Sheet music with 2 instruments

Waltz in Ab Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 1) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts4 pages03:319 hours ago28 views
Oboe, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Albéniz's early works were mostly "salon style" music. Albéniz's first published composition, Marcha Militar, appeared in 1868. A number of works written before this are now lost. He continued composing in traditional styles ranging from Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt until the mid-1880s. He also wrote at least five zarzuelas, of which all but two are now lost.

Among these works are the "Seis Pequeños Valses" (6 Little Waltzes) for Piano Opus 25 Nos 1-6.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Waltz in Ab Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 1) for Oboe & Piano.

Divertimento in F Major (Hob XVI:9) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts4 pages06:442 days ago24 views
Flute, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Divertimento in F Major (Hob XVI:9) for Flute & Classical Guitar.

Violin Concerto in Bb Major (RV 383 Op. 4 No. 1) for Violin & Piano

2 parts13 pages08:425 days ago60 views
Violin, Piano
Although Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) had already accomplished himself as a composer of violin sonatas and of sacred music, nothing propelled his career more than his first set of concertos -- L'estro armonico (Op.3) -- which first appeared in 1711. Besides being widely popular with both musicians and audiences of the day, L'estro armonico had a significant impact on the development of the relatively new solo-concerto. The set's influence was felt all across Europe -- no less a figure than J.S. Bach transcribed six of the Op.3 concertos for keyboard.

La Stravaganza (Op. 4) appeared shortly after, in around 1713, and was dedicated to Vettor Dolfin (the surname given in its Tuscan form, Delfino), a young Venetian noble to whom Vivaldi had taught the violin. While enormously successful in it's own right, this set of twelve concertos was a complete departure from Op.3. While the influence of the Corellian concerto grosso had been significant in L'estro armonico, in La Stravaganza Vivaldi severed himself completely from past traditions. The Op.4 set is characterized by harmonic daring, passage work bordering on the bizarre, and a new, uniquely flexible, solo-concerto "form" that would become so typical of Vivaldi. The originality and variety of material is also noteworthy; each work seems to systematically refute a different aspect of the traditional concerto, and even some standards of composition at the time. All this is not without its own sense of musical humor. However, the set also demonstrates the care the composer took over the selection and grouping of works destined for publication; i.e. grouping the concertos into pairs -- one major, one minor -- with an adjustment made to ensure that the whole set ends in major.

The Op.4 concertos are the earliest examples of a theatri al conception of the solo concerto to be offered to international audiences of music lovers. This, even more than Vivaldi's daring writing for the solo violin, is the true significance of the word stravaganza in the title. Indeed, among Vivaldi's printed works, the road to the future is marked by the Stravaganza concerti rather than those of L'estro armonico. Vivaldi would never retrace his steps in the direction of Op.3, and the collections which followed Op.4 further develop the concept of the instrumental solo as outlined in Op.4.

This Concerto in B-flat for violin, 4-part strings and continuo, RV 383a, is first in the Op.4 set. As Op.4 goes, this concerto begins relatively straight-forwardly.

The first movement, Allegro, serves admirably to give La Stravaganza a lively start, but stays well with in the norms established later on in the set.

The second movement, Largo, displays some extraordinarily beautiful writing for the violin during an extended solo, which in itself is noteworthy as it was not uncommon for "slow" movements of the period to consist of little more than a few punctuating chords.

The final Allegro is, it seems, a joke on form... the "opening" tutti, though wonderfully written, is so long that it takes up a full two-thirds of the movement! By the time the violin solo finally arrives, it is as if the composer ran out of ideas -- the violin solo goes on quite a while simply playing chord progressions, never really introducing any melodic material. After an extended opening tutti and an extended violin solo, one might get the feeling as the second tutti passage arrives that this movement is going to go on for several more minutes, but here Vivaldi takes a proverbial left-turn. To extend the metaphor, he slams on the brakes with some skillfully placed diminished-seventh chords, and brings the entire concerto to a sudden, but efficient, end.

Although originally scored for Violin and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass & Continuo), I created this arrangement for Violin & Piano.

Intermezzo in A Minor (Op. 116 No. 2) for Violin & Piano

2 parts3 pages02:4110 days ago50 views
Violin, Piano
Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897) was a German composer and pianist of the Romantic period. Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria. His reputation and status as a composer are such that he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the "Three Bs" of music, a comment originally made by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow.

Until 1865, a significant percentage of Brahms' published work was for piano solo. After this time, he concentrated on vocal music, not publishing a major work for piano until the Eight Piano Pieces, Op. 76, of 1878 and the Two Rhapsodies, Op. 79, of 1879. Brahms would take another break from the piano until the composition of Opp. 116-119 in the early 1890s. Thus, works for piano open and close his career as a composer. Although the late piano works are brief, they are among the most complex, dense, and reflective works composed for the instrument.

A month before publication, the Fantasias, Op. 116, encompassed five rather than seven pieces, and Brahms suggested to his publisher that the five be printed in one volume. In the end, Brahms added two pieces to the set, which was published in two volumes. Despite the division, aspects of the works themselves create some coherence for the whole. The first and last pieces are Capriccios in D minor and Nos. 4, 5, and 6 are in E major (No. 5 begins in minor but ends in major). Furthermore, there exist thematic links, the most obvious of which occurs in the opening measures of the third and seventh pieces and at the return of the first theme in the fifteenth measure of No. 4.

The Fantasias, Op. 116, do not require the technical facility necessary to perform many of Brahms' earlier works, but an incisive musicality is paramount for a proper understanding of these musical miniatures. Composed mostly in the summer of 1892, the pieces were published that year by Simrock in Berlin. Nos. 1-3 were first performed at a concert of January 30, 1893; No. 7 received its premiere on February 18 of the same year. Contrary to his usual practice, Brahms gave the set a descriptive rather than a generic title.

A fiery work in D minor, the first Capriccio is marked Presto, and requires a technique that is nearly Lisztian. The A minor Intermezzo obscures its triple meter in its outer sections, while the central episode shifts to a clearly articulated 3/8. The third piece, a Capriccio in G minor, returns to the fiery atmosphere of the first piece. Set in the Neapolitan E flat major, the central section falls into a trio format, its quarter-note triplets creating a sense of rhythmic freedom.

The format of No. 4, an Intermezzo, is unusual, and is in part the result of Brahms' predilection for developing variation. The first half of the piece alternates between two themes (A and B), which return in varied forms. After the diminutive third variation of A, a new idea (C) begins on the dominant. The ensuing variation of A returns to the tonic, but what seems to be a typical ternary construction is thwarted by a return of "C," now on the tonic, sandwiched in the middle of the "reprise," which does not behave at all like the first half of the piece. Symmetry is the salient feature of the fifth piece, an Intermezzo. In the opening measures, the material is vertically symmetrical. The motive, at first a half-step, moves upward in the uppermost voice and downward in the lowest, a process reversed on the next beat. The chords, too, are vertically symmetrical, with the narrowest intervals at the outermost extremes. The sixth piece, again marked Intermezzo, brings to mind some of the characteristics of a courtly minuet, while the initial charge of the final D minor Capriccio halts at its more fluid central section before the return of the opening, which ends on D major

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/fantasias-7-for-piano-op-116-mc0002356207 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this Interpretation of the Intermezzo in A Minor (Op. 116 No. 2) for Violin & Piano.

Divertimento in G Major (Hob XVI:8) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts3 pages05:1517 days ago61 views
Flute, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Divertimento in G Major (Hob XVI:8) for Flute & Classical Guitar.
Waltz in Eb Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 2) for Clarinet & Piano
Custom audio

Waltz in Eb Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 2) for Clarinet & Piano

2 parts1 page01:4819 days ago104 views
Clarinet, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Albéniz's early works were mostly "salon style" music. Albéniz's first published composition, Marcha Militar, appeared in 1868. A number of works written before this are now lost. He continued composing in traditional styles ranging from Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt until the mid-1880s. He also wrote at least five zarzuelas, of which all but two are now lost.

Among these works are the "Seis Pequeños Valses" (6 Little Waltzes) for Piano Opus 25 Nos 1-6.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Waltz in Eb Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 2) for Bb Clarinet & Piano.

"Sevilla (Sevillanas)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 3) for Flute & Piano

2 parts9 pages04:0723 days ago209 views
Flute, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Isaac Albéniz’s Suite española, Op. 47, is a suite for solo piano. It is mainly composed of works written in 1886 which were grouped together in 1887, in honour of the Queen of Spain. Like many of Albeniz’s works for the piano, these pieces depict different regions and musical styles in Spain.

The work originally consisted of four pieces: Granada, Cataluña, Sevilla and Cuba. The editor Hofmeister republished the Suite española in 1912, after Albéniz's death, but added Cádiz, Asturias, Aragón and Castilla. The other pieces had been published in other editions and sometimes with different titles (Asturias was originally the prelude from the suite Chants d'Espagne).

Each of these works refers to the geographical region portrayed. From Granada in Andalusia there is a Serenata, from Catalonia a Curranda or Courante, from Sevilla a Sevillanas and from Cuba (which was still part of Spain in the 1880s) a Notturno in the style of a habanera, from Castile a seguidillas, from Aragon a Fantasia in the style of a jota, and from Cadiz a saeta. This last example, like Asturias (Leyenda), is geographically inaccurate.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Sevilla (Sevillanas)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 3) for Flute & Piano.

Waltz in A Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 3) for Violin & Piano

2 parts3 pages03:15a month ago257 views
Violin, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Albéniz's early works were mostly "salon style" music. Albéniz's first published composition, Marcha Militar, appeared in 1868. A number of works written before this are now lost. He continued composing in traditional styles ranging from Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt until the mid-1880s. He also wrote at least five zarzuelas, of which all but two are now lost.

Among these works are the "Seis Pequeños Valses" (6 Little Waltzes) for Piano Opus 25 Nos 1-6.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Waltz in A Major from "Seis Pequeños Valses" (Op. 25 No. 3) for Violin & Piano.
Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Guitar
Custom audio

Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Guitar

2 parts11 pages14:02a month ago45 views
French Horn, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in Ab Major (Hob XVI:43) for French Horn & Classical Guitar.

Sonata in G Major (Hob XVI:40) for Oboe & Guitar

2 parts6 pages09:20a month ago66 views
Oboe, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in G Major (Hob XVI:40) for Oboe & Classical Guitar.

Sonata in C Major (Hob XVI:35) for Bassoon & Guitar

2 parts9 pages13:17a month ago36 views
Bassoon, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in C Major (Hob XVI:35) for Bassoon & Classical Guitar.
Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Clarinet & Guitar
Custom audio

Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Clarinet & Guitar

2 parts10 pages14:57a month ago56 views
Clarinet, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in D Major (Hob XVI:33) for Bb Clarinet & Classical Guitar.

"Mazurka" in Bb Major (Op. 7 No. 1) for Oboe & Guitar

2 parts2 pages02:16a month ago73 views
Oboe, Guitar
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

The Op. 7 set of mazurkas is the only one containing five pieces; all the composer's other published sets consist of either three or four items each. On the whole, this set represents a step forward from the Op. 6 collection. In fact, when the Op. 7 was published in 1832, it gained Chopin both recognition and notoriety in France for bold and imaginative writing that more tradition-minded ears found revolting. The pieces range in length from about four minutes (the second piece in the set) to half a minute (the final mazurka, in C major).

The first mazurka in this set, in B flat major and sometimes known as Mazurka No. 5, is probably the best known in the group. Marked Vivace, it is a graceful, lively piece whose elegance and debonair qualities give it a somewhat aristocratic air. But in the latter half of this piece a subdued theme appears that is more earthy, more peasant-like. The main theme returns to close this attractive work.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/mazurkas-5-for-piano-op-7-ct-56-59-mc0002369508 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Mazurka" in Bb Major (Op. 7 No. 1) for Oboe & Classical Guitar.

Divertimento in C Major (Hob XVI:7) for Violin & Guitar

2 parts3 pages05a month ago75 views
Violin, Guitar
Franz Joseph Haydn is the composer who, more than any other, epitomizes the aims and achievements of the Classical era. Perhaps his most important achievement was that he developed and evolved in countless subtle ways the most influential structural principle in the history of music: his perfection of the set of expectations known as sonata form made an epochal impact. In hundreds of instrumental sonatas, string quartets, and symphonies, Haydn both broke new ground and provided durable models; indeed, he was among the creators of these fundamental genres of classical music. His influence upon later composers is immeasurable; Haydn's most illustrious pupil, Beethoven, was the direct beneficiary of the elder master's musical imagination, and Haydn's shadow lurks within (and sometimes looms over) the music of composers like Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Brahms.

Until Beethoven, the piano sonata was not composed as a vehicle for virtuoso technique -- that was the domain of the concerto -- but as entertainment for amateurs in the privacy of their homes. Many such pieces were written for students, often as something of an exercise. Haydn had a number of students for whom he composed piano sonatas, and the wide range of ability among his students accounts for the disparate levels of sophistication we find among the over 50 surviving sonatas. Some of these works have been lost because Haydn gave the manuscripts to his students without making copies.

Two numbering schemes for the sonatas are commonly used. Here, the pieces are sorted using the numbering method proposed by H. C. Robbins Landon, while the "Hob. XVI" specification refers to its index in the Hoboken catalogue.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/franz-joseph-haydn-mn0000168380 )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Divertimento in C Major (Hob XVI:7) for Violin & Classical Guitar.
"Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano
Custom audio

"Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano

2 parts5 pages03:58a month ago229 views
Violin, Piano
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Isaac Albéniz’s Suite española, Op. 47, is a suite for solo piano. It is mainly composed of works written in 1886 which were grouped together in 1887, in honour of the Queen of Spain. Like many of Albeniz’s works for the piano, these pieces depict different regions and musical styles in Spain.

The work originally consisted of four pieces: Granada, Cataluña, Sevilla and Cuba. The editor Hofmeister republished the Suite española in 1912, after Albéniz's death, but added Cádiz, Asturias, Aragón and Castilla. The other pieces had been published in other editions and sometimes with different titles (Asturias was originally the prelude from the suite Chants d'Espagne).

Each of these works refers to the geographical region portrayed. From Granada in Andalusia there is a Serenata, from Catalonia a Curranda or Courante, from Sevilla a Sevillanas and from Cuba (which was still part of Spain in the 1880s) a Notturno in the style of a habanera, from Castile a seguidillas, from Aragon a Fantasia in the style of a jota, and from Cadiz a saeta. This last example, like Asturias (Leyenda), is geographically inaccurate.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola )

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Granada (Serenade)" from the Suite "Española" (Op. 47 No. 1) for Violin & Piano.

"Prélude" from the Suite "España" (Op. 165 No. 1) for Flute & Guitar

2 parts2 pages01:35a month ago136 views
Flute, Guitar
Born in 1860, Isaac Albéniz is best known for piano music that brilliantly evokes the spirit of Spain. As a composer-virtuoso, Albéniz successfully melded together composition and performance to create a bravura style reminiscent of the music of Liszt, seasoned with Spanish folk idioms. The work that most convincingly represents this synthesis of virtuosity and tradition is the enchantingly colorful and atmospheric Iberia, a suite of 12 pieces recalling Spanish (particularly Andalusian) places and dances. Albéniz used folklore as his inspiration, but created a singular melodic style, which eventually influenced Debussy and Ravel. Believing that artistic originality and an interest in one's national musical tradition do not exclude each other, Albéniz likewise was largely the creator of the Spanish musical idiom that would be adopted and developed by Granados and de Falla.

Albéniz's popular set of six album leaves, España, is the acme of his salon piano compositions. None of the pieces is longer than approximately four minutes, and none has the technical challenges and intricate textures of his masterpiece Iberia. The rhythms, modal harmonies, and subtle dramatics of its simple lines so completely evoke Spain that anything more would be gilding the lily. Together, the six pieces could be viewed as Albéniz's take on the traditional keyboard suite, made up as it is of a prelude followed by dances with a couple of non-dance movements thrown in. The prelude is really an introduction in the sense that its opening phrases sound like a ceremonial fanfare announcement. In between these are phrases where the changing harmonies of triplets split between the hands foreshadow what's to come in the Malagueña later. The second album leaf is the famous Tango in D, Albéniz's most recognized melody, frequently transcribed for other instruments. The Malagueña places the fandango rhythm in the right hand and the melody in the left hand. The fourth piece, Serenata, alternates playful staccato phrases with more legato, song-like melodies while frequently changing harmonies color its expressions. Fifth is the Capricho Catalan, a delicate song played almost entirely in parallel thirds over a constant offbeat accompaniment. The last piece is a Basque dance in 5/8 meter, the Zortzico. It has a distinctive, dotted-rhythm device that covers the second and third beats of each measure, and often the fourth and fifth also, normally beat out on a drum.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/espa%C3%B1a-album-leaves-6-for-piano-op-165-b-37-mc0002388524 )

Although originally written for Piano, I created this interpretation of the "Prélude" from the Suite "España" (Op. 165 No. 1) for Flute & Classical Guitar.

"The Evening Bells" in F Major (No. 4) for Marimba & Piano

2 parts2 pages01:16a month ago87 views
Percussion, Piano
Enrique Granados Campiña (1867 – 1916) was born in Lleida, Spain, the son of Calixto Granados, a Spanish army captain, and Enriqueta Campiña. As a young man he studied piano in Barcelona, where his teachers included Francisco Jurnet and Joan Baptista Pujol. In 1887 he went to Paris to study. He was unable to become a student at the Paris Conservatoire, but he was able to take private lessons with a conservatoire professor, Charles-Wilfrid de Bériot, whose mother, the soprano Maria Malibran, was of Spanish ancestry. Bériot insisted on extreme refinement in tone production, which strongly influenced Granados’s own teaching of pedal technique. He also fostered Granados's abilities in improvisation.[2] Just as important were his studies with Felip Pedrell. He returned to Barcelona in 1889. His first successes were at the end of the 1890s, with the opera María del Carmen, which attracted the attention of King Alfonso XIII.

Granados wrote piano music, chamber music (a piano quintet, a piano trio, music for violin and piano), songs, zarzuelas, and an orchestral tone poem based on Dante's Divine Comedy. Many of his piano compositions have been transcribed for the classical guitar: examples include Dedicatoria, Danza No. 5, Goyescas.

His music can be divided into basically three styles or periods: (1) A romantic style including such pieces as Escenas Románticas and Escenas Poeticas. (2) A more typically nationalist, Spanish style including such pieces as Danzas Españolas (Spanish Dances), 6 Piezas sobre cantos populares españoles (Six Pieces based on popular Spanish songs). (3) The Goya (Goyesca) period, which includes the piano suite Goyescas, the opera Goyescas, various Tonadillas for voice and piano, and other works.

"Bocetos" (Sketches) are a collection of relatively little-known Granados suites composed between 1923 & 1913. Escenas románticas, Bocetos, and Cuentos de la juventud are all Granados works that have seldom been recorded in their entirety, the last set being intended as "easy pieces" for students and even booklet note writer Harris Goldsmith refers to the whole as "salon pieces.".

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Granados )

Although originally written for Piano, I created this interpretation of "The Evening Bells" (La Campana de la Tarde) in F Major (No. 4) for Marimba & Piano.
"Malagueña" from the Suite "España" (Op. 165 No. 3) for Oboe & Harp
Custom audio

"Malagueña" from the Suite "España" (Op. 165 No. 3) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:58a month ago141 views
Oboe, Harp
Born in 1860, Isaac Albéniz is best known for piano music that brilliantly evokes the spirit of Spain. As a composer-virtuoso, Albéniz successfully melded together composition and performance to create a bravura style reminiscent of the music of Liszt, seasoned with Spanish folk idioms. The work that most convincingly represents this synthesis of virtuosity and tradition is the enchantingly colorful and atmospheric Iberia, a suite of 12 pieces recalling Spanish (particularly Andalusian) places and dances. Albéniz used folklore as his inspiration, but created a singular melodic style, which eventually influenced Debussy and Ravel. Believing that artistic originality and an interest in one's national musical tradition do not exclude each other, Albéniz likewise was largely the creator of the Spanish musical idiom that would be adopted and developed by Granados and de Falla.

Albéniz's popular set of six album leaves, España, is the acme of his salon piano compositions. None of the pieces is longer than approximately four minutes, and none has the technical challenges and intricate textures of his masterpiece Iberia. The rhythms, modal harmonies, and subtle dramatics of its simple lines so completely evoke Spain that anything more would be gilding the lily. Together, the six pieces could be viewed as Albéniz's take on the traditional keyboard suite, made up as it is of a prelude followed by dances with a couple of non-dance movements thrown in. The prelude is really an introduction in the sense that its opening phrases sound like a ceremonial fanfare announcement. In between these are phrases where the changing harmonies of triplets split between the hands foreshadow what's to come in the Malagueña later. The second album leaf is the famous Tango in D, Albéniz's most recognized melody, frequently transcribed for other instruments. The Malagueña places the fandango rhythm in the right hand and the melody in the left hand. The fourth piece, Serenata, alternates playful staccato phrases with more legato, song-like melodies while frequently changing harmonies color its expressions. Fifth is the Capricho Catalan, a delicate song played almost entirely in parallel thirds over a constant offbeat accompaniment. The last piece is a Basque dance in 5/8 meter, the Zortzico. It has a distinctive, dotted-rhythm device that covers the second and third beats of each measure, and often the fourth and fifth also, normally beat out on a drum.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/espa%C3%B1a-album-leaves-6-for-piano-op-165-b-37-mc0002388524 )

Although originally written for Piano, I created this interpretation of the "Malagueña" from the Suite "España" (Op. 165 No. 3) for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Nocturne in C# Minor (Op. 27 No. 1) for Flute & Harp
Custom audio

Nocturne in C# Minor (Op. 27 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts6 pages04:37a month ago281 views
Flute, Harp
Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."

The two Nocturnes (Op. 27) and dedicated to Mme. la Comtesse d'Appony, are Chopin's third publication in the genre. Many feel these two works to be among the very best of his compositions; they are certainly two of the most powerful--and, as fate would have it, famous--nocturnes he ever penned. The composer's conception of nocturne form (and sentiment), as embodied here, is virtually unrecognizable as that which he inherited from Irish composer John Field.

The first of the pair is cast in the melancholy, brooding key of C sharp minor, and employs the typical ABA form with coda. There is a piquant (very temporary) inability to select between the minor and major third scale degrees throughout the opening gesture of the work. The arpeggiated left-hand figuration, common throughout the Nocturnes, adds perhaps more to the atmosphere, in this case morbid and intentionally grating, than does the accompaniment of any other Nocturne. The central section is of a far more overtly passionate nature, rising to climaxes of great emotional extremes (hopeful longing, bitterness and resentment). The reprise of the A section is tragic indeed; the resigned coda is of its composer's finest silk.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/nocturne-for-piano-no-7-in-c-sharp-minor-op-27-1-ct-114-mc0002404682 ).

Although originally composed for solo piano, I created this interpretation of the Nocturne in C# Minor (Op. 27 No. 1) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

François Couperin - Les Papillons

2 parts2 pages01:14a month ago47 views
Flute(2)
Flute Duet

Il existe sur ce site déjà un arrangement pour deux flûtes de cette même pièce par Mike Magatagan qui m'inspire beaucoup. Merci!