Sheet music

"Mazurka" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 4) for String Quartet
Video

"Mazurka" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 4) for String Quartet

4 parts4 pages03:2512 hours ago19 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Though far from prolific as a composer -- by day he was a scientist noted for his research on aldehydes -- Alexander Borodin nevertheless earned a secure place in the history of Russian music. As a creative spirit, Borodin was the most accomplished of the Russian nationalists composers. He had a particular gift for the distinctive stripe of exoticism so evident in his most frequently performed work, the Polovtsian Dances from the opera Prince Igor.

The illegitimate son of a Georgian prince and a doctor's wife, Borodin enjoyed a comfortable upbringing. As a child he learned to play several instruments and tried his hand at composing, but other aptitudes directed his formal education. He studied chemistry at St. Petersburg's Medico-Surgical Academy, obtaining his doctorate in 1858 and pursuing further studies in Europe until 1862. Upon his return to Russia, he became a professor at his alma mater; but even as an academic career apparently loomed before him, he maintained a devotion to music.

Under the influence of Mily Balakirev, whom he met in 1862, Borodin became interested in applying elements of Russian folk music to works for the concert hall and stage. He joined a circle of like-minded composers -- Balakirev, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, and Cui -- famously dubbed "The Five" or "The Mighty Handful." The influence of Balakirev in particular is at once in evident in the Symphony No. 1 in E flat major (1867). Borodin began the much craggier Symphony No. 2 in B minor in 1869, the same year he commenced labor on his most important work, the opulent four-act opera Prince Igor. While it took Borodin more than five years to complete the symphony, work on Prince Igor dragged on for decades. Borodin, who had in the meantime completed a number of other works, left the opera unfinished at the time of his death. It was completed posthumously by Rimsky-Korsakov, a skillful craftsman and a particularly apt match for Borodin's colorful musical character, and Alexander Glazunov. Glazunov also completed the Symphony No. 3 in A minor, which the composer had been working on until the time of his death.

Aside from teaching chemistry and conducting research, Borodin helped found a series of medical courses for women in 1872. Such activities, as well as the poor health that plagued him in the 1880s, drained the energy that he might have devoted to composition. Still, as a part-time composer, Borodin jeft a significant oeuvre: more than a dozen worthy songs, miscellaneous piano pieces, two string quartets (the second of which contains a ravishing Nocturne often performed in an arrangement for string orchestra), and the popular tone poem In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880). He died while attending a ball in St. Petersburg on February 27, 1887.

Borodin wrote little enough -- an opera, a couple of symphonies, a tone poem for orchestra, a couple of string quartets, a string quintet for chamber musicians, and a handful of songs for voice and piano -- and next to nothing of any substance for the piano alone. The largest of his piano works is the Petite Suite, seven brief movements composed over a period of five years, dedicated to the Countess Louise de Merci d'Argenteau and published in 1885. Following Borodin's death in 1887, Glazunov edited and orchestrated a number of his works, including the Petite Suite. In Borodin's autograph, the score bears the dedication "Petit poeme d'amour d'une jeune fille" (Little poems on the love of a young girl). Each movement of the work also has a brief explanation following it. The austerely liturgical first "Au couvent" (At the Convent), "The Church's vows foster thoughts only of God"; the shyly charming second Intermezzo, "Dreaming of Society Life"; the grandly joyous "Mazurka I," "Thinking only of dancing"; the lyrically romantic "Mazurka II," "Thinking both of the dance and the dancer"; the voluptuously lyrical "Reverie" (Dreams), "Thinking only of the dance"; the sensually chaste Serenade, "Dreaming of love"; and the closing romantic Nocturne, "Lulled by the happieness of being in love." Clearly, Borodin had a specific program for the whole work, a work that is part dance, part dream, and all love.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/petite-suite-for-piano-mc0002375472 ).

Although originally composed for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Mazurka" from the Petite Suite (Mvt. 4) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Flight" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 53 No. 6) for Cello & Piano
Video

"Flight" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 53 No. 6) for Cello & Piano

2 parts10 pages02:3212 hours ago12 views
Cello, Piano
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

The eight volumes of Songs Without Words, each consisting of six "songs" (Lieder), were written at various points throughout Mendelssohn's life, and were published separately. The piano became increasingly popular in Europe during the early nineteenth century, when it became a standard item in many middle-class households. The pieces are within the grasp of pianists of various abilities and this undoubtedly contributed to their popularity. This great popularity has caused many critics to under-rate their musical value. He composed Book 4 (Opus 53) between 1839–41

The first song is "On the Seashore" (Andante con moto). Suitably it opens with sempre tenuto e legato. Each of the melody notes should be given their full value. Mendelssohn is given the opportunity to show off his talent with being able to supply the perfect undertones with the main body of melody lines. "On the Seashore" provides a clear, tender, and concise style that is typical with Mendelssohn.

"Clouds" (Allegro non troppo) is also known as "The Fleecy Clouds". Thought to have been written for his sister Fanny as Mendelssohn truly thought that his music would speak in larger volumes than his words. Compare this song with Book Three No. 3, and there appears to be some common resemblance. The piece is impulsive and is very much influenced by Schumann.

"Agitation" (Presto Agitato). Not until the Ninth measure is the subject of this piece loudly apparent. There lies the effective monotony that is prevalent throughout this song. In measure 69, he inserts additional notes on the weaker beat with the left hand.

"Sadness of Soul" (Adagio) is expressive, but perhaps overly sentimental. It is a prime example of a cantabile (singing) style of playing. The song is very similar to his composition of "On wings of Son" op.34 No. 2. The use of the sustain pedal adds an ingenious third hand.

"Folk Dance" (Allegro con Fuoco) is certainly his best out of this book. As the term "Fuoco" is implied, it is to be played with fire and passion. Felix composes with this fury, and has an almost patriotic march. Basically, this song has been elaborated on from the forth song in book One. This has none of Mendelssohn's usual traits of politeness and gentle mannerisms, but is attacked with more aggression and roughness.

"Flight" (Molto allegro vivace). Instead of using cadence forms as was used in No. 5, Mendelssohn's use of chromatic seconds give the listener a sense of being caught up in a hurricane. Later in the piece, it presents a pure display of raw technical power. The piece builds, until the last few measures dwindle down to a surprising diminuendo.

The book on a whole is certainly worth mentioning. Mendelssohn shrugs off his polite way of being, and occasionally opts to be somewhat more aggressive. The piece contrasts in mood, showing that even this composer can be found in his own kind of personal tug of war, and leave the comfort that is his nature.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-4-op-53-mc0002393259 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Flight" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 53 No. 6) for Cello & Piano.
Found in Community

Groups

United Methodist Church

1 discussion • 374 scores • 46 members

Discussions

This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
"Duetto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 38 No. 6) for Flute, Bassoon & Harp
Video

"Duetto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 38 No. 6) for Flute, Bassoon & Harp

3 parts6 pages02:58a day ago11 views
Flute, Bassoon, Harp
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

The eight volumes of Songs Without Words, each consisting of six "songs" (Lieder), were written at various points throughout Mendelssohn's life, and were published separately. The piano became increasingly popular in Europe during the early nineteenth century, when it became a standard item in many middle-class households. The pieces are within the grasp of pianists of various abilities and this undoubtedly contributed to their popularity. This great popularity has caused many critics to under-rate their musical value. He composed Book 4 (Opus 53) between 1839–41

Book III is a collection of miniatures containing some of the composer's most lyrical and songful piano pieces:

"The Evening Star" (Con Moto). The title was not given by Mendelssohn, but by Steven Heller. The song fails to inspire, and lacks character. It continues through in a sweet and always warm voice. It fails to climax at any given point, but continues to hold the same rhythm and stride throughout the entire song. It does carry the ability to relax, but never sways, and goes directly into the final diminuendo.

"Lost Happiness" (Allegro non troppo). This is an attractive piece. There are three distinctive voices heard as melody, bass, and accompaniment. Each voice receiving a turn, as the others fade in the background as the quiet voices. It does have a theme of repetition and comes across as weak.

"The Poets Harp" (Presto e molto vivace). Technically, this piece requires practice with the sustain pedal. It's a bright and cheerful song that is a pleasure to play. Its quickness allows more of the melody to come through, and in its end, makes it equally enjoyable to listen to.

"Hope" (Andante) is more of a choral style, as it offers no assistance of an accompaniment. The Voices are all heard evenly, and sung in time to the chords. No. 4 in book 1, as well as no 3. In book 2 seem so familiar to this piece. It's a colorful song, but lacks luster.

"Passion"(Agitato). Extremely well represented. With each emotion that Mendelssohn dictates, the harmony of the key changes. Grief for example is met with the minor key. At certain points, the piece explodes and then is subdued. Technically, the high end of the right hand carries the melody. At the same time, the left hand is in constant use as Staccato notes dot the bass lines. The bass lines meld the song together to create this masterpiece.

"Duet" (Andante con moto). Two voices are continually heard speaking back and forth as though in a casual conversation. At times, the voices meld together as if in agreement. Although this is certainly one of Mendelssohn's greater compositions, it was later that he was able to improve this piece with Prelude in A Flat. Considered to be a love song as Felix composed this soon after meeting his soon to be wife, Cecile.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-3-op-38-mc0002393325 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Duetto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 38 No. 6) for Flute, Bassoon & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 6) for Flute, Oboe & Guitar
Video

"Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 6) for Flute, Oboe & Guitar

3 parts2 pages02:022 days ago30 views
Flute, Oboe, Guitar
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 6) for Flute, Oboe & Classical Guitar.
Un poco Agitato, ma Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 4) for Flute & Harp
Video

Un poco Agitato, ma Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 4) for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:053 days ago11 views
Flute, Harp
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Although they have opus numbers, the last two books of Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte are not really genuine "opera." This is especially the case with the pieces assembled as Op. 102 and published in Bonn after the composer's death. Two of these, Nos. 3 and 5, composed on December 12, 1845, may be Mendelssohn's last works for piano. The set contains works in major and minor keys and a variety of song types, including solos, duets, and part-songs.

As in every book of Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte, the first piece resembles a solo song. Through a syncopated pattern in the right hand Mendelssohn creates an atmosphere of agitation. The soaring melody provides a foil to the constantly leaping left hand, the ungainly octaves of which plod throughout the piece. Harmonically, the piece is not adventurous, straying from E minor only once, to the tonic major.

The second of the set is primarily a duet in texture, although there are moments in which there are three and even four voices. Marked Adagio, the D major piece moves between polyrhythmic and homorhythmic passages. After a brief, intense push toward "sharp" harmonies in the middle section, we hear a return of the opening material, compressed and modified to provide a firm close.

No. 3, in C major and 6/8 meter, is fast and dance-like. The division between the accompaniment, consisting of block chords, and the leaping, single-line melody is clear. The nature of the melody, which is mainly a series of neighbor-tone motions interspersed with a few rising scales, makes the material of the piece more textural and gestural than melodic. Mendelssohn closes the first part of and the entire binary-form piece with a return to the introductory neighbor-note figure, foregoing the falling interval and rising scale that marks the A section.

Swirling arpeggios mark No. 4, in G minor, which also has the texture of a solo song. After two measures of introduction, a melody begins that features powerful chromatic alterations, particularly the flatted second scale degree, which presses downward to the tonic note, G natural. As the melody spins out into repeated fragments of itself, the harmony changes and the structure seems to fall apart. A reprise of the opening measures of the melody, however, sets thing back on track, although Mendelssohn does not hesitate to insert a new figure before the close.

The fifth piece, in A major, is predominantly duet-like, but the overall effect is more pianistic than vocal. A syncopated pulse, to be played with the thumb of the left hand, permeates the entire piece and provides pedal tones around which the melody and bass move gracefully. Passages that seem like reprisals move off in new directions, although they are all based on primary material.

No. 6 is a part-song, evident in its predominantly homophonic texture, despite which it has the thinnest sound of the set. More than in any other piece of the Op. 85 set, outer parts move independently.


Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-8-op-102-mc0002405359 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Un poco Agitato, ma Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 4) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Norwegian Melody" from Lyric Pieces (Book 1 Op. 12 No. 6)  for String Quartet
Video

"Norwegian Melody" from Lyric Pieces (Book 1 Op. 12 No. 6) for String Quartet

4 parts3 pages00:464 days ago74 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Composer Edvard Grieg, the icon of Norwegian music, left his home in Bergen, Norway to study at the conservatory in Leipzig. There he began his formal musical education under the auspices of Ignaz Moscheles (piano) and Carl Reinecke (composition). While in school, the young composer saw the premiere of his first work, his String Quartet in D minor, performed in Karlshamn, Sweden. Despite being diagnosed with a form of tuberculosis, which left him with only one functioning lung, Grieg graduated from the conservatory in 1862. The composer had an intense desire to develop a national style of composition, but recognized the importance of becoming well versed in the work of the European masters, and consequently relocated to Copenhagen, studying with Niels Gade. He was thus able to remain in Scandanavia, while working in a thriving cultural center. In 1867 against his family's better judgment, Grieg married his cousin Nina Hagerup, a talented pianist, but whose vocal abilities enchanted the composer even more. Shortly after their wedding, the couple moved to Oslo, where Grieg supported them by teaching piano and conducting. He and his wife traveled extensively throughout Europe and it was during a period of time spent in Denmark, the composer wrote his landmark opus, the Piano Concerto in A minor. The premiere was given in 1869, with Edmund Neupert as the soloist. The piece was received with an enthusiasm that would attach itself to the composer's reputation for the remainder of his career.

Norway's most famous composer, dedicated his career to the pursuit of a national sound. The respect he had for his predecessors illustrates the sincerity with which he worked towards this goal. He wrote in the Romantic tradition with, in his own words, the determination to "create a national form of music, which could give the Norwegian people an identity."

As a miniaturist, Grieg was a master. In particular, some of his most characteristic work can be found in the ten volumes of Lyric Pieces for piano. These short, attractive gems reveal a strong national flavor, combining the mildly chromatic style of nineteenth-century salon pieces with elements of Norwegian folk music. They are also relatively easy to play, being tuneful and rather accessible in style. Such a winning combination delighted the public and publisher alike, and almost singlehandedly assured Grieg a comfortable old age.

Book One, Op. 12 opens with a delicate "Arietta," a cantabile melody accompanied by rippling arpeggios divided between the two hands. Subsequent sections include a "Waltz," characterized by a recurring stacatto passage; "The Watchman's Song," an unpretentious theme presented in repeated two-bar cells, surrounding a faster, more propulsive middle section; a lilting "Fairy Dance"; a mazurka-like "Folk Tune"; a vigorous "Norwegian Melody," which contains a deep, drone pedal point; "Album Leaf;" and "National Song."

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-8-for-piano-book-1-op-12-mc0002361225 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Norwegian Melody" from Lyric Pieces (Book 1 Op. 12 No. 6) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Sonatina: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" (BWV 106 No 1) for Oboe & Strings
Video

Sonatina: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" (BWV 106 No 1) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts2 pages01:464 days ago20 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Born on March 21, 1685, in Eisenach, Thuringia, Germany, Johann Sebastian Bach had a prestigious musical lineage and took on various organist positions during the early 18th century, creating famous compositions like "Toccata and Fugue in D minor." Some of his best-known compositions are the "Mass in B Minor," the "Brandenburg Concertos" and "The Well-Tempered Clavier." Bach died in Leipzig, Germany, on July 28, 1750. Today, he is considered one of the greatest Western composers of all time.

There can be little doubt that this is the best known and most admired of Bach's earliest cantatas. It could be argued that in later years Bach's art became a great deal more mature, but it hardly grew more profound. It is one of those art works that stands at the crossroads of time, seeming to look both forward and backwards. In the latter instance it is highly sectional, with little in the way of the extended, developed movements of the later years, it is lightly orchestrated, begins with a short introductory sinfonia and it draws principally upon chorales and biblical references with the minimum of added text. On the other hand, it is created from structural elements which operate across and unite movements, the writing is highly idiomatic and the musical architecture derives principally from the essence of the text.

It is a work of such depth and intensity that one can scarcely avoid speculating that the deceased for whose internment it was composed, had some personal connection with the twenty-two year old composer. Or perhaps it simply struck a chord that reminded him of the death of his own parents, scarcely more than a dozen years previously. But whatever the personal impact the occasion might have had on him, there is no disputing the depth and profundity which the emerging composer managed to elicit from the minimal lines of conventional text.

The segmented nature of this work makes it seem more complex than it really is. It falls into four basic movements thus: sinfonia, chorus (with solos), aria (becoming a duet) and closing chorale. The longest and most complex of the two hybrid movements is the second.

the Sonatina (sinfonia) is from his earliest essays into the cantata genre, Bach had been attracted to the notion of making the instrumental introduction an organic part of the total composition: see, for example, Cs 4 and 150. His choice of instruments for this work, two viola da gamba (perhaps most widely known for their later appearance in Brandenburg 6), two recorders and continuo together produce a sound that is today archaic and unworldly. Whether mourners in the first decade of the eighteenth century would have felt the same way cannot be known. But the soundscape is intimate, ethereal and totally suited to the processes of mourning and personal reflection upon the soul and character of the departed.

It is only twenty bars long but that is sufficient to establish the mood and ambience. The recorders play mostly in unison but when they do not, their differences are subtle but significant. For example, in bars 4, 5 and 6 the second instrument falls silent in the latter part of each bar, thereafter to reunite itself with its companion. The effect is a telling one of division and togetherness. In bar 7-8 the oscillation about two notes (f and e) has the effect of a slow, macabre trill. Even at this early stage, Bach's sensitivity to the subtleties of instrumentation was well developed; the details may seem trivial but they are artistically significant.

Although originally written for Flutes (2), Viola da Gambas (2) and Basso Continuo, I created this arrangement for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Adagio non Troppo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 3) for Horn & Harp
Video

Adagio non Troppo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 3) for Horn & Harp

2 parts1 page02:444 days ago24 views
French Horn, Harp
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Adagio non Troppo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 3) for French Horn & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 6) for Woodwind Quartet
Video

Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 6) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:515 days ago38 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Although they have opus numbers, the last two books of Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte are not really genuine "opera." This is especially the case with the pieces assembled as Op. 102 and published in Bonn after the composer's death. Two of these, Nos. 3 and 5, composed on December 12, 1845, may be Mendelssohn's last works for piano. The set contains works in major and minor keys and a variety of song types, including solos, duets, and part-songs.

As in every book of Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte, the first piece resembles a solo song. Through a syncopated pattern in the right hand Mendelssohn creates an atmosphere of agitation. The soaring melody provides a foil to the constantly leaping left hand, the ungainly octaves of which plod throughout the piece. Harmonically, the piece is not adventurous, straying from E minor only once, to the tonic major.

The second of the set is primarily a duet in texture, although there are moments in which there are three and even four voices. Marked Adagio, the D major piece moves between polyrhythmic and homorhythmic passages. After a brief, intense push toward "sharp" harmonies in the middle section, we hear a return of the opening material, compressed and modified to provide a firm close.

No. 3, in C major and 6/8 meter, is fast and dance-like. The division between the accompaniment, consisting of block chords, and the leaping, single-line melody is clear. The nature of the melody, which is mainly a series of neighbor-tone motions interspersed with a few rising scales, makes the material of the piece more textural and gestural than melodic. Mendelssohn closes the first part of and the entire binary-form piece with a return to the introductory neighbor-note figure, foregoing the falling interval and rising scale that marks the A section.

Swirling arpeggios mark No. 4, in G minor, which also has the texture of a solo song. After two measures of introduction, a melody begins that features powerful chromatic alterations, particularly the flatted second scale degree, which presses downward to the tonic note, G natural. As the melody spins out into repeated fragments of itself, the harmony changes and the structure seems to fall apart. A reprise of the opening measures of the melody, however, sets thing back on track, although Mendelssohn does not hesitate to insert a new figure before the close.

The fifth piece, in A major, is predominantly duet-like, but the overall effect is more pianistic than vocal. A syncopated pulse, to be played with the thumb of the left hand, permeates the entire piece and provides pedal tones around which the melody and bass move gracefully. Passages that seem like reprisals move off in new directions, although they are all based on primary material.

No. 6 is a part-song, evident in its predominantly homophonic texture, despite which it has the thinnest sound of the set. More than in any other piece of the Op. 85 set, outer parts move independently.


Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-8-op-102-mc0002405359 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Andante from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 102 No. 6) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).
"Agitato e con Fuoco" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 4) for Flute & Strings
Video

"Agitato e con Fuoco" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 4) for Flute & Strings

5 parts7 pages02:406 days ago34 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Agitato e con Fuoco" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 4) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Arioso: "Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben" (BWV 248 No 38) for Horn & Strings
Video

Arioso: "Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben" (BWV 248 No 38) for Horn & Strings

5 parts2 pages02:327 days ago23 views
French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Reciativo & Arioso: "Immanuel, o süßes Wort/Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben” (Emmanuel, o sweet word!/Jesus, o my dearest life) for French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Moderato" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 19 No. 4) for Oboe & Piano
Video

"Moderato" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 19 No. 4) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts2 pages03:037 days ago27 views
Oboe, Piano
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

As Mendelssohn's admirers are aware, the six works in his Op. 19b Songs Without Words are not piano versions of the six songs in the Op. 19a vocal collection, nor are they drawn from any of his other songs. Listeners have often assumed the piano works have a vocal connection not just because of their collective title, but because pieces like No. 2, in A minor here, have been given titles. This one is often published as "Regrets," but considering its somewhat melancholy mood and other features, that tag captures the chief aspect of this work's character. Indeed, there is something regretful about the main theme, a songful creation whose mostly descending contour and intimate, quasi-nocturnal manner seem to convey a sense of loss. Yet the music is elegant and emotionally restrained, conveying its sadness in an almost light fashion. Marked Andante Espressivo, the work is gentle and lovely, reaching its most touching moment near the close, when the music descends to the piano's bass region, after which the theme is heard in a beautiful mixture of upper- and lower-register sonorities.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/song-without-words-for-piano-no-2-in-a-minor-op-19b-2-mc0002389215 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Moderato" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 19 No. 4) for Oboe & Piano.
Andante Sostenuto from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 85 No. 4) Arranged for Flute & Harp
Video

Andante Sostenuto from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 85 No. 4) Arranged for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:078 days ago42 views
Flute, Harp
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn first refers to "Lieder ohne Worte" (Songs without Words) in a letter to his sister on December 1828. He composed them initially for family and friends, but by 1832 decided to revise and publish these miniatures. Six sets of Lieder ohne Worte were printed during the composer's lifetime. The last two books of Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte (Songs Without Words) were published with the opus numbers "85" and "102," but they cannot really be considered genuine opera, although there is evidence that Mendelssohn contemplated a seventh volume of Lieder ohne Worte. Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 5 of Op. 85 form part of a manuscript Mendelssohn wrote out in 1845, suggesting that these four pieces, at least, were intended to be printed together. These and two other works were assembled after Mendelssohn's death and published as the seventh book of Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 85, in Bonn in 1850.

In this set of Lieder ohne Worte, we find a mixture of songs in major and minor keys and a variety of song types, including examples of the solo song, duet, and part song. No. 1, in F major, is fashioned along the lines of the solo song, as is the first song of every one of the books of Lieder ohne Worte. Accompanied by continuous rising arpeggios in triplet motion, the Andante espressivo melody moves in a straight duplet rhythm that clashes with the left-hand triplets, producing a dream-like effect. Narrow in range, the melody develops from small fragments through the A section. After the central section explores the subdominant, the A-section melody returns, but is, at first, re-harmonized. The piece closes peacefully as the triplet figure rises to the stratosphere.

The second of the set, in A minor, was composed in 1834. In contrast to the first piece, it is duet-like, although the primary melody is in the highest voice. Rhythmically intricate, the piece's primary driving force is harmony, which ventures as far as B major, and its second half is a variation of the first. No. 3 is a solo song with a clear division between melody and accompaniment. In E flat major, the piece's rapidly repeated chords produce a dense wall of sound, and the central section takes repeated fragments of the first part as its point of departure. The fourth piece of Op. 85 is also a solo song. Composed in 1845, it features an elegiac melody that covers a wide range and contains expressive chromatic inflections. No. 5 is in the style of a part song, evident in its homophonic texture. At times the texture increases to three or four voices, and the bass line often moves in contrary motion to the melody, creating a dense wash of sound. No. 6, a solo song, is a perfect example in miniature of Mendelssohn's ability to extract the greatest expressiveness from a melody through chromatic inflections and harmonic manipulation.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-7-op-85-mc0002436054 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Andante Sostenuto from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 85 No. 4) Arranged for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Aria: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" (BWV 106 No 2) for Flute, Horn & Strings
Video

Aria: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" (BWV 106 No 2) for Flute, Horn & Strings

6 parts16 pages07:089 days ago38 views
Flute, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Born on March 21, 1685, in Eisenach, Thuringia, Germany, Johann Sebastian Bach had a prestigious musical lineage and took on various organist positions during the early 18th century, creating famous compositions like "Toccata and Fugue in D minor." Some of his best-known compositions are the "Mass in B Minor," the "Brandenburg Concertos" and "The Well-Tempered Clavier." Bach died in Leipzig, Germany, on July 28, 1750. Today, he is considered one of the greatest Western composers of all time.

There can be little doubt that this is the best known and most admired of Bach's earliest cantatas. It could be argued that in later years Bach's art became a great deal more mature, but it hardly grew more profound.

It is one of those art works that stands at the crossroads of time, seeming to look both forward and backwards. In the latter instance it is highly sectional, with little in the way of the extended, developed movements of the later years, it is lightly orchestrated, begins with a short introductory sinfonia and it draws principally upon chorales and biblical references with the minimum of added text. On the other hand, it is created from structural elements which operate across and unite movements, the writing is highly idiomatic and the musical architecture derives principally from the essence of the text.

It is a work of such depth and intensity that one can scarcely avoid speculating that the deceased for whose internment it was composed, had some personal connection with the twenty-two year old composer. Or perhaps it simply struck a chord that reminded him of the death of his own parents, scarcely more than a dozen years previously. But whatever the personal impact the occasion might have had on him, there is no disputing the depth and profundity which the emerging composer managed to elicit from the minimal lines of conventional text.

The segmented nature of this work makes it seem more complex than it really is. It falls into four basic movements thus: sinfonia, chorus (with solos), aria (becoming a duet) and closing chorale.

The longest and most complex of the two hybrid movements is the second.

It is a compendium of short segments, tenor and bass solos enclosed by two choral sections. The text stresses God’s and nature’s law that we should all die, the universality of this concept reinforced by its statement by the choir rather than through an individual aria. The tenor represents the voice of Man asking for divine guidance and the bass that of the Lord who commands us. Thus, although a superficial analysis of this movement might deem it to be backward-looking, particularly with regard to its various short segments, closer scrutiny reveals an inspired elucidation of the substance of the text by means of a fully mature architectural grasp of the musical material. The general structure is as follows: 1. Chorus (andante/ allegro/adagio): God’s time is the best time: through His will we live and have our being: in Him we die at the right time, just as He wills. 2. Tenor arioso (lento): Lord, Teach us that we must die so as to become wise. 3. Bass arioso (vivace): Set your house in order since you will cease living and die. 4. Chorus (andante): The ancient law is, Man you must die: so come Lord Jesus.

Although originally written for Flutes (2), Viola da Gambas (2), Alto Voice and Basso Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute, French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Allegro di Molto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 2) for Oboe & Strings
Video

"Allegro di Molto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 2) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts5 pages02:059 days ago22 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Allegro di Molto" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 2) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Aria: "Er wird mich wohl bedenken" (BWV 100 No 3) for Flute, Oboe & Cello
Video

Aria: "Er wird mich wohl bedenken" (BWV 100 No 3) for Flute, Oboe & Cello

3 parts7 pages07:0410 days ago43 views
Flute, Oboe, Cello
Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan (What God does is done well), BWV 100, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig between 1732 and 1735. The chorale cantata is based on the hymn by Samuel Rodigast (1674).

This work is a late chorale cantata for an unspecified occasion. Bach likely composed and first performed it in Leipzig between 1732 and 1735. This is considered one of Bach's latest extant church cantatas.

The cantata is based on the hymn "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" (1675) by Samuel Rodigast. This chorale was traditionally used in Leipzig as a song for weddings. Unlike most of Bach's earlier chorale cantatas, he used the text unchanged.

Only the first and last movements use the chorale melody, while the inner movements adopt "carefully gradated sound colors". The rising fourth of the chorale melody, however, recurs throughout the cantata.

The first movement draws on BWV 99 with added horn and timpani parts. The change in instrumentation makes the mood "celebratory and jovial", in contrast to the intimate atmosphere of the original. The movement opens with a presentation of two instrumental themes, which repeat when the soprano enters with the chorale melody. The instrumental lines are complex compared to the vocal part.

The alto and tenor duet, according to Ludwig Finscher, reflects the "Italian chamber duet (Steffani, Handel) on account of the motet-style arrangement of the text and the imitatory interweaving of the vocal parts". The melody enters in imitative layers based on the ascending-fourth interval. The continuo line is a four-bar mostly scalar motif that repeats in several related keys.

The soprano aria is accompanied by what John Eliot Gardiner terms "the most technically challenging of all Bach's flute obbligati, with its roulades of twenty-four successive demisemiquavers per bar".

The "jaunty" bass aria is accompanied by "lilting" syncopated strings. The "splendid spacious" melody is remarkable for its concluding descending motif. As in the galant style, the accompanying violins play parallel thirds and sixths. The formal structure of the movement is unusual: rather than the conventional final reprise of the A section expected in da capo form, the B section is followed immediately by the closing ritornello.

The alto aria is in 12/8 time and the minor mode, and is accompanied by oboe d'amore and continuo. It focuses on imagery of bitterness. The aria is introduced by a flowing oboe d'amore solo melody.

The final movement is quite similar to the version of the chorale that appeared in BWV 75, but adds horns and timpani. Structurally, it begins with imitative instrumental entries and lengthens several sections compared to the previous work.

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), four-part choir, two horns, timpani, flauto traverso, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe & Cello.
"Lied" in B Minor from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 67 No. 5) for Woodwind Quartet
Video

"Lied" in B Minor from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 67 No. 5) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages02:0610 days ago28 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

It was Goethe, linchpin of the German Romantic literary movement who once declared that "music begins where words end," and it was Mendelssohn who was to famously prove the point in his Lieder ohne Worte or Songs without Words. These works, encompassing some eight complete volumes in all (the first came out in print during 1830; five more followed in the years prior to 1845, while the last two were issued after the composer's death) each containing six pieces, were a seminal Germanic response to the world of Romantic miniaturism, and principally, the growing interest amongst composers to distil the rapture of the moment through the medium of the keyboard gem.

Karl Schumann, the famous German musicologist and Lieder scholar, once famously characterized Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte as not simply "Pillars of the piano repertoire," but rather as "a household possession, as widespread in Germany as the Grimm brothers' fairy tales, Ludwig Richter's pictures, or Uhland's poetry ... and no less beloved in Victorian England." During the composer's nineteenth year, Mendelssohn's sister Fanny noted in her diary that "my birthday was celebrated very nicely ... Felix has given me a 'Song without Words' for my album. He has lately written several very beautiful ones." Later, towards the tragically premature end of his life aged just thirty-eight (by which time the Lieder ohne Worte had already become very popular), Mendelssohn volunteered precious little substantive fact about their origins, writing that "even if, in one or other of them, I had a particular word or words in mind, I would not tell anyone, because the same word means different things to different people. Only the songs say the same thing, arouse the same feeling, in everyone--a feeling that cannot be expressed in words."

While it has become fashionable in critical circles to denigrate Mendelssohn's fragile sensibilities as little more than the manifestation of a kind of upper-class dilettantism, we should not forget that in his own way, he was far ahead of the field when it came to recognizing the future direction that music, especially the keyboard miniature, would take. In this regard, Mendelssohn anticipated the new expressive directions to be pursued by Schumann (whose wife Clara did much to popularize the Songs in the concert hall) and Liszt. And beyond these alone, the critic Joan Chissell also points that composers such as Grieg, Brahms, Fauré, and even Bizet also held them in high regard.

Of the six Lieder ohne Worte of the sixth volume, Op. 67, 2, two have titles. Op. 67 No. 4 in C major is the celebrated "Spinnerlied" (Spinning Song) while the last of the set, Op. 67 No. 6 in E major is entitled "Wiegenlied" (or "Berceuse"). The set begins with a straightforward Andante in E flat, and is followed by a terse F sharp minor Allegro leggiero. No. 3 of the set is a tranquil Andante in B flat, while the penultimate "Lied" of the Op. 67 group is a simple B minor movement headed Moderato.

And finally, while these beguiling, some would say simplistic pieces have been slighted as representative of the worst kind of Romantic kitsch, Chissell rightly reminds us that "without all these pieces, how much poorer our understanding would have been of the impressionable heart behind the master-craftsman's façade."

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-6-op-67-mc0002406942 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Lied" in B Minor from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 67 No. 5) Arranged for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn & Bassoon).
"Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 1) for Oboe & Harp
Video

"Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 1) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:0511 days ago12 views
Oboe, Harp
Far from the troubled, coarse libertine that has become an archetype of the Romantic composer, Felix Mendelssohn was something of an anomaly among his contemporaries. His own situation -- one largely of domestic tranquility and unhindered career fulfillment -- stands in stark contrast to the personal Sturm und Drang familiar to his peers. Mendelssohn was the only musical prodigy of the 19th century whose stature could rival that of Mozart. Still, his parents resisted any entrepreneurial impulses and spared young Felix the strange, grueling lifestyle that was the lot of many child prodigies. He and his sister Fanny were given piano lessons, and he also studied violin, and both joined the Berlin Singakademie.

The eminent German musicologist and Lieder scholar Karl Schumann once famously described Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte (Songs without words) as not simply "Pillars of the piano repertoire," but rather as "a household possession, as widespread in Germany as the Grimm brothers' fairy tales, Ludwig Richter's pictures, or Uhland's poetry ... and no less beloved in Victorian England." But these works were an absolutely typical Germanic reaction to the world of Romantic miniaturism, and especially, the growing interest among composers to encapsulate the mood of the moment in a keyboard gem.

While it has become fashionable in critical circles to denigrate Mendelssohn's fragile sensibilities as little more than the manifestation of a kind of upper-class dilettantism, in his own way, he was actually far ahead of the field when it came to recognizing the future direction that music, especially the keyboard miniature, would take. In this regard, Mendelssohn anticipated the new expressive directions to be pursued by Schumann (whose wife, Clara, did much to popularize the Songs in the concert hall) and Liszt.

Of the six Lieder ohne Worte of the fifth volume, Op. 62, no fewer than three pieces were given descriptive titles. Interestingly, Goethe (along with von Schiller the central figure of the German Romantic literary movement) had written "music begins where words end." No doubt, however, he would have been among the first to agree that the sombre mood of Op. 62 No. 3 in E minor "Trauermarsch" (Funeral March) needs no semantic prop to convey its sorrowful message. No. 5 in A minor is one of three Lieder to have the title "Venezianisches Gondollied" (Venetian Gondola Song).

The concluding Lied ohne Worte of the Op. 62 group is one of the most famous of all piano miniatures. This is the A major "Frühlingslied" or "Spring Song." The remaining untitled pieces are Op. 62 No. 1 in G (Andante espressivo), No. 2 in B flat (Allegro con fuoco), and No. 4 in G (Allegro con anima). Finally, while these beguiling, some would say simplistic, pieces have sometimes been slighted as representative of the worst kind of Romantic kitsch, the critic Joan Chissell rightly reminds us that "without all these pieces, how much poorer our understanding would have been of the impressionable heart behind the master-craftsman's façade."

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-words-6-for-piano-book-5-op-62-mc0002379890 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Andante Espressivo" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 62 No. 1) for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp.