Sheet music for Piccolo

Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings
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Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings

7 parts33 pages10:186 years ago11,793 views
Piccolo, Strings(5), Harpsichord
Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) started playing the violin in his early years. He started studying to become a priest when he was 15 and was ordained in 1703 at the age of 25. In September 1703 Vivaldi became a violin teacher at an orphanage where he started writing concertos and sacred vocal music for the oprhans. Later on he became responsible for all the musical activity of the institution. Around 1717 Vivaldi was offered a new position as Maestro di Cappella (in charge of music in a chapel) of the governor of Mantua. During this period Vivaldi wrote his famous four violin concertos the Four seasons.

Antonio Vivaldi's concertos cut a revolutionary swath through the more fustian rituals of high Baroque music in much the way that minimalism gutted academic serialism 250 years later. They standardized the fast-slow-fast movement scheme that has survived as the classic concerto pattern, and developed the ritornello form (in which a refrain for the ensemble alternates with free episodes for the soloist), using it as a vehicle for thematic integration and elaboration. Vivaldi's 500-plus concertos were athletic entertainments that swept continental Europe, influencing not only younger composers, but causing a wave of stylistic conversion in older ones.

Vivaldi wrote this "Concerto per Flautino" sometime between 1728 and 1729 and although there is not a reliable evidence that the frontispiece information "Concerto per Flautino" means the sopranino recorder (in 'F') as a soloist. The Italian term flautino means simply a "small flute". There is however, a written instruction "Gl'istromti trasportati alla 4a" ("The instruments transposed a fourth"), witch corroborate which the conjecture that this concert was written for a soprano recorder (in 'C'), the standard transposition for recorder in 18th century, where the recorder player needs to read the recorder part like playing with an alto recorder in 'F'.

This arrangement was created for solo Piccolo and String Ensemble (Violins, Viola, Cello & String Bass).

"Fossils" from the "Carnival of the Animals" for Winds & Strings

13 parts7 pages01:212 years ago3,452 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Carnival of the Animals" is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

It was composed in February 1886 while Saint-Saëns was vacationing in a small Austrian village. It was originally scored for a chamber group of flute/piccolo, clarinet (B flat and C), two pianos, glass harmonica, xylophone, two violins, viola, cello and double bass, but is usually performed today with a full orchestra of strings, and with a glockenspiel substituting for the rare glass harmonica. The term for this rare 11-piece musical ensemble is a "hendectet" or an "undectet."

Saint-Saëns, apparently concerned that the piece was too frivolous and likely to harm his reputation as a serious composer, suppressed performances of it and only allowed one movement, Le cygne, to be published in his lifetime. Only small private performances were given for close friends like Franz Liszt.

Saint-Saëns did, however, include a provision which allowed the suite to be published after his death. It was first performed on 26 February 1922, and it has since become one of his most popular works. It is a favorite of music teachers and young children, along with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. In fact, it is very common to see any combination of these three works together on modern CD recordings.

Movement 12. Fossiles (Fossils)

Strings, two pianos, clarinet, and xylophone: Here, Saint-Saëns mimics his own composition, the Danse macabre, which makes heavy use of the xylophone to evoke the image of skeletons playing card games, the bones clacking together to the beat. The musical themes from Danse macabre are also quoted; the xylophone and the violin play much of the melody, alternating with the piano and clarinet. The piano part is especially difficult here - octaves that jump in quick thirds. Allusions to "Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman" (better known in the English-speaking world as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star), the French nursery rhymes "Au clair de la lune", and "J'ai du bon tabac" (the piano plays the same melody upside down), the popular anthem Partant pour la Syrie, as well as the aria Una voce poco fa from Rossini's The Barber of Seville can also be heard.


Although originally written for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:14a year ago3,533 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harp
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Harp, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Morning Mood" from Peer Gynt (Suite No. 1 Opus 46) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages04:27a year ago3,135 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness.

Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly.

Grieg opens the first Peer Gynt suite with a piece called "Morning Mood", originally played at the beginning of the fourth act. A gentle E major theme is announced by the flutes, and then the oboes, against a static harmonic background that effectively emulates the stillness of the first moments of dawn. This lovely melody--an inverted arch shape--is taken through a sparkling palette of subtle harmonic inflections; bright flute trills join the musical mixture as "Morning Mood" comes to a gentle close. Although "Morning Mood" is only four minutes long, Grieg manages to capture in music something both timeless and universal.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Morning Mood" for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, F Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"King of the Pipers" for Piccolo

1 part4 pages02:566 years ago2,156 views
Piccolo
The "King of the Pipers" is a traditional Irish Jig of unknown origin. Although usually associated with the bagpipes, it is not actually played much at all on the Uilleann pipes (traditional bagpip[es of Ireland). The tune is strongly associated with the fiddle playing of Donegal and is annotated in "the Northern Fiddler" an out of print classic which collects the tunes of well known fiddlers from that county.

The Jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound meter, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th century England, and was quickly adopted on the Continent where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga). Today it is most associated with Irish dance music and Scottish country dance music. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Although originally written for uilleann pipes, I created this arrangement for solo Piccolo.
"Miniature Overture" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 1) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

"Miniature Overture" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 1) for Small Orchestra

10 parts23 pages03:15a year ago1,470 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work..

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Miniature Overture" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 1) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboe, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Triangle, Violins & Violas).
"Bravade" for Solo Piccolo
Video

"Bravade" for Solo Piccolo

1 part1 page02:435 years ago1,441 views
Piccolo
Jacob van Eyck (c1590-1657) - the 'Orpheus of Utrecht' was a blind bell-tuner and carillonneur, who was also an excellent recorder player. He was actually a paid busker who would serenade strollers in a Utrecht churchyard. His two-volume collection 'Der Fluiten-Lusthof' (the Flute's Garden of Delight) contains many sets of variations on popular secular and sacred tunes.

Although this piece was written for flute (probably recorder), I transcribed this piece for solo Piccolo.
"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra

12 parts8 pages01:05a year ago1,389 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra (Piccolos, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Glockenspiel, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

The Sabre Dance (from the ballet 'Gayane') for Winds & Strings

9 parts21 pages02:31a year ago1,050 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Sabre Dance" (Armenian: Սուսերով Պար) is a movement in the final act of the ballet Gayane, written by Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian and completed in 1942. It evokes a whirling war dance in an Armenian dance, where the dancers display their skill with sabres. Its middle section incorporates an Armenian folk song from Gyumri.

Due to its exceptionally exciting rhythm, the "Sabre Dance" established a place for itself in common concert practice, leading also to various adaptations in popular music. Its recognizable ostinato and popular melodies have made it a popular concert band piece.

Although other arrangements exist (most noteably the György Cziffra from Gayane), I wanted to remain true to the original orchestral score and as such, I created this arrangement of the "Sabre Dance" movement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe & French Horn) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

I believe the original work is copyright and claim fair use for this arrangement because (1) the selected instrumentation would not readily allow it to be used as a substitute for the original commercial orchestral score or recording, (2) it is not replaceable with an uncopyrighted or freely copyrighted sample of comparable educational value and (3) I believe that this arrangement will not affect the value of the original work or limit the copyright holder's rights or ability to distribute the original orchestral score or recording. If you are the copyright holder of the original orchestral score and you feel that this arrangement does not fall under "fair use", please contact me with information on how to proceed.

"Domine, ego Credidi" (Opus 12 No. 4) for Wind Ensemble

7 parts2 pages03:035 years ago1,005 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon
Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction.

Saint-Saëns' Oratorio de Noël is a solid composition of an extremely appealing work. Scored for five soloists, chorus, strings, harp, and organ, the oratorio lies within the capabilities of good church and community choirs, and could easily find a place in the repertoires of groups looking for an alternative to Messiah to celebrate the Christmas season. It's warmly, but not gushily Romantic, with gratifying vocal and choral writing, and both harmonic and contrapuntal richness and variety. Much of it resembles what Mendelssohn might have sounded like had he lived long enough to adopt a late-Romantic idiom. Several of the movements are strongly memorable, particularly the Prelude and Consurge, Filia Sion (with their nods to Bach's Weinachtsoratorium), the duet, Benedictus, and the trio Tecum principium. One of the standouts of this performance is the organ of Hans-Joachim Bartsch, whose sensitive playing and colorful choice of registration is especially striking.

Although originally written for Chorus (SATB) and Orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Domine, ego Credidi" from Oratorio de Noël (Opus 12 No. 4) for Wind Ensemble (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).
Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra

18 parts15 pages06:299 months ago993 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England.

The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums.

Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major.

The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400).

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Magnificat Anima Mea" (BWV 243 No. 1) for Wind Ensemble

17 parts18 pages03:135 years ago945 views
Trumpet(3), Piccolo, Flute(3), Oboe(2), Clarinet(4), French Horn, Bassoon(2), Timpani
Johann Sebastian Bach's Magnificat is a musical setting of the biblical canticle Magnificat. It is scored for five vocal parts (two sopranos, alto, tenor and bass), and a Baroque orchestra including trumpets and timpani. It is the first major liturgical composition on a Latin text by Bach.

In 1723, after taking up his post as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, Bach set the text of the Magnificat in a twelve movement composition in the key of E-flat major. For a performance at Christmas he inserted four hymns (laudes) related to that feast. This version, including the Christmas interpolations, was given the number BWV 243a in the catalogue of Bach's works.

For the feast of Visitation of 1733, Bach produced a new version of his Latin Magnificat, without the Christmas hymns: instrumentation of some movements was altered or expanded, and the key changed from E-flat major to D major, for performance reasons of the trumpet parts. This version of Bach's Magnificat is known as BWV 243. After publication of both versions in the 19th century, the second became the standard for performance. It is one of Bach's most popular vocal works.

Bach's Magnificat consists of eleven movements for the text of Luke 1:46–55, concluded by a twelfth doxology movement. Each verse of the canticle is assigned to one movement, except verse 48 (the third verse of the Magnificat) which begins with a soprano solo in the third movement and is concluded by the chorus in the fourth movement. The traditional division of the Magnificat, as used by composers since the late Middle Ages, was in 12 verses: it differs from Bach's 12 movements in that Luke's verse 48 is one verse in the traditional division, while the doxology is divided in two verses.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnificat_%28Bach%29).

I created this arrangement of the Magnificat anima mea Dominum (My spirit gives great praise to the Lord) for Wind Ensemble (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, 3 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 3 Bb Clarinets, Bass Clarinet, French Horn, 2 Bassoons & Timpani) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Herr Jesu Christ, wahr’ Mensch und Gott" (BWV 127 No 1) for Small Orchestra

13 parts31 pages05:214 years ago883 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Trumpet(2), Trombone, French Horn, Tuba, Strings(4)
Herr Jesu Christ, wahr' Mensch und Gott (Lord Jesus Christ, true Man and God), BWV 127, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the Sunday Estomihi, the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, and first performed it on 11 February 1725. It is based on the chorale in eight stanzas by Paul Eber (1562).

Bach wrote the chorale cantata in his second year in Leipzig for Estomihi. The Sunday, also called Quinquagesima, is the last Sunday before Lent, when Leipzig observed tempus clausum and no cantatas were performed. In 1723, Bach had probably performed two cantatas in Leipzig on that Sunday, Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn, BWV 23, composed earlier in Köthen, and Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe, BWV 22, both audition pieces to apply for the post of Thomaskantor in Leipzig.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were taken from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, "praise of love" (1 Corinthians 13:1–13), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing the blind near Jericho (Luke 18:31–43). The Gospel also announces the Passion. The text is based on the funeral song in eight stanzas by Paul Eber (1562). The hymn suites the Gospel, stressing the Passion as well as the request of the blind man in the final line of the first stanza: "Du wollst mir Sünder gnädig sein" (Be merciful to me, a sinner). The song further sees Jesus' path to Jerusalem as a model for the believer's path to his end in salvation. An unknown librettist kept the first and the last stanza and paraphrased the inner stanzas in a sequence of recitatives and arias. Stanzas 2 and 3 were transformed to a recitative, stanza 4 to an aria, stanza 5 to a recitative, stanzas 6 and 7 to another aria.

Bach first performed the cantata on 11 February 1725. It is the second to last chorale cantata of his second annual cycle, the only later one being BWV 1 for the feast of Annunciation which was celebrated even if it fell in the time of Lent.

The opening chorale is structured by an extended introduction and interludes. These parts play on a concertante a motif derived from the first line of the chorale, but also have a cantus firmus of the chorale "Christe, du Lamm Gottes", the Lutheran Agnus Dei, first played by the strings, later also by the oboes and recorders. It appears in a similar way to the chorale as the cantus firmus in the opening chorus of his later St Matthew Passion, "O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig (de)". Its request "erbarm dich unser" (have mercy upon us) corresponds to the request of the blind man. A third chorale is quoted repeatedly in the continuo, "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden". Christoph Wolff notes that on Good Friday of that year Bach would perform the second version of his St John Passion, replacing the opening and the closing movement of the first version by music based on chorales, "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" which would become the final movement of the first part of the St Matthew Passion, and again "Christe, du Lamm Gottes".

Bach chose a rare instrumentation for the first aria, the oboe plays a melody, supported by short chords in the recorders, in the middle section "Sterbeglocken" (funeral bells) are depicted by pizzicato string sounds. Movement 4 illustrates the Day of Judgement. On the text "Wenn einstens die Posaunen schallen" (When one day the trumpets ring out), the trumpet enters. The unusual movement combines an accompagnato recitative with an aria, contrasting the destruction of heaven and earth with the security of the believers, the latter given in text and tune from the chorale. John Eliot Gardiner describes it as a "grand, tableau-like evocation of the Last Judgement, replete with triple occurrences of a wild 6/8 section when all hell is let loose in true Monteverdian concitato ("excited") manner". He compares it to the "spectacular double chorus" from the St Matthew Passion "Sind Blitze, sind Donner in Wolken verschwunden".

The closing chorale is a four-part setting with attention to details of the text, such as movement in the lower voices on "auch unser Glaub stets wacker sei" (also may our faith be always brave) and colourful harmonies on the final line "bis wir einschlafen seliglich" (until we fall asleep contentedly).

Although originally scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, trumpet, two recorders, two oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Trombone, French Horn, F Tuba and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Chorale: "Und was der ewig gütig Gott" (BWV 86 No 3) for Piccolo, Tubular Bells, Marimba & Cello

4 parts5 pages02:053 years ago847 views
Piccolo, Percussion(2), Cello
Wahrlich, wahrlich, ich sage euch (Truly, truly I say to you), BWV 86, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for Rogate, the fifth Sunday after Easter, and first performed it on 14 May 1724.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig in his first annual cycle for the fifth Sunday after Easter, called Rogate. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle of James, "doers of the word, not only listeners" (James 1:22–27) and from the Gospel of John, from the farewell discourses of Jesus, prayers will be fulfilled (John 16:23–30). The theme of the cantata is a quotation from the gospel, beginning the cantata with the promise of Jesus "Verily, verily, I say unto you, whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give you". An unknown poet used as movement 3 the 16th stanza of Georg Grünwald's hymn "Kommt her zu mir, spricht Gottes Sohn" (1530), and as the closing chorale the eleventh stanza of "Es ist das Heil uns kommen her" by Paul Speratus (1524). The poet hints at the question how the promise can be understood looking the reality of life. In movement 2 he uses the image of a rose with thorns to illustrate two conflicting aspects. In movements 3 and 4 he confirms the promise which has to be seen in the perspective of time. Movement 5 refers to the waiting for a promise being kept, and the closing chorale assures that God knows the right time. The structure of the six movements – a gospel quotation in the beginning, chorales as movements 3 and 6, the sequence of recitative and arias – is similar to Wo gehest du hin? BWV 166, first performed one week earlier.

The gospel quotation is given to the bass as the vox Christi, the voice of Jesus. The instruments, strings probably doubled by oboe d'amore, introduce vocal motifs which the voice picks up. The bass sings the text three times, while the instruments continue playing the same motifs. Julian Mincham observes: "The richness of the text, the unobtrusive nature of the melodic ideas and the gently flowing rhythms combine to create an appropriate atmosphere of dignified restraint".

In movement 2, the alto is accompanied by the strings and a violin obbligato in virtuoso figuration, which may illustrate the heavenly light promised as the final fulfillment. In the chorale of movement 3, the unadorned cantus firmus in the soprano is embedded in a trio of the two oboes d'amore and the continuo. In movement 5, the last aria, a motif of five notes is first introduced by the violin and then picked up by the tenor on the words "Gott hilft gewiß" (God's help is sure). The motif is repeated in the violin again and again. The closing chorale is set for four parts.

Although originally written for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir only for the closing chorale, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Piccolo, Tubular Bells, Marimba & Cello.
"As The Rain & Snow Fall From Heaven" (BWV 18) for Flute Trio
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"As The Rain & Snow Fall From Heaven" (BWV 18) for Flute Trio

3 parts3 pages03:286 years ago802 views
Piccolo, Flute(2)
"Gleichwie der Regen und Schnee vom Himmel fällt" ("Just like the rain and snow falling from the sky" (BWV 18), is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. It was composed for Sexagesima Sunday, based on text by Erdmann Neumeister written in 1711 for the Eisenach court, which cites Isaiah and Psalm 118.

The work falls relatively early in Bach's chronology of cantata compositions — it was possibly composed for 24 February 1715, but more probably a year or two earlier. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were taken from the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, "God's power is mighty in the week" (2 Corinthians 11:19–12:9), and from the Gospel of Luke, the parable of the Sower (Luke 8:4–15). The work is scored for an SATB choir, two recorders, a bassoon, violas I-IV, violoncello and continuo. It can be noted that the instrumentation is similar to Brandenburg Concerto n°6, which also omits violins. Furthermore, the second (Leipzig) version of this cantata only uses the middle and low strings, without the recorders.

this arrangement is of the sinfonia and the form is that of a flexible chaconne, broken into episodes, in a da capo form.

Although originally written for SATB choir & period instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute Trio (Piccolo, Flute & Alto Flute).

"Sinfonia 6" (BWV 792) for Flute Trio

3 parts2 pages01:155 years ago777 views
Piccolo, Flute(2)
One of the greatest composers of all time. Bach wrote hundreds of pieces for organ, choir, as well as many other instruments. He spent most of his life as a church organist and a choir director. His music combines profound expression with clever musico-mathematical feats, like fugues and cannons in which the same melody is played against itself in various ways.

The Inventions and Sinfonias BWV 772–801, also known as the Two- and Three-Part Inventions, are a collection of thirty short keyboard compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750): 15 inventions, which are 2-part contrapuntal pieces, and 15 sinfonias, which are 3-part contrapuntal pieces. They were originally written as musical exercises for his students.

The two groups of pieces are both arranged in order of ascending key, each group covering eight major and seven minor keys. The inventions were composed in Köthen; the sinfonias, on the other hand, were probably not finished until the beginning of the Leipzig period.

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I arranged it for Flute Trio (Piccolo, Flute & Alto Flute).
La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra
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La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra

18 parts5 pages01:399 months ago622 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England.

The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums.

Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major.

The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400).

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorale: "Herr Christ, der einge Gottessohn" (BWV 96 No 1) for Piccolo & Strings

5 parts11 pages06:533 years ago603 views
Piccolo, Strings(4)
Herr Christ, der einge Gottessohn (Lord Christ, the only Son of God), BWV 96, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 18th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 8 October 1724. It is based on the hymn "Herr Christ, der einig Gotts Sohn" by Elisabeth Cruciger (1524).

Bach wrote the cantata in 1724 for the 18th Sunday after Trinity as part of his second annual cycle of mostly chorale cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, Paul's thanks for grace of God in Ephesus (1 Corinthians 1:4–8), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Great Commandment (Matthew 22:34–46). The cantata text of an unknown author is based exclusively on the chorale "Herr Christ, der einig Gotts Sohn" in five stanzas of Elisabeth Cruciger (1524). The first and last stanza in their original wording are movements 1 and 6 of the cantata, stanzas 2 and 3 were paraphrased to movements 2 and 3 of the cantata, and stanza 4 was reworded for movements 4 and 5. The chorale was originally associated with Epiphany, but also with the 18th Sunday after Trinity. The Gospel asks how Jesus, of David's descent as said in 2 Samuel 7, can also be David's Lord, as claimed in Psalms 110:1. The chorale tries to answer this question, comparing Jesus to the Morning star, an image also used in the hymn "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern", the base for Bach's cantata Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, BWV 1.

Bach performed the cantata at least three times, first on 8 October 1724, a second time probably on 24 October 1734, and a third time probably on 1 October 1740. Musicologists have suggested different dates for the later performances.

In the opening chorus, a chorale fantasia, Bach has the alto sing the cantus firmus and a horn play along (in later performance replaced by trombone). An unusual flauto piccolo or sopranino recorder is used to illustrate the sparkling of the morning star. In a later performance (probably 1734) it was replaced by a violino piccolo. The choral setting is polyphonic in the three other voices and embedded in instrumental music base on similar motifs.

The tenor aria is accompanied by the transverse flute, probably played by the flauto piccolo player of the first movement. As for Was frag ich nach der Welt, BWV 94, written some weeks before, Bach seems to have had an excellent flute player.

The bass aria illustrates the words "Bald zur Rechten, bald zur Linken lenkte sich mein verirrter Schritt" (Soon to the right, soon to the left my erring steps lean) in jagged motifs and a frequent switch between winds and strings. In the middle section steady steps picture "Gehe doch, mein Heiland, mit" (Yet go with me, my Savior). The final part combines both elements.

The closing chorale is a four-part setting for the choir, horn, oboes and strings.

Although originally scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, flauto traverso, flauto piccolo or (later) violino piccolo, two oboes, horn or (later) trombone, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Piccolo and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings
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Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts8 pages03:07a year ago540 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"Il trovatore" (The Troubadour) opera in four acts by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi that premiered at the Teatro Apollo in Rome on January 19, 1853. Verdi prepared a revised version in French, Le Trouvère, with added ballet music, which premiered at the Paris Opéra on January 12, 1857. Based on the 1836 play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, the opera is one of three considered to represent the culmination of Verdi’s artistry to that point. (The other two are Rigoletto and La traviata.)

Verdi was impressed with García Gutiérrez’s melodramatic play and engaged Cammarano (Verdi’s collaborator on three previous operas) to write a libretto based on it, although no theatre had commissioned the work. The librettist was reluctant, and Verdi’s correspondence with him reveals a struggle between them as Verdi sought a new way to present the drama on its own terms, without the constraints of operatic convention. He practically begged Cammarano to release him from the strictures of “cavatinas, duets, trios, choruses, finales, etc., etc.,” and to make “the entire opera…a single piece.”

The opera was a triumph from the first night. Themes of obsession, revenge, war, and family are conveyed through characters who present dramatic contrasts. The central character—and the one who seems to have attracted Verdi’s interest most strongly—is the gypsy Azucena. (He had considered naming the opera for her.) The composer, who by this time had mastered the Romantic and bel canto traditions, took so many aspects of the opera (including fiery characters, extreme dramatic situations, and virtuosic demands on singers) to the very limits of current possibilities that later critics ridiculed the characters and plot as being well beyond plausible. Yet the music was transcendent, and the opera continues to be widely performed. Act II features the “"Anvil Chorus"” (or “"Gypsy Chorus"”), which has become one of the best-known passages in the operatic repertoire.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anvil_Chorus).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Arrangement of the Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
"Night on Bald Mountain" (IMM 43) for Small Orchestra
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"Night on Bald Mountain" (IMM 43) for Small Orchestra

16 parts76 pages09:574 months ago529 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839 – 1881) was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music. Many of his works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other national themes. Such works include the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on Bald Mountain and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition.

For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have posthumously come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available. In a July 5, 1867 letter to Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov, Modest Mussorgsky wrote "(I have) finished St. John's Night on Bald Mountain, a musical picture with the following program: (1) assembly of the witches, their chatter and gossip; (2) cortege of Satan; (3) unholy gratification of Satan; and (4) witches' sabbath." Mussorgsky proclaims "in form and character my composition is Russian and original. Its tone is hot and chaotic.... St. John's Night is something new and is bound to produce a satisfactory impression...."

The impression was not so satisfactory for Mily Balakirev, who rejected the work in 1869 from consideration for a Free School concert. Balakirev sent the manuscript back to Mussorgsky bearing handwritten marks such as the comment "Rubbish!" in the margins. Later, under the spell of Liszt's Totentanz, Mussorgsky considered refashioning the movement as a piano/orchestral work, but nothing came of this plan.

In May 1877, Mussorgsky drew up the scenario of his comic opera Sorochintsy Fair, proposing an extensive revision of the St. John's Night music as an Intermezzo opening the third act. Mussorgsky completed this part of the opera in 1880, retaining music from (1) and (3) of the original work, and adding new material. Identified as "Dream of the Young Peasant Lad," this also had a new program: as a boy dreams on a hill, he is threatened by inhuman voices and finds himself mocked in the realm of shadows. The voices warn of the Devil and the "Black God" Chernobog; as the shadows fade, both appear. Chernobog is glorified, a Black Mass is sung, and a Witches' Sabbath breaks out. As a church bell intones, Chernobog disappears and the demons writhe in agony. A church choir sings, the demons fade away, awakening the boy. Mussorgsky was never to complete Sorochintsy Fair.

In 1867 letter quoted above, Mussorgsky wrote Rimsky-Korsakov "I should like us to examine the orchestration together (...) we might clear up many things." Rimsky-Korsakov fulfilled his end of the bargain in 1886, five years after Mussorgsky's death, in producing Night on Bald Mountain (also "Night on the Bare Mountain"). This was the "Lad's Dream" music, minus its choral parts and with its abrupt, dramatic effectual "stings" removed. The first half of the second section was removed, and Rimsky-Korsakov dropped most of the major-key material save a brief fanfare figure. The whole work was subjected to a streamlining of orchestration and meter, and divided into symmetrical sections. Rimsky-Korsakov has often been accused of "composing" the "Matins Bell" section that concludes Bald Mountain, but in truth the music is all Mussorgsky's save the final flute trio at the very end. The Rimsky-Korsakov edition was an immediate worldwide success from the day it was launched and helped to establish Mussorgsky's name. It remains the most popular version of Mussorgsky's famous piece, although the original versions are available in modern editions and are revived to acclaim as well. Some conductors, such as Claudio Abbado and Esa-Pekka Salonen, have made personal specialties of the 1867 version.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/night-on-bald-mountain-noch-na-l%C3%AFsoy-gore-symphonic-poem-edited-by-rimsky-korsakov-mc0002369147 ).

Although originally created for full orchestra, I created this Interpretation of the "Night on Bald Mountain" A symphonic poem (IMM 43) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, Bassoon, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).