Sheet music with 12 instruments

"Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra
Video

"Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra

12 parts11 pages03a year ago1,571 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horns, French Horns, Bassoons, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra

12 parts8 pages01:05a year ago1,391 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra (Piccolos, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Glockenspiel, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
Found in Community

Groups

United Methodist Church

1 discussion • 378 scores • 45 members

Discussions

The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"Regina Coeli" for Small Orchestra

12 parts12 pages03:235 years ago1,281 views
Ferdinand Lukas Schubert (1794 - 1859) was an Austrian composer and brother of Franz Schubert. He also designed the grave stone for the grave of Ludwig van Beethoven, which is now at Vienna's Central Cemetery. He was an Austrian teacher, organist and composer. He is notable for his compositions and for his role in publishing the complete works of his younger brother Franz Schubert. He received training in piano and violin from his father, Franz Theodor Schubert, and his older brother Ignaz, later from Michael Wood, and finally from the public teacher of the choir of St. Anna, Joseph Drechsler. As a boy, Ferdinand played violin in the Schubert family string quartet, with his brothers Franz and Ignaz on viola and violin and his father on cello. Franz Schubert composed many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.

The Regina Cæli or Regina Cœli ("Queen of Heaven"), is an ancient Latin Marian Hymn of the Christian Church. It is one of the four seasonal Marian antiphons of the Blessed Virgin Mary, prescribed to be sung or recited in the Liturgy of the Hours at the conclusion of the last of the hours to be prayed in common that day, typically night prayer (Compline or Vespers). The Regina Caeli is sung or recited in place of the Angelus during the Easter season, from Holy Saturday through the Saturday after Pentecost.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra: Bb Trumpte, French Horn, String Ensemble (Violins (2), Viola & Cello), Timpani & Woodwinds (Flutes (2), Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major (BWV 1068) for Small Orchestra

12 parts59 pages26:06a year ago916 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Johann Sebastian Bach probably wrote his Suite for Orchestra No 3 in D major, BWV 1068 in 1731. This was not the sort of music he normally wrote; it is lighter fare than his normally more rigorous, sacred or fugal fare. Suites for orchestra were also called overtures, and they were an all-purpose form of entertainment, featuring some pretensions of French culture, which was the most sought-after affectation among the royals of Europe in the eighteenth century. The genre was a collection of excerpts from French ballets and operas, and the arrangement of the form was an overture (the beginning of a stage work) followed by a collection of dances. Garden parties, trade fairs, and every other sort of celebration were good spots for these pieces.

Bach wrote only four of these works; it was not the sort of thing he did naturally. However, the local groups of players in Leipzig, called Collegium Musicum, required music; he had been appointed its director in 1729, on top of his normal duties at the Thomas School. His political position in Leipzig was usually tenuous because he was frequently petitioning the city council for a better wage, better teaching and conducting conditions, and more money for music in general. For this he probably needed to commit to acts of good faith, and music such this Orchestral Suite in D major would have been exactly what the city council and citizens enjoyed.

This work was most likely revived from a similar piece he wrote around 1720 in Cöthen. Its Leipzig premiere probably took place "at the Zimmermann Coffee House in the Cather-Strasse from 8 to 10 on Friday." This unearthed advertisement for the concert features the D major Orchestral Suite. For someone who stood back from the world of light, entertainment music, Bach was good at writing it. This suite uses a rich blend of timbre, featuring oboes, trumpets, timpani, strings, and continuo. Its second movement, Air, (also known as "Air on the G String") centers around one of the most well known melodies he ever wrote. Bach approaches the music with his personal instincts intact, and leans as much toward Italy as much as France in this material. The visceral, propulsive nature of Vivaldi's concertos find their way into all these orchestral suites.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/orchestral-suite-no-3-in-d-major-bwv-1068-mc0002393446).

Although originally written for 2 Oboes, 3 Trumpets, Timpani, Strings & Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major (BWV 1068) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Te Deum" (Opus 155) for Small Orchestra

12 parts17 pages02:255 years ago852 views
Trumpet(2), Strings(4), Timpani, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Robert Führer (1807 - 1861) was born in Praha, he became the Director of Music at the Dome in 1839 at the age of 32. He was deemed to be most talented, but he lived a most expensive style of life. To support this extravagant lifestyle he sold a valuable Stradivarius violin which was owned by the Dome. This fact was discovered in 1843, when he was dismissed for the crime. Without a church to call home he wandered through several different towns and villages, but never stayed in any one place for too long. During this period he had to support himself from sales of his church music compositions. Luckily this was successful because his music was well loved. No other composer's works enjoyed as widespread performance amongst the choirs in South Germany and Austria. His musical style varies from a composer such as Mozart, and is more in keeping with that of an early Caecilian. His works were often written for rural choirs, meaning that they were not too musically demanding. In spite of this, larger and more difficult works can be found in his repertoire. Although his works were sometimes judged to not have been "carefully" composed, he surely was a talented and experienced composer, well loved by his public, and had an innate sense for composing a beautiful melodic line.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra: Trumpets (2), String Ensemble (Violins (2), Violas & Cellos), French Horn, Timpani & Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorale: "Jesu, der du meine Seele" (BWV 78 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts35 pages05:263 years ago848 views
Trumpet, Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Jesu, der du meine Seele (Jesus, You, who my soul), BWV 78, is a church cantata of Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 14th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 10 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Johann Rist.

Bach wrote the cantata in his second year in Leipzig, when he composed an annual cycle of chorale cantatas. For the 14th Sunday after Trinity, 10 September 1724, he chose the chorale of Johann Rist (1641) in 12 stanzas. Rist set the words and probably also the melody. An unknown librettist wrote the poetry for seven movements, keeping the first and last stanza and quoting some of the original lines as part of his own writing in the other movements. Movement 2 corresponds to stanza 2 of the chorale, 6 to 11, 3 to 3–5, 4 to 6–7, and 5 to 8–10.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Galatians, Paul's teaching on "works of the flesh" and "fruit of the Spirit" (Galatians 5:16–24), and from the Gospel of Luke, Cleansing ten lepers (Luke 17:11–19). The chorale seems only distantly related, dealing with the Passion of Jesus, which cleanses the believer. The poet refers to sickness and healing in a few lines, more than the chorale does, such as "Du suchst die Kranken" (you search for the sick).

The cantata is remarkable for its widely contrasting affects: meditative profundity in the opening chorus, nearly joyful though hesitant bouncing in the second movement, and despair in the third.

The opening chorus "Jesu, der du meine Seele" (Jesus, You, who my soul) is a chorale fantasia in the form of a passacaglia. The theme, known as passus duriusculus or chromatic fourth, appears 27 times, sometimes reversed, sometimes in different keys. It was already known before Bach, who used it first in movement 5 of his early cantata for Easter Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4, and notably in Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12, which was a model for the Crucifixus of his Mass in B minor. The soprano has the cantus firmus, the other part expresses the meaning of the words in polyphony on a variety of motifs.

Source: Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesu,_der_du_meine_Seele,_BWV_78)

Although originally scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, violone and basso continuo including organ and horn in the opening chorus, I created this arrangement for Winds (Bb Trumpet, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viloa & Cello).

Graduale: "Pie Jesu" for Small Orchestra

12 parts11 pages02:305 years ago774 views
Franz Bühler (1760 - 1823) was a German composer and Organist. In 1794 he became organ player in Bolzano, 1804 director of choir in Augsburg. His compositions are in a strict classic style and were in his time widely spread. Besides larger works he wrote also short and easy works for rural choirs.

The Gradual (Latin: graduale) is a chant or hymn in the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist for many Christian denominations. In the Tridentine Mass it was and is sung after the reading or chanting of the Epistle and before the Alleluia, or, during penitential seasons, before the Tract. In the Mass of Paul VI the gradual corresponds to the Responsorial Psalm. There is the option to replace this psalm with the gradual, but its use is extremely rare. It is part of the Proper of the Mass.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra: String Ensemble (Violins (2), Violas & Cellos), French Horn, Eb Alto Horn, Timpani & Woodwinds (Flutes (2), Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus & Arioso: "Ihr werdet weinen und heulen" (BWV 103 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts27 pages05:553 years ago729 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(6), Contrabass
Ihr werdet weinen und heulen (You shall weep and wail), BWV 103, is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the third Sunday after Easter, called Jubilate (Jubilate Sunday).

Bach composed the cantata in his second year as Thomaskantor in Leipzig and first performed it on 22 April 1725. It is the first of nine cantatas on texts by Christiana Mariana von Ziegler, which Bach composed at the end of his second annual cycle of cantatas in Leipzig. Based on the Gospel reading from the Farewell Discourse, where Jesus, announcing that he will leave, says "your sorrow shall be turned into joy", Bach contrasts music of sorrow and joy, notably in the unusual first movement, where he inserts an almost operatic recitative of Jesus in the fugal choral setting. The architecture of the movement combines elements of the usual concerto form with the more text-related older form of a motet. Bach scores an unusual flauto piccolo (descant recorder in D) as an obbligato instrument in an aria contemplating the sorrow of missing Jesus, who is addressed as a doctor who shall heal the wounds of sins. Bach scores a trumpet in only one movement, an aria expressing the joy about the predicted return of Jesus. The cantata in six movements closes with a chorale, the ninth stanza of Paul Gerhardt's hymn "Barmherzger Vater, höchster Gott".

The cantata begins in B minor, illustrating sorrow, but in movement 4 shifts to the relative major key of D major, illustrating the theme of consolation in Ziegler's text.

The opening chorus has an unusual structure, which includes an arioso passage for the bass voice. All instruments except the trumpet play a ritornello, after which a choral fugue pictures the weeping and wailing of the text in unrelated musical material, rich in chromaticism. In great contrast the following line, "aber die Welt wird sich freuen" (But the world will rejoice), is conveyed by the chorus embedded in a repeat of the first part of the ritornello. The sequence is repeated on a larger scale: this time the fugue renders both lines of the text as a double fugue with the second theme taken from the ritornello, then the ritornello is repeated in its entirety. The bass as the vox Christi (voice of Christ) sings three times, with a sudden tempo change to adagio, "Ihr aber werdet traurig sein" (But you will be sad) as an accompagnato recitative. Musicologist Julian Mincham notes: "This recitative is a mere eight bars long but its context and piteousness give it enormous dramatic impact. Bach's lack of respect for the conservative Leipzig authorities' dislike of operatic styles in religious music was never more apparent!" Klaus Hofmann compares the recitative's "highly expressive melody and harmony" to Bach's Passions. Finally, the extended sequence of fugue and ritornello with chorus returns transposed, on the text "Doch eure Traurigkeit soll in Freude verkehret werden" (Yet your sorrow shall be changed into joy). According to Alfred Dürr, the architecture of the movement is a large scale experiment combining elements of the older style of a text-related motet with the form of a concerto of instrumental groups and voices, as typically used by Bach.
John Eliot Gardiner, 2007

Movement 2 is a secco recitative for tenor, concluding in an arioso section with a "deeply moving" melisma on the word "Schmerzen" (sorrows). Movement 3, "Kein Arzt ist außer dir zu finden" (Besides You is no doctor to be found) is an aria for alto with the obbligato flauto piccolo, which according to Mincham, employs a "figuration ever striving upwards, moderates the underlying sense of potential tragedy". The alto recitative "marks a change of scene", it begins in B minor, like the opening chorus, but modulates to D-major and ends with a wide-ranging coloratura marking the word "Freude" (joy). Movement 5, "Erholet euch, betrübte Sinnen" (Recover now, O troubled feelings), picks up the joyful coloraturas, supported by the trumpet and fanfares in triads in the orchestra, Mincham notes that the trumpet "bursts upon us with an energy, acclamation and jubilation unheard, so far, in this work". The cantata is closed with a four-part setting of the chorale, sung to the melody of "Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit" which Bach used frequently, including in his St Matthew Passion.

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, trumpet, flauto piccolo (descant recorder in D), two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ihr_werdet_weinen_und_heulen,_BWV_103).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus & Arioso: "Ihr werdet weinen und heulen" (You shall weep and wail)for Winds (Flute, Oboe, A Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (4 Violins, Violas, Cellos & Double Basses).

Coro: "Herrscher des Himmels, erhöre das Lallen" (BWV 248 No 24) for Organ & Small Orchestra

12 parts10 pages04:123 years ago679 views
Trumpet(2), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Organ
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Coro: "Herrscher des Himmels, erhöre das Lallen" (Ruler of Heaven, hear the murmur) for Pipe Organ & Small Orchestra (2 Bb Trumpets, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Scotland The Brave - ANZAC SONG - For Pipes and Drums

12 parts20 pages01:505 months ago196 views
Bagpipe(5), Flute, Other Woodwinds(2), Percussion(2), Tuba, French Horn
So the reason i chose to do this piece of music is because of it's legacy. It was played by the Scots throughout history and especially during WW1. As an Australian who's grandfather fought in combat and therefor marches in the ANZAC parade, i am deeply connected to hearing this song played during the march. It is very powerful and is known to increase the moral of men during WW1. I'd also like to thank Mike Magadan for the original arrangement of this score. Now, enjoy.

Chorale: "Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ" (BWV 91 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts24 pages03:183 years ago498 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(7)
Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ (Praise be to You, Jesus Christ), BWV 91, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote the Christmas cantata in Leipzig in 1724 for Christmas Day and first performed it on 25 December 1724. The chorale cantata is based on the hymn "Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ" (1524) by Martin Luther.

The chorale cantata from Bach's second annual cycle is based on the main chorale for Christmas Day, "Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ" (1524) by Martin Luther. The beginning summarizes Christmas in two lines: "Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ, daß du Mensch geboren bist" (Praise be to You, Jesus Christ, since You were born a man). All stanzas end with the acclamation Kyrieleis. The cantata was Bach's first composed for Christmas Day in Leipzig; in his first year in Leipzig 1723 he had chosen to perform again Christen, ätzet diesen Tag, BWV 63, written before in Weimar.

The prescribed readings for the feast day were from the Epistle of Titus, "God's mercy appeared" (Titus 2:11–14) or from Isaiah, "Unto us a child is born" (Isaiah 9:2–7), and from the Gospel of Luke, the Nativity, Annunciation to the shepherds and the angels' song (Luke 2:1–14). The unknown poet of the cantata text kept the first and the last stanza, expanded verse 2 by recitatives, transformed stanzas 3 and 4 to movement 3, an aria, stanza 5 to a recitative, and stanza 6 again to an aria.

Bach performed the cantata again four more times on 25 December, in 1731, in 1732 or 1733, and twice in the 1740s, even after his Christmas Oratorio had been first performed in 1734, which also uses two stanzas of Luther's chorale.

The opening chorus makes use of four choirs: the voices, the horns, the oboes and the strings. The material from the ritornellos is present also in interludes between the five lines and as accompaniment for the vocal parts. The choral melody is sung by the soprano. The lower voices are set in imitation for the first and the last line, in chords for the second and fourth line, and in a combination in the central line "Von einer Jungfrau, das ist wahr" (from a virgin, this is true).

In movement 2, the recitative is contrasted with chorale phrases, which are accompanied by a repetition of the first line of the chorale in double tempo. The tenor aria is accompanied by three oboes, whereas the strings illuminate the following recitative. The last aria is a duet, contrasting "Armut" (poverty) and "Überfluss" (abundance), "Menschlich Wesen" (human being), rendered in chromatic upward lines, and "Engelsherrlichkeiten" (angelic splendours), shown in coloraturas and triadic melodies.

At times the horns have independent parts in the closing chorale and embellish especially the final Kyrieleis.

Although originally scored for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass, a four-part choir, two horns, timpani, three oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (5 Violins, Violas, & Cellos) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Jauchzet, ihr erfreuten Stimmen" (BWV 120 No 2) for Small Orchestra

12 parts25 pages07:444 years ago394 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Strings(4)
Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille (God, You are praised in the stillness), BWV 120, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the occasion of Ratswechsel, the inauguration of a new town council in a church service, probably in 1742. Parts of the cantata appeared in a wedding cantata (BWV 120a) and a cantata (BWV 120b) commemorating the Augsburg Confession in 1730. Bach reworked the choral second movement for the Symbolum Nicenum of his Mass in B minor.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the inauguration of the newly elected town council, which took place in a festive service at the Nikolaikirche on the Monday following St. Bartholomew's Day (24 August). A first performance in 1728 or 1729 was regarded as likely, but more recent sources such as Klaus Hofmann date it to 1742. The autographed score of that performance is preserved, with the heading "J. J. Concerto à 4 Voci. due Hautb. due Violini, Viola, 3 Trombe, Tamburi è | Continuo". Parts of the cantata appear in the wedding cantata Herr Gott, Beherrscher aller Dinge, BWV 120a and a cantata Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille, BWV 120b for the 200th anniversary of the Augsburg Confession in 1730. The latter work's music is lost, only parts of the former cantata are extant. Bach reworked the first part of the second movement Jauchzet, ihr erfreuten Stimmen for the Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum in the Symbolum Nicenum (Credo) of his Mass in B minor.

The first movement is based on Psalm 65:2. It is unusual for Bach to open a festive cantata with a solo voice, but the words "aus der Stille" (out of silence) may have prompted him to write it for alto and two oboe d'amore. The first part of the jubilant second movement, a chorus dominated by the full orchestra, was adapted for the Mass in B minor. The soprano aria with solo violin is probably based on an earlier work from Bach's time in Köthen that served as a model also for a movement of a violin sonata BWV 1019a. The tenor recitative is accompanied by strings to underline its character as a prayer for justice and future blessings. The words for the final chorale are taken from the German Te Deum "Herr Gott, dich loben wir" by Martin Luther.

Although it was originally written for four soloists, soprano, alto, tenor and basso, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra 3 Bb Trumpets, Flute, Oboe French Horn, Euphonium, Timpani and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Chorus: "Nun danket alle Gott" (BWV 192 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts45 pages07:024 years ago372 views
Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank ye all our God), BWV 192, is a church cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in Leipzig in 1730.

BWV 192 is a chorale cantata. It was likely first performed in late 1730, but its exact date and occasion are unknown. It may have been written for a wedding. The original score is no longer extant. The tenor part was lost and was reconstructed by scholar Gunther Raphael.

The cantata begins with a chorale fantasia. Unusually, the ritornello is followed not by the chorale melody, but by a four-part dialogue. The first chorale phrase appears in the soprano voice over imitative counterpoint in the lower voices and staccato chords in the accompaniment.

The duet aria is introduced by a ritornello "with a double hiatus suggestive of modesty or diffidence". The movement is structurally like a da capo aria but lacks a contrasting middle section.

The work ends with another chorale fantasia with a "rollicking gigue melody". It is in ritornello form, with the soprano carrying the chorale melody. As in the first movement, the lower voices sing imitative lines.

Although originally scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, three oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Trumpets, French Horn & F Tuba) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen" (BWV 66 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts39 pages10:183 years ago361 views
Flute, Oboe, Guitar, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(3), Viola(2), Cello(2)
Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen (Rejoice, you hearts), BWV 66, is a church cantata for Easter by Johann Sebastian Bach. The cantata is Bach's first composition for Easter in Leipzig. The day before, on Easter Sunday of 1724, he had performed Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4. He derived the cantata for the Second Day of Easter ("den zweiten Osterfesttag") from his earlier secular work, the Serenata Der Himmel dacht auf Anhalts Ruhm und Glück composed in Köthen. On the Third Day of Easter of 1724 he performed Ein Herz, das seinen Jesum lebend weiß, BWV 134, which he derived in a similar way from Die Zeit, die Tag und Jahre macht, BWV 134a, a cantata to celebrate the New Year's Day of 1719 in Köthen.

Bach performed the cantata again in Leipzig on 26 March 1731 and probably on 11 April 1735.

This, the exuberant first movement, was derived from the final movement of the secular cantata. It opens with a virtuoso orchestral introduction of 24 measures, depicting vital joy. First the alto shouts: "Erfreut, ihr Herzen" (Rejoice, you hearts), the tenor continues "Entweichet, ihr Schmerzen" (fade away, you sorrows), all voices proclaim in homophony: "Es lebet der Heiland und herrschet in euch" (the Savior lives and rules within you). The middle section is given mostly to alto and tenor, who illustrate mourning and fear in a sorrowful "series of poignant descending chromatic passages and suspensions", although the words speak of the chasing away these moods: "Ihr könnet verjagen das Trauren, das Fürchten, das ängstliche Zagen" (You can drive away mourning, fear, anxious despair). The continuo plays repeated "trembling" notes, a "heartbeat" as Bach used later in the tenor recitative of his St Matthew Passion, "O Schmerz! Hier zittert das gequälte Herz" (O pain! Here trembleth the tormented heart). Finally the choir enters, one voice after the other building a chord, gently adding words of consolation: "Der Heiland erquicket sein geistliches Reich" (the Savior revives his spiritual kingdom). The instruments throw in motifs of the introduction, leading to the recapitulation of the first section. The movement has been termed "one of the longest and most exhilarating of Bach’s early works".

The cantata in six movements is festively scored for alto, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, trumpet, two oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo including bassoon.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erfreut_euch,_ihr_Herzen,_BWV_66).

I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (3 Violins, 2 Violas & 2 Cellos).

Chorus: "Liebster Immanuel, Herzog der Frommen" (BWV 123 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts36 pages05:243 years ago347 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Liebster Immanuel, Herzog der Frommen (Dearest Emmanuel, duke of the pious), BWV 123, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in his second year in Leipzig to conclude a set of Christmas cantatas on the Feast of Epiphany.

In the opening chorus Bach uses the beginning of the chorale melody as an instrumental motif, first in a long introduction, then as a counterpoint to the voices. The soprano sings the cantus firmus. The lower voices are set mostly in homophony with two exceptions. The text "Komme nur bald" (come soon) is rendered by many calls in the lower voices. The text of the final line is first sung by the bass on the melody of the first line, which alto and tenor imitate to the soprano singing the text on the melody of the last line, thus achieving a connection of beginning and end of the movement. The prominent woodwinds, two flutes and two oboes d'amore, and the 9/8 time create a pastoral mood.

The tenor aria, accompanied by two oboes d'amore, speaks of "harte Kreuzesreise" (harsh journey of the Cross), illustrated by a chromatic ritornello of four measures in constant modulation. Christoph Wolff terms the material "bizarre chromatic melodic figures". When the ritornello appears again at the end of the first section, it is calmer in the melodies, with the chromatic theme in the continuo, perhaps because the singer claims he is not frightened. In the middle section, thunderstorms are pictured "allegro" in "exuberant passage-work" of the voice, calming to "adagio" on "Heil und Licht", the reference to the Epiphany.

The bass aria is termed by John Eliot Gardiner, who performed the cantata on the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage in the Nikolaikirche in Leipzig, as "one of the loneliest arias Bach ever wrote". The voice is only accompanied by a single flute and a "staccato" continuo. Gardiner compares the flute to "some consoling guardian angel".

The cantata is closed by an unusual four-part chorale. The Abgesang of the bar form is repeated, the repeat marked piano. The reason is likely the text which ends "bis man mich einsten legt ins Grab hinein" (until one day I am laid in the grave). Alfred Dürr notes such soft endings also in Bach's early cantatas Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit, BWV 106 and Gott, wie dein Name, so ist auch dein Ruhm, BWV 171, but also in Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt, BWV 68.

The cantata in six movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, two flauto traverso, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebster_Immanuel,_Herzog_der_Frommen,_BWV_123).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Chorus "Liebster Immanuel, Herzog der Frommen" (Dearest Emmanuel, duke of the pious) for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & F Tuba) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot" (BWV 39 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts27 pages05:583 years ago333 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot (Break your bread for the hungry), BWV 39,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig and first performed it on 23 June 1726, the first Sunday after Trinity. About three years earlier, on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1723, Bach had taken office as Thomaskantor and started his first cycle of cantatas for the occasions of the liturgical year, and on the first Sunday after Trinity 1724 he began his second cycle, consisting of chorale cantatas. As he composed no new work for the first Sunday after Trinity 1725, Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot is regarded as part of his third cantata cycle.

Bach set the opening movement as a complex choral structure, but the central movement as a simple solo for the bass voice, traditionally considered the voice of Jesus. The instrumentation is for woodwinds and strings, including recorders as a symbol of poverty, need and humility. It is possibly the last time that Bach scored recorders in his cantatas.

According to Christoph Wolff and Klaus Hofmann, the cantata text is taken from a 1704 collection which is attributed to Duke Ernst Ludwig von Sachsen-Meiningen. Works from this collection had been set to music by the court composer Johann Ludwig Bach, whose cantatas Bach had frequently performed in 1725. They all start with an Old Testament quotation, then focus on a New Testament passage in a central movement. The librettist organized the text in seven poetic movements, divided into two distinct parts. Both parts begin with a quotation from the Bible, but not, as in several other Bach cantatas, taken from the prescribed readings. Part I starts with a quotation from the Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 58:7–8), Part II begins with a quotation from the Epistle to the Hebrews (Hebrews 13:16), which forms the text for the central fourth movement. The first part derives from the words of the prophet a call to love one's neighbour and to share God's gifts, the second part similarly deals with thanks for God's gifts and makes a promise to love one's neighbour and share. The poet closed the cantata with stanza 6 from David Denicke's hymn "Kommt, laßt euch den Herren lehren" (1648), which summarizes the ideas. This hymn is sung to the melody of "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele", which was codified by Louis Bourgeois when setting the Geneva Psalm 42 in his collection of Psaumes octante trios de David (Geneva, 1551). Bourgeois seems to have been influenced by the secular song "Ne l'oseray je dire" contained in the Manuscrit de Bayeux published around 1510.

Bach first performed the cantata on 23 June 1726. It is considered to be part of Bach's third annual cantata cycle in Leipzig. While the first and second cycle lasted one year, according to Christoph Wolff, the cantatas of the third cycle date from a period beginning on the first Sunday after Trinity, 3 June 1725, and lasting for about three years. Musicologist Julian Mincham notes that "Bach attached personal significance to this particular day and consequently sought to parade a work of considerable substance".

The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, alto and bass), a four-part choir, two alto recorders, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. The recorders (flauti dolci) represent poverty, need and a "mood of humility". It is possibly the last time that Bach scored recorders in his cantatas.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brich_dem_Hungrigen_dein_Brot,_BWV_39).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Chorus: "Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot" (Break your bread for the hungry) for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Clarinets, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Exaudi Domine Iustitiam Meam" for Winds & Strings

12 parts8 pages03:045 years ago323 views
Václav Jindřich Veit (German: Wenzel Heinrich Veit 1806 - 1864) was a Czech composer, copyist, pianist and lawyer.

To pay tuition at a law school in Prague, Veit gave music lessons. After earning his law degree and getting a position as a legal clerk, Veit continued to teach music and even started writing music. He wrote mostly chamber music, and later on in his life wrote more and more songs with texts in Czech, such as "Pozdravení pěvcovo". He also wrote some church music, including a setting of the Te Deum and a couple of masses. Although he wrote some orchestral music, such as a violin concertino and a parody of Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique, Veit only wrote one symphony, in E minor, which is however considered "a notable milestone in the development of the Czech symphonic style.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, Bassoon), Brass (Alto Horn & French Horn) and String Ensemble (Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass & Contrabass). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Laßt uns sorgen, laßt uns wachen" (BWV 213 No 1) for Winds & Strings

12 parts18 pages06:032 years ago267 views
Trumpet(2), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Laßt uns sorgen, laßt uns wachen (Let us take care, let us watch over), BWV 213,[a] is a secular cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed it in Leipzig on a text by Picander and first performed it on 5 September 1733. It is also known as Die Wahl des Herkules (The choice of Hercules) and Hercules am Scheidewege (Hercules at the crossroads).

The cantata is scored for two voices: the farmer (bass) and Mieke (soprano). The instrumentation includes a string trio of violin, viola and basso continuo, accompanied by a flute, horn and second violin respectively.

The work was a dramma per musica describing the story of "Hercules at the Crossroads". Bach composed the piece for the 11th birthday of Crown Prince Friedrich Christian of Saxony. It was first performed in Leipzig on 5 September 1733 at Zimmermann's coffeehouse (the locale celebrated in the Coffee Cantata).

Bach used the aria "Schlafe, mein Liebster" in a revised form in Part II of his Christmas Oratorio. A duet of the cantata and the duet "Et in unum Dominum" from his Mass in B minor share a common lost base.

The cantata has four vocal soloists: Lust (soprano), Hercules (alto), Virtue (tenor), and Mercury (bass). It is also scored for a four-part choir, two horns, oboe d'amore, two oboes, two violins, two violas (or viola and bassoon), and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La%C3%9Ft_uns_sorgen,_la%C3%9Ft_uns_wachen,_BWV_213).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Laßt uns sorgen, laßt uns wachen" (Let us take care, let us watch over) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Weil du vom Tod erstanden bist" (BWV 15 No 9) for Small Orchestra

12 parts12 pages04:113 years ago231 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Denn du wirst meine Seele nicht in der Hölle lassen (For you shall not leave my soul in hell), JLB 21, BWV 15, is a church cantata spuriously attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach but most likely composed by Johann Ludwig Bach.

The piece was initially thought to be an early work of Johann Sebastian Bach. However, Bach scholars reattributed the piece to his cousin, Johann Ludwig Bach. The piece was likely composed in Meiningen in 1704 for the first day of Eastertide, known as Easter Sunday. There is some evidence that it may have been performed again under the aegis of Johann Sebastian Bach on 21 April 1726 in Leipzig. The prescribed readings for the day are 1 Corinthians 5: 6-8 and Mark 16: 1-8.

It has been proposed that the text may have been authored by Christoph Helm (as suggested by W. Blankenburg) or by Herzog Ernst Ludwig von Sachsen-Meinigen (as suggested by K. Kuester).

The piece is scored for two corni da caccia, two oboes, timpani, one oboe da caccia, violins, violas and viola da gamba, and basso continuo, four vocal soloists (soprano, altus, tenor, and bassus) and four-part choir.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denn_du_wirst_meine_Seele_nicht_in_der_H%C3%B6lle_lassen).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "Weil du vom Tod erstanden bist" (Because you have been raised from the dead) for Small Orchestra (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Coro: "Friede über Israel" (BWV 34 No 5) for Small Orchestra

12 parts15 pages03:043 years ago208 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
O ewiges Feuer, o Ursprung der Liebe (O eternal fire, o source of love), BWV 34,[a] is a church cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach as an adaptation of a previously composed secular cantata, BWV 34a. This piece reached its current form in Leipzig in 1740 or by 1746 for the first day of Pentecost. The date of the work's premiere is unknown, but it certainly took place in or before 1746.

The opening chorus presents the image of eternal heavenly flame. The instrumental ritornello comprises a sustained trumpet entry, active strings, and "flickering" oboes, drums, and trumpets. Unlike in most da capo movements, this ritornello appears only at the beginning and end. Each voice enters on a long note, imitating the trumpet and presenting the notion of "eternal Divine Love shining through the ongoing flames of consecration". The middle section develops these themes in minor keys before the ritornello returns to reprise the A section.

The two recitatives (the second and fourth movements, for tenor and bass respectively) are quite similar in character: they adopt an authoritative tone, are in minor mode, and begin with a bass pedal.

The alto aria conveys images of contentment by incorporating a lilting berceuse-like rhythm, with violin obbligato and flute in tenths and octaves. It is accompanied by a tonic pedal in the continuo. The aria is in adapted ternary form.

The closing chorus adopts the end of the bass recitative as its introduction. The violins and oboes then play an ascending figure to introduce the new melody. The movement is structured as a 12-bar instrumental section, repeated with choir, followed by a 31-bar instrumental section, repeated with choir.

The piece is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, bass) and four-part choir, two oboes, two flauti traversi, timpani (tamburi), three trombe in D, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_ewiges_Feuer,_o_Ursprung_der_Liebe,_BWV_34).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chor: "Friede über Israel" (Peace upon Israel) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet in Bb, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).