Sheet music for French Horn

"Fossils" from the "Carnival of the Animals" for Winds & Strings

13 parts7 pages01:212 years ago3,446 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Carnival of the Animals" is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

It was composed in February 1886 while Saint-Saëns was vacationing in a small Austrian village. It was originally scored for a chamber group of flute/piccolo, clarinet (B flat and C), two pianos, glass harmonica, xylophone, two violins, viola, cello and double bass, but is usually performed today with a full orchestra of strings, and with a glockenspiel substituting for the rare glass harmonica. The term for this rare 11-piece musical ensemble is a "hendectet" or an "undectet."

Saint-Saëns, apparently concerned that the piece was too frivolous and likely to harm his reputation as a serious composer, suppressed performances of it and only allowed one movement, Le cygne, to be published in his lifetime. Only small private performances were given for close friends like Franz Liszt.

Saint-Saëns did, however, include a provision which allowed the suite to be published after his death. It was first performed on 26 February 1922, and it has since become one of his most popular works. It is a favorite of music teachers and young children, along with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. In fact, it is very common to see any combination of these three works together on modern CD recordings.

Movement 12. Fossiles (Fossils)

Strings, two pianos, clarinet, and xylophone: Here, Saint-Saëns mimics his own composition, the Danse macabre, which makes heavy use of the xylophone to evoke the image of skeletons playing card games, the bones clacking together to the beat. The musical themes from Danse macabre are also quoted; the xylophone and the violin play much of the melody, alternating with the piano and clarinet. The piano part is especially difficult here - octaves that jump in quick thirds. Allusions to "Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman" (better known in the English-speaking world as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star), the French nursery rhymes "Au clair de la lune", and "J'ai du bon tabac" (the piano plays the same melody upside down), the popular anthem Partant pour la Syrie, as well as the aria Una voce poco fa from Rossini's The Barber of Seville can also be heard.


Although originally written for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet
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"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:046 years ago6,512 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, this piece has been adapted to the standard Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) configuration.

Wind Quintet (Opus 88 No. 1) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts43 pages24:285 years ago5,284 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Anton Reicha (1770 – 1836) was a Bohemian-born, later naturalized French composer of music very much in the German style. A contemporary and lifelong friend of Beethoven, he is now best remembered for his substantial early contributions to the wind quintet literature and his role as teacher of pupils including Franz Liszt and Hector Berlioz. He was also an accomplished theorist, and wrote several treatises on various aspects of composition. Some of his theoretical work dealt with experimental methods of composition, which he applied in a variety of works such as fugues and études for piano and string quartet.

Reicha was born in Prague. His town piper father died when the boy was just 10 months old, leaving him in custody of a mother who had no interest in educating him. The young composer ran away from home when only ten years old, and was subsequently raised and educated in music by his paternal uncle Josef Reicha. When they moved to Bonn, Josef secured for his nephew a place playing violin in the Hofkapelle electoral orchestra alongside the young Beethoven on viola, but for Reicha this was not enough. He studied composition secretly, against his uncle's wishes, and entered the University of Bonn in 1789. When Bonn was captured by the French in 1794 Reicha fled to Hamburg, where he made a living teaching harmony and composition and studied mathematics and philosophy. Between 1799 and 1801 he lived in Paris, trying to gain recognition as an opera composer, without success. In 1801 he moved on to Vienna, where he studied with Salieri and Albrechtsberger and produced his first important works. His life was once again affected by war in 1808, when he left Vienna when it was occupied by the French under Napoleon and returned to Paris, where he spent the rest of his life teaching composition and in 1818 was appointed professor at the Conservatoire.

Reicha's output during his Vienna years included large semi-didactic cycles of works such as 36 Fugues for piano (in a "new method of fugal writing"), L'art de varier (a set of 57 variations on an original theme), and exercises for the treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples). During the later Paris period, however, he focused his attention mostly on theory and produced a number of treatises on composition. Works of this period include 25 crucially important wind quintets which are considered the locus classicus of that genre and are his best known compositions. None of the advanced ideas he advocated in the most radical his music and writings (not used in the 25 great wind quintets), including polyrhythm, polytonality and microtonal music, were accepted or employed by nineteenth-century composers. Due to Reicha's unwillingness to have his music published (like Michael Haydn before him), he fell into obscurity soon after his death and his life and work have yet to be intensively studied.

Musically, the wind quintets represent a more conservative trend in Reicha's oeuvre when compared to his earlier work, namely the compositions of the Viennese period. Instead, Reicha was inspired by the supreme artistry of his players from the Opéra Comique to explore the technical limits of the five instruments comprising the wind quintet, with writing that combines elements from comic opera, folk tradition, military marches and fanfares with his lifelong interests in variation form and counterpoint. Technical wizardry also prevails in compositions that illustrate Reicha's theoretical treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples) of 1803, where techniques such as bitonality and polyrhythm are explored in extremely difficult sight-reading exercises. 36 fugues for piano, published in 1803, was conceived as an illustration of Reicha's neue Fugensystem, a new system for composing fugues. Reicha proposed that second entries of fugue subjects in major keys could occur in keys other than the standard dominant), to widen the possibilities for modulations and undermine the conservative tonal stability of the fugue. The fugues of the collection not only illustrate this point, but also employ a variety of extremely convoluted technical tricks such as polyrhythm (no. 30), combined (nos. 24, 28), asymmetrical (no. 20) and simply uncommon (no. 10 is in 12/4, no. 12 in 2/8) meters and time signatures, some of which are derived from folk music, an approach that directly anticipates that of later composers such as Béla Bartók. No. 13 is a modal fugue played on white keys only, in which cadences are possible on all but the 7th degree of the scale without further alteration. Six fugues employ two subjects, one has three, and No. 15 six. In several of the fugues, Reicha established a link with the old tradition by using subjects by Haydn (no. 3), Bach (no. 5), Mozart (no. 7), Scarlatti (no. 9), Frescobaldi (no. 14) and Handel (no. 15). Many of the technical accomplishments are unique to fugue literature.

Although originally written for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in C, Horn in E & Bassoon I created this arrangement forWoodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Silver Bells" for English Handbells, Horn & Piano

4 parts3 pages01:443 years ago5,247 views
Percussion(2), French Horn, Piano
"Silver Bells" is a classic Christmas song, composed by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. It was first performed by Bob Hope and Marilyn Maxwell in the motion picture The Lemon Drop Kid, filmed in July–August 1950 and released in March 1951. The first recorded version was by Bing Crosby and Carol Richards, released by Decca Records in October 1950. After the Crosby and Richards recording became popular, Hope and Maxwell were called back in late 1950 to refilm a more elaborate production of the song.

"Silver Bells" started out as the questionable "Tinkle Bells." Said Ray Evans, "We never thought that tinkle had a double meaning until Jay went home and his first wife said, 'Are you out of your mind? Do you know what the word tinkle is?'" This song's inspiration has conflicting reports. Several periodicals and interviews cite the writer Jay Livingston stating that the song inspiration came from by the bells used by Santa Clauses and Salvation Army people on New York City street corners. However, an interview with co-writer Ray Evans to NPR said that the song was inspired by a bell that sat on Ray and Jay's shared office desk.

In the original version the lyrics were "Hear the snow crunch, see the kids bunch, this is Santa's big day" but was later changed to "Here the snow crunch, see the kids bunch, this is Santa's big scene".

I created this unusual arrangement to a friend & Music Teacher for an upcoming performance utilizing students with English Handbells, French Horn & Piano.

"March of the Grenadier Guards" (HWV 20) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages02:145 years ago4,356 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
George Frideric Handel (1685 – 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Scipione was the eighth of the full-length operas Handel composed for the Royal Academy of Music, the London promoters of Italian opera at the King's Theatre. Even for a composer famed for the speed with which he composed, it was written in considerable haste. According to Handel's librettist, Paolo Antonio Rolli, it was composed in only three weeks, with Handel completing the score just ten days before the opening night, March 12, 1726. Handel had good reason to be in such a hurry. It had been his intention to open the season with Alessandro, composed as a showpiece to display the talents of three of the greatest singers of the day, the castrato Senesino, and the rival sopranos, Francesca Cuzzoni and Faustina Bordoni, newly engaged by the Royal Academy. When it became obvious Bordoni would not arrive in England in time, Handel, obviously feeling he needed a new opera with which to open the season, turned to Scipione.

Rolli's text, cast in the usual three acts, is based on an earlier libretto by Antonio Salvi, Publio Cornelio Scipione (1704). In keeping with many of the operas Handel composed during this period, the plot has a historical context, in this instance the capture of the Spanish port of Cartagena by the young Roman general Publius Cornelius Scipio in 209 B.C. The opera opens with the famous March that accompanies Scipio's triumphant entry into the city, but the subsequent plot is centered around his love for Berenice (soprano), a captured princess. Berenice, however is already betrothed to the prince Luceius (a role taken by Senesino in the first performances), who disguises himself as a Roman in a vain attempt to rescue her. After much misunderstanding and imbroglio, Luceius is revealed as Berenice's lover. Scipio, true to the magnanimous character of opera seria heroes, renounces his claim to Berenice. Most commentators agree that Scipione shows signs of the haste with which it was written, the Handel authority Winton Dean suggesting that, with the exception of Floridante of 1721, it is the weakest of all his Royal Academy operas. Nevertheless, it contains some fine music particularly in Act II, where the drama reaches a peak in the confrontation between Scipio and Luceius, and Berenice's avowal of constancy articulated in her aria "Scoglio d'immota fronte." The scoring is lightweight, largely being restricted to strings with a pair of flutes included in one aria and two recorders in another. Although the opera achieved a respectable initial run of 13 performances, it was revived by Handel only once, in 1730, when the composer made extensive alterations.

Although originally written for Brass, Woodwinds & Strings, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra

11 parts10 pages02:05a year ago3,993 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is a dance for a ballerina. It is the third movement in The Nutcracker pas de deux. This pas de deux is from Act 2 of the 1892 ballet The Nutcracker. It is danced by the principal female dancer. The number was choreographed by Lev Ivanov to music written by Tchaikovsky.

Choreographer Marius Petipa wanted the Sugar Plum Fairy's music to sound like "drops of water shooting from a fountain". Tchaikovsky found the ideal instrument to do this job in Paris in 1891. It was then that he came across the recently invented celesta. This instrument looked like a piano. It sounded like bells. Tchaikovsky wrote, "[The celesta is] midway between a tiny piano and a Glockenspiel, with a divinely wonderful sound." He wanted to use the celesta in The Nutcracker. He asked his publisher to buy one. He wanted to keep the purchase a secret. He did not want other Russian composers to "get wind of it and ... use it for unusual effects before me."

Tchaikovsky introduced the celesta to Russian music lovers on 19 March 1892 when the Nutcracker Suite was performed for the Russian Musical Society in St. Petersburg. The instrument is forever identified with the Sugar Plum Fairy. It is heard in other parts of Act 2 of The Nutcracker besides the Sugar Plum Fairy's dance. The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is one of the ballet's best known musical numbers. It is often "jazzed up" for television commercials at Christmas time.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Celesta, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Small Orchestra
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"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Small Orchestra

11 parts11 pages03:154 years ago3,743 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Violin, Piano(5)
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is a Christmas carol that first appeared in 1739 in the collection Hymns and Sacred Poems, having been written by Charles Wesley. A somber man, Wesley had requested and received slow and solemn music for his lyrics, not the joyful tune expected today. Moreover, Wesley's original opening couplet is "Hark! how all the welkin rings / Glory to the King of Kings".

The popular version is the result of alterations by various hands, notably by Wesley's co-worker George Whitefield who changed the opening couplet to the familiar one, and by Felix Mendelssohn. A hundred years after the publication of Hymns and Sacred Poems, in 1840, Mendelssohn composed a cantata to commemorate Johann Gutenberg's invention of the printing press, and it is music from this cantata, adapted by the English musician William H. Cummings to fit the lyrics of “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”, that propels the carol known today.

In 1855, English musician William H. Cummings adapted Felix Mendelssohn's secular music from Festgesang to fit the lyrics of "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" written by Charles Wesley. Wesley envisioned the song being sung to the same tune as his song "Christ the Lord Is Risen Today", and in some hymnals that tune is included for "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" along with the more popular Mendelssohn-Cummings tune.

At the request of a follower, I created this arrangement of my earlier arrangement (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/26687) for a Modern Small (school) Orchestra (Bb Trumpets, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Trombones, F Tuba, 2 Violins, Violas, Cellos & Basses).

The Trumpet Shall Sound (From Handel's "Messiah Oratorio" HWV 56, Part III, Scenes I and II)

14 parts51 pages05:472 years ago592 views
Voice, Trumpet(2), French Horn(2), Flute(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tuba
All credit for writing "The Trumpet Shall Sound" goes to my friend, Mike Magatagan [GO CHECK HIS ACCOUNT OUT! musescore.com/mike_magatagan]. I arranged the pitch and the Intro [Behold, I Shew You A Mysery].

"Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:14a year ago3,532 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harp
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Harp, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra
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Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:224 years ago3,353 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory to God in the Highest), BWV 191, is a church cantata written by the German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, and the only one of his church cantatas set to a Latin text. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig probably in 1745 to celebrate the end of the Second Silesian War on Christmas Day. The composition's three movements all derive from the Gloria of an earlier Missa written by Bach in 1733, which the composer would later use as the Gloria of his Mass in B minor.

Gloria in excelsis Deo was written in Leipzig for Christmas Day, as indicated by the heading on the manuscript in Bach's own handwriting, "J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti." (Jesu Juva Festo Nativitatis Christi -- Celebration for the birth of Christ), to be sung around the sermon. Recent archival and manuscript evidence suggest the cantata was first performed not in 1743, but in 1745 at a special Christmas Day service to celebrate the Peace of Dresden, which brought to an end the hardships imposed on the region by the Second Silesian War.

Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Unlike Bach's other church cantatas, the words are not in German, taken from the bible, a chorale or contemporary poetry, but in Latin, taken from the Gloria and the Doxology. This late work is the only Latin cantata among around 200 surviving sacred cantatas in German. It is based on an earlier composition, the Missa in B minor (Kyrie and Gloria) which Bach had composed in 1733 and that would, in 1748, become part of his monumental Mass in B minor. The first movement (Gloria) is an almost identical copy of the earlier work, while the second and third movements are close parodies. Parts, for instance, of the fugal section of Sicut erat in principio, taken from the Cum sancto spiritu of the 1733 setting, are moved from a purely vocal to an instrumentally accompanied setting. The modifications Bach made to the last two movements of BWV 191, however, were not carried over into the final manuscript compilation of the Mass in B minor, leaving it a matter of speculation whether or not these constitute "improvements" to Bach's original score.

The cantata bears the heading ::J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti. Gloria in excelsis Deo. à 5 Voci. 3 Trombe Tymp. 2 Trav 2 Hautb. 2 Violini Viola e Cont. Di J.S.B. in Bach's own handwriting. The cantata is festively scored for soprano and tenor soloists and an unusual five-part choir (with a dual soprano part), three trumpets, timpani, two flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Mass in B minor structure#Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_in_excelsis_Deo,_BWV_191).

I created this arrangement of the opening Coro: "Gloria in excelsis Deo. Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis" (Glory to God in the highest, and peace on earth to men of good will) for Small orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Double Basses).

"Trumpet Tune & March" in C Major for Brass Quartet

4 parts2 pages025 years ago3,188 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674–1707) was an English baroque composer, organist and, pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark's March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes's Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke's piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has featured in royal weddings.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell), was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Although originally written for Pipe Organ, I Arranged this piece for Brass Quartet (2 Bb Trumpets, French Horn & Tuba).

"Morning Mood" from Peer Gynt (Suite No. 1 Opus 46) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages04:27a year ago3,124 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness.

Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly.

Grieg opens the first Peer Gynt suite with a piece called "Morning Mood", originally played at the beginning of the fourth act. A gentle E major theme is announced by the flutes, and then the oboes, against a static harmonic background that effectively emulates the stillness of the first moments of dawn. This lovely melody--an inverted arch shape--is taken through a sparkling palette of subtle harmonic inflections; bright flute trills join the musical mixture as "Morning Mood" comes to a gentle close. Although "Morning Mood" is only four minutes long, Grieg manages to capture in music something both timeless and universal.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Morning Mood" for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, F Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet
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"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet

5 parts8 pages04:266 years ago2,985 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Charles Gounod was born in Paris, the son of a pianist mother and an artist father. His mother was his first piano teacher. Under her tutelage, Gounod first showed his musical talents. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Fromental Halévy and Pierre Zimmermann.

Gounod wrote "Funeral march of a marionette" as a light-hearted piece of musical grotesquerie, a mock funeral procession with a jaunty beat and a carefree tune over a humorously not-slow-enough funeral march. The music in the beginning is supposed to tell the listener that two of the members of the Marionette troupe have had a duel and one of them has been killed. A party of pallbearers is organized and the procession sets out for the cemetery in march time. The music soon takes on a more cheerful spirit, for some of the troupe, wearied with the march, seek consolation at a wayside inn, where they refresh themselves and also descant upon the many virtues of their late companion. At last they get into place again and the procession enters the cemetery to the march rhythm -- the whole closing with the bars intended to reflect upon the briefness and weariness of life, even for marionettes.

The "Funeral March of a Marionette", received a new and unexpected lease of life from 1955 when it was first used as the theme for the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. The "Funeral March of a Marionette," slight as it is, has never lost its charm. It was originally written as one of the movements of a Suite Burlesque, which was never completed.

Although originally written for Piano, this arrangement was created for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Alla Hornpipe" (HWV 349 No. 12) for Wind Ensemble

8 parts6 pages03:276 years ago2,844 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet(2), Bassoon
The Water Music is a collection of orchestral movements, often considered three suites, composed by George Frideric Handel. It premiered on 17 July 1717 after King George I had requested a concert on the River Thames. The concert was performed by 50 musicians playing on a barge near the royal barge from which the King listened with close friends, including Anne Vaughan, the Duchess of Bolton, the Duchess of Newcastle, Countess of Darlington, the Countess of Godolphin, Madam Kilmarnock, and the Earl of Orkney. The barges, heading for Chelsea or Lambeth and leaving the party after midnight, used the tides of the river. George I was said to have enjoyed the suites so much that he made the exhausted musicians play them three times over the course of the outing.

The triple-time hornpipe dance rhythm was often used by composers in England in the Baroque period. It is probably artificial to draw too rigid a distinction between the popular and art-music examples. Many country dance examples are found in The Dancing Master, such as "The Hole in the Wall", by Purcell, and there are also extant theatrical choreographies that use steps from French court ballet, but which characteristically have step-units going across the measure. Henry Purcell and George Frideric Handel composed hornpipes, and Handel occasionally gave "alla hornpipe" as a tempo indication (see Handel's Water Music). Today, the most well-known baroque hornpipe tune is probably Purcell's "Hornpipe Rondeau" from the incidental music to Abdelazer (which was used by Benjamin Britten as the theme for his Young Person's Guide To The Orchestra) or the 'Alla Hornpipe' movement from the D major of Handel's Water Music suites. Hornpipes are occasionally found in German music of this period.

Although this piece was originally written for Orchestra, I arranged it for Wind Ensemble (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, C Trumpet, Bass Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Music for the Young" for Wind Quintet

5 parts21 pages10:065 years ago2,809 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 – 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time, and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1865. The formal Western-oriented teaching he received there set him apart from composers of the contemporary nationalist movement embodied by the Russian composers of The Five, with whom his professional relationship was mixed. Tchaikovsky's training set him on a path to reconcile what he had learned with the native musical practices to which he had been exposed from childhood. From this reconciliation, he forged a personal but unmistakably Russian style—a task that did not prove easy. The principles that governed melody, harmony and other fundamentals of Russian music ran completely counter to those that governed Western European music; this seemed to defeat the potential for using Russian music in large-scale Western composition or from forming a composite style, and it caused personal antipathies that dented Tchaikovsky's self-confidence. Russian culture exhibited a split personality, with its native and adopted elements having drifted apart increasingly since the time of Peter the Great, and this resulted in uncertainty among the intelligentsia of the country's national identity.

Tchaikovsky's Album for the Young (Opus 39) is a collection of 24 short songs that vary in meter, tempo, style, and harmonic structure.Inspired by Robert Schumann's children's works like Kinderszenen and Album fur die Jugend, Tchaikovsky, dissatisfied with the quality of children's music and lack thereof, composed these piano works in 1878, hoping to improve piano literature for children. These pieces are very much adult-like. Tchaikovsky masterfully demonstrates an adult understanding of childhood adolescence and innocence. Though these scores were dedicated to his seven year old nephew, Vladimir Davidoff, these pieces are certainly not for beginners.

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, this arrangement fetures ten (10) pieces for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 Nos. 4&5) for Small Orchestra

11 parts21 pages06:055 years ago2,725 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Strings(5)
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (Glory to God in the highest) for Small Orchestra (Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Bassoon, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Tollite Hostias" (Opus 12 No. 10) for Small Orchestra

10 parts5 pages02:075 years ago2,718 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(5)
Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns (1835 – 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor, and pianist of the Romantic era. He is known especially for The Carnival of the Animals, Danse macabre, Samson and Delilah (Opera), Piano Concerto No. 2, Cello Concerto No. 1, Havanaise, Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, and his Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony).

Saint-Saëns' Oratorio de Noël is a solid presentation of an extremely appealing work. Scored for five soloists, chorus, strings, harp, and organ, the oratorio lies within the capabilities of good church and community choirs, and could easily find a place in the repertoires of groups looking for an alternative to Messiah to celebrate the Christmas season. It's warmly, but not gushily Romantic, with gratifying vocal and choral writing, and both harmonic and contrapuntal richness and variety. Much of it resembles what Mendelssohn might have sounded like had he lived long enough to adopt a late-Romantic idiom. Several of the movements are strongly memorable, particularly the Prelude and Consurge, Filia Sion (with their nods to Bach's Weinachtsoratorium), the duet, Benedictus, and the trio Tecum principium. One of the standouts of this performance is the organ of Hans-Joachim Bartsch, whose sensitive playing and colorful choice of registration is especially striking. The choral singing and orchestral playing of Bachchor and Bachorchester Mainz, conducted by Diethard Hellmann is top notch -- full and warmly nuanced. Sopranos Verena Schweizer, Edith Wiens, alto Helena Jungwirth, and tenor Friedrich Melzer sing beautifully, but bass Kurt Widmer is a little hooty. The sound is adequate, but is sometimes slightly distant. With a running time of less than 40 minutes, the CD could have used some filling out, perhaps with a few of the composer's many excellent liturgical choral works.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra: String Ensemble (Violins (2), Viola, Cello & Bass), French Horn & Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, & Bassoon).
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra
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"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra

11 parts15 pages02:27a year ago2,717 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Piano
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" (Norwegian: I Dovregubbens hall) is a piece of orchestral music composed by Edvard Grieg in 1875 as incidental music for the sixth scene of act 2 in Henrik Ibsen's 1867 play Peer Gynt. It was originally part of Opus 23 but was later extracted as the final piece of Peer Gynt, Suite No. 1, Op. 46. Its easily recognizable theme has helped it attain iconic status in popular culture, where it has been arranged by many artists (See Grieg's music in popular culture).

The English translation of the name is not literal. Dovre is a mountainous region in Norway, and "gubbe" translates into (old) man or husband. "Gubbe" is used along with its female counterpart "kjerring" to differentiate male and female trolls, "trollgubbe" and "trollkjerring". In the play, Dovregubben is a troll king that Peer Gynt invents in a fantasy.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Hall_of_the_Mountain_King).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Piano, Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"The Trumpet Shall Sound" (HWV 56 No. 48) for Trumpet, Horn & Strings

6 parts9 pages08:384 years ago2,572 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Strings(4)
Messiah (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

The work begins quietly, with instrumental and solo movements preceding the first appearance of the chorus, whose entry in the low alto register is muted. A particular aspect of Handel's restraint is his limited use of trumpets throughout the work. After their introduction in the Part I chorus "Glory to God", apart from the solo in "The trumpet shall sound" they are heard only in "Hallelujah" and the final chorus "Worthy is the Lamb".

Handel wrote "The trumpet shall sound" as the final Bass Aria for Part III Scene II (No. 48). Although written for Trumpets, Chorus (SATB), Bass Soloist and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Bb Trumpet, French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra

13 parts17 pages02:33a year ago2,550 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work..

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).