Sheet music with 13 instruments

"Fossils" from the "Carnival of the Animals" for Winds & Strings

13 parts7 pages01:212 years ago3,458 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Carnival of the Animals" is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

It was composed in February 1886 while Saint-Saëns was vacationing in a small Austrian village. It was originally scored for a chamber group of flute/piccolo, clarinet (B flat and C), two pianos, glass harmonica, xylophone, two violins, viola, cello and double bass, but is usually performed today with a full orchestra of strings, and with a glockenspiel substituting for the rare glass harmonica. The term for this rare 11-piece musical ensemble is a "hendectet" or an "undectet."

Saint-Saëns, apparently concerned that the piece was too frivolous and likely to harm his reputation as a serious composer, suppressed performances of it and only allowed one movement, Le cygne, to be published in his lifetime. Only small private performances were given for close friends like Franz Liszt.

Saint-Saëns did, however, include a provision which allowed the suite to be published after his death. It was first performed on 26 February 1922, and it has since become one of his most popular works. It is a favorite of music teachers and young children, along with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. In fact, it is very common to see any combination of these three works together on modern CD recordings.

Movement 12. Fossiles (Fossils)

Strings, two pianos, clarinet, and xylophone: Here, Saint-Saëns mimics his own composition, the Danse macabre, which makes heavy use of the xylophone to evoke the image of skeletons playing card games, the bones clacking together to the beat. The musical themes from Danse macabre are also quoted; the xylophone and the violin play much of the melody, alternating with the piano and clarinet. The piano part is especially difficult here - octaves that jump in quick thirds. Allusions to "Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman" (better known in the English-speaking world as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star), the French nursery rhymes "Au clair de la lune", and "J'ai du bon tabac" (the piano plays the same melody upside down), the popular anthem Partant pour la Syrie, as well as the aria Una voce poco fa from Rossini's The Barber of Seville can also be heard.


Although originally written for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra

13 parts17 pages02:33a year ago2,564 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work..

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Halleluja Chorus: "Gedenk, Herr Jesu, an dein Amt" (BWV 143 No 7) for Small Orchestra

13 parts15 pages02:264 years ago1,050 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele (Praise the Lord, O my soul), BWV 143, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. It is not known if he composed the cantata for New Year's Day in Mühlhausen or Weimar, between 1708 and 1714.The librettist is unknown. The cantata draws from Psalm 146 and the hymn Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ by Jakob Ebert to develop its seven movements.

Bach wrote the cantata for New Year's Day, which is also the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ. The prescribed readings for the day were from the Epistle to the Galatians, "by faith we inherit" (Galatians 3:23–29), and from the Gospel of Luke, the circumcision and naming of Jesus eight days after his birth. However, most of the text for the cantata was taken by the unknown librettist from Psalms 146. Movements 2 and 7 are the first and third stanza from the chorale "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" by Jakob Ebert, written in 1601.

The provenance of this cantata is disputed: some suggest that it may not be a Bach work because of its "unpretentious" nature and the lack of authoritative original music, or perhaps it was a transposition of an earlier work. Alternatively, part of the cantata may have been written by Bach, while other parts (likely the choruses and the bass aria) were added or amended by other composers.

The opening chorus is quite short, using imitative fanfare figures without much harmonic development. It employs a ritornello theme on the tonic and dominant chords, incorporating a descending-third sequence. Its text is the opening of Psalm 146.

The soprano chorale is accompanied by a violin obbligato. Although the vocal line is mostly undecorated, it is accompanied by a rhythmically active violin counterpoint following the circle of fifths. The obbligato line reaches a double cadence before the soprano entrance.

The tenor recitative is quite short and is considered unremarkable.

The fourth movement is a tenor aria in free verse. The vocal line is "convoluted and angular", reflecting the themes of misfortune, fear and death. Musicologist Julian Mincham suggests that these themes suggest that Salomon Franck may be the poet, as these were recurrent images in his texts, but also notes a lack of integration atypical of Franck's oeuvre.

The bass aria employs a triadic motif similar to that of Gott ist mein König, BWV 71. It is short and has a limited range of tonal development or chromatic variation.

The sixth movement is another tenor aria characterized by the layered scale figuration in the instrumental accompaniment. The bassoon and continuo perform as a duet against the chorale melody in the strings.

The closing chorus employs the third stanza of the chorale as a cantus firmus in the soprano. The lower voices sing Alleluias and are more varied in their writing.

The cantata was scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, three corni da caccia, timpani, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobe_den_Herrn,_meine_Seele,_BWV_143).

I created this arrangement of the Halleluja Chorus: "Gedenk, Herr Jesu, an dein Amt" (Think, Lord, at this time on Your office) for Small Orchestra (2 Bb Trumpets, French Horn & F Tuba), Timpani, & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Hallelujah Chorus" from "Messiah" (HWV 56 No. 44) for Small Orchestra
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"Hallelujah Chorus" from "Messiah" (HWV 56 No. 44) for Small Orchestra

13 parts24 pages03:41a year ago967 views
Trumpet(2), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Piano(4)
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

At the end of his manuscript Handel wrote the letters "SDG"—Soli Deo Gloria, "To God alone the glory". This inscription, taken with the speed of composition, has encouraged belief in the apocryphal story that Handel wrote the music in a fervour of divine inspiration in which, as he wrote the "Hallelujah" chorus, "he saw all heaven before him". Many of Handel's operas, of comparable length and structure to Messiah, were composed within similar timescales between theatrical seasons.

Although originally written for Full Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violins, Violas & Cellos).

Chorale: "Herr Jesu Christ, wahr’ Mensch und Gott" (BWV 127 No 1) for Small Orchestra

13 parts31 pages05:214 years ago883 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Trumpet(2), Trombone, French Horn, Tuba, Strings(4)
Herr Jesu Christ, wahr' Mensch und Gott (Lord Jesus Christ, true Man and God), BWV 127, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the Sunday Estomihi, the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, and first performed it on 11 February 1725. It is based on the chorale in eight stanzas by Paul Eber (1562).

Bach wrote the chorale cantata in his second year in Leipzig for Estomihi. The Sunday, also called Quinquagesima, is the last Sunday before Lent, when Leipzig observed tempus clausum and no cantatas were performed. In 1723, Bach had probably performed two cantatas in Leipzig on that Sunday, Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn, BWV 23, composed earlier in Köthen, and Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe, BWV 22, both audition pieces to apply for the post of Thomaskantor in Leipzig.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were taken from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, "praise of love" (1 Corinthians 13:1–13), and from the Gospel of Luke, healing the blind near Jericho (Luke 18:31–43). The Gospel also announces the Passion. The text is based on the funeral song in eight stanzas by Paul Eber (1562). The hymn suites the Gospel, stressing the Passion as well as the request of the blind man in the final line of the first stanza: "Du wollst mir Sünder gnädig sein" (Be merciful to me, a sinner). The song further sees Jesus' path to Jerusalem as a model for the believer's path to his end in salvation. An unknown librettist kept the first and the last stanza and paraphrased the inner stanzas in a sequence of recitatives and arias. Stanzas 2 and 3 were transformed to a recitative, stanza 4 to an aria, stanza 5 to a recitative, stanzas 6 and 7 to another aria.

Bach first performed the cantata on 11 February 1725. It is the second to last chorale cantata of his second annual cycle, the only later one being BWV 1 for the feast of Annunciation which was celebrated even if it fell in the time of Lent.

The opening chorale is structured by an extended introduction and interludes. These parts play on a concertante a motif derived from the first line of the chorale, but also have a cantus firmus of the chorale "Christe, du Lamm Gottes", the Lutheran Agnus Dei, first played by the strings, later also by the oboes and recorders. It appears in a similar way to the chorale as the cantus firmus in the opening chorus of his later St Matthew Passion, "O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig (de)". Its request "erbarm dich unser" (have mercy upon us) corresponds to the request of the blind man. A third chorale is quoted repeatedly in the continuo, "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden". Christoph Wolff notes that on Good Friday of that year Bach would perform the second version of his St John Passion, replacing the opening and the closing movement of the first version by music based on chorales, "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" which would become the final movement of the first part of the St Matthew Passion, and again "Christe, du Lamm Gottes".

Bach chose a rare instrumentation for the first aria, the oboe plays a melody, supported by short chords in the recorders, in the middle section "Sterbeglocken" (funeral bells) are depicted by pizzicato string sounds. Movement 4 illustrates the Day of Judgement. On the text "Wenn einstens die Posaunen schallen" (When one day the trumpets ring out), the trumpet enters. The unusual movement combines an accompagnato recitative with an aria, contrasting the destruction of heaven and earth with the security of the believers, the latter given in text and tune from the chorale. John Eliot Gardiner describes it as a "grand, tableau-like evocation of the Last Judgement, replete with triple occurrences of a wild 6/8 section when all hell is let loose in true Monteverdian concitato ("excited") manner". He compares it to the "spectacular double chorus" from the St Matthew Passion "Sind Blitze, sind Donner in Wolken verschwunden".

The closing chorale is a four-part setting with attention to details of the text, such as movement in the lower voices on "auch unser Glaub stets wacker sei" (also may our faith be always brave) and colourful harmonies on the final line "bis wir einschlafen seliglich" (until we fall asleep contentedly).

Although originally scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, trumpet, two recorders, two oboes, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Trombone, French Horn, F Tuba and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.
Orchestral Suite in D Major No. 4 (BWV 1069) for Small Orchestra
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Orchestral Suite in D Major No. 4 (BWV 1069) for Small Orchestra

13 parts63 pages28:33a year ago766 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
It is unknown when Johann Sebastian Bach originally wrote his Suite for Orchestra No. 4 in D major, BWV 1069. The original version has never been found. Some scholars believe that the original music was absorbed into his Cantata 110 from 1725, which narrows down the work's date somewhat; it was not written after 1725, if this theory is correct. The third version takes the instrumental parts back out of the cantata and realizes them again for strings, oboes, trumpets, timpani, strings, and continuo. The orchestral suite is also called an overture; these terms are used interchangeably, though the opening movement of this genre is called an overture as well. It is generally made to imitate a collection of excerpts from French ballets and operas. French culture held sway over much of the rest of Europe in the eighteenth century. Many composers worked on this genre to the extent that it was the cornerstone of their output. Telemann, the most famous composer residing in Germany during Bach's lifetime, wrote upwards of over 1000 such orchestral suites. The beginnings of these orchestral suites imitates what one expects from an overture of a French grand opera, a poised, regal beginning, featuring the dotted rhythms that French aristocrats were particularly fond of in that day. These openings were then followed by collections of dances. There were general, fixed rules to how these dances were laid out, but those rules did not hold Bach fast. In general, this was not the sort of thing he enjoyed writing. His music tended to be either serious, or sacred, or both. He wrote a phenomenal amount of cantatas. Orchestral suites were something of a fluffier nature, foreshadowing the impending Gallant period. They were optimal for garden parties, trade fairs, and civic celebrations of all kinds, as well as an excellent source of income.

Bach wrote only four known orchestral suites, but he wrote them skillfully. Each of them is festive and fun. The secret ingredient in his overtures was to inject a bit of the Italian influence into each one. For all intents and purposes, Italian music was much more critical to Bach's style than French music ever was, particularly in his absorption of Vivaldi's concerto style, which brought out a speedy, visceral quality. Thus the lofty tones of the French sound never gets turgid or boring. Among the four orchestral suites, the fourth has some of the sweetest, loveliest qualities. It is in five movements, and is under 20 minutes in duration. Never intended for close listening, these pieces often reveal the good nature of a man who usually only offers ecstatic visions and musical epiphany. There are also many unearthed works by Bach for keyboard that are not intended as art, but these are meant for teaching, and the sort of accidental beauty they contain is different from the orchestral suites. They were meant as part of a perfect day, not for correcting performance problems. Listeners are recommended to enjoy these pieces without worrying about close listening. A similar collection of works, the Brandenburg Concertos, have a lot more in them for hearers to wrap their minds around. A comparison will reveal the orchestral suites to be airier, with more emphasis on engaging propulsion (the Italian influence) while the concertos have denser and more inspired contrapuntal lines. The question of quality is not really a fair one in this context; Bach's orchestral suites do exactly what they are supposed to do. It is also pleasant to take what the genius regards as simply "pleasant."

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/orchestral-suite-no-4-in-d-major-bwv-1069-mc0002366402).

Although originally written for 3 Oboes, Bassoon, 3 Trumpets, Timpani, Strings & Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major (BWV 1068) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorus: "Wenn soll es doch geschehen" (BWV11 No. 11) for Wind Ensemble

13 parts15 pages07:355 years ago746 views
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist of the Baroque period. He enriched many established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Mass in B minor, the The Well-Tempered Clavier, his cantatas, chorales, partitas, Passions, and organ works. His music is revered for its intellectual depth, technical command, and artistic beauty.

There are four extant works by Johan Sebastian Bach for the Feast of the Ascension, part of the liturgical cycle for Easter. Three are cantatas belonging to the cantata cycles composed in 1723-1724 (BWV37), 1724-1725 (BWV128), and 1725-1726 (BWV43). Although often designated as a cantata, the present work is more accurately described as a short oratorio, including as it does a narrative role for the Evangelist. It was composed in 1735, and first performed in one of the principal Leipzig churches on May 19 of that year. The Evangelist's narration was drawn by an unknown librettist from the Gospels of Luke and Mark, and the Acts of the Apostles. These sections plus two recitatives and the chorale placed at the center of the work are the only original parts of the oratorio, the opening and closing choruses, and the two arias all being drawn from previously written cantatas, now lost. The two choruses are planned on a grand scale, with the same brilliantly festive scoring (including three trumpets and drums) Bach had employed in Parts I, III, and IV of the Christmas Oratorio of 1734-1735. The closing chorus is chorale-based, using the hymn "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen" as a choral cantus firmus around which the orchestra weaves a joyously dance-like fantasia. "Ach bleibe doch," the alto aria is an extensive revision of an aria originally found in a lost wedding cantata, the same source the composer drew upon for the Agnus Dei of the Mass in B minor. The soprano aria "Jesu, deine Gandenblicke" is remarkable for the scoring of two flutes, oboe, violins, and violas without bass, the lightly translucent texture reflecting the text's allusion to Christ leaving his body to ascend to Heaven. The central section of recitative includes a telling piece of dramatization at the appearance of the angels, "two men in white apparel," whose words are addressed to the amazed onlookers as a duet.

Although the Chorus "Wenn soll es doch geschehen" ("When shall it Happen") was originally composed for Chorus (SATB) & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Wind Ensemble (Bb Trumpets (3), Flutes (2), Oboes (2), Bb Clarinets (2), French Horn, Bb Tuba, Timpani & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php)

"Gloria in Excelsis" from the Mass in F Major (BWV 233 No. 2) for Winds & Strings

13 parts22 pages06:272 years ago676 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), English Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Church music in Latin by Johann Sebastian Bach comprises about ten compositions, all composed during his Leipzig period. As a Lutheran church musician, Bach was more devoted to the composition of sacred music in German, writing hundreds of liturgical compositions in that language, and for instance also producing a German version of Pergolesi's Stabat Mater. Compared to Lutheran practice elsewhere, an uncharacteristic amount of Latin was however used in church services in Leipzig: it included music on Latin texts being performed on ordinary Sundays, on high holidays (Christmas, Easter, Pentecost), and the Magnificat also on Marian feasts (Annunciation, Visitation, Purification).

In Lutheran service, a Missa was a setting of only Kyrie and Gloria. Such a mass consisting of only Kyrie and Gloria is for that time period sometimes indicated as Missa brevis (literally: "short mass"). In 1733 Bach composed such a Missa brevis for the Catholic court in Dresden, however in an extended setting. In the late 1730s he again composed four Missae breves, mostly parodies of earlier cantata movements. At the end of his life he expanded the Missa for Dresden to his only setting of the complete Mass ordinary, the Mass in B minor.

Bach wrote four other settings of Kyrie and Gloria, sometimes called Missa brevis. The attribute brevis in this case means short in words, unlike the Missa brevis of the classical period which is short in duration. Sometimes the works are termed Lutheran mass, because the combination of only Kyrie and Gloria was used more frequently in the Lutheran liturgy.

They seem to have been intended for liturgical use, considering a performance time of about 20 minutes each, the average duration of a Bach cantata. They may have been composed around 1738/39. Possibly they were written for Count Franz Anton von Sporck or performed by him in Lysá.

Each Missa is in six movements, the Kyrie one choral movement in three sections, the Gloria in five movements. The first and last movement of the Gloria are also choral, framing three arias for different voice types. The music consists mostly of parodies of cantata movements. He changed the music slightly to adjust to the Latin words, but kept the original instrumentation. The opening chorus of Es wartet alles auf dich, BWV 187, became the final movement of the Missa in G minor, Cum sancto spiritu. Occasionally he switched a voice part, for example he asked for a tenor in the Quoniam of that Missa, a parody of the soprano aria Halt ich nur fest an ihm of that cantata.

For the Missa in F major, BWV 233, scored for horns, oboes, bassoon, strings, SATB, and basso continuo, Bach derived most of the six movements from earlier cantatas as parodies.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bach's_church_music_in_Latin#Settings_of_.28parts_of.29_the_Latin_mass_liturgy).

I created this arrangement of the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (Glory to God in the highest) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn Bass Clarinet & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorus: "Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele" (BWV 180 No 1) for Winds & Strings

13 parts39 pages05:364 years ago563 views
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (Adorn yourself, o dear soul), BWV 180, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 20th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 22 October 1724. The cantata text is based on the chorale "Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele" by Johann Franck.

Bach wrote the cantata in his second year in Leipzig as part of his second annual cycle of chorale cantatas for the 20th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 22 October 1724. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, "walk circumspectly, ... filled with the Spirit" (Ephesians 5:15--21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the great banquet (Matthew 22:1--14). The German term used in Luther's Bible translation is Hochzeitsmahl, literally "wedding meal". The cantata text is based on the Eucharistic chorale in nine stanzas Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, BWV 180 (1649) by Johann Franck,[3] thus connecting the "great banquet" from the gospel to the Abendmahl (Eucharist). The hymn is sung during a service in preparation for the holy communion, and imagines a bride getting ready for her wedding. An unknown author kept the text of the first, central and last stanza (1, 4, 9), and paraphrased the other stanzas to arias and recitatives, stanzas 2 and 7 to arias, stanzas 3, 5--6 and 8 to recitatives. He stayed close to the original and did not seek closer relation to the readings than given by the general context.

Compared to the early cantata for the same occasion, Ach! ich sehe, itzt, da ich zur Hochzeit gehe, BWV 162, Bach stresses the invitation of God and the joy of the banquet, rather than the possibility of man's failing to respond to the invitation. Alfred Dürr compares the opening chorus and both arias to dances, movement 1 to a gigue, movement 2 to a bourrée, movement 5 to a polonaise. The opening chorus is an orchestral concerto with the vocal parts embedded, the soprano singing the cantus firmus of the tune by Johann Crüger. John Eliot Gardiner sees the "relaxed 12/8 processional movement" as "perfectly tailored to the idea of the soul dressing itself up in all its wedding finery".

The following three movements are distinguished by their obbligato instruments. A flute accompanies the tenor voice in movement 2, "Ermuntre dich: dein Heiland klopft" (Be lively now, your Savior knocks). The knocking is expressed in repeated notes. The demanding flute part was probably composed for the excellent flute player for whom Bach first wrote a few weeks earlier in Was frag ich nach der Welt, BWV 94, and then in other cantatas during the fall of 1724. A violoncello piccolo complements the soprano in movement 3, which begins as a secco recitative "Wie teuer sind des heilgen Mahles Gaben" (How dear are the gifts of the holy meal) and leads to the fourth stanza of the chorale, "Ach, wie hungert mein Gemüte" (Ah, how my spirit hungers), sung in a moderately adorned version of the tune. In movement 4, two recorders reflect the text of the alto recitative which develops to an arioso, with the recorders first playing just long chords, then gradually adding movement. The full orchestra supports the soprano in the second aria "Lebens Sonne, Licht der Sinnen" (Sun of life, light of the senses). The last recitative, "Mein Herz fühlt in sich Furcht und Freude" (My heart feels its own fear and joy) is secco, but closes as an arioso on the words "und deiner Liebe stets gedenken" (and considers your love constantly). The closing chorale, "Jesu, wahres Brot des Lebens" (Jesus, true bread of life), is set for four parts.

Although originally scored for four soloists, soprano, alto, tenor and bass, four-part choir, and an orchestra of two recorders, flauto traverso, two oboes, oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, violoncello piccolo and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (2 Flutes, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Trumpet, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Christen, ätzet diesen Tag" (BWV 63 No 1) for Small Orchestra

13 parts22 pages05:493 years ago514 views
Trumpet(3), French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Christen, ätzet diesen Tag (Christians, engrave this day), BWV 63, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the Christmas cantata for the First Day of Christmas, possibly in 1713 for the Liebfrauenkirche in Halle. He performed it again for his first Christmas as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, on 25 December 1723.

The cantata is Bach's earliest extant cantata for Christmas, possibly composed in Weimar as early as 1713. The text of the cantata, which echoes theologians in Halle, suggests that it was composed with Halle's Liebfrauenkirche in mind, in 1713, when Bach applied to be organist of this church, or in 1716, when he was involved in rebuilding its organ. The text is possibly by that church's 'Pastor primarius' Johann Michael Heineccius, who also wrote the libretti for other Bach cantatas definitely written for Halle and had favoured Bach's application for organist at the church as a successor to Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow. Musicologist Christoph Wolff deducts from the "lavish forces" of four trumpets, timpani and three oboes on top of the strings, an unprecedented scoring in Bach's cantatas, that the work was not composed for the intimate Schloßkirche in Weimar. He dates it as 1714 or 1715. According to John Eliot Gardiner, the first performance may have taken place in Weimar in the church of St. Peter und Paul, performed by the combined musicians of the ducal Capelle and the town. The lack of a closing chorale, which closes most of Bach's later cantatas, has raised the question if the work is based on a secular cantata.

The cantata has a festive character but lacks certain features typically associated with Christmas music, such as Pastoral music, angels' song and cradle song, even a Christmas carol or chorale, as Gardiner words it: "The cantata contains none of the usual Nativity themes: no cradle song, no music for the shepherds or for the angels, not even the standard Christmas chorales". The symmetry of the text around the recitative "Nun kehret sich das bange Leid … in lauter Heil und Gnaden" (So now, today, the anxious sorrow is changed … into pure blessing and grace) is reflected in the music. The recitatives lean toward arioso at times, typical for Bach's music in the period. The choral movements show da capo form, but with distinctly contrasting middle sections, which relates to motet style. Wolff describes these movements as "fanfare-like frameworks", a cantabile choral setting contrasting with virtuoso orchestral playing in "secular dance".

Gardiner observes that the first recitative for alto, accompanied by the strings, contains "tortuous passage[s] in which voice and continuo struggle to free themselves from "Satan's slavish chains"". The cantata contains two duets, rare in Bach's cantatas, likely an expression of communal rejoicing which is expressed better in a duet than by a single voice. The second duet is a minuet, illustrating the words "Kommt, ihr Christen, kommt zum Reihen" (Come, you Christians, come to dance). Instead of the usual closing chorale, the cantata ends with a chorus "conceived on the largest of scales", full of energy. The trumpets begin with pompous fanfares, the voices first sing a fanfare, addressing the "highest", then open a permutation fugue which is later expanded by instrumental doubling and counteraction, to express the thanks of the devout souls. The middle section is a second fugue in similar style which ends with a "preposterous collective trill" on the word "quälen" (torment), observed by Mincham as "a passage of extraordinary intensity. The tempo slows, the harmony becomes tragic and chromatic and the whole feeling is that of deepest melancholy at the very thought of Satan’s embrace". Then a da capo of the complete first section ends the cantata on "the original celebratory flourishes of the complete ritornello theme".

In one of the later performances Bach changed the part of obbligato oboe in movement 3 to an organ, writing it himself in the part for the continuo organ.

The cantata in seven movements is festively scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, four trumpets, timpani, three oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, organ in a later version, and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christen,_%C3%A4tzet_diesen_Tag,_BWV_63).

I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (Bb Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sonata: "Der Himmel lacht! Die Erde jubilieret" (BWV 31 No 1) for Small Orchestra

13 parts17 pages05:253 years ago429 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Der Himmel lacht! Die Erde jubilieret (Heaven laughs! Earth exults), BWV 31,[a] is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the first day of Easter. Bach composed the cantata in Weimar and first performed it on 21 April 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schloßkirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. Bach composed the cantata for Easter Sunday in 1715.

The festive character of the work is demonstrated by a sonata with a fanfare-like introduction, a concerto of the three groups brass, reeds and strings, all divided in many parts. The first choral movement, sung by a five-part chorus, evokes the "celestial laughter and worldly jubilation" of the text, according to John Eliot Gardiner.

The cantata in nine movements is festively scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a five-part choir (SSATB), three trumpets, timpani, three oboes, taille (tenor oboe), bassoon, two violins, two violas, two cellos and basso continuo. The scoring for five parts in the choir, five parts in the woodwinds and six parts in the strings is unusual.

Source; Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Himmel_lacht!_Die_Erde_jubilieret,_BWV_31).

I created this arrangement of the opening Sonata: "Der Himmel lacht! Die Erde jubilieret" (Heaven laughs! Earth exults) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet in Bb, Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria & Coro: "Kommt, eilet und laufet" (BWV 249 No 3) for Small Orchestra

13 parts34 pages06:373 years ago425 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Guitar, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Easter Oratorio (BWV 249) is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, beginning with Kommt, eilet und laufet ("Come, hasten and run"). Bach composed it in Leipzig and first performed it on 1 April 1725.

The first version of the work was completed as a cantata for Easter Sunday in Leipzig on 1 April 1725, then under the title Kommt, gehet und eilet. It was named "oratorio" and given the new title only in a version revised in 1735. In a later version in the 1740s the third movement was expanded from a duet to a four-part chorus. The work is based on a secular cantata, the so-called Shepherd Cantata Entfliehet, verschwindet, entweichet, ihr Sorgen, BWV 249a which is now lost, although the libretto survives. Its author is Picander who is also likely the author of the oratorio's text. The work is opened by two instrumental movements that are probably taken from a concerto of the Köthen period. It seems possible that the third movement is based on the concerto's finale.

Unlike the Christmas Oratorio, the Easter Oratorio has no narrator but has four characters assigned to the four voice parts: Simon Peter (tenor) and John the Apostle (bass), appearing in the first duet hurrying to Jesus' grave and finding it empty, meeting there Mary Magdalene (alto) and "the other Mary", Mary Jacobe (soprano). The choir was present only in the final movement until a later performance in the 1740s when the opening duet was set partly for four voices. The music is festively scored for three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, oboe d'amore, bassoon, two recorders, transverse flute, two violins, viola and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Aria duetto & Coro: "Kommt, eilet und laufet, ihr flüchtigen Füße" (Come, hurry and run, you speedy feet) for Small Orchestra (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Höchster, schau in Gnaden an" (BWV 63 No 7) for Small Orchestra

13 parts22 pages10:163 years ago402 views
Trumpet(3), French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Christen, ätzet diesen Tag (Christians, engrave this day), BWV 63, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the Christmas cantata for the First Day of Christmas, possibly in 1713 for the Liebfrauenkirche in Halle. He performed it again for his first Christmas as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, on 25 December 1723.

The cantata is Bach's earliest extant cantata for Christmas, possibly composed in Weimar as early as 1713. The text of the cantata, which echoes theologians in Halle, suggests that it was composed with Halle's Liebfrauenkirche in mind, in 1713, when Bach applied to be organist of this church, or in 1716, when he was involved in rebuilding its organ. The text is possibly by that church's 'Pastor primarius' Johann Michael Heineccius, who also wrote the libretti for other Bach cantatas definitely written for Halle and had favoured Bach's application for organist at the church as a successor to Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow. Musicologist Christoph Wolff deducts from the "lavish forces" of four trumpets, timpani and three oboes on top of the strings, an unprecedented scoring in Bach's cantatas, that the work was not composed for the intimate Schloßkirche in Weimar. He dates it as 1714 or 1715. According to John Eliot Gardiner, the first performance may have taken place in Weimar in the church of St. Peter und Paul, performed by the combined musicians of the ducal Capelle and the town. The lack of a closing chorale, which closes most of Bach's later cantatas, has raised the question if the work is based on a secular cantata.

The cantata has a festive character but lacks certain features typically associated with Christmas music, such as Pastoral music, angels' song and cradle song, even a Christmas carol or chorale, as Gardiner words it: "The cantata contains none of the usual Nativity themes: no cradle song, no music for the shepherds or for the angels, not even the standard Christmas chorales". The symmetry of the text around the recitative "Nun kehret sich das bange Leid … in lauter Heil und Gnaden" (So now, today, the anxious sorrow is changed … into pure blessing and grace) is reflected in the music. The recitatives lean toward arioso at times, typical for Bach's music in the period. The choral movements show da capo form, but with distinctly contrasting middle sections, which relates to motet style. Wolff describes these movements as "fanfare-like frameworks", a cantabile choral setting contrasting with virtuoso orchestral playing in "secular dance".

Gardiner observes that the first recitative for alto, accompanied by the strings, contains "tortuous passage[s] in which voice and continuo struggle to free themselves from "Satan's slavish chains"". The cantata contains two duets, rare in Bach's cantatas, likely an expression of communal rejoicing which is expressed better in a duet than by a single voice. The second duet is a minuet, illustrating the words "Kommt, ihr Christen, kommt zum Reihen" (Come, you Christians, come to dance). Instead of the usual closing chorale, the cantata ends with a chorus "conceived on the largest of scales", full of energy. The trumpets begin with pompous fanfares, the voices first sing a fanfare, addressing the "highest", then open a permutation fugue which is later expanded by instrumental doubling and counteraction, to express the thanks of the devout souls. The middle section is a second fugue in similar style which ends with a "preposterous collective trill" on the word "quälen" (torment), observed by Mincham as "a passage of extraordinary intensity. The tempo slows, the harmony becomes tragic and chromatic and the whole feeling is that of deepest melancholy at the very thought of Satan’s embrace". Then a da capo of the complete first section ends the cantata on "the original celebratory flourishes of the complete ritornello theme".

In one of the later performances Bach changed the part of obbligato oboe in movement 3 to an organ, writing it himself in the part for the continuo organ.

The cantata in seven movements is festively scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, four trumpets, timpani, three oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, organ in a later version, and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christen,_%C3%A4tzet_diesen_Tag,_BWV_63).

I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (Bb Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Preis und Dank" (BWV 249 No 11) for Small Orchestra

13 parts12 pages03:473 years ago394 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Easter Oratorio (BWV 249) is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, beginning with Kommt, eilet und laufet ("Come, hasten and run"). Bach composed it in Leipzig and first performed it on 1 April 1725.

The first version of the work was completed as a cantata for Easter Sunday in Leipzig on 1 April 1725, then under the title Kommt, gehet und eilet. It was named "oratorio" and given the new title only in a version revised in 1735. In a later version in the 1740s the third movement was expanded from a duet to a four-part chorus. The work is based on a secular cantata, the so-called Shepherd Cantata Entfliehet, verschwindet, entweichet, ihr Sorgen, BWV 249a which is now lost, although the libretto survives. Its author is Picander who is also likely the author of the oratorio's text. The work is opened by two instrumental movements that are probably taken from a concerto of the Köthen period. It seems possible that the third movement is based on the concerto's finale.

Unlike the Christmas Oratorio, the Easter Oratorio has no narrator but has four characters assigned to the four voice parts: Simon Peter (tenor) and John the Apostle (bass), appearing in the first duet hurrying to Jesus' grave and finding it empty, meeting there Mary Magdalene (alto) and "the other Mary", Mary Jacobe (soprano). The choir was present only in the final movement until a later performance in the 1740s when the opening duet was set partly for four voices. The music is festively scored for three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, oboe d'amore, bassoon, two recorders, transverse flute, two violins, viola and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Chorus: "Preis und Dank" (Praise and thanks) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Freue dich, erlöste Schar" (BWV 30 No 1) for Winds & Strings

13 parts14 pages06:503 years ago377 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Freue dich, erlöste Schar (Rejoice, redeemed flock), BWV 30,[a] is a church cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the Feast of St. John the Baptist ("Fest Johannes des Täufers", also "Johannistag") and first performed it on 24 June 1738 or later.

The opening chorus is in a major key and displays continuous dynamic musical movement. It adopts a syncopated introductory rhythm that later reappears in the alto aria. The form is between a da capo and a rondo: the A section appears in the middle of the B section. The movement also reverses expectations regarding introductions, beginning with a combined vocal and instrumental thematic statement before presenting it without voices.

All of the recitatives in Part I are secco. The "dazzling and brilliant" bass aria of Part I is characterized by triplet figures and includes full string accompaniment in roulades. It includes the same foundational motive as the alto aria, and is formally in modified ternary. The alto aria is remarkable for its binary-form ritornello and "blues-like" final cadence; structurally, the movement is a gavotte. Craig Smith notes that "one can hardly think of another Bach aria that so profoundly illustrates a state of grace. The gentle dance rhythms are celestial and heavenly in their inexorable progress". Part I concludes with the cantata's only chorale.

Part II opens with the cantata's only recitativo accompagnato, for bass with oboes and continuo. This prepares a bass aria, which opens with an "aggressive 'scotch snap'" that repeats throughout the movement. A secco soprano recitative prepares a 9/8 soprano aria with chromatic bass, gigue rhythms, and an operatic style. The penultimate movement is a tenor recitative with "elongated phrases and weird chromatic harmonies", representing a tortured soul. The piece concludes with a repetition of the chorus on different text.

The piece is scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor, bass), a four-part choir, two oboes, two flauti traversi, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo and is in twelve movements, divided in two parts, to be performed before and after the sermon.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freue_dich,_erl%C3%B6ste_Schar,_BWV_30).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Freue dich, erlöste Schar" (Rejoice, redeemed flock) for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, french Horn & Euphonium) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
Chorus: "Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen" (BWV 11 No 1) for Wind Ensemble
Custom audio

Chorus: "Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen" (BWV 11 No 1) for Wind Ensemble

13 parts18 pages09:293 years ago371 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Bassoon, Timpani
Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen (Laud to God in all his kingdoms), BWV 11,[a] known as the Ascension Oratorio (Himmelfahrtsoratorium), is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, marked by him as Oratorium In Festo Ascensionis Xsti (Oratorio for the feast of the Ascension of Christ), probably composed in 1735 for the service for Ascension and first performed on 19 May 1735.

Bach had composed his Christmas Oratorio, based on the gospels of Luke and Matthew, in 1734, a work in six parts to be performed on six occasions during Christmas tide. He had composed an Easter Oratorio already in 1725. The Ascension Oratorio appeared thus in the same liturgical year as the Christmas Oratorio. The text for the Ascension Oratorio, a compilation of several biblical sources, free poetry and chorales, was presumably written by Picander who had written the libretti for the St Matthew Passion and the Christmas Oratorio, among others. It follows the story of the Ascension as told in Luke, Mark and the Acts of the Apostles.

The bible narration is compiled from multiple sources: the first recitative of the Evangelist (movement 2) is from Luke 24:50–51, the second (5) from Acts 1:9 and Mark 16:19, the third (7) from Acts 1:10–11, the last (9) from Luke 24:52a, Acts 1:12 and Luke 24:52b. The biblical words are narrated by the tenor as the Evangelist. In his third recitative two men are quoted, for this quotation tenor and bass both sing in an Arioso.

Part I, which tells of the Ascension, is concluded by the fourth stanza of Johann Rist's hymn "Du Lebensfürst, Herr Jesu Christ" in a four part setting. Part II reflects the reaction of the disciples. The closing chorale on the seventh stanza of Gottfried Wilhelm Sacer's "Gott fähret auf gen Himmel" is set as a chorale fantasia. While the music for the narration and the first chorale were new compositions in 1735, Bach based the framing choral movements and the two arias on earlier compositions. He used the model for the alto aria again much later for the Agnus Dei of his Mass in B minor.

In the first complete edition of Bach's works, the Bach-Ausgabe of the Bach Gesellschaft, the work was included under the cantatas (hence its low BWV number), and in the Bach Compendium it is numbered BC D 9 and included under oratorios.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobet_Gott_in_seinen_Reichen,_BWV_11).

The festive opening chorus, Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen, is believed to be based on a movement from the lost secular cantata Froher Tag, verlangte Stunden, BWV Anh. 18. The movement has no fugue, but dance-like elements and Lombard rhythm.

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen" (Laud to God in all his kingdoms) for Wind Ensemble (Bb Trumpets (3), Flutes (2), Oboes (2), Bb Clarinets (2), French Horn, Bb Tuba, Timpani & Bassoon).

"Vesper Psalms" (Opus 4) for Harp & Strings

13 parts64 pages26:155 years ago364 views
Little is know of the composer Joseph (Josef) Anton Bauer (1725-1808). He was born and lived his life in Oedheim, Württemberg, Germany. Bauer was a composer and organist whose most famous work consisted of a series of flute quartets. Heas was a contemporary of the young Beethoven and worked together in Bonn during the 1780's. As an Organist, he produced a sparse body of liturgical works; not all surviving today.

His works were published in Paris between 1770 and 1776, in three sets of five compositions each (Opuses 1-5). These works are scored for flute, violin, cello and Keyboard and reveal an advanced early classical style, in some cases with four movement structures.

Vespers is the sunset evening prayer service in the Western Catholic, Eastern (Byzantine) Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran liturgies of the canonical hours. The word comes from the Greek ἑσπέρα ("hespera") and the Latin vesper, meaning "evening." It is also referred to in the Anglican tradition as Evening Prayer or Evensong. The term is also used in some Protestant denominations (such as the Presbyterian Church or Seventh-day Adventist Church) to describe evening services.

Althouhs ths work was intended for accompanied chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and String Orchestra (6 Violins, 4 Violas & 2 Cellos) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Es erhub sich ein Streit" (BWV 19 No 1) for Small Orchestra

13 parts17 pages04:553 years ago334 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Es erhub sich ein Streit (There arose a war), BWV 19,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig in 1726 for the Feast of Saint Michael and first performed it on 29 September 1726. The chorale theme is Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele, which was codified by Louis Bourgeois when setting the Geneva Psalm 42 in his collection of Pseaumes octante trios de David (Geneva, 1551). Bourgeois seems to have been influenced by the secular song "Ne l'oseray je dire" contained in the Manuscrit de Bayeux published around 1510.

As with other Bach cantatas written for the Feast of St. Michael, this work opens with an "imposing" chorus. The opening and closing section of this da capo movement focuses on a single line of text describing the battle against the forces of evil. The middle section sets the remaining five lines of the text. The movement includes no instrumental introduction, creating an "immediate dramatic effect". Craig Smith suggests that the "vaulting high-energy fugue theme is the perfect illustration of the heroic struggle".

The bass recitative in E minor describes the importance of the victory over Satan, but exudes a sombre mood, suggesting the continued difficulties of mankind.

The third movement is a soprano aria with obbligato oboes, "an oasis of protective tranquillity" in the major mode. However, elements of the music disturb the peace conveyed by the text: the extended ritornello begins with an "odd three-bar phrasing", leading into a passage of constant momentum between the two oboes.

The tenor recitative is again in the minor mode, this time to describe the fragility of man. This movement moves into a striking tenor aria, describing a personal response to the text. The aria is the longest movement of the cantata, representing a third of the total length of the work. The trumpet plays the full chorale melody of "Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr", probably with the third stanza mentioning angels in mind, over a siciliano rhythm in the strings and continuo.

The penultimate movement is a brief secco soprano recitative that returns to the major mode to prepare the closing chorale. The chorale has the feel of a minuet, although there is some tension because of the changing phrase lengths employed by the melody.

The piece is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass) and four-part choir, three trombe, timpani, two oboes, oboe da caccia, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Traditionally in Leipzig during Bach's time the Feast of St Michael celebrations used the largest orchestra available. All known complete Bach cantatas for this occasion include trumpet and timpani.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Es_erhub_sich_ein_Streit,_BWV_19).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Es erhub sich ein Streit" (A struggle arose) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Erschallet, ihr Lieder" (BWV 172 No 1) for Trumpets & Strings

13 parts27 pages03:494 years ago323 views
Erhöhtes Fleisch und Blut (Exalted flesh and blood), BWV 173, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for Pentecost Monday and first performed it on 29 May 1724.

Bach probably wrote the cantata in his first year in Leipzig for Pentecost Monday. He based it on a congratulatory cantata Durchlauchtster Leopold, BWV 173a, composed in Köthen. The music of the 1724 version is lost, but a version of 1727 is extant. Possibly the 1724 version was even closer to the secular work than the existing version. The unknown poet wrote parodies for six of the eight movements of the congratulatory cantata, including two recitatives in movements 1 and 5. Bach did not use movements 6 and 7 in this church cantata, but 7 later in Er rufet seinen Schafen mit Namen, BWV 175.

The prescribed readings for the feast day were from the Acts of the Apostles, the sermon of Peter for Cornelius (Acts 10:42--48), and from the Gospel of John, "God so loved the world" from the meeting of Jesus and Nicodemus (John 3:16--21). The poetry is a general praise of God's great goodness towards men. Only movements 1 and 4 relate to the Gospel; the first stanza of movement 4 is a close paraphrase of the beginning of the gospel text, "Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt ..." (For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.) This verse became the opening chorus of Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt, BWV 68, for the same occasion a year later.

Bach gave the first movement to the tenor instead of the soprano in the secular work and changed the vocal line considerably, but wrote these changes into the original part. Movement 4, a paraphrase of the quotation from the gospel, is a duet, which handles three stanzas in ever richer variations: the first stanza is for bass and strings in G major, the second in higher D major for soprano and additional flutes, the final one for both voices in A major and with more figuration. The structure of this duet is unique in Bach's cantatas, the variations in rising keys, and the increase in instruments and musical texture all add to illustrate the exaltation mentioned in the title of the cantata. For the Baroque, the exaltation of the noble employer of the secular cantata could be adapted without change to the exaltation of God. The final chorus, based on a duet as movement 8 of BWV 173a, is partly expanded to four parts, but in homophony.

Although this cantata was scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, two flauto traverso, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Trumpets (Piccolo Trumpet in A, Bb Trumpet & Flugelhorn) & Strings (4 Violins, 3 Violas, 2 Cellos & Basses) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20

Aria & Chorus: "The trumpet's loud clangor" (HWV 76 Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra

13 parts14 pages03:57a year ago294 views
Trumpet(2), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Like Alexander's Feast, the composer's more famous work in honor of the patron saint of music, George Frideric Handel's Ode for St. Cecilia's Day, HWV 76, is a setting of texts written in honor of Saint Cecilia by John Dryden in 1697. Perhaps inspired by the sweeping success of Alexander's Feast (composed and first performed in 1736), Handel revisited Dryden's ode three years later to create a new, shorter work. The circumstances of the November 22, 1739, Lincoln's Inn Fields premiere of HWV 76 were something of an omen of things to come: the Ode for St. Cecilia's Day was presented as little more than a prelude to Alexander's Feast, and indeed the work has remained in the shadow of its sister piece ever since. The Ode is of very considerable merit, however; the three choruses contained within it are among the finest ever crafted by the composer, and the six arias are of equally high quality.

HWV 76 is properly an ode and not an oratorio; there is no plot, but rather a series of recitatives, arias, choruses, and instrumental pieces that extol the praises of the St. Cecilia (a third century martyr). Handel's score is for soprano and tenor soloists, the usual SATB chorus, and a colorful orchestra made up of strings, continuo, flute, double reeds, trumpets and timpani.

Handel's tendency to borrow music from himself and other composers is famous, and indeed, essentially all of the melodies contained in the Ode for St. Cecilia's Day were lifted straight from the keyboard pieces of Gottlieb Muffat's Componimenti musicali (published ca. 1739). However, the working-out of this pre-fab material over the course of the Ode is entirely Handel's own. The musical subject of Dryden's ode provides a sure footing for all sorts of musical text-painting and allusion.

The Ode falls loosely into two halves, each of which ends with a chorus, and which are separated by an orchestral March. The work's two-part overture was taken from, or perhaps used as the model for, the composer's own Concerto grosso, Op. 6, No. 5, composed around the same time. The singing begins with a recitative for tenor solo, "From harmony, from heav'nly harmony," the text of which is immediately echoed in the first of the three choruses. The soprano follows with the stunning but graceful aria "What passion cannot Music raise and quell," and the boisterous tenor counters with "The Trumpet's loud clangor," immediately taken up by the chorus.

A succession of four arias--three for soprano, one for tenor (but that one the delightful "Violins proclaim")--begins the second half of the Ode for St. Cecilia's Day. A soprano recitative ("But bright Cecilia rais'd the wonder high'r") prefaces the final chorus ("As from the pow'r of sacred lays" / "The dead shall live"), itself a spectacular example of Handel's choral writing. It moves seamlessly from the opening soprano solo to a purely choral climax and finale in which the composer displays his contrapuntal wizardry in a stunning double fugue.

Source: Allmusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/ode-for-st-cecilias-day-song-for-st-cecilias-day-for-soloists-chorus-orchestra-hwv-76-mc0002406927).

Although originally written for Mixed Chorus & Baroque Orchestra, I created this Interpretation of the Aria & Chorus: "The trumpet's loud clangor" from "Ode for St. Cecilia's Day" (HWV 76 Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, A Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violins, Violas & Cello).