Sheet music

"Fugue" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 2) for String Quartet
Video

"Fugue" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 2) for String Quartet

4 parts5 pages02:2713 hours ago16 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Tchaikovsky's Six Pieces on a Single Theme (Six morceaux composés sur un seul thème) for solo piano (Op. 21), were composed between the end of September & November 1873 in Moscow. The pieces were published for the first time by Vasily Bessel in 1873. Twenty years later they pieces came to the attention of Aleksandr Ziloti: "I recently looked over your old piano pieces and began with your 'gems' (Op. 21); I will play the Prelude and Mazurka; incidentally. these have been published by Mackar". "I have completed your six piano pieces", Tchaikovsky wrote to Vasily Bessel on 28 November/10 December 1873. "Now I'm in the process of making fair copies of them, and you should receive them in the near future. All six pieces are written around one theme and will be have the overall title Suite: Nos. 1) Prelude, 2) Fugue, 3) Impromptu, 4) Mazurka, 5) Marche funebre, 6) Scherzo. The whole thing is dedicated to A. G. Rubinstein. I've kept you waiting for these pieces, and for this I apologize; the fact is that I also gave my word to Jurgenson that I would write six pieces for him, amongst other things".

The pieces are dedicated to Anton Rubinstein, who played them many years after they were published. Tchaikovsky was upset by the great pianist's indifference: "Isn't A. Rubinstein a strange fellow? Why didn't he turn his attention to my piano pieces 10 years ago? Why hasn't he played a single note until now? Why did I do to deserve this! Nevertheless, I am very thankful for his sudden change of heart", he wrote to Pyotr Jurgenson on 14/26 April 1883. The following year he suggested to Nadezhda von Meck that she should hear Anton Rubinstein play the Op. 21 pieces in Paris: "He is always playing four of my six piano pieces, which some time ago I wrote and dedicated to him. Truly, these pieces could not be better played".

The title Suite was changed by the author to Six Morceaux. Sketches for the pieces are contained in the same copybook as sketches for the Nocturne and Capriccioso from the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — which were written immediately prior to the Op. 21 set. The sequence of the sketches indicates that the Mazurka was the first to be composed, and the remaining five pieces were written in the order in which they were published.

They set was included in volume 51Б of Tchaikovsky's Complete Collected Works (1946), edited by Ivan Shishov

Source: Wikipedia (http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/Six_Pieces_on_a_Single_Theme,_Op._21 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Fugue" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 2) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Choral Prelude: "Nun komm der Heiden Heiland" (BuxWV 211) for Oboe & Piano
Video

Choral Prelude: "Nun komm der Heiden Heiland" (BuxWV 211) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts2 pages01:21a day ago24 views
Oboe, Piano
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ.

This prelude sets the principal Lutheran chorale of the Advent season. The basis of the text and music is the Gregorian Hymnus, "Veni Redemptor Genitum," and was translated into German by Martin Luther in 1524. The first verse of the chorale reads: "Now comes the savior of the heathen known as a child of a virgin, that is why all the world wonders, why God chose such a birth for him."

Buxtehude's setting of the chorale is somewhat brief at only 21 measures, but the ornamentation of the chorale melody in the soprano range is very warm and beautiful, so that this tiny prelude is one of Buxtehude's most played chorale preludes.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chorale-prelude-for-organ-in-g-minor-buxwv-211-nun-komm-der-heiden-heiland-mc0002356688 ).

Although originally created for Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Chorale prelude: "Nun komm der Heiden Heiland" (BuxWV 211) for Flute & Piano.
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"Prélude" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 1) for Flute & Strings
Video

"Prélude" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 1) for Flute & Strings

5 parts3 pages01:473 days ago43 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Tchaikovsky's Six Pieces on a Single Theme (Six morceaux composés sur un seul thème) for solo piano (Op. 21), were composed between the end of September & November 1873 in Moscow. The pieces were published for the first time by Vasily Bessel in 1873. Twenty years later they pieces came to the attention of Aleksandr Ziloti: "I recently looked over your old piano pieces and began with your 'gems' (Op. 21); I will play the Prelude and Mazurka; incidentally. these have been published by Mackar". "I have completed your six piano pieces", Tchaikovsky wrote to Vasily Bessel on 28 November/10 December 1873. "Now I'm in the process of making fair copies of them, and you should receive them in the near future. All six pieces are written around one theme and will be have the overall title Suite: Nos. 1) Prelude, 2) Fugue, 3) Impromptu, 4) Mazurka, 5) Marche funebre, 6) Scherzo. The whole thing is dedicated to A. G. Rubinstein. I've kept you waiting for these pieces, and for this I apologize; the fact is that I also gave my word to Jurgenson that I would write six pieces for him, amongst other things".

The pieces are dedicated to Anton Rubinstein, who played them many years after they were published. Tchaikovsky was upset by the great pianist's indifference: "Isn't A. Rubinstein a strange fellow? Why didn't he turn his attention to my piano pieces 10 years ago? Why hasn't he played a single note until now? Why did I do to deserve this! Nevertheless, I am very thankful for his sudden change of heart", he wrote to Pyotr Jurgenson on 14/26 April 1883. The following year he suggested to Nadezhda von Meck that she should hear Anton Rubinstein play the Op. 21 pieces in Paris: "He is always playing four of my six piano pieces, which some time ago I wrote and dedicated to him. Truly, these pieces could not be better played".

The title Suite was changed by the author to Six Morceaux. Sketches for the pieces are contained in the same copybook as sketches for the Nocturne and Capriccioso from the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — which were written immediately prior to the Op. 21 set. The sequence of the sketches indicates that the Mazurka was the first to be composed, and the remaining five pieces were written in the order in which they were published.

They set was included in volume 51? of Tchaikovsky's Complete Collected Works (1946), edited by Ivan Shishov

Source: Wikipedia (http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/Six_Pieces_on_a_Single_Theme,_Op._21 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Prélude" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 1) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Fantasy XII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 12) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy XII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 12) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:034 days ago39 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy XII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 12) for Violin & Viola.
"Russian Dance" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 10) for Guitar & Strings
Video

"Russian Dance" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 10) for Guitar & Strings

5 parts4 pages02:085 days ago57 views
Guitar, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece.

Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste.

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Russian Dance" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 10) for Classical Guitar & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Fantasy XI from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 11) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy XI from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 11) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:436 days ago36 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy XI from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 11) for Violin & Viola.

Scotland The Brave - ANZAC SONG - For Pipes and Drums

12 parts20 pages01:507 days ago49 views
Bagpipe(5), Flute, Other Woodwinds(2), Percussion(2), Tuba, French Horn
So the reason i chose to do this piece of music is because of it's legacy. It was played by the Scots throughout history and especially during WW1. As an Australian who's grandfather fought in combat and therefor marches in the ANZAC parade, i am deeply connected to hearing this song played during the march. It is very powerful and is known to increase the moral of men during WW1. I'd also like to thank Mike Magadan for the original arrangement of this score. Now, enjoy.
"Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 9) for Oboe & Strings
Video

"Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 9) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts7 pages05:327 days ago59 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece.

Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste.

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 9) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Fantasy X from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 10) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy X from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 10) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:288 days ago33 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy X from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 10) for Violin & Viola.
"Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 8) for Flute & Strings
Video

"Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 8) for Flute & Strings

5 parts7 pages03:119 days ago82 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece.

Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste.

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Valse" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 8) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Fantasy IX from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 9) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy IX from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 9) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:3810 days ago45 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy IX from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 9) for Violin & Viola.
"Romance San Paroles" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 6) for Harp
Video

"Romance San Paroles" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 6) for Harp

1 part2 pages01:5111 days ago52 views
Harp
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece.

Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste.

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ).

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Romance San Paroles" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 6) for Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Fantasy VIII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 8) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy VIII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 8) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:4712 days ago39 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy VIII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 8) for Violin & Viola.
Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol. 2 No. 2) for Winds & Strings
Video

Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol. 2 No. 2) for Winds & Strings

8 parts10 pages03:5813 days ago46 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 – 1890) was a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life. He was born at Liège, in what is now Belgium (though at the time of his birth it was part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands). He gave his first concerts there in 1834 and studied privately in Paris from 1835, where his teachers included Anton Reicha. After a brief return to Belgium, and a disastrous reception to an early oratorio Ruth, he moved to Paris, where he married and embarked on a career as teacher and organist. He gained a reputation as a formidable improviser, and travelled widely in France to demonstrate new instruments built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

When César Franck’s son, Georges Franck, offered to Enoch the unknown collection of his father’s manuscripts, he described, that these pieces were composed „by the request of Franck’s friend, a village organist, who asked Franck to compose some nice, but simple pieces suitable for the village church service”.

Indeed, Auguste Sanches was an organ amateur in Azille, where Franck with his family spent the vacations. Franck composed his „simple pieces” mostly during August and September 1859, but also there are some older (1858) and later (up to 1866) additions, not necessary understood in the close connection with the pieces of 08-09 1859. Some of other pieces are extremely difficult and weren’t probably composed for the amateur organist.

This collection is extremally important for Franck’s legacy and art-work-understanding. This is main link between the early organ pieces (such as [Pieces] in E flat major or in A major, or Andantino in g minor, and "Six Pieces” published in 1868.

Only part of the pieces has signed the dates of composition, what is helpful in the way, that we know about quite long period of composition (9 years), and about the fact, that the Collection hasn’t chronological order. Moreover, the collection hasn’t quite no order at all, so, it is not a "collection” or a "cycle”, but just unordered set of more or less separate pieces.

Source: Ars Polonica (http://arspolonica.ocross.net/muzyka/cesar-franck-1822-1890/cesar-franck-1822-1890-the-pieces-posthumes-or-44-petites-pieces-or-lorganiste-ii/ ).

Although originally created for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Offertoire from 30 Pièces pour Orgue (FWV 24 Vol. 2 No. 2) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Fantasy VII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 7) for Violin & Viola
Video

Fantasy VII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 7) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:2914 days ago43 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy VII from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 7) for Violin & Viola.
Fantaisie in Ab Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 9) for String Quartet
Video

Fantaisie in Ab Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 9) for String Quartet

4 parts5 pages04:3015 days ago26 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 – 1890) was a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life. He was born at Liège, in what is now Belgium (though at the time of his birth it was part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands). He gave his first concerts there in 1834 and studied privately in Paris from 1835, where his teachers included Anton Reicha. After a brief return to Belgium, and a disastrous reception to an early oratorio Ruth, he moved to Paris, where he married and embarked on a career as teacher and organist. He gained a reputation as a formidable improviser, and travelled widely in France to demonstrate new instruments built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

In 1858 he became organist at Sainte-Clotilde, a position he retained for the rest of his life. He became professor at the Paris Conservatoire in 1872; he took French nationality, a requirement of the appointment. His pupils included Vincent d'Indy, Ernest Chausson, Louis Vierne, Charles Tournemire, Guillaume Lekeu and Henri Duparc. After acquiring the professorship Franck wrote several pieces that have entered the standard classical repertoire, including symphonic, chamber, and keyboard works.

In 1889 the publisher, Enoch, commissioned Franck to compose 100 pieces for harmonium -- a portable reed organ patented by Debain in the early 1840s and improved by the Alexandres, father and son, through the mid-century. The harmonium's popularity for home music created a demand, though thrifty French publishers, hedging their bets, often advertised their offerings as being "for organ or harmonium." Franck's collection, published posthumously, is presented in this way, though the pieces, with their open textures and absence of pedal parts, are plainly for harmonium. In any case, between August 16 and September 20, 1890, Franck completed 63 pieces, of which 59 were published in the autumn of 1891 with the misleading title L'Organiste. Thus, they are contemporary with the Trois Chorals for organ and, though necessarily on a smaller scale, partake of their unflagging invention.

As Franck left it, the collection is divided into eight suites of seven pieces each (with three numbers of an incomplete suite outstanding), following an invariable plan of three numbers in the major, three in the minor, and a rhapsodic concluding movement which weaves together the themes of the preceding. While most are introduced by tempo and metronome indications ("Poco allegretto. Quarter note = 63"), occasional headings -- "Offertoire," "Prière," "Communion," "Offertoire funèbre," "Sortie" -- show that Franck intended these pieces primarily for liturgical use. But widely distributed selections from L'Organiste, offered as piano albums, demonstrate that they possess charm and interest quite independent of the nave. Indeed, Franck seems to have been thinking of the preludes of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier as he composed, for their melodic flair is complemented by a compositional resourcefulness which lends them substance far surpassing similar works by his friend Lefébure-Wély, or Chaminade.

The occasional use of folk song -- "Chant Béarnais," "Chant de la Creuse," "Noël Angevin," and the like -- throws Franck's straightforward yet always vivacious craft into high relief. And through them all we catch an aural glimpse of Franck the improviser. "For César Franck had, or rather was, the genius of improvisation, and no other modern organist, not excepting the most renowned executants, would bear the most distant comparison with him in this respect," Vincent d'Indy recalled in 1906, adding: "sometimes the master would invite other people, friends, amateurs, or foreign musicians, to visit him in the organ-loft. Thus it happened that on April 3, 1866, Franz Liszt, who had been his sole listener, left the church of Sainte-Clotilde lost in amazement, and evoking the name of J.S. Bach in an inevitable comparison."

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lorganiste-vol1-for-organ-or-harmonium-fwv-41-mc0002373358 ).

Although originally created for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Fantaisie in Ab Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 9) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Fantasy VI from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 6) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:0716 days ago30 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy VI from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 6) for Violin & Viola.
Fantaisie in G Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 8) for English Horn & Strings
Custom audio

Fantaisie in G Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 8) for English Horn & Strings

5 parts14 pages11:0717 days ago45 views
English Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
César-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (1822 – 1890) was a composer, pianist, organist, and music teacher who worked in Paris during his adult life. He was born at Liège, in what is now Belgium (though at the time of his birth it was part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands). He gave his first concerts there in 1834 and studied privately in Paris from 1835, where his teachers included Anton Reicha. After a brief return to Belgium, and a disastrous reception to an early oratorio Ruth, he moved to Paris, where he married and embarked on a career as teacher and organist. He gained a reputation as a formidable improviser, and travelled widely in France to demonstrate new instruments built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

In 1858 he became organist at Sainte-Clotilde, a position he retained for the rest of his life. He became professor at the Paris Conservatoire in 1872; he took French nationality, a requirement of the appointment. His pupils included Vincent d'Indy, Ernest Chausson, Louis Vierne, Charles Tournemire, Guillaume Lekeu and Henri Duparc. After acquiring the professorship Franck wrote several pieces that have entered the standard classical repertoire, including symphonic, chamber, and keyboard works.

In 1889 the publisher, Enoch, commissioned Franck to compose 100 pieces for harmonium -- a portable reed organ patented by Debain in the early 1840s and improved by the Alexandres, father and son, through the mid-century. The harmonium's popularity for home music created a demand, though thrifty French publishers, hedging their bets, often advertised their offerings as being "for organ or harmonium." Franck's collection, published posthumously, is presented in this way, though the pieces, with their open textures and absence of pedal parts, are plainly for harmonium. In any case, between August 16 and September 20, 1890, Franck completed 63 pieces, of which 59 were published in the autumn of 1891 with the misleading title L'Organiste. Thus, they are contemporary with the Trois Chorals for organ and, though necessarily on a smaller scale, partake of their unflagging invention.

As Franck left it, the collection is divided into eight suites of seven pieces each (with three numbers of an incomplete suite outstanding), following an invariable plan of three numbers in the major, three in the minor, and a rhapsodic concluding movement which weaves together the themes of the preceding. While most are introduced by tempo and metronome indications ("Poco allegretto. Quarter note = 63"), occasional headings -- "Offertoire," "Prière," "Communion," "Offertoire funèbre," "Sortie" -- show that Franck intended these pieces primarily for liturgical use. But widely distributed selections from L'Organiste, offered as piano albums, demonstrate that they possess charm and interest quite independent of the nave. Indeed, Franck seems to have been thinking of the preludes of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier as he composed, for their melodic flair is complemented by a compositional resourcefulness which lends them substance far surpassing similar works by his friend Lefébure-Wély, or Chaminade.

The occasional use of folk song -- "Chant Béarnais," "Chant de la Creuse," "Noël Angevin," and the like -- throws Franck's straightforward yet always vivacious craft into high relief. And through them all we catch an aural glimpse of Franck the improviser. "For César Franck had, or rather was, the genius of improvisation, and no other modern organist, not excepting the most renowned executants, would bear the most distant comparison with him in this respect," Vincent d'Indy recalled in 1906, adding: "sometimes the master would invite other people, friends, amateurs, or foreign musicians, to visit him in the organ-loft. Thus it happened that on April 3, 1866, Franz Liszt, who had been his sole listener, left the church of Sainte-Clotilde lost in amazement, and evoking the name of J.S. Bach in an inevitable comparison."

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lorganiste-vol1-for-organ-or-harmonium-fwv-41-mc0002373358 ).

Although originally created for Pipe Organ, I created this Interpretation of the Fantaisie in G Major from L'Organiste (FWV 41 No. 8) for English Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Fantasy V from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 5) for Violin & Viola

2 parts3 pages02:0918 days ago39 views
Violin, Viola
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12.

From the original 36 Fantasies for the Harpsichord by Georg Philipp Telemann, the individual pieces are grouped into three series of twelve. They are very much representative of Telemann's introduction to Germany of the galant style from France, which is characterized by a lighter and less contrapuntal style of writing. Furthermore, Telemann's Fantaisies TWV 33 are considered to be precursors of the Classical sonata form, thus preparing the way for Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in the eighteenth century.

Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/36_Fantaisies_pour_le_clavessin,_TWV_33:1-36_(Telemann,_Georg_Philipp) ).

Although originally created for Keyboard (Harpsichord), I created this Arrangement of the Fantasy V from 12 Fantasie (TWV 33:1-12 No. 5) for Violin & Viola.