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11 Sonatas from the "Sonate à 3  4  e 5" for Piano
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11 Sonatas from the "Sonate à 3 4 e 5" for Piano

1 part40 pages38:3220 hours ago29 views
Piano
William Young (??? - 1662) was an English viol player and composer of the Baroque era, who worked at the court of Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Austria in Innsbruck. The sonatas which he published in 1653 were some of the earliest sonatas produced by an English composer.

The details of Young's origins are unknown. By 1652 he was a chamber musician at the Innsbruck court, where "the Englishman", as he was called, was a highly regarded viol player and composer. The design of his English-made viol influenced that of some of the viols built by Jakob Stainer, the Austrian luthier. In 1660 Ferdinand Charles granted permission for Young to visit England, but there are no traces of his reappearance there. He is not to be confused with William Young (died 1671), another musician, who played violin and flute at the court of Charles II of England from 1661.

During the late 16th century and the first half of the 17th a number of English musicians took up employment in Germany, Denmark, Austria, the Low Countries and Spain. Among them were six virtuoso violists: William Brade, Thomas Simpson, Walter Rowe, Daniel Norcombe, Henry Butler and William Young. They had a major effect on the development of continental viol playing, Rousseau declaring that it was the ‘English who were the first to compose and play chordal pieces on the viol, and who exported their knowledge to other Kingdoms’. Brade and Simpson both published collections of consort music; Simpson's volumes include many dances by his English contemporaries, e.g. Robert Bateman, John Dowland, John Farmer, Alfonso Ferrabosco, Robert Johnson, Peter Philips and Thomas Tomkins, as well as works by German composers. The pavan was the form that particularly attracted Anglo-German composers to display their most sustained and complex musical ideas, corresponding to the role held by the fantasia in England. German composers such as Valentin Haussman and Melchior Franck published instrumental music which began to show idiomatic string characteristics. Other volumes of dance music, such as Schein's Banchetto musicale (Leipzig, 1617), group the dances into suites (Padouana, Gagliarda, Courente, Allemande and Tripla). The viol is designated in some of the progressive three- and four-part Canzoni e concerti (1627) by the Polish violinist Adam Jarzebski. In 1649 Johann Hentzschel published a canzona for eight bass viols and continuo in a solemn, contrapuntal Venetian style using double choir writing. David Funck's Stricturae viola di gambicae, ex sonatis, ariis, intradis, allemandis (Leipzig, 1677) for four bass viols exploits the viol's full three-octave range. The divisions composed by Daniel Norcombe and Henry Butler, who worked in Brussels and Spain respectively, were warmly commended by Christopher Simpson as models ‘worthy to be imitated’. Butler's 13 surviving sets are of grand proportions, exploring the range of the instrument with taxing virtuosity and developing up to 49 variations.

The first published sonatas by an Englishman were William Young's Sonatae à 3, 4, e 5 for two to four violins, obbligato bass viol and continuo (Innsbruck, 1653). The virtuosity displayed by the British expatriates was taken up by their continental pupils, most notably Johann Schop, Nicolaus Bleyer and Gabriel Schütz. Young and Henry Butler (an English viol player working at the Spanish court) were the first English composers to call their works sonatas. However, Butler died in 1652 with his three sonatas unpublished. Young's 11 sonatas for two, three, and four parts and continuo, published in Innsbruck in 1653, are known to have reached England. In modern times, the 11 sonatas were rediscovered by William Gillies Whittaker. He found them in manuscript in Uppsala University Library in Sweden, and published them in 1930.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Young_(composer) ).

Although originally created for 2-4 Violins, Obbligato Bass Viol and Continuo, I created this Interpretation of the 11 Sonatas from "Sonatae à 3, 4, e 5" for Solo Piano.

Mazurka in D Major (Op. 33 No. 2) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts4 pages02:10a day ago24 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

The nineteenth century saw the emergence of several new forms and genres, in some part as a departure from the great sonata form enlarged and expanded by Beethoven. As a result, many composers, especially for the piano, were turning towards more intimate character pieces. These miniatures allowed for the brief exploration of an idea, whether technical or emotional. Among the new genres appearing at the time was Chopin's Mazurka, a fusion of three Polish dance forms with the classical traditions of the composer's homeland. The three dance forms, the Mazur, the Kujawiak, and the Oberek, are sometimes found in their pure form, but often are merged with each other or with other genres or styles. The Mazurka enabled Chopin to explore many different dynamic, harmonic, and melodic colors, and to create many different personalities and characteristics. The result is a genre that can't be described universally, each piece being unique.

The Mazurkas of Opus 33 each present distinct traits and characteristics. The first, marked Lento, has a lyrical, expressive melody line over a waltz pattern in the bass. The mood shifts effortlessly between mournful and hopeful, with a cherished and delicate intimacy. The second Mazurka is a true Oberek, impetuous, fast, and with strong, irregular accents. The mood is joyous, with playful, comic tremolo figures. The coda is free and full of flurries. The third piece of the collection, marked Semplice, is truly a simple and innocent approach to the genre. The sweet, tender melodic line is supported by subtly accented second beats, keeping the flavor of the dance. The final Mazurka adds rhythmic interest to the set, with the grace notes and trills bringing a rustic, native feel. The piece is written in rondo form, with several different characters appearing in the episodes between the recurring original theme.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/mazurkas-4-for-piano-op-33-ct-72-75-mc0002494824 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this interpretation of the Mazurka in D Major (Op. 33 No. 2) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
"In Monte Oliveti" for Woodwind Quintet
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"In Monte Oliveti" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages02:312 days ago31 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Mikolaj Zielenski (1550 - 1615) was a Polish composer. Zieleński's only known surviving works are two 1611 liturgical cycles of polychoral works, the Offertoria/Communes totius anni. These were dedicated to the Archbishop of Gniezno, Wojciech Baranowski. The sets consist of large-scale double- and triple-choir antiphons, as well as some monodic works typical of the Seconda pratica style of early Monteverdi. Zieleński's music is the first known Polish music set in the style of the Baroque.

Little is known today about the life and work of Mikołaj Zieleński who lived at the turn of the 17th century, indeed too little considering the volume of his work and its historical significance. The fragmentary information we have about him today allows us to reconstruct solely a very fragmentary biographical sketch about this composer. The circumstances in which his exceptional talent was born are a matter of many hypotheses and conjectures. The music created thanks to his exceptional gift allowed Zieleński to take a place in the history of music by which he is even regarded as the best Polish composer before Chopin. Szymon Skorowolski, a historian contemporary to Zieleński, classified him as a member of a group of Polish composers who had been educated in Rome, "in media Roma exercitati". This is a reference of great significance as it locates the main source of his musical knowledge as a professional composer.

Although the time of his musical education is determined by this remark it makes it possible to come up with a hypothesis as to the range of the Italian music masters under whom he may have studied or whose music became familiar to him and indicates his possible connections within Italian musical circles. It is quite certain that Zieleński studied the work of Palestrina whose compositions were recognized by the Council of Trent as the stylistic paragon and pattern of church polyphony. He also became familiar with the compositions of the Gabrielis (Andrea and his nephew Giovanni), the two most eminent representatives of the Venetian polychoral school. Likewise it cannot be excluded that the Polish composer acquainted himself with the ideas of Florentine camerata contained in Dialogo della musica antica et della moderna of V. Galilea (1581). Even the first attempts at accompanied monody made by Caccini and Galilea in their Le nuove musiche (1601) may have been familiar to him.

All the above-made suppositions and conclusions seem to find corroboration in the two volumes of works by Mikołaj Zieleński, Offertoria and Communiones (published in Venice in 1611) at the press of Jacob Vincentius. Both the frontispiece and the short preface published in these books state that Zieleński was a composer, organist and Kapelmeister at the court of the Polish primate Wojciech Baranowski. The status of the patron as well as the seat of his court, ?owicz, the capital of the Archbishops and Primates of Poland, and a well-known centre of musical life back in these days, were fitting with the composer's rank as a musician.

Unfortunately, these are the only known facts concerning the life and work of Mikołaj Zieleński. We know much more about his mastery as a composer from his works that were published.

Offertoria totius anni which make up the first volume, contain 56 seven- and eight-voiced compositions enriched with the accompaniment of instruments. Next to the Offertoria known surely after Gabrielli's Sacrae Simphoniae we find here a twelve voice Magnificat. The pieces in this collection are rendered in the concerto style of the polychoral Venetian school. Let us emphasize that the eight-voiced texture became the most typical form of this type of composition in the beginning of the 17th century. By taking up this trend, Zieleński became one of the precursors of the innovational approach to composing offertories.

Source: IMSLP(https://imslp.org/wiki/In_monte_oliveti_(Martini%2C_Giovanni_Battista) ).

Although originally created for three unaccompanied mixed choirs (SATB), I created this Interpretation of "In Monte Oliveti" for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).
"Album Leaf" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 2) for Clarinet & Strings
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"Album Leaf" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 2) for Clarinet & Strings

5 parts4 pages03:073 days ago30 views
Clarinet, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Edvard Hagerup Grieg (1843 – 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him: the city's largest concert building (Grieg Hall), its most advanced music school (Grieg Academy) and its professional choir (Edvard Grieg Kor). The Edvard Grieg Museum at Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen, is dedicated to his legacy.

The seven works that constitute Edvard Grieg's Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces, published as Op. 47 in 1888, were composed from 1885-88. By mid-1885, Grieg had reconciled with his wife Nina, and together they built a home outside Bergen at Troldhaugen ("Valley of the Trolls"). This would serve as home to the Griegs for the rest of their days. Once completed, the considerable expense of building this elaborate house would drive Grieg back to his worktable. In these years he shaped the First Peer Gynt Suite from his incidental music of 1874-5, revised his cantata Oleg Trygvason, and completed his Third Violin Sonata for the violinist Adolf Brodsky.

It was at Brodsky's in Leipzig on New Year's Day, 1888 that Grieg enjoyed lunch in the company of fellow composers Johannes Brahms and Peter Tchaikovsky. Also in Leipzig, Grieg met the young English composer Frederick Delius; the two became fast friends, and Delius rejoined Grieg at Troldhaugen for the summer of that year. In May, Grieg traveled to London where he performed his A minor Piano Concerto for the last time. Joyous news arrived in the form of a letter from Grieg's publisher Max Abraham with C.F. Peters; Abraham agreed to assume the remaining debt on Troldhaugen and pay it off, relieving Grieg of the responsibility of having to raise the funds to do so.

It was in this stimulating atmosphere of settling-in, reinvigorating his romance with Nina, cleaning up old business, and acquainting himself with his peers that Grieg composed the Fourth Book of Lyric Pieces.

He saved many of his freshest ideas for this set; immediately established through the bitter melodic tinge of the opening "Valse-Impromptu," almost bi-tonal in its constant tension between the E major melody in the right hand against the E minor tonality in which the piece is rooted. "Albumblad" (Album-leaf) has an ecstatic quality that is reminiscent of somewhat later works of Scriabin. "Melodie" is stated over a grave, minimal, and insistent quarter- and eighth-note figure (in 6/8 time) which is sometimes voiced only in bare fifths for long stretches of bars. In "Halling," a setting of a traditional duple-time Norwegian dance, the bare fifths in the accompaniment return decorated by dissonant passing tones. The melody is likewise peppered with dissonant grace notes and adjacent pitches; at one point Grieg achieves a minor ninth in the melody. "Melancoli," marked Largo, is somber, as indicated by the title, and largely serves to provide thematic contrast between the "Halling" and "Springdans" (Spring or Leaping Dance) which follows. The "Springdans," a triple time Norwegian dance, is similar in approach to the "Halling"; Grieg adds huge leaps in the left hand to the treble register and some tricky triplet figures in the right. The concluding "Elegie" centers around a drooping chromatic melody that is harmonized by thirds in the manner of Massenet's Elegie. Perhaps an ending more respectable than ideal in this context, this piece is nevertheless haunting in its own distinctive way.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/lyric-pieces-7-for-piano-book-4-op-47-mc0002361065 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Album Leaf" from Lyric Pieces (Book 4 Op. 47 No. 2) for Bb Clarinet & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Mazurka" in A Minor (Op. 7 No. 2) for Piano

1 part2 pages02:383 days ago60 views
Piano
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

The Op. 7 set of mazurkas is the only one containing five pieces; all the composer's other published sets consist of either three or four items each. On the whole, this set represents a step forward from the Op. 6 collection. In fact, when the Op. 7 was published in 1832, it gained Chopin both recognition and notoriety in France for bold and imaginative writing that more tradition-minded ears found revolting. The pieces range in length from about four minutes (the second piece in the set) to half a minute (the final mazurka, in C major).

The second mazurka in this set, in B flat major and sometimes known as Mazurka No. 5, is probably the best known in the group. Marked Vivace, it is a graceful, lively piece whose elegance and debonair qualities give it a somewhat aristocratic air. But in the latter half of this piece a subdued theme appears that is more earthy, more peasant-like. The main theme returns to close this attractive work.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/mazurkas-5-for-piano-op-7-ct-56-59-mc0002369508 ).

I created this Transcription of the "Mazurka" in A Minor (Op. 7 No. 2) for Piano.
Magnificat à 12 for Winds & Strings
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Magnificat à 12 for Winds & Strings

12 parts17 pages05:534 days ago37 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Mikolaj Zielenski (1550 - 1615) was a Polish composer. Zieleński's only known surviving works are two 1611 liturgical cycles of polychoral works, the Offertoria/Communes totius anni. These were dedicated to the Archbishop of Gniezno, Wojciech Baranowski. The sets consist of large-scale double- and triple-choir antiphons, as well as some monodic works typical of the Seconda pratica style of early Monteverdi. Zieleński's music is the first known Polish music set in the style of the Baroque..

The Magnificat ("My soul magnifies the Lord") is a canticle, also known as the Song of Mary, the Canticle of Mary and, in the Byzantine tradition, the Ode of the Theotokos. It is traditionally incorporated into the liturgical services of the Catholic Church (at vespers) and of the Eastern Orthodox churches (at the morning services). It is one of the eight most ancient Christian hymns and perhaps the earliest Marian hymn. Its name comes from the incipit of the Latin version of the canticle's text.

The text of the canticle is taken directly from the Gospel of Luke (1:46–55) where it is spoken by Mary upon the occasion of her Visitation to her cousin Elizabeth. In the narrative, after Mary greets Elizabeth, who is pregnant with John the Baptist, the latter moves within Elizabeth's womb. Elizabeth praises Mary for her faith (using words partially reflected in the Hail Mary), and Mary responds with what is now known as the Magnificat.

Within the whole of Christianity, the Magnificat is most frequently recited within the Liturgy of the Hours. In Western Christianity, the Magnificat is most often sung or recited during the main evening prayer service: Vespers in the Catholic and Lutheran churches, and Evening Prayer (or Evensong) in Anglicanism. In Eastern Christianity, the Magnificat is usually sung at Sunday Matins. Among Protestant groups, the Magnificat may also be sung during worship services, especially in the Advent season during which these verses are traditionally read.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnificat ).

Although originally created for three unaccompanied mixed choirs (SATB), I created this Interpretation of the Magnificat à 12 for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Tuba, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Concerto in G Major (Gimo 297) for Flute, Oboe & 2 Violins

4 parts9 pages06:555 days ago55 views
Flute, Oboe, Violin(2)
Virtually nothing is known of the life of Vito Ugolino (? - 1750) who was an Italian Composer from the Baroque period.

The Baroque era in music began in Italy around 1600 and lasted till about 1750. Before it came the Renaissance period, during which the concept of music had expanded from a single line of melody (the Gregorian plainchant of the Medieval age) to multiples lines which could be sung or played simultaneously, and fit together smoothly to make a harmonious whole.

There were two types of concertos which flourished during the Baroque era. The first of these, championed especially by Arcangelo Corelli, was the concerto grosso (‘large concerto’), which featured a small group of soloists — two violins and a cello, for example — as a contrast in texture with the full orchestra. The other kind of concerto was the solo concerto, which gave the limelight to just one instrument (most commonly a violin, but there are concertos for all manner of soloist — the oboe concertos by Alessandro Marcello and Tomaso Albinoni are especially beautiful).

One of the most important composers in the early development of the solo concerto was Antonio Vivaldi, who wrote more than 500 of them, for a wide range of solo instruments — mostly to be played by the highly talented girls at the Venetian orphanage where he was the director of music. As the Baroque era moved towards the Classical in the mid-18th century, it was the solo concerto, with its opportunities for virtuoso display and for song-like eloquence, which took over from the concerto grosso as the favoured form.

The word ‘Baroque’ wasn’t used until towards the end of the Baroque period, and at first it was intended as an insult! It comes from the Portuguese word barroco, which meant a misshapen pearl, and it was initially used to criticise this ‘modern’ music for its shameless use of new and strange effects in order to express moods and emotions.

Source: WikiPedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baroque_music ).

Although originally composed for Mandolin, Violins and Basso Continuo, I created this Interpretation of the Concerto in G Major (Gimo 297) for Flute, Oboe & 2 Violins.

Waltz in A Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 3) for Violin & Piano

2 parts3 pages03:156 days ago88 views
Violin, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Albéniz's early works were mostly "salon style" music. Albéniz's first published composition, Marcha Militar, appeared in 1868. A number of works written before this are now lost. He continued composing in traditional styles ranging from Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt until the mid-1880s. He also wrote at least five zarzuelas, of which all but two are now lost.

Among these works are the "Seis Pequeños Valses" (6 Little Waltzes) for Piano Opus 25 Nos 1-6.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Waltz in A Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 3) for Violin & Piano.
Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Guitar
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Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Guitar

2 parts11 pages14:027 days ago30 views
French Horn, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Classical Guitar.

Sonata in G Major (Hob XVI:40) for Oboe & Guitar

2 parts6 pages09:208 days ago49 views
Oboe, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in G Major (Hob XVI:40) for Oboe & Classical Guitar.

Sonata in C Major (Hob XVI:35) for Bassoon & Guitar

2 parts9 pages13:179 days ago20 views
Bassoon, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in C Major (Hob XVI:35) for Bassoon & Classical Guitar.
Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Clarinet & Guitar
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Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Clarinet & Guitar

2 parts10 pages14:5710 days ago37 views
Clarinet, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Bb Clarinet & Classical Guitar.
"Mazurka" in Bb Major (Op. 7 No. 1) for Oboe & Guitar
Video

"Mazurka" in Bb Major (Op. 7 No. 1) for Oboe & Guitar

2 parts2 pages02:1611 days ago48 views
Oboe, Guitar
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

The Op. 7 set of mazurkas is the only one containing five pieces; all the composer's other published sets consist of either three or four items each. On the whole, this set represents a step forward from the Op. 6 collection. In fact, when the Op. 7 was published in 1832, it gained Chopin both recognition and notoriety in France for bold and imaginative writing that more tradition-minded ears found revolting. The pieces range in length from about four minutes (the second piece in the set) to half a minute (the final mazurka, in C major).

The first mazurka in this set, in B flat major and sometimes known as Mazurka No. 5, is probably the best known in the group. Marked Vivace, it is a graceful, lively piece whose elegance and debonair qualities give it a somewhat aristocratic air. But in the latter half of this piece a subdued theme appears that is more earthy, more peasant-like. The main theme returns to close this attractive work.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/mazurkas-5-for-piano-op-7-ct-56-59-mc0002369508 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Mazurka" in Bb Major (Op. 7 No. 1) for Oboe & Classical Guitar.
"Clair de Lune" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 3) for String Quartet
Video

"Clair de Lune" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 3) for String Quartet

4 parts6 pages04:1312 days ago75 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed
It is difficult to establish an appropriate chronological place for Claude Debussy's Suite bergamasque within his output. He originally composed the piece in 1890, but it was not published until 1905, and the extent to which he revised it during the interval is unclear. Certainly the published work is a great stylistic advance over the few short piano works which preceded it during the late 1880s and early 1890s, but whether that advance is due to an early maturity or to much later alteration will perhaps always elude historians.

The Suite, Debussy's tribute to the French Baroque clavecinistes (harpsichordists), comprises four individual movements: Prélude, Menuet, Clair de lune, and Passepied. It is interesting to note that Debussy originally titled the third and fourth pieces "Promenade sentimentale" and "Pavane," respectively, and changed their titles only shortly before publishing the Suite in 1905. This has caused many to question the purported connection between the much-celebrated Clair de lune and Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name. However, Debussy's connection with Verlaine's poetry is far reaching enough for the association to be meaningful. He had already set the poem "Clair de lune," as well as several others, for voice and piano on two separate occasions by 1891, and the word bergamasque is itself contained within that particular text.

The Prelude, an F major piece cast in ternary (ABA) form, unfolds in an aristocratic, unhurried way. The opening declamation, spanning some four octaves, is nobleness itself, while the B section, in A minor, is devoted to more thoughtful ideas. Perhaps the best music in the Prelude is contained within the lengthy passage that connects the middle section to the reprise of the opening. The Menuet presents the best glimpse of Debussy's emerging compositional voice. Save for its 3/4 meter there is little trace of the traditional minuet form to be found. Especially notable is the absence of a trio section. Clair de lune is perhaps the most famous work Debussy ever penned. Although Debussy's reliance on left-hand arpeggios throughout the piece can lead to a somewhat mechanical effect in the hands of less skilled performers, Clair de lune has a way of drawing the listener into its magical atmosphere. Particularly striking are the opening gestures, still and quiet, and a passage in parallel octaves that connects the opening to the more active middle-section. The Passepied that ends the Suite is cast in 4/4 time, betraying its origins as a pavane, since the traditional Passepied is invariably found in 3/4 time. As is the case with the Menuet, Debussy is making reference to an antiquated dance form without actually making use of it.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-bergamasque-for-piano-l-82-75-mc0002369288 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Clair de Lune" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 3) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Prelude" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 1) for String Quartet
Video

"Prelude" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 1) for String Quartet

4 parts7 pages03:5912 days ago29 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed
It is difficult to establish an appropriate chronological place for Claude Debussy's Suite bergamasque within his output. He originally composed the piece in 1890, but it was not published until 1905, and the extent to which he revised it during the interval is unclear. Certainly the published work is a great stylistic advance over the few short piano works which preceded it during the late 1880s and early 1890s, but whether that advance is due to an early maturity or to much later alteration will perhaps always elude historians.

The Suite, Debussy's tribute to the French Baroque clavecinistes (harpsichordists), comprises four individual movements: Prélude, Menuet, Clair de lune, and Passepied. It is interesting to note that Debussy originally titled the third and fourth pieces "Promenade sentimentale" and "Pavane," respectively, and changed their titles only shortly before publishing the Suite in 1905. This has caused many to question the purported connection between the much-celebrated Clair de lune and Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name. However, Debussy's connection with Verlaine's poetry is far reaching enough for the association to be meaningful. He had already set the poem "Clair de lune," as well as several others, for voice and piano on two separate occasions by 1891, and the word bergamasque is itself contained within that particular text.

The Prelude, an F major piece cast in ternary (ABA) form, unfolds in an aristocratic, unhurried way. The opening declamation, spanning some four octaves, is nobleness itself, while the B section, in A minor, is devoted to more thoughtful ideas. Perhaps the best music in the Prelude is contained within the lengthy passage that connects the middle section to the reprise of the opening. The Menuet presents the best glimpse of Debussy's emerging compositional voice. Save for its 3/4 meter there is little trace of the traditional minuet form to be found. Especially notable is the absence of a trio section. Clair de lune is perhaps the most famous work Debussy ever penned. Although Debussy's reliance on left-hand arpeggios throughout the piece can lead to a somewhat mechanical effect in the hands of less skilled performers, Clair de lune has a way of drawing the listener into its magical atmosphere. Particularly striking are the opening gestures, still and quiet, and a passage in parallel octaves that connects the opening to the more active middle-section. The Passepied that ends the Suite is cast in 4/4 time, betraying its origins as a pavane, since the traditional Passepied is invariably found in 3/4 time. As is the case with the Menuet, Debussy is making reference to an antiquated dance form without actually making use of it.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-bergamasque-for-piano-l-82-75-mc0002369288 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Prelude" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 1) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Divertimento in C Major (Hob XVI:7) for Violin & Guitar
Video

Divertimento in C Major (Hob XVI:7) for Violin & Guitar

2 parts3 pages0513 days ago42 views
Violin, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Divertimento in C Major (Hob XVI:7) for Violin & Classical Guitar.

The Suite Bergamasque (L. 75) for String Quartet

4 parts32 pages16:0813 days ago25 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed
It is difficult to establish an appropriate chronological place for Claude Debussy's Suite bergamasque within his output. He originally composed the piece in 1890, but it was not published until 1905, and the extent to which he revised it during the interval is unclear. Certainly the published work is a great stylistic advance over the few short piano works which preceded it during the late 1880s and early 1890s, but whether that advance is due to an early maturity or to much later alteration will perhaps always elude historians.

The Suite, Debussy's tribute to the French Baroque clavecinistes (harpsichordists), comprises four individual movements: Prélude, Menuet, Clair de lune, and Passepied. It is interesting to note that Debussy originally titled the third and fourth pieces "Promenade sentimentale" and "Pavane," respectively, and changed their titles only shortly before publishing the Suite in 1905. This has caused many to question the purported connection between the much-celebrated Clair de lune and Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name. However, Debussy's connection with Verlaine's poetry is far reaching enough for the association to be meaningful. He had already set the poem "Clair de lune," as well as several others, for voice and piano on two separate occasions by 1891, and the word bergamasque is itself contained within that particular text.

The Prelude, an F major piece cast in ternary (ABA) form, unfolds in an aristocratic, unhurried way. The opening declamation, spanning some four octaves, is nobleness itself, while the B section, in A minor, is devoted to more thoughtful ideas. Perhaps the best music in the Prelude is contained within the lengthy passage that connects the middle section to the reprise of the opening. The Menuet presents the best glimpse of Debussy's emerging compositional voice. Save for its 3/4 meter there is little trace of the traditional minuet form to be found. Especially notable is the absence of a trio section. Clair de lune is perhaps the most famous work Debussy ever penned. Although Debussy's reliance on left-hand arpeggios throughout the piece can lead to a somewhat mechanical effect in the hands of less skilled performers, Clair de lune has a way of drawing the listener into its magical atmosphere. Particularly striking are the opening gestures, still and quiet, and a passage in parallel octaves that connects the opening to the more active middle-section. The Passepied that ends the Suite is cast in 4/4 time, betraying its origins as a pavane, since the traditional Passepied is invariably found in 3/4 time. As is the case with the Menuet, Debussy is making reference to an antiquated dance form without actually making use of it.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-bergamasque-for-piano-l-82-75-mc0002369288 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Suite Bergamasque (L. 75) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Castilla (Seguidilla)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 7) for Woodwind Quartet
Video

"Castilla (Seguidilla)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 7) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts8 pages02:3213 days ago61 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Isaac Albéniz’s Suite española, Op. 47, is a suite for solo piano. It is mainly composed of works written in 1886 which were grouped together in 1887, in honour of the Queen of Spain. Like many of Albeniz’s works for the piano, these pieces depict different regions and musical styles in Spain.

The work originally consisted of four pieces: Granada, Cataluña, Sevilla and Cuba. The editor Hofmeister republished the Suite española in 1912, after Albéniz's death, but added Cádiz, Asturias, Aragón and Castilla. The other pieces had been published in other editions and sometimes with different titles (Asturias was originally the prelude from the suite Chants d'Espagne).

Each of these works refers to the geographical region portrayed. From Granada in Andalusia there is a Serenata, from Catalonia a Curranda or Courante, from Sevilla a Sevillanas and from Cuba (which was still part of Spain in the 1880s) a Notturno in the style of a habanera, from Castile a seguidillas, from Aragon a Fantasia in the style of a jota, and from Cadiz a saeta. This last example, like Asturias (Leyenda), is geographically inaccurate.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Castilla (Seguidilla)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 7) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).
"Menuet" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 2) for String Quartet
Video

"Menuet" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 2) for String Quartet

4 parts8 pages04:1014 days ago33 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed
It is difficult to establish an appropriate chronological place for Claude Debussy's Suite bergamasque within his output. He originally composed the piece in 1890, but it was not published until 1905, and the extent to which he revised it during the interval is unclear. Certainly the published work is a great stylistic advance over the few short piano works which preceded it during the late 1880s and early 1890s, but whether that advance is due to an early maturity or to much later alteration will perhaps always elude historians.

The Suite, Debussy's tribute to the French Baroque clavecinistes (harpsichordists), comprises four individual movements: Prélude, Menuet, Clair de lune, and Passepied. It is interesting to note that Debussy originally titled the third and fourth pieces "Promenade sentimentale" and "Pavane," respectively, and changed their titles only shortly before publishing the Suite in 1905. This has caused many to question the purported connection between the much-celebrated Clair de lune and Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name. However, Debussy's connection with Verlaine's poetry is far reaching enough for the association to be meaningful. He had already set the poem "Clair de lune," as well as several others, for voice and piano on two separate occasions by 1891, and the word bergamasque is itself contained within that particular text.

The Prelude, an F major piece cast in ternary (ABA) form, unfolds in an aristocratic, unhurried way. The opening declamation, spanning some four octaves, is nobleness itself, while the B section, in A minor, is devoted to more thoughtful ideas. Perhaps the best music in the Prelude is contained within the lengthy passage that connects the middle section to the reprise of the opening. The Menuet presents the best glimpse of Debussy's emerging compositional voice. Save for its 3/4 meter there is little trace of the traditional minuet form to be found. Especially notable is the absence of a trio section. Clair de lune is perhaps the most famous work Debussy ever penned. Although Debussy's reliance on left-hand arpeggios throughout the piece can lead to a somewhat mechanical effect in the hands of less skilled performers, Clair de lune has a way of drawing the listener into its magical atmosphere. Particularly striking are the opening gestures, still and quiet, and a passage in parallel octaves that connects the opening to the more active middle-section. The Passepied that ends the Suite is cast in 4/4 time, betraying its origins as a pavane, since the traditional Passepied is invariably found in 3/4 time. As is the case with the Menuet, Debussy is making reference to an antiquated dance form without actually making use of it.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-bergamasque-for-piano-l-82-75-mc0002369288 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Menuet" from the "Suite Bergamasque" (L. 75 No. 2) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano
Video

"Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano

2 parts5 pages03:5815 days ago106 views
Violin, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Isaac Albéniz’s Suite española, Op. 47, is a suite for solo piano. It is mainly composed of works written in 1886 which were grouped together in 1887, in honour of the Queen of Spain. Like many of Albeniz’s works for the piano, these pieces depict different regions and musical styles in Spain.

The work originally consisted of four pieces: Granada, Cataluña, Sevilla and Cuba. The editor Hofmeister republished the Suite española in 1912, after Albéniz's death, but added Cádiz, Asturias, Aragón and Castilla. The other pieces had been published in other editions and sometimes with different titles (Asturias was originally the prelude from the suite Chants d'Espagne).

Each of these works refers to the geographical region portrayed. From Granada in Andalusia there is a Serenata, from Catalonia a Curranda or Courante, from Sevilla a Sevillanas and from Cuba (which was still part of Spain in the 1880s) a Notturno in the style of a habanera, from Castile a seguidillas, from Aragon a Fantasia in the style of a jota, and from Cadiz a saeta. This last example, like Asturias (Leyenda), is geographically inaccurate.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano.