Sheet music

"Ode to Whiskey" for Viola & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:453 years ago1,048 views
Viola, Harp
Turlough O'Carolan (1670–1738) was a blind early Irish harper, composer and singer whose great fame is due to his gift for melodic composition. He was the last great Irish harper-composer and is considered by many to be Ireland's national composer. Harpers in the old Irish tradition were still living as late as 1792, as ten, including Arthur O'Neill, Patrick Quin and Donnchadh Ó Hámsaigh, showed up at the Belfast Harp Festival, but there is no proof of any of these being composers. Ó Hámsaigh did play some of Carolan's music but disliked it for being too modern. Some of O'Carolan's own compositions show influence from the style of continental classical music, whereas others such as Carolan's Farewell to Music reflect a much older style of "Gaelic Harping".

Though the harp is by no means peculiar to Ireland, it has been regarded from early mediaeval times as supremely the musical instrument of the Irish. But %T much of the music of the harpers is lost in the mists of antiquity. Carolan (1670-1738) was the last of the Irish harper-composers and the only one whose pieces have survived in any number. About two hundred of his pieces are extant, but they are found scattered in manuscripts and in rare (sometimes unique) printed books, often being unidentified as his. They are now gathered together here in a definitive edition. Carolan was blinded by smallpox in early youth and adopted music as a career. His genius for making melody manifested itself almost at once, and for nearly fifty years he travelled the Irish countryside, staying at the great houses and entertaining the company with his playing and singing. The great majority of his pieces were composed in honour of his patrons and in most cases he devised verses to fit the music. He was also a familiar figure in Dublin.

An Ode to Whiskey (Óid don uisce beatha) is written in the first person singular as some believe that this was an indication that Carolan was addicted to alcohol. His supporters say that Carolan's use of the first person is simply poetic license and could not apply to himself as he could never have been Ireland's greatest composer with such an addiction. Decide for yourself. "This spirited tune is attributed to Turlough O'Carolan by Dr. Douglas Hyde (Literary History of Ireland, p. 599), who characterizes it as 'one of the finest Bacchanalian songs in any language'." ...Carolan by Donal O'Sullivan, Ossian pub. 1958, Co. Cork. This poem, charactarized by Hyde as one of the finest Bachalarian tunes in any language, appears with that comment in O'Sullivan's book 2 pg 118 No 197. The English metrical translation is by John D'Alton.

English Lyrics:

Why, liquor of life, do I love you so,
When in all our encounters you lay me low?
More stupid and senseless I every day grow,
What a hint - if I'd mend by the warning.

Tattered and torn you've left my coat,
I've not a cravat - to save my throat;
Yet I pardon you all, my sparkling doat,
If you'll cheer me again in the morning.


Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Viola & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Aria: "Jesu, beuge doch mein Herze" (BWV 47 No 4) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts8 pages04:143 years ago397 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden (Whoever exalts himself, will be abased / KJV: For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased), BWV 47, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the cantata in his fourth year in Leipzig for the 17th Sunday after Trinity. It is regarded as part of his third annual cycle of cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, the admonition to keep the unity of the Spirit (Ephesians 4:1–6), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing a man with dropsy on the Sabbath (Luke 14:1–11). The poet Johann Friedrich Helbig (1680–1722) was a court poet at the ducal court of Saxe-Eisenach from 1718. He published an annual cycle of cantatas in 1720, Aufmunterung der Andacht (Encouragement of Devotion), which included this cantata. It is the only cantata text of Helbig which Bach composed. It is not known whether he knew the publishing or rather a composition of Georg Philipp Telemann, who composed several of Helbig's texts in Eisenach. The poet takes the final line from the Gospel as a starting point (movement 1) and then concentrates on the warning of pride, leading to a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is the eleventh and final stanza of the hymn "Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz", which Bach had used in 1723 in his cantata Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138.

The opening chorus is the most elaborate of the five movements. Bach used for the long ritornello music from his organ prelude in C minor (BWV 546), transposed to G minor. The oboes play a motif, rising in sequences, which becomes a vocal theme of a fugue, illustrating the haughty self-exaltation in the first half of the Gospel text. A countersubject moves in the opposite direction to illustrate the self-humiliation. The fugue is concluded by a homophonic "summary". The sequence of fugue and summary is repeated. Finally, the complete ritornello is repeated like a da capo, but with the voices additionally embedded, stating the complete text once more in homophony.

The soprano aria was originally accompanied by an obbligato organ, as was, three weeks later, the aria Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49. In a later performance of the cantata, Bach assigned the obbligato part to a violin. The da capo aria depicts humility in the first section, pride in the middle section, in rough rhythm both in the voice as in the obbligato, whereas the continuo plays the theme from the first section to unify the movement. John Eliot Gardiner describes the "harsh, stubborn broken chords" as illustrating arrogance. The only recitative, accompanied by the strings, is the central movement. Gardiner observes that Bach's "autograph score shows, for example, how he sharpened the rhythm of the word "Teufelsbrut" (devil's brood) to make its impact more abrupt and brutal." The second aria is in three parts, but without a vocal da capo. Oboe and violin are equal partners to the bass voice in a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is set for four parts in utmost humility.

The cantata in five movements is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, two violins, viola, organ obbligato and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wer_sich_selbst_erh%C3%B6het,_der_soll_ern...).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Jesu, beuge doch mein Herze" (Jesus, bow down my heart) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"An Emigrant's Daughter" for Viola & Harp

2 parts5 pages03:083 years ago720 views
Viola, Harp
"An Emigrant's Daughter" ("The Grenadier and The Lady"). This song tells the true story of the emigration of Irish ancestors. In 1842, a great-great-great grandfather with his wife and four children emigrated from Ireland. Their only daughter came during this crossing. This story is told as seen through her ​​eyes and originally with her ​​voice.

Although this work was originally written for Celtic Harp and Voice, I created this arrangement for Viola & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Aria: "Wer ein wahrer Christ will heißen" (BWV 47 No 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts7 pages08:103 years ago441 views
Flute, Harp
Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden (Whoever exalts himself, will be abased / KJV: For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased), BWV 47, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the cantata in his fourth year in Leipzig for the 17th Sunday after Trinity. It is regarded as part of his third annual cycle of cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, the admonition to keep the unity of the Spirit (Ephesians 4:1–6), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing a man with dropsy on the Sabbath (Luke 14:1–11). The poet Johann Friedrich Helbig (1680–1722) was a court poet at the ducal court of Saxe-Eisenach from 1718. He published an annual cycle of cantatas in 1720, Aufmunterung der Andacht (Encouragement of Devotion), which included this cantata. It is the only cantata text of Helbig which Bach composed. It is not known whether he knew the publishing or rather a composition of Georg Philipp Telemann, who composed several of Helbig's texts in Eisenach. The poet takes the final line from the Gospel as a starting point (movement 1) and then concentrates on the warning of pride, leading to a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is the eleventh and final stanza of the hymn "Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz", which Bach had used in 1723 in his cantata Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138.

The opening chorus is the most elaborate of the five movements. Bach used for the long ritornello music from his organ prelude in C minor (BWV 546), transposed to G minor. The oboes play a motif, rising in sequences, which becomes a vocal theme of a fugue, illustrating the haughty self-exaltation in the first half of the Gospel text. A countersubject moves in the opposite direction to illustrate the self-humiliation. The fugue is concluded by a homophonic "summary". The sequence of fugue and summary is repeated. Finally, the complete ritornello is repeated like a da capo, but with the voices additionally embedded, stating the complete text once more in homophony.

The soprano aria was originally accompanied by an obbligato organ, as was, three weeks later, the aria Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49. In a later performance of the cantata, Bach assigned the obbligato part to a violin. The da capo aria depicts humility in the first section, pride in the middle section, in rough rhythm both in the voice as in the obbligato, whereas the continuo plays the theme from the first section to unify the movement. John Eliot Gardiner describes the "harsh, stubborn broken chords" as illustrating arrogance. The only recitative, accompanied by the strings, is the central movement. Gardiner observes that Bach's "autograph score shows, for example, how he sharpened the rhythm of the word "Teufelsbrut" (devil's brood) to make its impact more abrupt and brutal." The second aria is in three parts, but without a vocal da capo. Oboe and violin are equal partners to the bass voice in a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is set for four parts in utmost humility.

The cantata in five movements is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, two violins, viola, organ obbligato and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wer_sich_selbst_erh%C3%B6het,_der_soll_erniedriget_werden,_BWV_47).

I created this arrangement of the first Aria: "Wer ein wahrer Christ will heißen" (Who wishes to be called a true Christian) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Chorus: "Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein Schmerz sei" (BWV 46 No 1) for Winds & Strings

13 parts28 pages05:133 years ago252 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe(2), English Horn, Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein Schmerz sei (Behold and see, if there be any sorrow), BWV 46, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the tenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 1 August 1723.

The cantata is part of Bach's first annual cycle of cantatas, which he began when he took up office as Thomaskantor in May 1723. The topic is based on the prescribed reading from the gospel of Luke, Jesus announcing the destruction of Jerusalem and cleansing of the Temple. The librettist is unknown. The cantata is structured in six movements: two choral movements frame a sequence of alternating recitatives and arias. The opening movement is based on a verse from the Book of Lamentations, a lament of the destructed Jerusalem, related to the announcement from the gospel. The text moves from reflecting God's wrath in the past to the situation of the contemporary Christian. The closing chorale, a stanza from Johann Matthäus Meyfart's hymn "O großer Gott von Macht", is a prayer culminating in the thought "do not repay us according to our sins".

The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, a slide trumpet, two recorders, two oboes da caccia, strings and basso continuo.[2] This is an unusually rich instrumentation for an ordinary Sunday. Bach created in the opening chorus an unusual "uncompromising" fugue for up to nine parts. The bass aria with an obbligato trumpet, depicting God's wrath compared to a thunderstorm, has been regarded as "more frightening" than any contemporary operatic 'rage' arias. The closing chorale is not the usual simple four-part setting, but includes instrumental interludes reminiscent of motifs used before.

Bach used music of the first section of the opening chorus for Qui tollis peccata mundi of his Mass in B minor. He made considerable changes when he adapted the lamenting music to depict the Lamb of God carrying the sins of the world.

As with other cantatas Bach composed in his first years in Leipzig, we do not know the identity of the librettist. It is the third in a group of ten cantatas following the same structure of biblical text (in this case from the Old Testament) – recitative – aria – recitative – aria – chorale. The ten cantatas were dedicated to the 8th to 14th and 21st to 22nd Sunday after Trinity and the second Sunday after Easter.

The words for the first movement are taken from the Book of Lamentations (Lamentations 1:12), a lament about the historic destruction of Jerusalem. The text, suitable in connection with the announcement by Jesus, is among the prescribed readings for Good Friday and has been set to music often. The text for the inner movements 2 to 5 were written by the unknown poet, who dedicated a pair of recitative and aria to the memory of the historic event, another pair to the warning that the contemporary Christian is threatened in a similar way. The final chorale is the ninth stanza of "O großer Gott von Macht" by Johann Matthäus Meyfart.

The cantata is structured in six movements and scored for three vocal soloists (alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir (SATB), a slide trumpet (Zugtrompete, Tr), mostly doubling the choir soprano, two recorders (Fl), two oboes da caccia (Oc), two violins (Vl), viola (Va) and basso continuo (Bc). This is an unusually rich instrumentation for an ordinary Sunday.[6] The title on the original parts reads: "10 post Trinit: / Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein etc. / a / 4 Voci / 1 Tromba / 2 Flauti / 2 Hautb: da Caccia / 2 Violini / Viola / con / Continuo / di Sign: / J.S.Bach".

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schauet_doch_und_sehet,_ob_irgend_ein_Schmerz_sei,_BWV_46).

I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, 2 Oboes, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, bass Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"O'Carolan's Welcome" for Viola & Harp

2 parts2 pages03:303 years ago1,710 views
Viola, Harp
Turlough O'Carolan (1670--1738) was a blind early Irish harper, composer and singer whose great fame is due to his gift for melodic composition. He was the last great Irish harper-composer and is considered by many to be Ireland's national composer. Harpers in the old Irish tradition were still living as late as 1792, as ten, including Arthur O'Neill, Patrick Quin and Donnchadh Ó Hámsaigh, showed up at the Belfast Harp Festival, but there is no proof of any of these being composers. Ó Hámsaigh did play some of Carolan's music but disliked it for being too modern. Some of O'Carolan's own compositions show influence from the style of continental classical music, whereas others such as Carolan's Farewell to Music reflect a much older style of "Gaelic Harping".

Carolan's Welcome is a traditional air composed by Turlough Carolan. It is also known by a number of different titles, including "Carden's Welcome", "O'Carolan's Welcome", and "Carolan's Air".

Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Recitative: "Der Mensch ist Kot, Stank, Asch und Erde" (BWV 47 No 3) for Horn & Strings

5 parts1 page01:073 years ago129 views
French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden (Whoever exalts himself, will be abased / KJV: For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased), BWV 47, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the cantata in his fourth year in Leipzig for the 17th Sunday after Trinity. It is regarded as part of his third annual cycle of cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, the admonition to keep the unity of the Spirit (Ephesians 4:1–6), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing a man with dropsy on the Sabbath (Luke 14:1–11). The poet Johann Friedrich Helbig (1680–1722) was a court poet at the ducal court of Saxe-Eisenach from 1718. He published an annual cycle of cantatas in 1720, Aufmunterung der Andacht (Encouragement of Devotion), which included this cantata. It is the only cantata text of Helbig which Bach composed. It is not known whether he knew the publishing or rather a composition of Georg Philipp Telemann, who composed several of Helbig's texts in Eisenach. The poet takes the final line from the Gospel as a starting point (movement 1) and then concentrates on the warning of pride, leading to a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is the eleventh and final stanza of the hymn "Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz", which Bach had used in 1723 in his cantata Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138.

The opening chorus is the most elaborate of the five movements. Bach used for the long ritornello music from his organ prelude in C minor (BWV 546), transposed to G minor. The oboes play a motif, rising in sequences, which becomes a vocal theme of a fugue, illustrating the haughty self-exaltation in the first half of the Gospel text. A countersubject moves in the opposite direction to illustrate the self-humiliation. The fugue is concluded by a homophonic "summary". The sequence of fugue and summary is repeated. Finally, the complete ritornello is repeated like a da capo, but with the voices additionally embedded, stating the complete text once more in homophony.

The soprano aria was originally accompanied by an obbligato organ, as was, three weeks later, the aria Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49. In a later performance of the cantata, Bach assigned the obbligato part to a violin. The da capo aria depicts humility in the first section, pride in the middle section, in rough rhythm both in the voice as in the obbligato, whereas the continuo plays the theme from the first section to unify the movement. John Eliot Gardiner describes the "harsh, stubborn broken chords" as illustrating arrogance. The only recitative, accompanied by the strings, is the central movement. Gardiner observes that Bach's "autograph score shows, for example, how he sharpened the rhythm of the word "Teufelsbrut" (devil's brood) to make its impact more abrupt and brutal." The second aria is in three parts, but without a vocal da capo. Oboe and violin are equal partners to the bass voice in a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is set for four parts in utmost humility.

The cantata in five movements is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, two violins, viola, organ obbligato and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wer_sich_selbst_erh%C3%B6het,_der_soll_erniedriget_werden,_BWV_47).

I created this arrangement of the first Recitative: "Der Mensch ist Kot, Stank, Asch und Erde" (Mankind is dung, filth, ashes and earth) for French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Nun hilf uns, Herr, den Dienern dein" (BWV 120 No 6) for Brass Quartet

4 parts1 page023 years ago456 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille (God, You are praised in the stillness), BWV 120, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the occasion of Ratswechsel, the inauguration of a new town council in a church service, probably in 1742. Parts of the cantata appeared in a wedding cantata (BWV 120a) and a cantata (BWV 120b) commemorating the Augsburg Confession in 1730. Bach reworked the choral second movement for the Symbolum Nicenum of his Mass in B minor.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the inauguration of the newly elected town council, which took place in a festive service at the Nikolaikirche on the Monday following St. Bartholomew's Day (24 August). A first performance in 1728 or 1729 was regarded as likely, but more recent sources such as Klaus Hofmann date it to 1742. The autographed score of that performance is preserved, with the heading "J. J. Concerto à 4 Voci. due Hautb. due Violini, Viola, 3 Trombe, Tamburi è | Continuo". Parts of the cantata appear in the wedding cantata Herr Gott, Beherrscher aller Dinge, BWV 120a and a cantata Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille, BWV 120b for the 200th anniversary of the Augsburg Confession in 1730. The latter work's music is lost, only parts of the former cantata are extant. Bach reworked the first part of the second movement Jauchzet, ihr erfreuten Stimmen for the Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum in the Symbolum Nicenum (Credo) of his Mass in B minor.

The first movement is based on Psalm 65:2. It is unusual for Bach to open a festive cantata with a solo voice, but the words "aus der Stille" (out of silence) may have prompted him to write it for alto and two oboe d'amore. The first part of the jubilant second movement, a chorus dominated by the full orchestra, was adapted for the Mass in B minor. The soprano aria with solo violin is probably based on an earlier work from Bach's time in Köthen that served as a model also for a movement of a violin sonata BWV 1019a. The tenor recitative is accompanied by strings to underline its character as a prayer for justice and future blessings. The words for the final chorale are taken from the German Te Deum "Herr Gott, dich loben wir" by Martin Luther.

The instrumentation reflects the festive occasion for which it was written: four soloists, soprano, alto, tenor and basso, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gott,_man_lobet_dich_in_der_Stille,_BWV_120).

I created this arrangement of the final Chorale "Nun hilf uns, Herr, den Dienern dein" (Now help, Lord, us Your servants) for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Euphonium).

"Hewlett's Air" for Violin, Viola & Harp

3 parts3 pages02:133 years ago1,327 views
Violin, Viola, Harp
Turlough O'Carolan, (Irish: Toirdhealbhach Ó Cearbhalláin) (1670–1738) was a blind early Irish harper, composer and singer whose great fame is due to his gift for melodic composition.

He was the last great Irish harper-composer and is considered by many to be Ireland's national composer. Harpers in the old Irish tradition were still living as late as 1792, as ten, including Arthur O'Neill, Patrick Quin and Donnchadh Ó Hámsaigh, showed up at the Belfast Harp Festival, but there is no proof of any of these being composers. Ó Hámsaigh did play some of Carolan's music but disliked it for being too modern. Some of O'Carolan's own compositions show influence from the style of continental classical music, whereas others such as Carolan's Farewell to Music reflect a much older style of "Gaelic Harping".

He was one of the last of the wandering Irish harpers and is considered by many to be the national composer. After being blinded by smallpox, Turlough was taught the harp and given a horse, then for almost fifty years, he journeyed from one end of the country to the other, composing for rich patrons and performing his tunes. One story goes that he fell asleep on a fairy rath one night to awake with all the tunes with which he would enthrall all Ireland. He even worked with styles derived from continental Baroque composers, but was of course mostly inspired by the tradition of the bardic harpists, who unfortunately are now lost to us.

Although this work was originally written for Celtic Harp, I created this arrangement for Violin, Viola & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Chorus: "Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden" (BWV 47 No 1) for Winds & Strings

10 parts26 pages06:483 years ago289 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden (Whoever exalts himself, will be abased / KJV: For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased), BWV 47, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the cantata in his fourth year in Leipzig for the 17th Sunday after Trinity. It is regarded as part of his third annual cycle of cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, the admonition to keep the unity of the Spirit (Ephesians 4:1–6), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing a man with dropsy on the Sabbath (Luke 14:1–11). The poet Johann Friedrich Helbig (1680–1722) was a court poet at the ducal court of Saxe-Eisenach from 1718. He published an annual cycle of cantatas in 1720, Aufmunterung der Andacht (Encouragement of Devotion), which included this cantata. It is the only cantata text of Helbig which Bach composed. It is not known whether he knew the publishing or rather a composition of Georg Philipp Telemann, who composed several of Helbig's texts in Eisenach. The poet takes the final line from the Gospel as a starting point (movement 1) and then concentrates on the warning of pride, leading to a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is the eleventh and final stanza of the hymn "Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz", which Bach had used in 1723 in his cantata Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138.

The opening chorus is the most elaborate of the five movements. Bach used for the long ritornello music from his organ prelude in C minor (BWV 546), transposed to G minor. The oboes play a motif, rising in sequences, which becomes a vocal theme of a fugue, illustrating the haughty self-exaltation in the first half of the Gospel text. A countersubject moves in the opposite direction to illustrate the self-humiliation. The fugue is concluded by a homophonic "summary". The sequence of fugue and summary is repeated. Finally, the complete ritornello is repeated like a da capo, but with the voices additionally embedded, stating the complete text once more in homophony.

The soprano aria was originally accompanied by an obbligato organ, as was, three weeks later, the aria Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49. In a later performance of the cantata, Bach assigned the obbligato part to a violin. The da capo aria depicts humility in the first section, pride in the middle section, in rough rhythm both in the voice as in the obbligato, whereas the continuo plays the theme from the first section to unify the movement. John Eliot Gardiner describes the "harsh, stubborn broken chords" as illustrating arrogance. The only recitative, accompanied by the strings, is the central movement. Gardiner observes that Bach's "autograph score shows, for example, how he sharpened the rhythm of the word "Teufelsbrut" (devil's brood) to make its impact more abrupt and brutal." The second aria is in three parts, but without a vocal da capo. Oboe and violin are equal partners to the bass voice in a prayer for humility. The closing chorale is set for four parts in utmost humility.

The cantata in five movements is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, two violins, viola, organ obbligato and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wer_sich_selbst_erh%C3%B6het,_der_soll_erniedriget_werden,_BWV_47).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Wer sich selbst erhöhet, der soll erniedriget werden" (Whoever exalts himself, will be abased) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Were you at the Rock?" for Viola & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:253 years ago713 views
Viola, Harp
This song speaks of Penal Days when the Mass was celebrated in secret at remote gatherings. The "Carraig" was the "Mass rock" used as a meeting-place and altar. According to native Irish "sean nos" singers, the words appear as a love song, "Were you at the Rock and did you see my Valentine?" (meaning either the priest or the Host). However, it was a code addressed to a disguised priest or congregant, so the enemy would not grasp the true meaning even if he spoke Irish. Death was the penalty for those caught at Mass. In Penal Times, a price of 30 pounds was offered for the head of a priest or hedge-school master, the same as for that of a wolf.

At first glance, "An Raibh Tú ag an gCarraig" appears to be a series of questions and answers about a young woman, but in reality it contains a coded message. A traditional air from the 1796 collection of "Ancient Irish Music" of Edward Bunting. The coded message is uncoded below.

Were you at the Mass? I was at the Mass;
Did you see the Virgin Mary? I saw the Virgin Mary
Did you take communion? I received communion,
And say the rosary? and said the rosary
Did you see the chalice? I saw the chalice,
Did you see the sacrifice of the Mass? and saw the sacrifice of the Mass
Did you practice the faith? And I practiced the faith;
Are we being persecuted as they are saying? we are not being subdued as they are saying.

Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Viola & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Aria: "Die Obrigkeit ist Gottes Gabe" (BWV 119 No 5) for String Trio

3 parts3 pages03:563 years ago544 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn (Praise the Lord, o Jerusalem), BWV 119, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the cantata during his first year in Leipzig for a service at St Nicholas Church to celebrate the change of council or Ratswechsel. Early in his career he had written at least one cantata for the equivalent service at Mühlhausen. There are five surviving cantatas for the Ratswechsel at Leipzig.

The text of the cantata consists of verses from psalms 147, 85 and 126, lines from Martin Luther's "German Te Deum" and poems by unknown writers. To suit the event for which it was written, these are all turned into hymns of thanking and praising God for Leipzig's prosperity and asking him to protect the city in the future.

Even among other festive music written by Bach, this work's scoring for four trumpets is unusual. It is characterised by a very solemn character and the attributes of courtly homage music, such as the opening chorus in the form of a French overture or fanfare-like trumpet interjections in the bass recitative. Bach created a work that in musical terms corresponds less to sacred music and more to the type of secular music for a princely court, as had been required of him during his time in office in Köthen. Only in its final two movements does Bach again use simple forms to emphasize the work's character of a church cantata, implying that earthly powers do not last, but God – the supreme ruler – is entitled to have the last word.

In addition to its dotted rhythms, the opening chorus is remarkable for the musical opposition between the trumpets and the rest of the instrumental parts. The middle section is faster, incorporating both fugal techniques and paired entries. The coda is an adaptation of the first section.

After a secco recitative, the oboes da caccia present the dotted-rhythm ritornello to introduce the tenor aria. The vocal entry is before the ritornello cadence. The following bass recitative is introduced and concluded with a fanfare-like trumpet and timpani line.

The fifth movement is an alto aria with two obbligato recorders, the only minor-mode movement. The obbligato presents high repeated notes beginning midway through the ritornello theme, which recurs as episodes and at the conclusion of the movement. The movement is, in effect, a trio sonata.

A soprano recitative precedes the second chorus, which is introduced by a long ritornello theme featuring an "imperious" trumpet melody. This theme plays four times during the da capo movement, which also includes elements of fugue. A very short yet harmonically adventurous alto recitative serves as the penultimate movement. The cantata ends "with the subtlest touches of flamboyance" in a chorale.

The cantata is scored for four soloists—soprano, alto, tenor and bass—a four-part choir, four trumpets, timpani, two recorders, three oboes, two oboes da caccia, two violins, viola, and basso continuo in 9 movements.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preise,_Jerusalem,_den_Herrn,_BWV_119).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Die Obrigkeit ist Gottes Gabe" (Authority is God's gift) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"The Old Rambler" for Viola & Harp

2 parts2 pages023 years ago1,362 views
Viola, Harp
The folk music of Ireland (also known as Irish traditional music, Irish trad, Irish folk music, and other variants) is the generic term for music that has been created in various genres in Ireland.

Historically much old-time music of the USA grew out of the music of Ireland, England and Scotland, as a result of cultural diffusion. By the 1970s Irish traditional music was again influencing music in the USA and further afield in Australia and Europe. It has occasionally been fused with rock and roll, punk rock and other genres, as in certain recordings of Horslips, Thin Lizzy, The Corrs, The Chieftains, Enya, Clannad, Riverdance, and Van Morrison.

Although this work was originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Viola & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Sonata in D Major (Opus 85 Mvt. 2) for Viola & Harp

2 parts6 pages03:163 years ago499 views
Viola, Harp
Mauro Giuseppe Sergio Pantaleo Giuliani (1781–1829) was an Italian guitarist, cellist and composer, and is considered by many to be one of the leading guitar virtuosi of the early 19th century.

This sonata was first written as work for flute and guitar in 1817. In keeping with the business practices of music of the day, Giuliani also had published a violin version. The music is very tuneful, using the kind of operatic Italian melody which Rossini was making popular. The entire sonata is nearly 20 minutes long and is a very pleasing, though hardly deep, work.

Although the guitar is more closely associated with Spain than with any other country, it was Italy which brought it into the concert hall. Paganini, the famous violin virtuoso, was an avid and very able guitarist who frequently wrote for the instrument. Mauro Giuliani was the most celebrated concert guitarist of the time. He became famous during the late days of the Classical era, and even Beethoven wrote guitar music for him. His rise to fame paralleled that of Rossini. His instrumental style occupies similar ground in the continuum between the Classical and the Romantic eras.

Although this piece was written for Guitar and Flute (or Violin), I created this arrangement for Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Aria: "Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid" (BWV 58 No 1) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts6 pages04:093 years ago427 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid (Oh God, how much heartache), BWV 58, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the Sunday after New Year's Day and presumably first performed it on 5 January 1727. He performed it again on 4 January 1733 or 3 January 1734.

The dialogue cantata was composed for the Sunday after New Year's Day, probably of 1727, but the extant version is a recomposition from the early 1730s, which changed the instrumentation and created a new third movement. The surviving continuo part of the original aria suggests a significantly different character.

The prescribed readings for the day are from the First Epistle of Peter, the suffering of Christians (1 Peter 4:12–19), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:12–23). The text of the cantata comprises the words of the hymn published by Martin Moller in 1587, in movement 1, as well as, for the chorale, poetry published by Martin Behm in the second volume (1610) of the Centuria precationum rhythmicarum. Authorship of verses 2–4 is unknown.

The chorale theme (Zahn 533a) is the melodic line of "Herr Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht II", which first appeared in Wolflein Lochamer's Lochamer-Liederbuch, printed in Nürnberg around 1455.

The structure of the piece is unusually symmetric. It opens and closes with a duet of the chorale text. Harmonically, the piece begins and ends in C major, and the central movement is in D minor. The second movement modulates from A minor to F major, while the fourth movement mirrors this motion.

The opening duet includes a ritornello of strings doubled by oboes, with a dotted-rhythm figure characteristic of a French overture. The taille and soprano perform the chorale melody, representing the Soul, while the bass acts as a vox Christi, singing an arioso. The melody is tonal but with a "very chromatic subtext". The ritornello recurs midway through the movement.

The secco bass recitative is chromatic and in two sections: the first describes a history of persecution with "striding angular phrases", while the second section emphasizes the presence of God using a gentler and smoother melodic line.

The third movement is the newer soprano aria with an obbligato solo violin. The da capo movement describes the Spirit's confidence in God. The first section includes a "motto theme" transitioning into a "hectic" violin melody. The middle section is characterized by a "muscular" soprano line and "oddly bizarre" solo violin. The first section returns modified and unheralded.

The soprano recitative, like the bass, begins by recounting persecution, but quickly becomes an arioso with a walking continuo.

The final movement is a combined chorale and aria for all parts. The soprano reprises the opening chorale melody in duple rather than the original triple time, with a responding line in the bass voice. After two phrases, the ritornello plays alone for eight measures before both voices re-enter in counterpoint to complete the chorale.

The piece is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), two oboes, taille, two violins, viola, and basso continuo and there are no choral interventions.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ach_Gott,_wie_manches_Herzeleid,_BWV_58).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Duetto Aria: "Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid" (Oh God, how much heartache) for Oboe and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Londonderry Air" for Viola & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:533 years ago993 views
Viola, Harp
Londonderry Air is an air that originated from County Londonderry in Ireland (now Northern Ireland). It is popular among the Irish diaspora and is very well known throughout the world. The tune is played as the victory anthem of Northern Ireland at the Commonwealth Games. "Danny Boy" is a popular set of lyrics to the tune.

The title of the air came from the name of County Londonderry in Ireland. The air was collected by Jane Ross of Limavady. Ross submitted the tune to music collector George Petrie, and it was then published by the Society for the Preservation and Publication of the Melodies of Ireland in the 1855 book The Ancient Music of Ireland, which Petrie edited. The tune was listed as an anonymous air, with a note attributing its collection to Jane Ross of Limavady.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Viola & Harp.

Chorale: "Amen, Amen, komm du schöne Freudenkrone" (BWV 61 No 6) for Oboe & Strings

5 parts1 page00:553 years ago334 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland (Now come, Savior of the heathens), BWV 61, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the first Sunday in Advent and first performed it on 2 December 1714.

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule.

The exact chronological order of Bach's Weimar cantatas remains uncertain. Only four bear autograph dates. BWV 61 is dated 1714 and bears the liturgical designation "am ersten Advent", the First Sunday of Advent. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Romans, "now is our salvation nearer" (Romans 13:11–14), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:1–9). The cantata text was provided by Erdmann Neumeister, who included the first stanza of Martin Luther's hymn "Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland" in the first movement, the end of the last verse of Philipp Nicolai's "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" as the closing chorale, and text from the Book of Revelation (Revelation 3:20) in the fourth movement ("Siehe, ich stehe vor der Tür und klopfe an. So jemand meine Stimme hören wird und die Tür auftun, zu dem werde ich eingehen und das Abendmahl mit ihm halten und er mit mir." – "Behold, I stand at the door and knock. Anyone that hears My voice and opens the door, to him I will enter and keep the evening meal with him and he with me."). The poet combined the ideas of Jesus' entry into Jerusalem and his promise to return with an invitation to enter the heart of the individual Christian.

Because of Bach's liturgical designation, the performance can be precisely dated to 2 December 1714. However, the opening movement relates to an earlier undatable version of the work. As Thomaskantor, director of music of the main churches of Leipzig, Bach performed the cantata again on 28 November 1723.

The first Sunday of Advent begins the liturgical year. Bach marked it by creating the opening chorus as a chorale fantasia in the style of a French overture, which follows the sequence slow – fast (fugue) – slow. In a French opera performance, the King of France would have entered during the overture; Bach greets a different king. Two of the four lines of the chorale melody are combined in the first slow section, line three is treated in the fast section, and line four in the final slow section. The melody of line 1 is first presented in the continuo, then sung by all four voices one after another, accompanied by a solemn dotted rhythm in the orchestra. Line 2 is sung by all voices together, accompanied by the orchestra. Line 3 is a fast fugato, with the instruments playing colla parte. Line 4 is set as line 2.

The recitative begins secco but continues as an arioso, with tenor and continuo imitating one another. (This more lyrical style of recitative derives from early Italian operas and cantatas, where it was known as mezz'aria – half aria.) The tenor aria is accompanied by the violins and violas in unison. It is written in the rhythm of a gigue, and the combination of voice, unison strings and continuo gives it the texture of a trio sonata. Richard Taruskin comments: "This hybridization of operatic and instrumental styles is ... standard operating procedure in Bach's cantatas." Movement 4, the quote from Revelation, is given to the bass as the vox Christi, and the knocking on the door is expressed by pizzicato chords in the strings. The response is the individual prayer of the soprano, accompanied only by the continuo, with an adagio middle section. In the closing chorale the violins add a jubilant fifth part to the four vocal parts.

Like other cantatas written in Weimar, the cantata is scored for a small ensemble consisting of soprano, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, two violins, two violas, and basso continuo. It has six movements.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_komm,_der_Heiden_Heiland,_BWV_61).

I created this arrangement for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Drum fahrt nur immer hin, ihr Eitelkeiten" (BWV 123 No 6) for Wind Quintet

5 parts1 page02:483 years ago382 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Liebster Immanuel, Herzog der Frommen (Dearest Emmanuel, duke of the pious), BWV 123, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for Epiphany and first performed it on 6 January 1725. It is based on the hymn by Ahasverus Fritsch (1679).

In the opening chorus Bach uses the beginning of the chorale melody as an instrumental motif, first in a long introduction, then as a counterpoint to the voices. The soprano sings the cantus firmus. The lower voices are set mostly in homophony with two exceptions. The text "Komme nur bald" (come soon) is rendered by many calls in the lower voices. The text of the final line is first sung by the bass on the melody of the first line, which alto and tenor imitate to the soprano singing the text on the melody of the last line, thus achieving a connection of beginning and end of the movement. The prominent woodwinds, two flutes and two oboes d'amore, and the 9/8 time create a pastoral mood.

The tenor aria, accompanied by two oboes d'amore, speaks of "harte Kreuzesreise" (harsh journey of the Cross), illustrated by a chromatic ritornello of four measures in constant modulation. Christoph Wolff terms the material "bizarre chromatic melodic figures". When the ritornello appears again at the end of the first section, it is calmer in the melodies, with the chromatic theme in the continuo, perhaps because the singer claims he is not frightened. In the middle section, thunderstorms are pictured "allegro" in "exuberant passage-work" of the voice, calming to "adagio" on "Heil und Licht", the reference to the Epiphany.

The bass aria is termed by John Eliot Gardiner, who performed the cantata on the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage in the Nikolaikirche in Leipzig, as "one of the loneliest arias Bach ever wrote". The voice is only accompanied by a single flute and a "staccato" continuo. Gardiner compares the flute to "some consoling guardian angel".

The cantata is closed by an unusual four-part chorale. The Abgesang of the bar form is repeated, the repeat marked piano. The reason is likely the text which ends "bis man mich einsten legt ins Grab hinein" (until one day I am laid in the grave). Alfred Dürr notes such soft endings also in Bach's early cantatas Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit, BWV 106 and Gott, wie dein Name, so ist auch dein Ruhm, BWV 171, but also in Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt, BWV 68.

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, two flauto traverso, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebster_Immanuel,_Herzog_der_Frommen,_BWV_123).

I created this arrangement of the Closing Chorale "Drum fahrt nur immer hin, ihr Eitelkeiten" (Therefore be gone always, you vanities) for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Ave Maria" (Opus 45) for Violin, Viola & Harp

3 parts5 pages02:503 years ago1,088 views
Violin, Viola, Harp
Little is know about the life of Laurenz Weiss (Lorenz Weiß 1810 - 1888) Austrian singing teacher, choral conductor and composer from Wein. He studied at the Conservatory of his native city. From 1831 to 1851 , he taught at the conservatory.

He composed many choral works and church music , and others involved in the teaching of singing. The religious stand out in Furore and Domine Domine, Domine noster, a duet for soprano and bass with orchestral accompaniment and an Ave Maria for soprano, cello and organ.

Although this piece was originally written for Soprano, Cello and Organ, I created this arrangement for Violin, Viola & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Chorale & Aria: "Ich hab für mir ein schwere Reis" (BWV 58 No 5) for English Horn & Strings

5 parts6 pages02:563 years ago230 views
English Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid (Oh God, how much heartache), BWV 58, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the Sunday after New Year's Day and presumably first performed it on 5 January 1727. He performed it again on 4 January 1733 or 3 January 1734.

The dialogue cantata was composed for the Sunday after New Year's Day, probably of 1727, but the extant version is a recomposition from the early 1730s, which changed the instrumentation and created a new third movement. The surviving continuo part of the original aria suggests a significantly different character.

The prescribed readings for the day are from the First Epistle of Peter, the suffering of Christians (1 Peter 4:12–19), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:12–23). The text of the cantata comprises the words of the hymn published by Martin Moller in 1587, in movement 1, as well as, for the chorale, poetry published by Martin Behm in the second volume (1610) of the Centuria precationum rhythmicarum. Authorship of verses 2–4 is unknown.

The chorale theme (Zahn 533a) is the melodic line of "Herr Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht II", which first appeared in Wolflein Lochamer's Lochamer-Liederbuch, printed in Nürnberg around 1455.

The structure of the piece is unusually symmetric. It opens and closes with a duet of the chorale text. Harmonically, the piece begins and ends in C major, and the central movement is in D minor. The second movement modulates from A minor to F major, while the fourth movement mirrors this motion.

The opening duet includes a ritornello of strings doubled by oboes, with a dotted-rhythm figure characteristic of a French overture. The taille and soprano perform the chorale melody, representing the Soul, while the bass acts as a vox Christi, singing an arioso. The melody is tonal but with a "very chromatic subtext". The ritornello recurs midway through the movement.

The secco bass recitative is chromatic and in two sections: the first describes a history of persecution with "striding angular phrases", while the second section emphasizes the presence of God using a gentler and smoother melodic line.

The third movement is the newer soprano aria with an obbligato solo violin. The da capo movement describes the Spirit's confidence in God. The first section includes a "motto theme" transitioning into a "hectic" violin melody. The middle section is characterized by a "muscular" soprano line and "oddly bizarre" solo violin. The first section returns modified and unheralded.

The soprano recitative, like the bass, begins by recounting persecution, but quickly becomes an arioso with a walking continuo.

The final movement is a combined chorale and aria for all parts. The soprano reprises the opening chorale melody in duple rather than the original triple time, with a responding line in the bass voice. After two phrases, the ritornello plays alone for eight measures before both voices re-enter in counterpoint to complete the chorale.

The piece is scored for two vocal soloists (soprano and bass), two oboes, taille, two violins, viola, and basso continuo and there are no choral interventions.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ach_Gott,_wie_manches_Herzeleid,_BWV_58).

I created this arrangement of the Closing Chorale & Aria Duetto "Ich hab für mir ein schwere Reis" (I have a difficult journey before me) for English Horn and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).