Sheet music with 11 instruments

"Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra

11 parts10 pages02:05a year ago3,987 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is a dance for a ballerina. It is the third movement in The Nutcracker pas de deux. This pas de deux is from Act 2 of the 1892 ballet The Nutcracker. It is danced by the principal female dancer. The number was choreographed by Lev Ivanov to music written by Tchaikovsky.

Choreographer Marius Petipa wanted the Sugar Plum Fairy's music to sound like "drops of water shooting from a fountain". Tchaikovsky found the ideal instrument to do this job in Paris in 1891. It was then that he came across the recently invented celesta. This instrument looked like a piano. It sounded like bells. Tchaikovsky wrote, "[The celesta is] midway between a tiny piano and a Glockenspiel, with a divinely wonderful sound." He wanted to use the celesta in The Nutcracker. He asked his publisher to buy one. He wanted to keep the purchase a secret. He did not want other Russian composers to "get wind of it and ... use it for unusual effects before me."

Tchaikovsky introduced the celesta to Russian music lovers on 19 March 1892 when the Nutcracker Suite was performed for the Russian Musical Society in St. Petersburg. The instrument is forever identified with the Sugar Plum Fairy. It is heard in other parts of Act 2 of The Nutcracker besides the Sugar Plum Fairy's dance. The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is one of the ballet's best known musical numbers. It is often "jazzed up" for television commercials at Christmas time.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Celesta, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Small Orchestra
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"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Small Orchestra

11 parts11 pages03:154 years ago3,742 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Violin, Piano(5)
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is a Christmas carol that first appeared in 1739 in the collection Hymns and Sacred Poems, having been written by Charles Wesley. A somber man, Wesley had requested and received slow and solemn music for his lyrics, not the joyful tune expected today. Moreover, Wesley's original opening couplet is "Hark! how all the welkin rings / Glory to the King of Kings".

The popular version is the result of alterations by various hands, notably by Wesley's co-worker George Whitefield who changed the opening couplet to the familiar one, and by Felix Mendelssohn. A hundred years after the publication of Hymns and Sacred Poems, in 1840, Mendelssohn composed a cantata to commemorate Johann Gutenberg's invention of the printing press, and it is music from this cantata, adapted by the English musician William H. Cummings to fit the lyrics of “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”, that propels the carol known today.

In 1855, English musician William H. Cummings adapted Felix Mendelssohn's secular music from Festgesang to fit the lyrics of "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" written by Charles Wesley. Wesley envisioned the song being sung to the same tune as his song "Christ the Lord Is Risen Today", and in some hymnals that tune is included for "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" along with the more popular Mendelssohn-Cummings tune.

At the request of a follower, I created this arrangement of my earlier arrangement (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/26687) for a Modern Small (school) Orchestra (Bb Trumpets, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Trombones, F Tuba, 2 Violins, Violas, Cellos & Basses).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Chorale: "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" (BWV 140 No 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts33 pages05:424 years ago2,937 views
Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Awake, calls the voice to us), BWV 140, also known as Sleepers Wake, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 25 November 1731. It is based on the hymn "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" (1599) by Philipp Nicolai. Movement 4 of the cantata is the base for the first of Bach's Schübler Chorales, BWV 645. The cantata is a late addition to Bach's cycle of chorale cantatas, featuring additional poetry for two duets of Jesus and the Soul which expand the theme of the hymn.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday after Trinity. This Sunday occurs only when Easter is extremely early. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, be prepared for the day of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 5:1–11), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1–13). The chorale cantata is based on the Lutheran hymn in three stanzas, "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" of Philipp Nicolai, which is based on the Gospel. Bach composed the cantata to complete his cycle of chorale cantatas which he had begun in 1724. The text of the three stanzas appears unchanged in movements 1, 4 and 7, while an unknown author supplied poetry for movements 2 and 3, 5 and 6, both a sequence of recitative and duet. He refers to the love poetry of the Song of Songs, showing Jesus as the bridegroom of the Soul. According to Christoph Wolff, the text was already available when Bach composed his cycle of chorale cantatas.

Bach performed the cantata only once, in Leipzig's main church Nikolaikirche on 25 November 1731. According to Christoph Wolff, Bach performed it only this one time, although the 27th Sunday after Trinity occurred one more time during his tenure in Leipzig, in 1742. He used movement 4 of the cantata as the base for the first of his Schübler Chorales, BWV 645.

In the modern three-year Revised Common Lectionary, the reading is scheduled for Proper 27, or the 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, in the first year of the three-year cycle of lessons. Thus, the hymn and the cantata are commonly performed in churches on that Sunday. The text and its eschatological themes are also commonly associated with the early Sundays of the season of Advent, and so the cantata is commonly performed during that season.

The first movement is a chorale fantasia based on the first verse of the chorale, a common feature of Bach's earlier chorale cantatas. It is in E-flat major. The cantus firmus is sung by the soprano. The orchestra plays independent material mainly based on two motifs: a dotted rhythm and an ascending scale "with syncopated accent shifts". The lower voices add in unusually free polyphonic music images such as the frequent calls "wach auf!" (wake up!) and "wo, wo?" (where, where?), and long melismas in a fugato on "Halleluja".

The second movement is a recitative for tenor as a narrator who calls the "Töchter Zions" (daughters of Zion). In the following duet with obbligato violino piccolo, the soprano represents the Soul and the bass is the vox Christi (voice of Jesus).

The third verse as the closing chorale
The fourth movement, based on the second verse of the chorale, is written in the style of a chorale prelude, with the phrases of the chorale, sung as a cantus firmus by the tenors (or by the tenor soloist), entering intermittently against a famously lyrical melody played in unison by the violins (without the violino piccolo) and the viola, accompanied by the basso continuo. Bach later transcribed this movement for organ (BWV 645), and it was subsequently published along with five other transcriptions Bach made of his cantata movements as the Schübler Chorales.

The fifth movement is a recitative for bass, accompanied by the strings. It pictures the unity of the bridegroom and the "chosen bride". The sixth movement is another duet for soprano and bass with obbligato oboe. This duet, like the third movement, is a love duet between the soprano Soul and the bass Jesus. Alfred Dürr describes it as giving "expression to the joy of the united pair", showing a "relaxed mood" in "artistic intensity".

The closing chorale is a four-part setting of the third verse of the hymn. The high pitch of the melody is doubled by a violino piccolo an octave higher, representing the bliss of the "heavenly Jerusalem".

Although the cantata was originally scored for three soloists—soprano, tenor and bass—, a four-part choir, horn, two oboes, taille, violino piccolo, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (Bb Trumpet, French Horn, flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 Nos. 4&5) for Small Orchestra

11 parts21 pages06:055 years ago2,724 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Strings(5)
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (Glory to God in the highest) for Small Orchestra (Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Bassoon, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra
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"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra

11 parts15 pages02:27a year ago2,711 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Piano
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" (Norwegian: I Dovregubbens hall) is a piece of orchestral music composed by Edvard Grieg in 1875 as incidental music for the sixth scene of act 2 in Henrik Ibsen's 1867 play Peer Gynt. It was originally part of Opus 23 but was later extracted as the final piece of Peer Gynt, Suite No. 1, Op. 46. Its easily recognizable theme has helped it attain iconic status in popular culture, where it has been arranged by many artists (See Grieg's music in popular culture).

The English translation of the name is not literal. Dovre is a mountainous region in Norway, and "gubbe" translates into (old) man or husband. "Gubbe" is used along with its female counterpart "kjerring" to differentiate male and female trolls, "trollgubbe" and "trollkjerring". In the play, Dovregubben is a troll king that Peer Gynt invents in a fantasy.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Hall_of_the_Mountain_King).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Piano, Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
"Transeamus usque Bethlehem" for Wind Ensemble
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"Transeamus usque Bethlehem" for Wind Ensemble

11 parts11 pages02:235 years ago1,605 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon(2), Trombone, French Horn, Tuba
Joseph Ignaz Schnabel 1767 - 1831) was a German composer and church musician.

Schnabel came from a musical family and was taught music early on by his father. As a child he was a chorister of the church in Wroclaw Vincent and attended by age 12, because he wanted to be a priest, St. Matthias School. By a fall in the water, he retired due to chronic ear problems, so he was no longer considered a career as a suitable priest.

Schnabel's compositional output consisted mainly instrumental accompaniment church music. With it, he established a special Silesian tradition, also known as Breslau school, which was widely independent of restorative tendencies still alive until the Second World War. Schnabel's best-known work is his treatment of the archives of the Wrocław Cathedral Weihnachtspastorale found an unknown composers from the early 18th Century, "Transeamus usque Bethlehem" (Travel to Bethelem), which must now be counted in the standard repertoire of many church choirs.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Wind Ensemble (Flutes (2), Oboes (2), Bb Clarinets (2), Bassoon, Contrabassoon, Trombone, French Horn and F Tuba).

Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F Major (BWV 1047) for Winds & Strings

11 parts54 pages12:25a year ago1,054 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello
The Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F Major (BWV 1047) by Johann Sebastian Bach is the second of six great concertos which, taken in combination, add up the most complex and artistically successful failed job application in recorded history. The Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 may have been one of the last to be written, and it certainly seems like a special-occasion piece. It's a concerto featuring four prominent instruments -- trumpet, recorder, oboe, and violin -- against a foundation of strings and continuo. The writing is virtuosic and brilliant; the high trumpet part, in particular, brings many fine players to grief.

The work basically follows the Italian concerto grosso pattern, punctuating the solo group's music with tutti outbursts for the strings, although here the soloists are often more integrated into the musical fabric than in the Italian model. The strongly rhythmic first movement, lacking a tempo indication, deploys the soloists both as members of the overall ensemble and as out-front players, in varying combinations. The orchestra introduces an energetic eight-bar theme, then, two at a time and separated by restatements of the opening melody, the soloists jump in with their own two-bar motif. From this point on, the soloists rarely recede completely, constantly toying with their short motif and picking up fragments of the initial theme as well.

The trumpet retires from the plaintive Andante, leaving the other three soloists, with bare continuo accompaniment, to focus on a sighing phrase. One instrument's entrance overlaps another's last notes in a sort of counterpoint that, despite several efforts, never gets off the ground.

Revamping a theme from the first movement, the Allegro assai takes counterpoint more seriously. In the earlier movements, Bach had passed a melody from one instrument to another, fully exploiting their contrasting colors. Now, in this final movement, the soloists each provide different voices in a full-fledged fugue, with the string orchestra merely reinforcing key moments. This fugue is no academic exercise; the music is bright and festive, clearly intended to show how a learned structure could be incorporated into popular entertainment at the margrave's court.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/brandenburg-concerto-no-2-in-f-major-bwv-1047-mc0002394826).

Although originally written for Baroque orchestra (Recorder, Oboe, Trumpet, violin, strings & Continuo), I created this Arrangement of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F Major (BWV 1047) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sinfonia: "Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir" (BWV 29 No 1) for String Ensemble

11 parts27 pages03:304 years ago898 views
Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir (We thank you, God, we thank you), BWV 29, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig in 1731 for Ratswechsel, the inauguration of a new town council, and first performed it on 27 August of that year. Bach used the music from the choral movement for both the Gratias agimus tibi and Dona nobis pacem of his Mass in B minor.

Bach composed the cantata in 1731 for Ratswechsel, the inauguration of the newly elected town council, which took place in a festive service in the Nikolaikirche on the Monday following St. Bartholomäus (24 August). He had written the cantatas Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn, BWV 119, and Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille, BWV 120, for the same occasion. The text by an unknown author includes in movement 2 Psalm 75:2 and as the closing chorale the fifth stanza of Johann Gramann's hymn "Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren".

The cantata is one of the few sacred cantatas of Bach opened by an orchestral sinfonia. Another is the early Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12. The music is an arrangement of the prelude from Bach's Partita for violin, BWV 1006. A solo organ plays the original violin part, while the orchestra adds an accompaniment.

The chorus, on verse 2 of Psalm 75, is written in grave stile antico. The bass begins in great simplicity a theme in even steps; the tenor starts imitating almost immediately, the alto a little later, then the soprano. A countersubject illustrates the telling of God's wonders, embellishing the words verkündigen ("proclaim") and Wunder ("wonders"). A dense texture is achieved. In the beginning only oboes and strings play colla parte, then a trumpet doubles the soprano. Developing further, two trumpets take part in the polyphony, and a climax is reached when the third trumpet and timpani enter. Bach adapted the music with only minor changes for the Gratias of his Missa for the court of Dresden in 1733, which expresses the same idea. Later he incorporated the Missa in his Mass in B minor and concluded his work by repeating the music as the Dona nobis pacem. According to Klaus Hofmann, all these movements are based on an earlier lost composition.

The tenor, a solo violin, and the continuo are equal partners in the following da capo aria.

The soprano aria, accompanied by oboe and strings, is in siciliano rhythm. The continuo rests during the vocal parts.

After a recitative which leads to a choral Amen, the alto soloist repeats the main section of the tenor aria, accompanied by the organ. This close connection within a work of both theme (3 and 6) and instrument (1 and 6) is unusual in Bach's cantatas.

In the closing chorale the trumpets accentuate the ends of some lines of the fifth verse of Johann Gramann's "Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren".

The Sinfonia movement experienced a period of crossover popularity in 1968 when Walter Carlos (now Wendy Carlos) created an exuberant rendition of it for electronic synthesizer (at the time a novelty) for the album Switched-On Bach.

Although the Cantata was originally written for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, four-part choir, solo organ and an orchestra consisting of three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this Arrangement for String Ensemble (6 Violins, 3 Violas, 3 Cellos and Basses) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Wenn ihr fröhlich seid an euren Festen" for Trumpets & Wind Ensemble

11 parts8 pages02:155 years ago777 views
Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722) was a German Baroque composer and keyboard player, Johann Kuhnau was a man of many gifts. A learned intellectual, a writer on music, linguist, philosopher, author of a satiric novel, and successful lawyer, he is remembered today mostly for his keyboard compositions. Kuhnau, however, was an important and influential voice in the German Baroque, particularly in Leipzig, where he was Bach's immediate predecessor as Kantor at the Thomasschule. He came from a family of musicians and showed an early aptitude for the art. Kuhnau studied music throughout his youth, was a chorister at the Kreuzschule in Dresden, and became a fine organist, but he entered the University of Leipzig as a law student, getting his degree in 1688. In 1689 he married, and over the course of the years had eight children. The years that followed, from 1689 until 1699, were very successful. He was well respected as a musician, particularly as a performer on the organ and as a teacher of music, and his law practice thrived. He wrote his satirical novel, entitled Der Musicalishe Quack-Salber (The Musical Quack), and he studied mathematics, Hebrew, and Greek, French, and Italian.

In 1701 Kuhnau was appointed Kantor at the Thomaskirche and Leipzig University's director of music. He taught music, directed performances, and composed. His competition in those years included the young Telemann, who entered law school in 1701. Telemann founded a collegium musicum, a musical performance association, to rival that of Kuhnau, and even encroached upon some of Kuhnau's duties as Kantor. Kuhnau suffered from severe ill health in his later years, and the city of Leipzig even offered Telemann Kuhnau's position in the event of the latter's death. Johann Friedrich Fasch and Melchior Hoffmann were also active in Leipzig and also numbered among Kuhnau's rivals; in the case of the former, who had been Kuhnau's pupil, the sting must have been especially acute. Nevertheless, Kuhnau was widely admired by his contemporaries and successors, and many German composers of the early eighteeth century either studied with him or otherwise showed his influence.

Kuhnau composed sacred music, secular vocal music, and keyboard music, but all that remains of his output are his keyboard music and his sacred cantatas. The Biblische Historien (Biblical Histories), his last set of keyboard works, are his most famous compositions; these are programmatic works that depict episodes from the Old Testament. They are extremely complex and inventive texturally. Also included in his keyboard works is a set of seven dance suites called the Neue Clavier Übung; both these and the Biblische Historien are notable for their incorporation of instrumental-music devices into keyboard music. Kuhnau's sacred cantatas likely had some influence upon Bach's own Leipzig works in the form.

"Wenn ihr fröhlich seid an euren Festen" (If you're happy at your festivities) was written originally for Chorus, Wind, Percussion & Strings, I arranged it for Trumpets (4) & Wind Ensemble (Timpani, Flutes (2), Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php)

"Ave Maria" for Winds & Strings

11 parts5 pages02:565 years ago737 views
Joseph Gregor Zangl (1821 - 1897) was an Austrian (Tyrol) composer from the 19th century. His religious compositions numbered almost 20 in the form of Masses and non-secular works. Very little has been written about his life or compositions.


Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (Violins (2), Viola, Cello & Bass), French Horn & Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F Major (BWV 1046) for Winds & Strings

11 parts67 pages20:43a year ago698 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello
The Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F Major (BWV 1046) by Johann Sebastian Bach is the first of six great concertos which, taken in combination, add up the most complex and artistically successful failed job application in recorded history. They were written around 1721 and dedicated to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg in March of the same year. Bach's position at Cöthen was becoming less desirable to him; his wife had died in 1720 while Bach accompanied his employer, Prince Leopold of Anthalt-Cöthen, to Carlsbad. The prince was also reallocating funds from music to his palace guard, no doubt because the prince's new wife was not a music lover.

Christian Ludwig probably heard Bach perform in 1719, or perhaps earlier at the spas in Carlsbad, where Prince Leopold would have Bach accompany him. Bach sent a beautifully rendered score of the concertos to the Margrave in 1721, suspecting that the royal might be interested in giving him a job, but there is no known response to Bach's political overture.

The first concerto is, like all of Bach's concertos, indebted to the methods of the Italians. Vivaldi was particularly attractive to the German composer, who eagerly copied out Vivaldi's scores in order to understand his use of contrast, rhythmic propulsion, and orchestration. The Brandenburg Concertos were not as unusual as was once thought; Italian composers created concertos for widely varying combinations of instruments, and Bach's shifting textures have their parallels in works by other composers. But the handling of the Italian concerto material went unmatched throughout the Baroque era. One unique, perhaps non-Italian idea in the Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 is Bach's use of hunting horns. The concerto also calls for three oboes and a bassoon, as well as continuo strings and the violino piccolo. The sound of the horns stands out, but the composer manages to make them blend into the ensemble through the use of multiple winds.

Though the first movement does not have a tempo marking, performances of the four-movement work are about 20 minutes in duration. Each movement has a brisk pace and extraordinary counterpoint that inventively shades and blurs the contrast between the small concertino group and the tutti ensemble. Along with the horn, the violino piccolo seems to have been included in order to draw more attention to the innovative qualities of the music. The Brandenburg Concertos contain some of Bach's most brilliant counterpoint, and the attention-grabbing orchestration of the first concerto has not diminished the work's value at all. It is among Bach's best works.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/brandenburg-concerto-no-1-in-f-major-bwv-1046-mc0002406529).

Although originally written for Baroque orchestra (3 Oboes, Bassoon, 2 Horns, Violino piccolo, strings & Continuo), I created this Arrangement of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F Major (BWV 1046) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Blühet, ihr Linden in Sachsen, wie Zedern" (BWV 214 No. 9) for Small Orchestra

11 parts8 pages03:155 years ago558 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(4)
Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten! (Resound, ye drums! Ring out, ye trumpets!), BWV 214,[a] is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed this cantata in 1733 to honor the 34th birthday of Maria Josepha, Queen of Poland and Electress of Saxony. It is also known as Glückwünschkantate zum Geburtstage der Königin (Congratulation cantata to the queen's birthday). It was first performed on 7 December 1733. The librettist of the text is unknown, but may have been Bach himself.

Parts of this secular work were reworked for Bach's Christmas Oratorio.

The opening chorus is a very long da capo form. Unusually for Bach, it opens with a timpani solo. The vocal lines are mostly homophonic or imitative – it is the instrumental forces that are the focus of the movement. Musicologist Julian Mincham notes that "the sweeping exhilaration of this movement is impossible to describe in words".

The tenor recitative conveys imagery of a thunderstorm and is followed by a soprano aria and recitative representing the "clashing of arms" and the battlefield. The alto aria, the only movement in the minor mode, includes a prominent oboe d'amore, while the following recitative is accompanied by chordal strings.

The bass da capo aria has a majestic obbligato trumpet line that underlines the "triumph, dignity and splendor" of the queen. The text focuses on the dual themes of fame and virtue. The penultimate movement is a bass recitative with a woodwind accompaniment. The piece ends with a dance-like chorus

The work features four vocal soloists: Bellona (soprano), Pallas (alto), Irene (tenor), and Fama (bass). It is also scored for a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two flutes, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, cello, violone, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C3%B6net,_ihr_Pauken!_Erschallet,_Trompeten!_BWV_214).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorus: "Blühet, ihr Linden in Sachsen, wie Zedern!" (Bloom, you Saxon lindens, like cedars!) for Small Orchestra: Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani and Strings (Violins (2), Viola & Cello).
Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings
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Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts8 pages03:07a year ago537 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"Il trovatore" (The Troubadour) opera in four acts by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi that premiered at the Teatro Apollo in Rome on January 19, 1853. Verdi prepared a revised version in French, Le Trouvère, with added ballet music, which premiered at the Paris Opéra on January 12, 1857. Based on the 1836 play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, the opera is one of three considered to represent the culmination of Verdi’s artistry to that point. (The other two are Rigoletto and La traviata.)

Verdi was impressed with García Gutiérrez’s melodramatic play and engaged Cammarano (Verdi’s collaborator on three previous operas) to write a libretto based on it, although no theatre had commissioned the work. The librettist was reluctant, and Verdi’s correspondence with him reveals a struggle between them as Verdi sought a new way to present the drama on its own terms, without the constraints of operatic convention. He practically begged Cammarano to release him from the strictures of “cavatinas, duets, trios, choruses, finales, etc., etc.,” and to make “the entire opera…a single piece.”

The opera was a triumph from the first night. Themes of obsession, revenge, war, and family are conveyed through characters who present dramatic contrasts. The central character—and the one who seems to have attracted Verdi’s interest most strongly—is the gypsy Azucena. (He had considered naming the opera for her.) The composer, who by this time had mastered the Romantic and bel canto traditions, took so many aspects of the opera (including fiery characters, extreme dramatic situations, and virtuosic demands on singers) to the very limits of current possibilities that later critics ridiculed the characters and plot as being well beyond plausible. Yet the music was transcendent, and the opera continues to be widely performed. Act II features the “"Anvil Chorus"” (or “"Gypsy Chorus"”), which has become one of the best-known passages in the operatic repertoire.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anvil_Chorus).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Arrangement of the Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore (IGV 31 Act 2 Scene 1) for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Timebunt Gentes Nomen Tuum Domine" (HV 87 No. 6) for Winds, Strings & Piano

11 parts28 pages04:145 years ago370 views
Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765 - 1846) was an Austrian composer known today perhaps more for his friendship with Mozart than for his own music.

Eybler was born into a musical family. His father was a teacher, choir director and friend of the Haydn family. Joseph Eybler studied music with his father before attending Stephansdom (the cathedral school of St. Stephen's Boys College) in Vienna. He studied composition under Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, who declared him to be the greatest musical genius in Vienna apart from Mozart. He also received praise from Haydn who was his friend, distant cousin and patron.

In 1792 he became choir director at the Karmeliterkirche (Carmelite Church) in Vienna. Two years later he moved to the Schottenkloster, where he remained for the next thirty years (1794-1824). Eybler also held court posts, including that of court Kapellmeister (chapel master) (1824–33). The Empress Marie Therese commissioned many works from him, including the Requiem in C minor (1803).

Although the Offertory: "Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine" ("Gentiles shall fear thy name, O Lord") in C minor was composed for Accompainied Chorus, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon), Strings (Violins (2), Viola, Cello & Bass) & Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Ich glaube, lieber Herr, hilf meinem Unglauben" (BWV 109 No 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts20 pages05:164 years ago315 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Ich glaube, lieber Herr, hilf meinem Unglauben (I believe, dear Lord, help my unbelief), BWV 109, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the 21st Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 17 October 1723.

Bach wrote the cantata in 1723 during his first year in Leipzig for the 21st Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, "take unto you the whole armour of God" (Ephesians 6:10–17), and from the Gospel of John, the healing of the nobleman's son (John 4:46–54). The unknown poet of the cantata text stressed the faith, which made the healing possible. The cantata opens with a quote from the Gospel of Mark, The possessed boy, Mark's rendition of the gospel (Mark 9:24). The following movements almost form a dialogue between fear and hope, or belief and doubt, such as Bach would compose three weeks later in O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 60, and again for Easter of 1724 in Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66. Movement 2 is a dialogue, movement 3 the expression of fear, movements 4 and 5 turn to hope. The closing chorale is verse 7 of "Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt" of Lazarus Spengler (1524).

The opening chorus shows many elements of a concerto grosso. In the instrumental ritornello, oboe 1 and violin 1 form the concertino. The vocal parts appear sometimes as a solo or duet, expressing belief in an upward theme derived from the ritornello theme, with doubt expressed in a downward line.

The inner dialogue in movement 2 is marked forte and piano, rather than giving the words to two different singers, as John Eliot Gardiner points out: "Bach reinforces the dichotomy between faith and doubt by assigning two opposing voices sung by the same singer, one marked forte, the other piano, alternating phrase by phrase and surely unique in Bach's recitatives". The final question "Ach Herr, wie lange?" (Ah, Lord, how long?) is intensified as an arioso, marked adagio. In the following aria fear is expressed, according to Gardiner, in "jagged melodic shapes, unstable harmonies headed towards anguished second inversion chords, and persistent dotted rhythmic figures". It has been compared to the tenor aria from Bach's St John Passion, Ach, mein Sinn.

The closing chorale is not a four-part setting, but a complex chorale fantasia with an independent orchestral part, in which the choral part is embedded. The lines of the chorale melody "Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt", interspersed by interludes, are sung in long notes by the soprano (with the corno) on a foundation of faster movement in the lower voices. This movement is the first chorale fantasia written in a Bach cantata in Leipzig, to be followed by many such movements opening chorale cantatas of the second annual cycle.


Although originally scored for alto and tenor soloists, a four-part choir, cor du chasse (corno da caccia or corno da tirarsi), two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorale: "O Gott, du frommer Gott" (BWV 24 No 6) for Winds & Strings

11 parts6 pages01:403 years ago313 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Ein ungefärbt Gemüte (An open mind) (literally: An undyed mind), BWV 24,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the fourth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 20 June 1723. It is the third new cantata of his first annual cycle. The title has been translated more freely, for example as "An unstained mind", "An unblemished conscience", "An undisguised intention", and "An unsophisticated mind".

Bach composed the cantata for the fourth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 20 June 1723, three weeks after he took up the position as Thomaskantor in Leipzig with Die Elenden sollen essen, BWV 75. Bach had begun to compose one cantata for almost every Sunday and holiday of the liturgical year, a project described by Christoph Wolff as "an artistic undertaking on the largest scale".

It seems likely that Bach performed in the same service also the earlier cantata Barmherziges Herze der ewigen Liebe, BWV 185, composed for the same occasion in Weimar in 1715. He had presented cantatas in two parts on the preceding three Sundays, the new works Die Elenden sollen essen, and Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76, and the earlier Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis, BWV 21. On the fourth Sunday he likely performed one cantata before and the other after the sermon. According to Christoph Wolff, he probably performed the new work first.

In his composition, Bach stresses the weight of the central biblical quotation by giving it to the choir, and by scoring the framing recitatives and arias with reduced accompaniment. The obbligato part in the first aria is played by the violins and viola in unison and resembles the vocal part. According to John Eliot Gardiner, Bach thus evokes an "unstained mind". Julian Mincham notes the "sombre and shaded tone quality" of the unison strings. The following recitative, termed an "exemplary mini-sermon in its own right", is secco and ends in an arioso. Here as in the first work for the same occasion, BWV 185, Bach shows the mirror effect of the words, "Mach aus dir selbst ein solches Bild, wie du den Nächsten haben willt!" (Make yourself into such an image, as you would have your neighbour be!) by imitation of voice and continuo. This phrase is rendered three times.

The central choral movement, "a powerful chorus which forms the core of the cantata", is in two sections: the complete text is once rendered in a free form, then again as a fugue, comparable to the concept prelude and fugue. Two oboes double the strings, a clarino plays an independent part. The prelude is in three symmetric sections. The fugue, a double fugue marked "vivace allegro", begins with the first vocal entrance only accompanied by the continuo, the first vocal entries are sung by the concertisten, the choir joins later. The music reaches a climax when the clarino plays the theme as a fifth part to the four vocal parts. The movement ends in free sequences. Mincham describes the "ceaseless activity through constant musical movement" of the music, the "fragmented rhythm" of the countersubject and the "breathless urgency" of the coda.

The following recitative is similar to the first in structure, but accompanied by the strings adding emphasis, mostly on strong beats. The final arioso, without the strings, stresses the prayer "Der liebe Gott behüte mich dafür!" (May dear God spare me from it!). The last aria is accompanied by two oboi d'amore; they play a long "doleful" introduction that is repeated as a postlude. The voice picks up their beginning motif. The tenor voice sings an unusual coloratura line when the text ends on "Macht uns Gott und Engeln gleich" (makes us like God and the angels), possibly representing the multitude of the Heavenly host.

The eight lines of the closing chorale in homophonic four-part vocal setting are richly framed by orchestral interludes and accompanied by the instruments. Bach found the style of chorale treatment in works by his predecessor in Leipzig, Johann Kuhnau. The last prayer asks for "ein unverletzte Seel" (an unsullied soul) "und rein Gewissen" (and a clear conscience).

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, clarino, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ein_ungef%C3%A4rbt_Gem%C3%BCte,_BWV_24).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "O Gott, du frommer Gott" (O God, You righteous God) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Tuba) & Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort" (BWV 20 No 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts18 pages05:113 years ago306 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort (O eternity, you word of thunder), BWV 20,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the first Sunday after Trinity Sunday and first performed it on 11 June 1724. It is the first chorale cantata from his second annual cycle, of chorale cantatas, based on the hymn (1642) by Johann Rist on a melody by Johann Schop.

Bach composed the cantata for the First Sunday after Trinity. The Sunday marks the beginning of the second half of the liturgical year, "in which core issues of faith and doctrine are explored". The year before, Bach had taken office as Thomaskantor in Leipzig. He was responsible for the education of the Thomanerchor, performances in the regular services in the Thomaskirche, the Nikolaikirche and others. He had started the project of composing one cantata for each Sunday and holiday of the liturgical year, termed by Christoph Wolff "an artistic undertaking on the largest scale". In 1724 he started a project on the first Sunday after Trinity to exclusively compose chorale cantatas, based on the main Lutheran hymn for the respective occasion, beginning with this cantata. Leipzig had a tradition of concentrating on the hymns. In 1690, the minister of the Thomaskirche, Johann Benedikt Carpzov, had announced that he would preach also on songs and that Johann Schelle, then the director of music, would play the song before the sermon. Bach composed some forty chorale cantatas in his second cycle.

The opening chorus, beginning not only the cantata but also the second annual cantata cycle, is in the style of a solemn French Overture in the typical three sections slow – fast (vivace) – slow. The French Overture was designed to mark the entry of the king. The melody is sung by the soprano as a cantus firmus in long notes, doubled by the slide trumpet. The chorale is in bar form. The first Stollen of three lines is handled in the slow section, the second Stollen of lines 4 to 6 in the fast section, the Abgesang of lines 7 an 8 in the concluding slow section. The lower voices are mostly in homophony. The development of themes happens in the orchestra. The rising theme of the slow section in dotted rhythm is derived from the beginning of the chorale tune, whereas the theme of the fast section is not related to the tune. The fast section is not a strict fugue. Bach seems mostly interested in illustrating the text, Ewigkeit (eternity) is rendered in long notes in the lower voices and the instruments, Donnerwort (thunderous word) appears as a sudden change to short notes with a melisma in the bass, on the words große Traurigkeit (great sadness) a downward chromatic line, a counterpoint in the fast section, also appears in the voices, erschrocken (terrified) is rendered in jarred rhythms interrupted by rests, first in the orchestra, then also in the voices, klebt (cleave) is a long note in the voices. John Eliot Gardiner describes: "The fragmentation and disjointed nature of the discourse is uncompromising and leaves no room for hope", and summarizes regarding the cantata: "Confronted by the baffling and disquieting subject of eternity, and specifically the eternity of hell, Bach is fired up as never before".

The recitatives are mostly secco, with an arioso only in movement 9 on the words Pracht, Hoffart, Reichtum, Ehr, und Geld (splendor, pride, riches, honor, and wealth) from the chorale. The arias contrast, interpreting the text in its affekt and in single phrases.
In movement 8, the call to wake up is intensified by trumpet signals and fast scales, evoking the Last Judgement. The first motif in movement 10 is sung by the two singers of the duet on the words O Menschenkind ("o child of man") and are repeated instrumentally as a hint of that warning. Both parts of the cantata are concluded by the same four-part chorale setting, asking finally Nimm du mich, wenn es dir gefällt, Herr Jesu, in dein Freudenzelt! (Take me, Jesus, if you will, into the felicity of your tent)..

The cantata is festively scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, tromba da tirarsi to double the cantus firmus, three oboes, two violins, viola, and continuo. The work contains eleven movements in two parts, to be performed before and after the sermon.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_Ewigkeit,_du_Donnerwort,_BWV_20).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort" (O eternity, you word of thunder) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Diligam Te Domine" (No. 6) for Brass & Strings

11 parts25 pages06:085 years ago302 views
Johann Caspar Aiblinger (1779 -- 1867) was a German composer. He was born in Wasserburg am Inn, Bavaria. In his eleventh year he commenced his studies at Tegernsee Abbey, where he was instructed in piano and organ-playing. Four years later he entered the gymnasium at Munich, where he studied under Professor Schlett, his countryman.

In 1800 he began his studies at the University of Landshut. Inwardly drawn to the Catholic Church, he completed his philosophy and began theology, but the secularization of many religious orders in Bavaria prevented his entrance into a cloister. He now devoted himself solely to music. Led by the then prevailing idea that without a visit to Italy no musical education is complete, he turned his footsteps southward.

After a stay of eight years at Vicenza, where he fell under the influence of his countryman Johann Simon Mayr, Aiblinger (1811) went to Venice and there met Meyerbeer, who procured for him an appointment at the Conservatory. His failure to establish a school for classical music led him to Milan to assume the direction of the local ballet. On his return to Bavaria, King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria invited him to Munich to direct the Italian opera. King Ludwig I of Bavaria appointed him director of the royal orchestra, and sent him to Italy to collect old Italian masterpieces. On his return be became the organist of the church of All Saints for which he wrote many valuable compositions.

Between 1820 and 1830 he tried operatic composition, but was unsuccessful. A crusade against Italian music, which led to the revival of Christoph Willibald Gluck's Iphigenia in Tauris, followed. Then he took up church music, studying the old masters and procuring performances of their works. He also wrote much church music. His numerous compositions comprise masses and requiems, offertories and graduals, psalms, litanies, and German hymns, many of which have been published at Augsburg, Munich, Regensburg, and Mainz.

The offertory (offering), in the Roman Catholic Mass and in derived liturgical forms, is the preparation of bread and wine on the altar and their formal offering to God. It takes place after the gospel and the creed and before the preface. A short psalm verse from Scriptures is appointed to be said or sung at the beginning; it varies from day to day. This is called the offertory verse. From ancient times it has been customary to collect the alms of the worshipers about the time of the offertory, hence the term has been transferred to the collection taken up in services in Protestant churches and to the music played or sung during the collection. The choice of this selection is usually left to the musicians of the church, and in many Protestant churches the offertory is the choir's principal musical selection in the service.

Although originally written for Voice (SATT), Strings and Organ, I created this arrangement for Brass (Piccolo, Flute, Bb Trumpet, Fugelhorn, French Horn, Trombone and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (BWV 101 No 1) for Winds & Strings

11 parts23 pages07:193 years ago297 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Trumpet, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott (Take away from us, Lord, faithful God), BWV 101, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the tenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 13 August 1724. It is based on the hymn by Martin Moller (1584).

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the tenth Sunday after Trinity as part of his second cantata cycle. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, different gifts, but one spirit (1 Corinthians 12:1–11), and from the Gospel of Luke, Jesus announcing the destruction of Jerusalem and cleansing of the Temple (Luke 19:41–48).

The text of the cantata is based on the seven stanzas of Martin Moller's chorale (1584), which he had written during a time of plague, as a paraphrase of the Latin poem Aufer immensam (1541). The chorale is sung on the melody of Martin Luther's "Vater unser im Himmelreich" on the Lord's Prayer. The words are used unchanged in movements 1 and 7. An unknown poet transcribed the ideas of stanzas 2, 4 and 6 to arias. He kept the text of stanzas 3 and 5, but interpolated it by recitative. The cantate text is only generally related to the readings, unlike Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein Schmerz sei, BWV 46, a year before, dealing with the lament of Jerusalem in text from Lamentations. But the poet hinted at the destruction of Jerusalem by "Daß wir nicht durch sündlich Tun wie Jerusalem vergehen!" (so that, through sinful acts, we might not be destroyed like Jerusalem!) in movement 2.

The chorale melody in Dorian mode is present in all movements but the first aria. The opening chorus is a chorale fantasia with the cantus firmus in the soprano, each line prepared by the lower voices. A choir of trombones plays colla parte with the voices, embedded in a setting of oboes and strings, which is also rather vocal. John Eliot Gardiner notes Bach's "disturbing intensification of harmony and vocal expression for the words 'für Seuchen, Feur und großem Leid' (contagion, fire and grievous pain) at the end of the movement".

The first aria is accompanied by a virtuoso flute, replaced by a violin in a later version. The flute writing suggests that Bach had a capable flute player at hand in 1724, as in Was frag ich nach der Welt, BWV 94, composed a week before. The recitative combines an embellished version of the chorale melody with secco recitative. The central movement starts like a dramatic aria, marked vivace, in three oboes and continuo. But after this "furious ritornello" the bass begins unexpectedly, marked andante, with the first line of the chorale stanza on the chorale melody, raising the question "why are you so incensed with us". In the middle section, the complete chorale is played by the instruments, while the voice sings independently.

The cantata in seven movements is richly scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, cornett, three trombones, two oboes, taille (tenor oboe), flauto traverso (or violin), two violins, viola and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimm_von_uns,_Herr,_du_treuer_Gott,_BWV_101).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (Take away from us, Lord, faithful God) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Trumpet, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Nimm mich dir zu eigen hin" (BWV 65 No 6) for Winds & Strings

11 parts12 pages03:133 years ago270 views
Trumpet(2), Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen (They will all come forth out of Sheba), BWV 65, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1724 in Leipzig for Epiphany and first performed it on 6 January 1724.

Bach wrote the cantata to conclude his first set of cantatas for the Christmas season in Leipzig on the Feast of Epiphany. He had performed five cantatas, Christen, ätzet diesen Tag, BWV 63 (composed possibly in 1713) and the new works Darzu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes, BWV 40, Sehet, welch eine Liebe hat uns der Vater erzeiget, BWV 64, Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, BWV 190, and Mein liebster Jesus ist verloren, BWV 154.
Bach first performed the cantata for Epiphany on 6 January 1724. In his Christmas Oratorio of 1734, Bach dedicated Part VI, Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben, to the topic and the occasion and first performed it on 6 January 1735.

The cantata is structured in seven movements and is festively scored for tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, two horns, two recorders, two oboes da caccia, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Bach employed a pair of horns before in his Christmas cantata Darzu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes, BWV 40, and later in his cantata for Christmas 1724, Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ, BWV 91, and in Part IV of his Christmas Oratorio.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sie_werden_aus_Saba_alle_kommen,_BWV_65).

I created this arrangement for Winds (2 Bb Trumpets, Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, English Horn & French Horn) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).