Sheet music

Coro from the Opera "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 A1S1N1) for Winds & Strings

9 parts6 pages01:384 hours ago4 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Coro from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 Act I Scene I No. 1) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, A Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Overture Allegro from the Opera "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts5 pages01:57a day ago23 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Overture Allegro from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 No. iii) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
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Overture from the Opera "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page01:322 days ago37 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
One of Georg Friedrich Händel's (1685 – 1759) greatest and most successful operas, Giulio Cesare was first performed at the King's Theatre in London on February 20, 1724, when it ran for 13 performances. Handel subsequently revived the work on three occasions, the last in 1732. It was composed for the Italian opera season of the Royal Academy, the organization formed by a group of noblemen under Handel's musical direction in 1719. From its inception, the Academy had sought to present some of the greatest singers of the day to London audiences; the original cast of Giulio Cesare was no exception: the great castrato Senesino (Caesar), and Francesca Cuzzoni (Cleopatra), one of the leading prima donnas of the day, took the stage to premiere Handel's work. By the conventions of the day, Giulio Cesare is unusual in a number of respects, not least of which is its subject matter. Based as it is on the famous historical love affair between Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, it departs from the more traditional realm (at least for opera seria of the time) of mythology. Around this central argument an excellent libretto, cast in the usual three acts by Nicola Haym, weaves a story of political intrigue and treachery involving Cleopatra's brother and co-ruler of Egypt, Tolomeo (Ptolemy). Giulio Cesare was the only opera Handel composed for the Royal Academy during 1724, and he lavished extra time and care on a score that frequently breaches the conventions of its genre. To a greater degree than in any other of Handel's operas, there is a flexibility of design that departs from the rigid alternation of recitative and da capo aria. Handel's orchestration is also richer than in any other of his operas. Nowhere is this richness and flexibility better demonstrated than in the extraordinary scene in Act Two in which Cleopatra attempts to seduce Caesar by revealing to him a pageant set on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Here Handel employs a double orchestra, one on stage including harp, theorbo, and viola da gamba, combined with the main body in a ravishing symphony of sensuality. Above all, perhaps, the greatness of Giulio Cesare resides in the person of Cleopatra, for whom the composer created one of the most acute and vividly drawn characterizations in operatic history. In the course of her eight arias, Cleopatra's progress from a self-confident ruler and vivacious flirt to mature young woman is charted with unparalleled sympathy and insight. Nowhere is she more affecting than in adversity, particularly after her imprisonment by Tolomeo, when she is given three magnificent arias, culminating in her famous "Piangerò." While it is Cleopatra who dominates the opera, the other major characters are also unusually well-drawn -- Caesar truly heroic yet vulnerably susceptible, and Tolomeo a more rounded and convincing villain than is frequently the case. While Handel may have later equaled the achievement of Giulio Cesare in Orlando and Alcina, it attains an overall level he never surpassed. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/giulio-cesare-in-egitto-opera-hwv-17-mc0002359520). Although originally written for Opera, I created this Arrangement of the Overture from "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (HWV 17 No. ii) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Preambulum & Fugue in A Minor (BuxWV 158) for Pipe Organ

1 part6 pages04:413 days ago36 views
Organ
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. The word "praeambulum" means the same thing as praeludium and this work is no different than his praeludia. It opens with a free toccata passage followed by two imitative fugal sections and concludes with a segment of free passage work. The two fugues are thematically related, the second fugue subject is a 6/4 version of the common time subject of the first fugue. Historically, Buxtehude's organ music has been studied because of its direct influence on Bach; Buxtehude wrote the first truly idiomatic fugues for the organ and was one of the first to experiment with the structure that Bach later codified into the prelude and fugue. Buxtehude is generally considered the greatest organist between Scheidt and Bach and is regarded as the originator of the German organ toccata. However, in addition to the keyboard music that so impressed his contemporaries, he also wrote some extraordinary works for trios involving the viola da gamba. His vocal works shared the devotion and intellectual rigor of his instrumental work, and were also much admired. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/praeambulum-for-organ-in-a-minor-buxwv-158-mc0002363254). I created this Transcription of the Preambulum & Fugue in A Minor (BuxWV 158) for Pipe Organ.

Sonatina in Bb Major (HWV 585) for Piano

1 part1 page00:403 days ago41 views
Piano
Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) was a German, later British, baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos. Handel received important training in Halle and worked as a composer in Hamburg and Italy before settling in London in 1712; he became a naturalised British subject in 1727. He was strongly influenced both by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and by the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition. Within fifteen years, Handel had started three commercial opera companies to supply the English nobility with Italian opera. Musicologist Winton Dean writes that his operas show that "Handel was not only a great composer; he was a dramatic genius of the first order." As Alexander's Feast (1736) was well received, Handel made a transition to English choral works. After his success with Messiah (1742) he never composed an Italian opera again. Almost blind, and having lived in England for nearly fifty years, he died in 1759, a respected and rich man. His funeral was given full state honours, and he was buried in Westminster Abbey in London. Born the same year as Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti, Handel is regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Baroque era, with works such as Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks and Messiah remaining steadfastly popular. One of his four Coronation Anthems, Zadok the Priest (1727), composed for the coronation of George II, has been performed at every subsequent British coronation, traditionally during the sovereign's anointing. Another of his English oratorios, Solomon (1748), has also remained popular, with the Sinfonia that opens act 3 (known more commonly as "The Arrival of the Queen of Sheba") featuring at the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremony. Handel composed more than forty operas in over thirty years, and since the late 1960s, with the revival of baroque music and historically informed musical performance, interest in Handel's operas has grown. Little is know about the Sonatina in Bb Major (HWV 585) for keyboard. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Frideric_Handel). Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this Transcription of the Sonatina in Bb Major (HWV 585) for Piano.

Suite in E Minor (HWV 429 No. 4) for Harp Duet

2 parts18 pages09:254 days ago24 views
Harp(2)
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel self-published the first volume of his Suites for keyboard in 1720. Although this was outside his usual activities as a composer, he did so because the suites had been published the previous year in Amsterdam by Jeanne Rogers, who, given the absence of international copyright laws, paid Handel not a penny for his work. The full title of the volume was Suites de pièces pour le Clavecin and the suites are most often sets of stylized dances with the occasional addition of other movements. The Suite in E minor consists of six movements: Fuga, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Presto, and Gigue. Marked Allegro, the opening four-voice Fuga has a hammering subject pounding through the whole movement until the final, massive Adagio cadence. The Allemande, marked Allegro moderato, is a sweet and supple movement with delicately intertwining voices. The Courante, marked Allegretto tranquillo, is an easily flowing movement in three voices that expand to four and then five voices at the cadences. The Sarabande, marked Allegretto con moto, is a quietly contemplative movement with an inward melody. The closing Gigue, in 12/8 and marked Vivace, is a hoot and a holler with a quick rush to the final cadence. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no4-in-e-minor-hwv-429-mc0002404813). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Suite in E Minor (HWV 429 No. 4) for Concert (Pedal) Harp Duet.

Concerto in G Major (HWV 487) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts4 pages02:345 days ago70 views
Flute, Guitar
Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) was a true European. He had a German work ethic, Italian passion and a Dutch head for business. And after training in Germany and Italy, from 1711 he went on to win the hearts of the British. He wooed them with his many operas and oratorios, and with instrumental works like his Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks. Yet during his lifetime, he was renowned not only as an organist, but also as one of the greatest harpsichordists of his day. The public couldn’t get enough of him on the harpsichord, either as a composer or a musician. Evidently times change. However, if we take a closer look at the period during which Handel settled in London, we soon see that people were occupied with the same issues then as they are today. The signing of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 finally brought peace after a long period of war, and with it a lasting balance of power in Europe. It was a historic moment, comparable to the foundation of the European Union. Historic, partly because it was the first time a treaty had been signed not on the battle field but at the negotiating table. For Handel it was a fortunate development as it allowed him to move much more freely around Europe. At the same time, England had not done badly out of the peace deal it had struck in Utrecht. Welfare in the country increased, certainly in London. Handel brought together new and old material, but just what was old and what was new we do not know. Probably some of the work dated from his student days in Germany, some from his years in Italy, and the new material from his time in London. The German folksongs in the Air of the Suite in D Minor and the Passacaille from the Suite in G Major could well have been composed in his German years, as could some of the Fugues. Little is written about the series of Preludes and Capriccios and Allegros although they were likely written for Organ or Harpsichord. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Frideric_Handel). Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this Interpretation of the Concerto in G Major (HWV 487) for Flute & Classical Guitar.

Suite in F# Minor (HWV 431 No. 6) for Piano

1 part8 pages09:306 days ago47 views
Piano
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Although he was a music composer not a music publisher, Handel undertook to issue his first volume of keyboard suites himself in London in 1720. He did so because as he wrote in the preface, "surrepticious [sic] and incorrect Copies of them had got Abroad" or, to put it more bluntly, Jeanne Roger of Amsterdam had pirated the scores and was making money off of them without paying Handel any royalties. Many of the suites were intended to be didactic pieces, teaching students keyboard technique while amusing them with cheerful melodies and pleasant harmonies. The Suite in F sharp minor is not one of those suites. Rather, it is a darkly tragic piece in four intense movements: an opening Prelude of enormous range and power, a brooding Largo in triple-time with huge chords and demonic trills, and a gigantic Fuga marked Allegro that simply starts with a descending theme but adds voice after voice of counterpoint to culminate in a stark Adagio cadence in seven voices. The closing Gigue, marked Presto, twists and winds through tightly argued modulations to a final, bleak cadence. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Transcription of the Suite in F# Minor (HWV 431 No. 6) for Piano.

Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 4) for String Quartet

4 parts6 pages02:017 days ago63 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel published his first volume of Suites for keyboard in London in 1720. The works had already been published without his permission in Amsterdam the previous year and Handel published them himself in London to protect his royalties. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites most often are sets of stylized dances. The Suite in F major, however, is not a set of dances, but rather a stylized church sonata in four movements: Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, and Fuga. The opening Adagio is a thoughtful and expansive movement with an exquisitely embellished melody above wide-ranging modulations starting in F major, but ending in A minor. The following Allegro is a rapid, racing movement in F major with few modulations. The following Adagio is a dramatic movement in D minor with a highly expressive melody above widely spaced chords. The closing Fuga Allegro is in four independent voices with an aggressive subject. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no2-in-f-major-hwv-427-mc0002405533). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 4) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Fantasia in C Minor (BWV 1121) for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages02:468 days ago69 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Bach was hired in 1708 by the ruling duke of Saxe-Weimar, Wilhelm Ernst, as an organist and member of the court orchestra; he was particularly encouraged to make use of his unique talents with the organ. During his tenure at Weimar his fame as an organist grew, and many students of the organ visited him to hear him play and to learn from his technique. The composer also wrote many of his greatest organ works during the period, including the Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 and the Prelude and Fugue in E major, BWV 566. Little is written about this Fantasia in C Minor, derived from a copy in the "Andreas-Bach-Buch" without attribution to an author by J. S. Bach, written in tablature; Lit.: D. Kilian, in: FS Dürr, p. 161ff.; Schulze St, p. 49f.; first edition: M. Seiffert, in: Organum IV/10, Leipzig 1925, p. 20. Although originally written for Organ, I created this Arrangement of the Fantasia in C Minor (BWV 1121 -- formerly BWV Anh, 205) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Adagio from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No 2 Mvt 3) for Piano

1 part1 page01:308 days ago39 views
Piano
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel published his first volume of Suites for keyboard in London in 1720. The works had already been published without his permission in Amsterdam the previous year and Handel published them himself in London to protect his royalties. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites most often are sets of stylized dances. The Suite in F major, however, is not a set of dances, but rather a stylized church sonata in four movements: Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, and Fuga. The opening Adagio is a thoughtful and expansive movement with an exquisitely embellished melody above wide-ranging modulations starting in F major, but ending in A minor. The following Allegro is a rapid, racing movement in F major with few modulations. The following Adagio is a dramatic movement in D minor with a highly expressive melody above widely spaced chords. The closing Fuga Allegro is in four independent voices with an aggressive subject. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no2-in-f-major-hwv-427-mc0002405533). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Adagio from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 3) for Piano.

Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 2) for Violin & Cello

2 parts2 pages02:039 days ago63 views
Violin, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel published his first volume of Suites for keyboard in London in 1720. The works had already been published without his permission in Amsterdam the previous year and Handel published them himself in London to protect his royalties. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites most often are sets of stylized dances. The Suite in F major, however, is not a set of dances, but rather a stylized church sonata in four movements: Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, and Fuga. The opening Adagio is a thoughtful and expansive movement with an exquisitely embellished melody above wide-ranging modulations starting in F major, but ending in A minor. The following Allegro is a rapid, racing movement in F major with few modulations. The following Adagio is a dramatic movement in D minor with a highly expressive melody above widely spaced chords. The closing Fuga Allegro is in four independent voices with an aggressive subject. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no2-in-f-major-hwv-427-mc0002405533). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Allegro from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 2) for Violin & Cello.

Adagio from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 1) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:2110 days ago68 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Handel published his first volume of Suites for keyboard in London in 1720. The works had already been published without his permission in Amsterdam the previous year and Handel published them himself in London to protect his royalties. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites most often are sets of stylized dances. The Suite in F major, however, is not a set of dances, but rather a stylized church sonata in four movements: Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, and Fuga. The opening Adagio is a thoughtful and expansive movement with an exquisitely embellished melody above wide-ranging modulations starting in F major, but ending in A minor. The following Allegro is a rapid, racing movement in F major with few modulations. The following Adagio is a dramatic movement in D minor with a highly expressive melody above widely spaced chords. The closing Fuga Allegro is in four independent voices with an aggressive subject. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no2-in-f-major-hwv-427-mc0002405533). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Adagio from the Suite in F Major (HWV 427 No. 2 Mvt. 1) for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & English Horn).

Suite in G Minor (HWV 432 No. 7) for Piano

1 part12 pages19:3211 days ago58 views
Piano
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. Back in the days before international copyright laws, any publisher could publish anything they wanted without fear of legal action. Thus, Jeanne Roger of Amsterdam published "surrepticious [sic] and incorrect Copies" of the suites in 1719 without paying or informing the composer. This led Handel to publish the works himself in London in 1720. The Suite in G Suite is one of the grandest and most impressive of the suites. In six movements, the Suite in G minor is much more than a standard-issue set of stylized dance movements. The first movement is an overture in the French style with a massive opening Adagio, followed by a fast and brutal Presto, with a pummeling theme played in thirds, sixths, and octaves. The following movement is a quietly lyrical Andante with a gently embellished melody. The next movement is a propulsive, two-voice Allegro in 3/8 time. The central Sarabande, marked Andante con moto, is an incredibly simple and affecting series of three- and four-voice chords with the melody as the top voice. The Gigue that follows is a hurtling movement in two virtuoso voices. The climax and culmination of the Suite in G minor is the monumental Passacaglia of contrapuntal force majeure. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no7-in-g-minor-hwv-432-mc0002659726). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Transcription of the Suite in G Minor (HWV 432 No. 7) for Piano.

Menuets from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 5) for String Quartet

4 parts1 page01:5812 days ago92 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the 2 Menuets from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 5) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

La Paix from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 3) for Winds & Strings

10 parts2 pages02:5013 days ago99 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the La Paix from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Bourrée from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 2) for Winds & Strings

10 parts5 pages01:4214 days ago81 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Bourrée from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Lentement from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1a) for Winds & Strings

7 parts1 page01:0715 days ago60 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Lentement from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1a) for Winds (Flute, Oboe & English Horn) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra

18 parts5 pages01:3917 days ago130 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra

18 parts15 pages06:2917 days ago111 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England. The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums. Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major. The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400). Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).