Sheet music

"Impromptu" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 3) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts3 pages01:3547 minutes ago3 views
Oboe, Piano
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Tchaikovsky's Six Pieces on a Single Theme (Six morceaux composés sur un seul thème) for solo piano (Op. 21), were composed between the end of September & November 1873 in Moscow. The pieces were published for the first time by Vasily Bessel in 1873. Twenty years later they pieces came to the attention of Aleksandr Ziloti: "I recently looked over your old piano pieces and began with your 'gems' (Op. 21); I will play the Prelude and Mazurka; incidentally. these have been published by Mackar". "I have completed your six piano pieces", Tchaikovsky wrote to Vasily Bessel on 28 November/10 December 1873. "Now I'm in the process of making fair copies of them, and you should receive them in the near future. All six pieces are written around one theme and will be have the overall title Suite: Nos. 1) Prelude, 2) Fugue, 3) Impromptu, 4) Mazurka, 5) Marche funebre, 6) Scherzo. The whole thing is dedicated to A. G. Rubinstein. I've kept you waiting for these pieces, and for this I apologize; the fact is that I also gave my word to Jurgenson that I would write six pieces for him, amongst other things". The pieces are dedicated to Anton Rubinstein, who played them many years after they were published. Tchaikovsky was upset by the great pianist's indifference: "Isn't A. Rubinstein a strange fellow? Why didn't he turn his attention to my piano pieces 10 years ago? Why hasn't he played a single note until now? Why did I do to deserve this! Nevertheless, I am very thankful for his sudden change of heart", he wrote to Pyotr Jurgenson on 14/26 April 1883. The following year he suggested to Nadezhda von Meck that she should hear Anton Rubinstein play the Op. 21 pieces in Paris: "He is always playing four of my six piano pieces, which some time ago I wrote and dedicated to him. Truly, these pieces could not be better played". The title Suite was changed by the author to Six Morceaux. Sketches for the pieces are contained in the same copybook as sketches for the Nocturne and Capriccioso from the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — which were written immediately prior to the Op. 21 set. The sequence of the sketches indicates that the Mazurka was the first to be composed, and the remaining five pieces were written in the order in which they were published. They set was included in volume 51? of Tchaikovsky's Complete Collected Works (1946), edited by Ivan Shishov Source: Wikipedia (http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/Six_Pieces_on_a_Single_Theme,_Op._21 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Impromptu" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 3) for Oboe & Piano

"Gigue à l'Angloise" in G Major for Viola Duet

2 parts1 page00:39a day ago27 views
Viola(2)
Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) was a German, Baroque composer who was a self taught musician. After giving up pursuing a law degree, he jumped into a musical career. His music incorporates several national styles, including French, and Italian, and he is even at times influenced by Polish popular music. The Gigue a l’Angloise is referencing the English country dance, the Angloise. This piece was written in the key of G Major and there are two separate complex lines in which each hand will have to blend together. At times, one part will be playing eighth notes, the other playing dotted quarters, and vica versa. Rhythm and timing will need to be addressed in this piece along with the balancing of melody and repeated phrases. Source: Pueblo Music (http://pueblomusic.com/pedagogy/?p=675 ). Although originally composed for Keyboard, I created this Interpretation of the "Gigue à l'angloise" in G Major for Viola Duet.
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"Nocturne" from "Six Pieces" (Op. 19 No. 4) for Flute & Strings

5 parts4 pages02:46a day ago30 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. This odd collection brings together five innocuous genre pieces with a substantial theme-and-variations set. The first item, known bilingually as "Abend-Träumerei" and "Rêverie du Soir," is a slow, G minor arabesque in 3/4 time, with a lyrical middle section. Next comes a "Scherzo humoristique" in D major, an effervescent piece in 3/8 with a more serious yet improvised-sounding middle section, full of short, obsessively repeated melody fragments that seem to want to burst into a folk song. The third piece, "Feuillet d'Album," is an abbreviated, highly lyrical item simple enough for student pianists; it's in standard ABA form, but the B section is barely discernible from the rest. Fourth is a Nocturne marked Andante sentimentale, a haunting, hesitant soliloquy interrupted by a more flowing midsection. A miniature cadenza leads to a reprise of the first section, now given a much more ornate treatment. Next is a B flat Capriccioso in 2/4 time, which Tchaikovsky originally thought to work into a symphony. The main material is quite poignant, but contrast arrives with the middle section, a jaunty Allegro vivacissimo in D minor. The sixth piece consists of a modest, expressive 16-bar theme in 3/4 time, followed by 12 variations and a coda. The first variation nudges the theme forward only slightly. The second flows more smoothly under triplets in the right hand. Variation 3 brings outright brilliance to the proceedings, intensified with the bravura staccato chords in Variation 4. The fifth variation is an amorous Andante, but the sixth brings back a staccato snap. The seventh could be the chordal outline of a hymn, while the eighth is an unexpectedly exultant waltz in D minor. Variation 9 turns the theme into a mazurka, complete with miniature cadenza. Variation 10 brings back the theme pretty much intact under florid passagework. The next variation is an exuberant Allegro brillante in the style of Schumann. Variation 12 features a tonic pedal-point in the bass all the way through (looking ahead to a technique Tchaikovsky would employ in a movement of his "Polish" Symphony). The whole thing ends with a virtuosic presto coda, driving toward a final crowd-pleasing crescendo. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/morceaux-6-for-piano-op-19-mc0002362792 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Nocturne" from "Six Pieces" (Op. 19 No. 4) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Overture Suite in C Major (TWV 55:C3) for Oboe & Strings

4 parts27 pages25:052 days ago27 views
Oboe, Violin, Viola, Cello
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12. Water Music (Wassermusik), TWV 55:C3, is the common name of the orchestral suite by Telemann, with the full title Hamburger Ebb' und Fluth (Hamburg ebb and flood). Telemann composed the piece in ten movements to celebrate the centennial anniversary of the Hamburg Admiralty in a performance on 6 April 1723. The suite draws upon Hamburg's geographical location as an important and successful port on the river Elbe while Telemann illustrates the piece with mythological water deities and tone painting giving the nautical theme added depth. The overture begins by representing the physical movement of the ocean, followed by several dance movements: first, the sleeping sea goddess Thetis, the mother of Achilles, who then awakes; the sea god Neptune in love; playful water nymphs known as Naiads; Neptune's son and sea messenger Triton joking; Aeolus, ruler of the winds; and Zephir, god of the west wind. Two final pieces follow, one depicting the tides of Hamburg and finally, its happy sailors. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_Music_(Telemann) ). Although originally composed for Piccolo, Recorders, Oboes, Bassoons, Strings & Continuo, I created this Interpretation of the "Overture Suite in C Major" (TWV 55:C3) the "Ouverture Wassermusik" for Oboe & Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"Chanson Triste" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 2) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts2 pages02:063 days ago56 views
Oboe, Piano
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece. Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Chanson Triste" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 2) for Oboe & Piano.

Overture Suite in B Flat Major (TWV 55:B8) for Flute & Strings

4 parts20 pages16:034 days ago44 views
Flute, Violin, Viola, Cello
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12. Telemann continued to be extraordinarily productive and successful, even augmenting his income by working for Eisenach employers as a Kapellmeister von Haus aus, that is, regularly sending new music while not actually living in Eisenach. Telemann's first published works also appeared during the Frankfurt period. His output increased rapidly, for he fervently composed overture-suites and chamber music, most of which is unappreciated. In the latter half of the Frankfurt period, he composed an innovative work, his Viola Concerto in G major, which is twice the length of his violin concertos. Also, here he composed his first choral masterpiece, his Brockes Passion, in 1716. Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/Oboe_Concerto%2C_TWV_51:f1_(Telemann%2C_Georg_Philipp) ). Although originally composed for String Orchestra, I created this Interpretation of the "Overture Suite in B-Flat Major" (TWV 55:B8) the "Ouverture Burlesque" for Flute & Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello).
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"Reverie Interrompue" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 12) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages03:555 days ago35 views
Flute, Harp
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece. Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Reverie Interrompue" from "from 12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 12) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Toccata in F Major (BuxWV 157) for String Quartet

4 parts8 pages04:065 days ago38 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. Like the Praeludia, BuxWV 144 and 145, this Toccata in F major works much like a prelude and fugue. It consists of two sections, an extended free toccata passage ending with a full cadence in the tonic followed by a long extended fugue which only breaks down into free rhapsodic passage work only measures before the end of the piece. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/toccata-for-organ-in-f-major-buxwv-157-mc0002392594 ). I created this Interpretation of the Toccata in F Major (BuxWV 157) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Nocturne in Ab Major (Op. 46) for Flute & Strings

5 parts7 pages05:235 days ago56 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Édouard Wolff (1816 - 1880) was a Polish pianist and composer and son of the famous doctor Józef Wolff and Eleonora Oestreicher. Wolff had the first piano lessons with his mother, an amateur pianist, and then studied from 1828 in Vienna with Wilhelm Würfel. After returning to Warsaw in 1832, he took private lessons with Joseph Elsner. In 1835 he went to Paris, where he first had contact with Frédéric Chopin, who introduced him to the Parisian musical society. Later there was an alienation between Chopin and him. Nevertheless, he dedicated two of his more than 300 piano pieces to Chopin: the Grand Allegro de Concert and Rêverie-Nocturne (Homage to Chopin). He also composed forty duos for piano and violin as well as a piano concerto. Source: Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/de:Edouard_Wolff ) Although originally composed for solo Piano, I created this interpretation of the Nocturne in Ab Major (Opus 46) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Cantata:
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Cantata: "In dulci jubilo" (BuxWV 52) for Brass & Strings

8 parts12 pages07:166 days ago37 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This cantata elaborates the Christmas chorale "In dulci jubilo." The cantata is scored for two sopranos, bass, two violins, and continuo. The chorale is in four verses and Buxtehude sets all four. The melody of the chorale appears distinctly enough in soprano, but Buxtehude often adds little melismas at the ends of phrases adding a bit more gentle jubilation to that already present in the chorale melody. The text of this chorale is interesting. It consists both of German and Latin, alternating Latin and German phrases. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/in-dulci-jubilo-for-ssb-voices-2-violins-continuo-buxwv-52-mc0002369382 ). Although originally created for Accompanied Chorus, I created this Interpretation of the Cantata: "In dulci jubilo" (BuxWV 52) for Brass (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Tuba) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cellos).
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"Mazurka" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 5) for Clarinet & Guitar

2 parts6 pages03:297 days ago47 views
Clarinet, Guitar
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Tchaikovsky's Six Pieces on a Single Theme (Six morceaux composés sur un seul thème) for solo piano (Op. 21), were composed between the end of September & November 1873 in Moscow. The pieces were published for the first time by Vasily Bessel in 1873. Twenty years later they pieces came to the attention of Aleksandr Ziloti: "I recently looked over your old piano pieces and began with your 'gems' (Op. 21); I will play the Prelude and Mazurka; incidentally. these have been published by Mackar". "I have completed your six piano pieces", Tchaikovsky wrote to Vasily Bessel on 28 November/10 December 1873. "Now I'm in the process of making fair copies of them, and you should receive them in the near future. All six pieces are written around one theme and will be have the overall title Suite: Nos. 1) Prelude, 2) Fugue, 3) Impromptu, 4) Mazurka, 5) Marche funebre, 6) Scherzo. The whole thing is dedicated to A. G. Rubinstein. I've kept you waiting for these pieces, and for this I apologize; the fact is that I also gave my word to Jurgenson that I would write six pieces for him, amongst other things". The pieces are dedicated to Anton Rubinstein, who played them many years after they were published. Tchaikovsky was upset by the great pianist's indifference: "Isn't A. Rubinstein a strange fellow? Why didn't he turn his attention to my piano pieces 10 years ago? Why hasn't he played a single note until now? Why did I do to deserve this! Nevertheless, I am very thankful for his sudden change of heart", he wrote to Pyotr Jurgenson on 14/26 April 1883. The following year he suggested to Nadezhda von Meck that she should hear Anton Rubinstein play the Op. 21 pieces in Paris: "He is always playing four of my six piano pieces, which some time ago I wrote and dedicated to him. Truly, these pieces could not be better played". The title Suite was changed by the author to Six Morceaux. Sketches for the pieces are contained in the same copybook as sketches for the Nocturne and Capriccioso from the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — which were written immediately prior to the Op. 21 set. The sequence of the sketches indicates that the Mazurka was the first to be composed, and the remaining five pieces were written in the order in which they were published. They set was included in volume 51? of Tchaikovsky's Complete Collected Works (1946), edited by Ivan Shishov Source: Wikipedia (http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/Six_Pieces_on_a_Single_Theme,_Op._21 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Mazurka" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 5) for Bb Clarinet & Classical Guitar

Concerto in F Minor (TWV51:F1) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts13 pages07:298 days ago53 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, the son of a Lutheran deacon who died in 1685, leaving the mother to raise their three children alone. The youth showed remarkable talent in music, but was temporarily discouraged in his chosen pursuit by Puritan Lutherans, who told Telemann's mother that he would turn out no better than "a clown, a tightrope walker or a marmot-trainer." In opposition to his mother's wishes, Telemann continued to study in secrecy until she relented, allowing him to train under the highly respected Kantor Benedict Christiani, at the Old City School. Outside of some early lessons in reading tablature, Telemann was self-taught and was capable of playing the flute, violin, viola da gamba, oboe, trombone, double bass, and several keyboard instruments. Telemann began to write music from childhood, producing an opera, Sigismundus, by age 12. From the vast field of Telemann concertos there exists a group that naturally flow from one to another and illuminate each other. There is virtuosic writing, as in the Concerto for recorder, string orchestra, and continuo in F major, TWV 51: F1, in both the Allegro second movement and, less typically, the final pair of minuets. There are technically simpler pieces in which the concerto grosso format is wittily extended or French and Italian styles are inventively mixed. The highlight is saved for the end: the Concerto for flute, recorder, string orchestra, and continuo in E minor, TWV 52: c1, offers a brillliant treatment of the contrast between these two closely related instruments and closes with a fabulous romp through Polish folk rhythms at Presto speed. The entire ensemble crisply hangs together in the fast movements, and the degree of transparency with the texture is impressive. There's an elusive sense of fun in Telemann that is essential to an enjoyable performance, and it's present here, even if somewhat diminished by rather brittle church sound. Source: IMSLP (https://imslp.org/wiki/Oboe_Concerto%2C_TWV_51:f1_(Telemann%2C_Georg_Philipp) ). Although originally composed for Recorder Strings and Continuo, I created this Transcription for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
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"Funeral March" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 4) for Pipe Organ

1 part9 pages04:088 days ago63 views
Piano
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Tchaikovsky's Six Pieces on a Single Theme (Six morceaux composés sur un seul thème) for solo piano (Op. 21), were composed between the end of September & November 1873 in Moscow. The pieces were published for the first time by Vasily Bessel in 1873. Twenty years later they pieces came to the attention of Aleksandr Ziloti: "I recently looked over your old piano pieces and began with your 'gems' (Op. 21); I will play the Prelude and Mazurka; incidentally. these have been published by Mackar". "I have completed your six piano pieces", Tchaikovsky wrote to Vasily Bessel on 28 November/10 December 1873. "Now I'm in the process of making fair copies of them, and you should receive them in the near future. All six pieces are written around one theme and will be have the overall title Suite: Nos. 1) Prelude, 2) Fugue, 3) Impromptu, 4) Mazurka, 5) Marche funebre, 6) Scherzo. The whole thing is dedicated to A. G. Rubinstein. I've kept you waiting for these pieces, and for this I apologize; the fact is that I also gave my word to Jurgenson that I would write six pieces for him, amongst other things". The pieces are dedicated to Anton Rubinstein, who played them many years after they were published. Tchaikovsky was upset by the great pianist's indifference: "Isn't A. Rubinstein a strange fellow? Why didn't he turn his attention to my piano pieces 10 years ago? Why hasn't he played a single note until now? Why did I do to deserve this! Nevertheless, I am very thankful for his sudden change of heart", he wrote to Pyotr Jurgenson on 14/26 April 1883. The following year he suggested to Nadezhda von Meck that she should hear Anton Rubinstein play the Op. 21 pieces in Paris: "He is always playing four of my six piano pieces, which some time ago I wrote and dedicated to him. Truly, these pieces could not be better played". The title Suite was changed by the author to Six Morceaux. Sketches for the pieces are contained in the same copybook as sketches for the Nocturne and Capriccioso from the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — which were written immediately prior to the Op. 21 set. The sequence of the sketches indicates that the Mazurka was the first to be composed, and the remaining five pieces were written in the order in which they were published. They set was included in volume 51? of Tchaikovsky's Complete Collected Works (1946), edited by Ivan Shishov Source: Wikipedia (http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/Six_Pieces_on_a_Single_Theme,_Op._21 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Funeral March" from "Six Morceaux on one theme" (Op. 21 No. 4) for Pipe Organ (2 Manuals w/Pedals)

Passacaglia in D Minor (BuxWV 161) for Bassoon & Piano

2 parts6 pages04:209 days ago45 views
Bassoon, Piano
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. The Passacaglia for organ in D minor, BuxWV 161, may well be Dietrich Buxtehude's most famous piece of music -- but that does not mean, sadly, that it is by any stretch of the imagination well recognized. It is one of three ostinato-oriented, ground bass organ pieces (BuxWV 159-161; a related work is BuxWV 137, whose brief final section is a chaconne) in which Buxtehude refocused the lens of his quintessentially north-German organ art to look at the Spanish-Italian chaconne and passacaglia forms -- forms hitherto foreign to mainstream German organ music. Like nearly all of Buxtehude's music, BuxWV 161 has to this point remained undatable -- the best we can do is say that it was probably composed during his 40-year tenure as organist at the Marienkirche at Lübeck, a post he held from 1668 to his death in 1707. In the Passacaglia, Buxtehude assigns the repeating four-measure ground bass to the pedals, and allows the two hands to devise ever more elaborate filigree -- here contrapuntally ordered, there made into more obviously virtuoso stuff -- to go above it. Buxtehude builds a four-section plan from the modulations through which he puts the ground bass (D minor - F major - A minor - D minor); each section is exactly 30 measures in length, with a one-measure "fill" separating neighboring sections. It is easy to recognize, when encountering such an unwaveringly precise but flexible-sounding architecture, the extent to which such works as the Passacaglia influenced Buxtehude's spiritual descendent J.S. Bach, who is of course famed for his intricate and sometimes mathematical structural layouts, and who as a young man traveled some 200 miles on foot so that he might hear Buxtehude play. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/passacaglia-for-organ-in-d-minor-buxwv-161-mc0002361998 ). I created this Interpretation of the Passacaglia in D Minor (BuxWV 161) for Bassoon & Piano.
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"Funeral March" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 3) for Horn & Strings

5 parts7 pages06:2910 days ago73 views
French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece. Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Funeral March" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 3) for French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Erbarme dich, mein Gott, um meiner Zaehren Willen!" (BWV 244 No. 39) for String Ensemble

6 parts12 pages05:2510 days ago49 views
Violin(4), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew" Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases. Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner. The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security. The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo. Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion). I created this arrangement of the Aria: "Erbarme dich, mein Gott, um meiner Zähren Willen!" (Have mercy, my God, for the sake of my tears!) for String Ensemble (4 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Toccata in D Minor (BuxWV 155) for Pipe Organ

1 part10 pages06:0611 days ago38 views
Organ
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This toccata in D minor works much like a praeludium in that there is an alternation of free passage work and imitative polyphony. Altogether there are three different imitative sections scattered in between segments of free rhapsodic passage work; however, it should be noted that the free passage work occurs more in this piece than imitative material. The first imitative portion of the toccata is fairly brief, and only eight measures long leading into a much more substantial imitative section. The third of the three imitative portions is yet longer. None of the three imitative portions of the toccata are thematically related as was so common in the praeludia of Buxtehude. The free rhapsodic portions of this toccata are quite wild and chaotic, making this work one of Buxtehude's most extreme examples of the stylus phantasticus, a style characterized by unpredictable improvisatory chaos. Also the free rhapsodic passages tend to pile upon one another in this piece. Rather than turning to imitative material after coming to a cadence at the end of each free toccata section, Buxtehude twice (once at the beginning, and again at the end) returns for more free toccata material. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/toccata-for-organ-in-d-minor-buxwv-155-mc0002367732 ). I created this Transcription of the Toccata in D Minor (BuxWV 155) for Pipe Organ (2 Manuals & Pedals).
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"Au Village" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 7) for Clarinet & Strings

5 parts9 pages03:0311 days ago36 views
Clarinet, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. Known as a salon piece, Tchaikovsky's Chanson triste, the second of the twelve short piano compositions, published as Douze morceaux (difficulté moyenne), is typical of the numerous Romantic miniature composed, as the title indicates, for amateur pianists. Deceptively slight, of an almost transparent simplicity, this morceau nevertheless captivates the listener with its disarming sincerity. Indeed, the inner narrative, carried by the fluid momentum of the music, may suggest feelings of subdued, almost forgotten, sadness, but the music remains engaging throughout the piece, sometimes even rising to a discernible level of dramatic intensity, which eventually, toward the end, yields to an aural mist, in which the initially adumbrated melancholy slowly, gradually, like a weakening echo, disappears in the abyss of an unremembered past. That this music is worthy of great pianist is confirmed by Sviatoslav Richter's powerfully serene performance of this piece. Tchaikovsky composed Chanson triste in 1878, a turbulent year, marked by his struggle to distance himself from his estranged wife, Antonina, who rejected a suggested divorce. In the midst of his emotional turmoil, the composer managed to find some peace at Kamenka, where he had use of a cottage. There, while working on his Piano Sonata in G major, Op. 37 and the Album for Children, Op. 39, Tchaikovsky composed the twelve pieces which include the Chanson triste. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/chanson-triste-for-piano-op-40-2-mc0002456214 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Au Village" from "12 Morceaux" (Op. 40 No. 7) for Bb Clarinet & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Prelude & Fugue in G Minor (BuxWV 148) for String Quartet

4 parts10 pages08:3112 days ago32 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right. Though we do not have copies of much of the work that most impressed his contemporaries, Buxtehude nonetheless left behind a body of vocal and instrumental music which is distinguished by its contrapuntal skill, devotional atmosphere, and raw intensity. He helped develop the form of the church cantata, later perfected by Bach, and he was just as famous a virtuoso on the organ. This piece in G minor is one of Buxtehude's larger more interesting praeludia. It is a bit unusual in its construction. It consists of a free section, two fugues, and a concluding bass ostinato section. As is common in Buxtehude's praeludia, there is a bit of free rhapsodic material in between the two fugues. The bass ostinato section is particularly peculiar. The ostinato itself is two bars plus one quarter note followed by a bar and three quarters of rest in the bass line. The rests in the bass line create an unusual ground bass, in which the ground is not sounding nearly half the time. On a large North German organ with an aggressive pedal division, this creates a very grand effect with the loud pedal division coming in and out of the texture. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/praeludium-for-organ-in-g-minor-buxwv-148-mc0002362980). I created this Interpretation of the Prelude & Fugue in G Minor (BuxWV 148) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Theme & Variations" from "Six Pieces" (Op. 19 No. 6) for Flute & Strings

5 parts24 pages09:5113 days ago79 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky's unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing. This odd collection brings together five innocuous genre pieces with a substantial theme-and-variations set. The first item, known bilingually as "Abend-Träumerei" and "Rêverie du Soir," is a slow, G minor arabesque in 3/4 time, with a lyrical middle section. Next comes a "Scherzo humoristique" in D major, an effervescent piece in 3/8 with a more serious yet improvised-sounding middle section, full of short, obsessively repeated melody fragments that seem to want to burst into a folk song. The third piece, "Feuillet d'Album," is an abbreviated, highly lyrical item simple enough for student pianists; it's in standard ABA form, but the B section is barely discernible from the rest. Fourth is a Nocturne marked Andante sentimentale, a haunting, hesitant soliloquy interrupted by a more flowing midsection. A miniature cadenza leads to a reprise of the first section, now given a much more ornate treatment. Next is a B flat Capriccioso in 2/4 time, which Tchaikovsky originally thought to work into a symphony. The main material is quite poignant, but contrast arrives with the middle section, a jaunty Allegro vivacissimo in D minor. The sixth piece consists of a modest, expressive 16-bar theme in 3/4 time, followed by 12 variations and a coda. The first variation nudges the theme forward only slightly. The second flows more smoothly under triplets in the right hand. Variation 3 brings outright brilliance to the proceedings, intensified with the bravura staccato chords in Variation 4. The fifth variation is an amorous Andante, but the sixth brings back a staccato snap. The seventh could be the chordal outline of a hymn, while the eighth is an unexpectedly exultant waltz in D minor. Variation 9 turns the theme into a mazurka, complete with miniature cadenza. Variation 10 brings back the theme pretty much intact under florid passagework. The next variation is an exuberant Allegro brillante in the style of Schumann. Variation 12 features a tonic pedal-point in the bass all the way through (looking ahead to a technique Tchaikovsky would employ in a movement of his "Polish" Symphony). The whole thing ends with a virtuosic presto coda, driving toward a final crowd-pleasing crescendo. Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/morceaux-6-for-piano-op-19-mc0002362792 ). Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Theme & Variations" from "Six Pieces" (Op. 19 No. 6) for Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).