfect illustration of the heroic struggle".

The bass recitative in E minor describes the importance of the victory over Satan, but exudes a sombre mood, suggesting the continued difficulties of mankind.

The third movement is a soprano aria with obbligato oboes, "an oasis of protective tranquillity" in the major mode. However, elements of the music disturb the peace conveyed by the text: the extended ritornello begins with an "odd three-bar phrasing", leading into a passage of constant momentum between the two oboes.

The tenor recitative is again in the minor mode, this time to describe the fragility of man. This movement moves into a striking tenor aria, describing a personal response to the text. The aria is the longest movement of the cantata, representing a third of the total length of the work. The trumpet plays the full chorale melody of "Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr", probably with the third stanza mentioning angels in mind, over a siciliano rhythm in the strings and continuo.

The penultimate movement is a brief secco soprano recitative that returns to the major mode to prepare the closing chorale. The chorale has the feel of a minuet, although there is some tension because of the changing phrase lengths employed by the melody.

The piece is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass) and four-part choir, three trombe, timpani, two oboes, oboe da caccia, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Traditionally in Leipzig during Bach's time the Feast of St Michael celebrations used the largest orchestra available. All known complete Bach cantatas for this occasion include trumpet and timpani.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Es_erhub_sich_ein_Streit,_BWV_19).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "Laß dein' Engel mit mir fahren" (Let your angels travel with me) for Brass (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet & French Horn) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Lullaby" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 7) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Lullaby" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 7) for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:052 days ago17 views
Flute, Harp
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "Lullaby" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 7) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Samuel Goldenberg & Schmuÿle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 6) for Marimba
Video

"Samuel Goldenberg & Schmuÿle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 6) for Marimba

1 part2 pages01:593 days ago12 views
Percussion
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "Samuel Goldenberg & Schmuÿle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 6) for Marimba.
"The Light-Hearted Maiden" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 6) for Marimba Duet
Video

"The Light-Hearted Maiden" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 6) for Marimba Duet

2 parts2 pages00:493 days ago17 views
Percussion(2)
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Light-Hearted Maiden" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 6) for Marimba Duet.
"Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 1) for Viola & Harp
Custom audio

"Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 1) for Viola & Harp

2 parts3 pages04:154 days ago29 views
Viola, Harp
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

A grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was brought up without religion until the age of seven, when he was baptised as a Reformed Christian. Felix was recognised early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his talent.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 1) for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"The Tuileries Gardens" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 3) for Flute & Strings
Video

"The Tuileries Gardens" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 3) for Flute & Strings

5 parts3 pages01:304 days ago28 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Tuileries Gardens" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 3) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Shepherd's Return" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 3) for Brass Quartet
Video

"The Shepherd's Return" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 3) for Brass Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:344 days ago15 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Shepherd's Return" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 3) for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Tuba).
"The Hurdy-Gurdy Man" (Op. 39 No. 24) for String Quartet
Video

"The Hurdy-Gurdy Man" (Op. 39 No. 24) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page00:564 days ago8 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 -- 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Tchaikovsky created his Children's Album: 24 Easy Pieces for piano (Op. 39) to be played "by" children, rather than "for" them. They're extremely short, all but two clocking in at ell under a minute.

No. 1 is a slow, tender "Morning Prayer" in 3/4 time. Things pick up with the second item, a moderately-paced but stimulating "Winter Morning." No. 3 is a brisk, highly staccato 3/8 picture of a "Little Horseman." No. 4 is "Mama," an expressive, lingering portrait. A balance for such feminine material comes with No. 5, a sprightly "March of the Wooden Soldiers." All may be quiet on the battle front, but there's trouble back home. The sixth piece, "The Sick Doll," is a languishing Lento in G minor. The unfortunate sequel is "Dolly's Funeral," a C minor march marked, appropriately, Grave. Something of a wake comes with No. 8, a lively waltz. Then, the nursery being a fickle place, "The New Doll" arrives in a charming Andantino movement.

A series of folk-inspired pieces begins with No. 10, a D minor Mazurka. No. 11 is a simple, extremely short (ten bars) "Russian Folksong," one that Tchaikovsky had included in the 50 Russian folk songs he'd arranged for piano duet in 1869. No. 12 is a sentimental "Peasant's Song," in which Tchaikovsky evokes a concertina wheezing back and forth between two chords. No. 13 is called, generically, "Folk Song" (Russian Dance), and employs the same tune Glinka used in his orchestral Kamarinskaya. No. 14 is a rousing little polka. The next piece heads south; it's a lively "Italian Ditty" with the staccato oom-pah-pah accompaniment one hears in many early and middle Verdi arias. No. 16 swings northwest for a placid, antique-sounding, G minor "French Melody." No. 17 is a "German Song" with a hint of yodeling, and for No. 18 it's back to Italy for a "Neapolitan Dance Tune," a stripped-down version of part of the "Neapolitan Dance" in Swan Lake.

No. 19 returns to the nursery at bedtime with an evocative C major "Old Nurse's Song." When the lights go out, the witch "Baba-Yaga" appears in E minor -- yet she seems to have arrived from Liadov's quirky little orchestral piece of the same name rather than from the terrifying penultimate movement of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. No. 21 brings lovely, melodic "Sweet Dreams," the set's longest piece. Soon it's time to wake up to the "Song of the Lark," a relatively bravura piece full of right-hand arabesques. It's Sunday morning, as we'll soon discover, and upon leaving the house we encounter "The Organ-Grinder," Tchaikovsky picked up this Moderato 3/4 tune from a Venetian street singer and would soon incorporate it into the middle section of the "Rêverie interrompue" closing his Opus 40 set of piano pieces. Finally, No. 24 finds us "In Church" -- Russian Orthodox, of course, as we can tell from the E minor chanting and low pedal-point tolling of a bell toward the end.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/childrens-album-24-easy-pieces-for-piano-op-39-mc0002355025 ).

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of "The Hurdy-Gurdy Man" (Op. 39 No. 24) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Hut on Hen's Legs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 9) for Flute & Strings
Video

"The Hut on Hen's Legs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 9) for Flute & Strings

5 parts9 pages03:125 days ago23 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Hut on Hen's Legs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 9) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Gypsies" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 4) for Double-Reed Quartet
Video

"The Gypsies" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 4) for Double-Reed Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:255 days ago10 views
Oboe(2), English Horn, Bassoon
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Gypsies" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 4) for Double-Reed Quartet (2 Oboes, English Horn & Bassoon).
"In Church" (Op. 39 No. 23) for String Quartet
Video

"In Church" (Op. 39 No. 23) for String Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:325 days ago11 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 -- 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Tchaikovsky created his Children's Album: 24 Easy Pieces for piano (Op. 39) to be played "by" children, rather than "for" them. They're extremely short, all but two clocking in at ell under a minute.

No. 1 is a slow, tender "Morning Prayer" in 3/4 time. Things pick up with the second item, a moderately-paced but stimulating "Winter Morning." No. 3 is a brisk, highly staccato 3/8 picture of a "Little Horseman." No. 4 is "Mama," an expressive, lingering portrait. A balance for such feminine material comes with No. 5, a sprightly "March of the Wooden Soldiers." All may be quiet on the battle front, but there's trouble back home. The sixth piece, "The Sick Doll," is a languishing Lento in G minor. The unfortunate sequel is "Dolly's Funeral," a C minor march marked, appropriately, Grave. Something of a wake comes with No. 8, a lively waltz. Then, the nursery being a fickle place, "The New Doll" arrives in a charming Andantino movement.

A series of folk-inspired pieces begins with No. 10, a D minor Mazurka. No. 11 is a simple, extremely short (ten bars) "Russian Folksong," one that Tchaikovsky had included in the 50 Russian folk songs he'd arranged for piano duet in 1869. No. 12 is a sentimental "Peasant's Song," in which Tchaikovsky evokes a concertina wheezing back and forth between two chords. No. 13 is called, generically, "Folk Song" (Russian Dance), and employs the same tune Glinka used in his orchestral Kamarinskaya. No. 14 is a rousing little polka. The next piece heads south; it's a lively "Italian Ditty" with the staccato oom-pah-pah accompaniment one hears in many early and middle Verdi arias. No. 16 swings northwest for a placid, antique-sounding, G minor "French Melody." No. 17 is a "German Song" with a hint of yodeling, and for No. 18 it's back to Italy for a "Neapolitan Dance Tune," a stripped-down version of part of the "Neapolitan Dance" in Swan Lake.

No. 19 returns to the nursery at bedtime with an evocative C major "Old Nurse's Song." When the lights go out, the witch "Baba-Yaga" appears in E minor -- yet she seems to have arrived from Liadov's quirky little orchestral piece of the same name rather than from the terrifying penultimate movement of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. No. 21 brings lovely, melodic "Sweet Dreams," the set's longest piece. Soon it's time to wake up to the "Song of the Lark," a relatively bravura piece full of right-hand arabesques. It's Sunday morning, as we'll soon discover, and upon leaving the house we encounter "The Organ-Grinder," Tchaikovsky picked up this Moderato 3/4 tune from a Venetian street singer and would soon incorporate it into the middle section of the "Rêverie interrompue" closing his Opus 40 set of piano pieces. Finally, No. 24 finds us "In Church" -- Russian Orthodox, of course, as we can tell from the E minor chanting and low pedal-point tolling of a bell toward the end.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/childrens-album-24-easy-pieces-for-piano-op-39-mc0002355025 ).

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of "In Church" (Op. 39 No. 23) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Bogatyr Gates" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 10) for Piano
Video

"The Bogatyr Gates" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 10) for Piano

1 part5 pages04:066 days ago46 views
Piano
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Transcription of "The Bogatyr Gates" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 10) for Piano.
"The Parting" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 16) for Bassoon & Strings
Video

"The Parting" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 16) for Bassoon & Strings

5 parts3 pages01:156 days ago24 views
Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Parting" from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 16) for Bassoon & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Song of the Lark" (Op. 39 No. 22) for String Quartet
Video

"Song of the Lark" (Op. 39 No. 22) for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages00:546 days ago30 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 -- 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Tchaikovsky created his Children's Album: 24 Easy Pieces for piano (Op. 39) to be played "by" children, rather than "for" them. They're extremely short, all but two clocking in at ell under a minute.

No. 1 is a slow, tender "Morning Prayer" in 3/4 time. Things pick up with the second item, a moderately-paced but stimulating "Winter Morning." No. 3 is a brisk, highly staccato 3/8 picture of a "Little Horseman." No. 4 is "Mama," an expressive, lingering portrait. A balance for such feminine material comes with No. 5, a sprightly "March of the Wooden Soldiers." All may be quiet on the battle front, but there's trouble back home. The sixth piece, "The Sick Doll," is a languishing Lento in G minor. The unfortunate sequel is "Dolly's Funeral," a C minor march marked, appropriately, Grave. Something of a wake comes with No. 8, a lively waltz. Then, the nursery being a fickle place, "The New Doll" arrives in a charming Andantino movement.

A series of folk-inspired pieces begins with No. 10, a D minor Mazurka. No. 11 is a simple, extremely short (ten bars) "Russian Folksong," one that Tchaikovsky had included in the 50 Russian folk songs he'd arranged for piano duet in 1869. No. 12 is a sentimental "Peasant's Song," in which Tchaikovsky evokes a concertina wheezing back and forth between two chords. No. 13 is called, generically, "Folk Song" (Russian Dance), and employs the same tune Glinka used in his orchestral Kamarinskaya. No. 14 is a rousing little polka. The next piece heads south; it's a lively "Italian Ditty" with the staccato oom-pah-pah accompaniment one hears in many early and middle Verdi arias. No. 16 swings northwest for a placid, antique-sounding, G minor "French Melody." No. 17 is a "German Song" with a hint of yodeling, and for No. 18 it's back to Italy for a "Neapolitan Dance Tune," a stripped-down version of part of the "Neapolitan Dance" in Swan Lake.

No. 19 returns to the nursery at bedtime with an evocative C major "Old Nurse's Song." When the lights go out, the witch "Baba-Yaga" appears in E minor -- yet she seems to have arrived from Liadov's quirky little orchestral piece of the same name rather than from the terrifying penultimate movement of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. No. 21 brings lovely, melodic "Sweet Dreams," the set's longest piece. Soon it's time to wake up to the "Song of the Lark," a relatively bravura piece full of right-hand arabesques. It's Sunday morning, as we'll soon discover, and upon leaving the house we encounter "The Organ-Grinder," Tchaikovsky picked up this Moderato 3/4 tune from a Venetian street singer and would soon incorporate it into the middle section of the "Rêverie interrompue" closing his Opus 40 set of piano pieces. Finally, No. 24 finds us "In Church" -- Russian Orthodox, of course, as we can tell from the E minor chanting and low pedal-point tolling of a bell toward the end.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/childrens-album-24-easy-pieces-for-piano-op-39-mc0002355025 ).

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of "Song of the Lark" (Op. 39 No. 22) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Limoges & Catacombs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvts. 7 & 8) for Harp
Video

"Limoges & Catacombs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvts. 7 & 8) for Harp

1 part6 pages05:587 days ago17 views
Harp
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "Limoges & Catacombs" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvts. 7 & 8) for Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Confidence from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 1) for Classical Guitar
Video

Confidence from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 1) for Classical Guitar

1 part1 page01:247 days ago46 views
Guitar
Johann Friedrich Franz Burgmüller, generally known as Friedrich Burgmüller (born Regensburg, Germany 4 December 1806 – 13 February 1874) was a German pianist and composer. He was born in Ratisbon (now Regensburg) Germany. Both his father, August, and his brother, Norbert, were musicians. His father was a musical theatre director in Weimar and other Southern German centers. He moved to Kassel in 1829 to study under Ludwig Spohr and Moritz Hauptmann. There he appeared as a pianist for his first concert, January 14, 1830. He moved to Paris in 1832 (at age 26), where he stayed until his death. Norbert, his brother, made plans to join him in Paris, in 1835. However, he drowned in a spa in Aachen a year later. In Paris, Friedrich adopted Parisian music and developed his trademark (light) style of playing. He wrote many pieces of salon music for the piano and published several albums. Burgmüller also went on to compose piano études intended for children. He died in Paris in 1874

His 18 Études (Op. 109) is a wonderful collection of small character studies composed in 1806-1874. Each piece presents a consistent technical problem, which is often the main idea of the piece, while at the same time having a distinct and lovely musical appeal.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Friedrich_Franz_Burgm%C3%BCller ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of Confidence from 18 Études (Op. 109 No. 1) for Classical Guitar.
"Sweet Dreams" (Op. 39 No. 21) for String Quartet
Video

"Sweet Dreams" (Op. 39 No. 21) for String Quartet

4 parts2 pages02:037 days ago45 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 -- 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Tchaikovsky created his Children's Album: 24 Easy Pieces for piano (Op. 39) to be played "by" children, rather than "for" them. They're extremely short, all but two clocking in at ell under a minute.

No. 1 is a slow, tender "Morning Prayer" in 3/4 time. Things pick up with the second item, a moderately-paced but stimulating "Winter Morning." No. 3 is a brisk, highly staccato 3/8 picture of a "Little Horseman." No. 4 is "Mama," an expressive, lingering portrait. A balance for such feminine material comes with No. 5, a sprightly "March of the Wooden Soldiers." All may be quiet on the battle front, but there's trouble back home. The sixth piece, "The Sick Doll," is a languishing Lento in G minor. The unfortunate sequel is "Dolly's Funeral," a C minor march marked, appropriately, Grave. Something of a wake comes with No. 8, a lively waltz. Then, the nursery being a fickle place, "The New Doll" arrives in a charming Andantino movement.

A series of folk-inspired pieces begins with No. 10, a D minor Mazurka. No. 11 is a simple, extremely short (ten bars) "Russian Folksong," one that Tchaikovsky had included in the 50 Russian folk songs he'd arranged for piano duet in 1869. No. 12 is a sentimental "Peasant's Song," in which Tchaikovsky evokes a concertina wheezing back and forth between two chords. No. 13 is called, generically, "Folk Song" (Russian Dance), and employs the same tune Glinka used in his orchestral Kamarinskaya. No. 14 is a rousing little polka. The next piece heads south; it's a lively "Italian Ditty" with the staccato oom-pah-pah accompaniment one hears in many early and middle Verdi arias. No. 16 swings northwest for a placid, antique-sounding, G minor "French Melody." No. 17 is a "German Song" with a hint of yodeling, and for No. 18 it's back to Italy for a "Neapolitan Dance Tune," a stripped-down version of part of the "Neapolitan Dance" in Swan Lake.

No. 19 returns to the nursery at bedtime with an evocative C major "Old Nurse's Song." When the lights go out, the witch "Baba-Yaga" appears in E minor -- yet she seems to have arrived from Liadov's quirky little orchestral piece of the same name rather than from the terrifying penultimate movement of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. No. 21 brings lovely, melodic "Sweet Dreams," the set's longest piece. Soon it's time to wake up to the "Song of the Lark," a relatively bravura piece full of right-hand arabesques. It's Sunday morning, as we'll soon discover, and upon leaving the house we encounter "The Organ-Grinder," Tchaikovsky picked up this Moderato 3/4 tune from a Venetian street singer and would soon incorporate it into the middle section of the "Rêverie interrompue" closing his Opus 40 set of piano pieces. Finally, No. 24 finds us "In Church" -- Russian Orthodox, of course, as we can tell from the E minor chanting and low pedal-point tolling of a bell toward the end.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/childrens-album-24-easy-pieces-for-piano-op-39-mc0002355025 ).

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of "Sweet Dreams" (Op. 39 No. 21) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"The Cattle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 4) for String Quintet
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"The Cattle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 4) for String Quintet

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Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music.

Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available.

Victor Hartmann, a Russian painter and architect, was one of Mussorgsky's close friends. When Hartmann died in St. Petersburg in 1873 at the age of 41, the composer was crushed. He wrote to the art critic Vladimir Stasov, paraphrasing Shakespeare: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and the Hartmanns perish?" In January 1874, the Russian Academy of Arts organized an exhibition of Hartmann's work. Mussorgsky attended the show, where he saw the varied images that became the basis for Pictures of an Exhibition. On June 2, Mussorgsky began work on Pictures, a musical impression of ten of Hartmann's paintings (plus five "promenades") for piano, and finished the work later in the same month.

Pictures of an Exhibition opens with a "Promenade" in 5/4 that serves as a unifying device throughout; it is a portrayal of the composer himself walking from one painting to the next. The first picture is "Gnomus," inspired by a design for a toy nutcracker that Hartmann drew in 1869. Another promenade is followed by "The Old Castle," a mysterious, lonely evocation built on pedal tones. "Tuileries" is inspired by a watercolor of children at play in the garden of the Tuileries. This bright and impressionistic piece is followed by the heavy tread of "Bydlo" (a Polish oxcart). Mussorgsky's setting of "Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks" is a wildly imaginative scherzo. A stern melody in a Jewish-music-derived scale opens "Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle," in which a wealthy Jew is portrayed by an insistent repeating figure in the treble, a poor Jew in the bass. The rapid patter of haggling housewives characterizes "The Market Place in Limoges." In another sudden change in mood, "Catacombs," which pictures Hartmann himself touring a vast catacomb of skulls, is rendered in naked chord progressions. "The Hut on Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga)" was inspired by Hartmann's design for a fourteenth century-style clock in the shape of a witch's hat. Mussorgsky transforms it into a miniature tone poem about Baba Yaga, the legendary Russian witch who devoured the souls of children. After a grand flourish, the work ends with "The Great Gate of Kiev," inspired by a never-implemented design Hartmann submitted to an architecture competition. Pictures of an Exhibition comes to a close with rich, booming chords which evoke bells.

Although Mussorgsky is known to have played Pictures of an Exhibition in recital, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer's death. It remained relatively little known until Ravel made a colorful orchestration of it in 1922, and in this form it has enjoyed even greater popularity than the original.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/pictures-at-an-exhibition-kartinki-s-v%C3%AFstavski-for-piano-mc0002362619 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of "The Cattle" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" (Mvt. 4) for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).