Sheet music with 14 instruments

The Trumpet Shall Sound (From Handel's "Messiah Oratorio" HWV 56, Part III, Scenes I and II)

14 parts51 pages05:472 years ago592 views
Voice, Trumpet(2), French Horn(2), Flute(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tuba
All credit for writing "The Trumpet Shall Sound" goes to my friend, Mike Magatagan [GO CHECK HIS ACCOUNT OUT! musescore.com/mike_magatagan]. I arranged the pitch and the Intro [Behold, I Shew You A Mysery].

"Morning Mood" from Peer Gynt (Suite No. 1 Opus 46) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages04:27a year ago3,112 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness.

Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly.

Grieg opens the first Peer Gynt suite with a piece called "Morning Mood", originally played at the beginning of the fourth act. A gentle E major theme is announced by the flutes, and then the oboes, against a static harmonic background that effectively emulates the stillness of the first moments of dawn. This lovely melody--an inverted arch shape--is taken through a sparkling palette of subtle harmonic inflections; bright flute trills join the musical mixture as "Morning Mood" comes to a gentle close. Although "Morning Mood" is only four minutes long, Grieg manages to capture in music something both timeless and universal.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Morning Mood" for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, F Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Chorus: "Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren" (BWV 137 No 1) for Small Orchestra

14 parts24 pages03:333 years ago1,012 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Timpani, Violin(4), Viola(2), Cello(2)
Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren (Praise the Lord, the mighty King of honor), BWV 137, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the cantata for the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity. It forms part of a cycle of chorale cantatas which Bach composed in Leipzig over a period of two years 1724–25. In 1724, his second year in the city, Bach had composed chorale cantatas between the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724 and Palm Sunday, but for Easter had returned to cantatas on more varied texts, possibly because he lost his librettist. Later Bach composed again chorale cantatas to complete his second annual cycle. This cantata is one of the completing works. It is based entirely on the unchanged words on the hymn "Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren" (1680) by Joachim Neander.

John Eliot Gardiner assumes, looking at the festive instrumentation and the general content of praise and thanksgiving, that the cantata was also performed that year to celebrate Ratswahl, the inauguration of the town council. Bach used in 1729 the setting of the final chorale, transposed to D major, to conclude the wedding cantata Herr Gott, Beherrscher aller Dinge, BWV 120a with the last two stanzas of the hymn.

As Alfred Dürr and Gardiner observed, the text as well as the chorale melody is present in all movements. The cantata is constructed in symmetry: the soprano carries the melody in the outer movements, in movement 2 it is sung by the alto, and in movement 4 played by the trumpet. In the central movement, the beginning of both the vocal and the instrumental theme are derived from it in the most intimate setting of the work. The melody in bar form has a Stollen of unusual five measures and reaches a climax at the beginning of the Abgesang, which Bach also stresses in a variety of means in the movements.

In the opening chorus the trumpets, oboes and strings play a concerto; the soprano sings the cantus firmus while the lower voices prepare the entries by imitation on the instrumental motifs. For the words "Kommet zu Hauf, Psalter und Harfen, wacht auf" (Come join the crowd, psaltery and harps, awake!), the setting is homophonic and accented.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobe_den_Herren,_den_m%C3%A4chtigen_K%C3%B6nig_der_Ehren,_BWV_137).

Although originally scored for four soloists, soprano, alto, tenor and bass, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra *Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Timpani, 4 Violins, 2 Violas & 2 Cellos).

Chorus: "Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen" (BWV 244 No. 1) for Winds & Strings

14 parts30 pages07:572 years ago745 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew" Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion.).

For those interested in learning about what is arguably greatest chorus ever written (or to hear a more traditional interpretation) might be interested in the rendition and programme notes from Bernard Greenberg: https://musescore.com/user/1831606/scores/812951

I created this arrangement of the Chorus: "Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen" (Come, ye daughters, help me lament) for Winds (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Clarinets, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorus: "Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen" (BWV 65 No 1) for Winds & Strings

14 parts20 pages06:043 years ago586 views
Trumpet(2), Flute(3), English Horn, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen (They will all come forth out of Sheba), BWV 65, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1724 in Leipzig for Epiphany and first performed it on 6 January 1724.

Bach wrote the cantata to conclude his first set of cantatas for the Christmas season in Leipzig on the Feast of Epiphany. He had performed five cantatas, Christen, ätzet diesen Tag, BWV 63 (composed possibly in 1713) and the new works Darzu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes, BWV 40, Sehet, welch eine Liebe hat uns der Vater erzeiget, BWV 64, Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, BWV 190, and Mein liebster Jesus ist verloren, BWV 154. The prescribed readings for the feast day were taken from the Book of Isaiah, the heathen will convert (Isaiah 60:1–6), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Wise Men From the East bringing gifts of gold, myrrh and frankincense to the newborn Jesus (Matthew 2:1–12). The unknown poet of the cantata text may be the same as for BWV 40 and BWV 64 for the Second and Third Day of Christmas. He begins with the final verse of the reading, Isaiah's prophecy "all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense". The poet juxtaposes the prediction by a chorale, stanza 4 of the old anonymous "Ein Kind geborn zu Bethlehem" (Puer natus in Bethlehem", "A babe is born in Bethlehem", 1543), which describes the arrival of the "Kön'ge aus Saba" (Kings from Sheba), related to the Gospel. The first recitative proclaims that the Gospel is the fulfillment of the prophecy and concludes that it is the Christian's duty to bring his heart as a gift to Jesus. This idea is the theme of the following aria. The second recitative equals the gifts Faith to the gold, Prayer to the incense, and Patience to the myrrh, which is again expanded in the aria. The cantata ends with stanza 10 of Paul Gerhardt's hymn "Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn".

Bach first performed the cantata for Epiphany on 6 January 1724. In his Christmas Oratorio of 1734, Bach dedicated Part VI, Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben, to the topic and the occasion and first performed it on 6 January 1735.

The opening chorus depicts, that "alle" (all), not just the three Magi, gather and move to adore. Horn signals call first and prevail throughout the movement, canonical and imitation developments illustrate the growing of a crowd. The central section is an extended choral fugue, framed by two sections with the voices embedded in a repeat of the instrumental introduction. John Eliot Gardiner remarked in connection with his Bach Cantata Pilgrimage that the instrumentation resembles Near Eastern music, the recorders representing "the high pitches often associated with oriental music and the oboes da caccia (in tenor register) to evoke the shawm-like double-reed instruments (salamiya and zurna) of the Near East".

In contrast, the archaic melody of the following chorale, telling of the three Kings from Sheba, is set for four parts. Both recitatives are secco, and the arias have no da capo. The first recitative applies the situation to the individual Christian, who has nothing to offer as a gift but his heart, explained in an arioso ending. The first aria is accompanied by the oboes da caccia, whose low register together with the bass voice conveys the humility expressed in the words. The tenor recitative ends on the notion "des größten Reichtums Überfluß mir dermaleinst im Himmel werden" (the abundance of the greatest wealth must some day be mine in Heaven). To show this abundance, the following dance-like aria is accompanied by all the wind instruments, playing concertante and together. The closing chorale is sung on the melody of "Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh allzeit", which Bach used frequently later, as the base for his chorale cantata BWV 111 and movement 25 of his St Matthew Passion.

The cantata is structured in seven movements and is festively scored for tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, two horns, two recorders, two oboes da caccia, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Bach employed a pair of horns before in his Christmas cantata Darzu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes, BWV 40, and later in his cantata for Christmas 1724, Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ, BWV 91, and in Part IV of his Christmas Oratorio.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sie_werden_aus_Saba_alle_kommen,_BWV_65).

I created this arrangement for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, Alto Flute, English Horn, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Unser Mund sei voll Lachens" (BWV 110 No 1) for Harps & Small Orchestra

14 parts44 pages09:244 years ago547 views
Trumpet(3), Strings(8), Timpani, Harp(2)
Unser Mund sei voll Lachens (May our mouths be full of laughter), BWV 110, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig for Christmas Day and first performed it on 25 December 1725.

The cantata was composed in Leipzig as a choral work celebrating Christmas Day. This piece is based on Psalm 126, Jeremiah 10, and the second chapter of Luke.

The opening chorus is "May our mouth be full of laughter and our tongues full of praise", which is an adaptation of the Bach's Overture in D major, BWV 1069. The soprano/tenor duet "Ehre sei Gott in der Höhe" is a version of Bach's Magnificat. The cantata begins with its most powerful section, the opening chorus, which calls for all instruments to be performing besides bassoon. The text concludes with acknowledgement that the Lord has achieved great things for his people.

A tenor aria includes two intertwining flutes as the soloist describes soaring thoughts and senses, prompted by the thought that God-become-man intends that his people be "Himmels Kinder", (heaven's children). A bass recitative (You, Lord, are unlike any other) is followed by an alto aria (Ach Herr, was ist ein Menschenkind) accompanied by oboe d'amore that expresses wonder about the nature of man that the Lord should seek to redeem him through such painful action.

The two voices shine over a simple organ and continuo accompaniment as they offer to God glory in the highest as peace on Earth is awaited because the child has come as a sign of favor.

The closing chorale is related to the third section of the composer's Christmas Oratorio: "Alleluia! All praise be given God from the bottom of our hearts."

Although originally written for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass soloists, four-part chorus, three trumpets, three oboes, oboe d'amore, oboe da caccia, two transverse flutes, bassoon, two violins, viola, timpani, and continuo, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet in A, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Timpani, 2 Concert (Pedal) Harps and Strings (4 Violins, 2 Violas & 2 Cellos).

Chorus: "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" (BWV 1 No 1) for Winds & Strings

14 parts47 pages06:493 years ago517 views
Trumpet(2), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(3), Viola(2), Cello
Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How beautifully the morning star shines), BWV 1,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1725 in Leipzig for the feast of the Annunciation and it was first performed on 25 March 1725, which fell that year on Palm Sunday. It is a chorale cantata, being based on the hymn "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" (1599) by Philipp Nicolai.

This cantata is part of Bach's second annual cycle of cantatas, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity 1724. It was the last chorale cantata in the cycle and is based on the hymn "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" (1599) by Philipp Nicolai. The hymn was associated with Epiphany but also with the Annunciation, and it was the latter feast for which the cantata was written. In Leipzig the Annunciation was celebrated with music, although it typically falls in Lent, when Leipzig observed tempus clausum. This cantata was first performed on 25 March 1725 (which in that year was also Palm Sunday) and its joyful nature would have been all the more striking after the suspension of music for Lent.

The scoring provides a rich orchestration, the sparkle of the morning star is illustrated by two solo violins. The scoring is reminiscent of Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen, BWV 65, written for Epiphany. The cantus firmus in the chorale fantasia of the opening chorus is sung by the sopranos. The other voices support the melody, sometimes preparing it.

Both recitatives are secco, with melismata on the words "Freudenschein" (joyful radiance) and "Erquickung" (refreshment). The first aria combines the soprano voice with the oboe da caccia in alto range. Two violins accompany the tenor in the second aria, reminiscent of the opening chorus.

The closing chorale is embellished by an independent part of the second horn, while the other instruments double the voices.

The cantata in six movements is scored for soprano, tenor, and bass soloists, a four-part choir, two horns, two oboes da caccia, two violins obbligato, viola and basso continuo. A festive scoring like this, including brass, was usually performed on holidays. Bach would later use the pair of horns in Part IV of his Christmas Oratorio, dealing with the naming of Jesus as announced to Mary.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wie_sch%C3%B6n_leuchtet_der_Morgenstern,_BWV_1).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern" (How beautifully the morning star shines) for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (3 Violins, 2 Violas & Cellos.

Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben" (BWV 248 No 54) for Small Orchestra

14 parts28 pages04:523 years ago464 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben” (Lord, when our proud enemies snarl) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Sanctus" from the Mass in C Major (BWV 237) for Small Orchestra
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"Sanctus" from the Mass in C Major (BWV 237) for Small Orchestra

14 parts10 pages01:282 years ago372 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Church music in Latin by Johann Sebastian Bach comprises about ten compositions, all composed during his Leipzig period. As a Lutheran church musician, Bach was more devoted to the composition of sacred music in German, writing hundreds of liturgical compositions in that language, and for instance also producing a German version of Pergolesi's Stabat Mater. Compared to Lutheran practice elsewhere, an uncharacteristic amount of Latin was however used in church services in Leipzig: it included music on Latin texts being performed on ordinary Sundays, on high holidays (Christmas, Easter, Pentecost), and the Magnificat also on Marian feasts (Annunciation, Visitation, Purification).

In Lutheran service, a Missa was a setting of only Kyrie and Gloria. Such a mass consisting of only Kyrie and Gloria is for that time period sometimes indicated as Missa brevis (literally: "short mass"). In 1733 Bach composed such a Missa brevis for the Catholic court in Dresden, however in an extended setting. In the late 1730s he again composed four Missae breves, mostly parodies of earlier cantata movements. At the end of his life he expanded the Missa for Dresden to his only setting of the complete Mass ordinary, the Mass in B minor.

BWV 237 to 241 are separate settings of the Sanctus. The first two of these (C major, BWV 237 and D major, BWV 238) were composed in 1723, his first year in Leipzig. The Sanctus in D minor BWV 239 is considered spurious, a work by an unknown composer copied by Bach. The Sanctus in G major BWV 240 is considered doubtful, and the Sanctus BWV 241 is Bach's arrangement of a composition by Johann Caspar Kerll.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bach's_church_music_in_Latin).

The Sanctus in C Major (BWV 237) is an accessible work for mixed chorus (SATB), Tromba (trumpets) I-III, Tamburi (tympani), Oboe I-II, Violino I-II, Viola, Continuo.

I created this arrangement of the "Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus, Dominus Deus" (Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Hosts) for Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Coro: "Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott" (BWV 129 No 1) for Small Orchestra

14 parts30 pages054 years ago367 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(4)
Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (Praised be the Lord, my God), BWV 129, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for Trinity Sunday and possibly first performed it on 16 June 1726. It is a general praise of the Trinity, without a reference to a specific gospel reading. Addressing God the Creator, the Saviour and the Comforter, it could be used for other occasions such as Reformation Day. The cantata is festively scored and ends in a chorale fantasia, like the Christmas Oratorio. It is the conclusion of Bach's second annual cycle of cantatas, containing chorale cantatas.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for Trinity Sunday, the earliest in 1726. In his second year Bach had composed chorale cantatas between the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724 and Palm Sunday, but for Easter had returned to cantatas on more varied texts, possibly because he lost his librettist. Later Bach composed again chorale cantatas to complete his second annual cycle. This cantata is one of the completing works. It is based entirely on the unchanged words on the chorale Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (1665) by Johann Olearius and celebrates the Trinity in five stanzas.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Romans, reflecting "depth of wisdom" (Romans 11:33–36), and from the Gospel of John, the meeting of Jesus and Nicodemus (John 3:1–15). Unlike most chorale cantatas of 1724/25, but similar to the early Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4 and Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren, BWV 137, also composed after the second cantata cycle, Bach left the chorale text unchanged, thus without a reference to the readings.

Although originally scored for three soloists, soprano, alto and bass, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, flauto traverso, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for a Modern Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, Flute(s), Oboe(s), Bb Clarinets, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Violins, Violas & Cellos) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Chorus: "Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn" (BWV 119 No 1) for Small Orchestra

14 parts34 pages05:493 years ago338 views
Trumpet(3), French Horn, Timpani, Strings(9)
Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn (Praise the Lord, o Jerusalem), BWV 119, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for Ratswechsel, the inauguration of a new town council, and first performed it on 30 August 1723.

Bach composed the cantata during his first year in Leipzig for a service at St Nicholas Church to celebrate the change of council or Ratswechsel. Early in his career he had written at least one cantata for the equivalent service at Mühlhausen. There are five surviving cantatas for the Ratswechsel at Leipzig.

The text of the cantata consists of verses from psalms 147, 85 and 126, lines from Martin Luther's "German Te Deum" and poems by unknown writers. To suit the event for which it was written, these are all turned into hymns of thanking and praising God for Leipzig's prosperity and asking him to protect the city in the future.

Even among other festive music written by Bach, this work's scoring for four trumpets is unusual. It is characterised by a very solemn character and the attributes of courtly homage music, such as the opening chorus in the form of a French overture or fanfare-like trumpet interjections in the bass recitative. Bach created a work that in musical terms corresponds less to sacred music and more to the type of secular music for a princely court, as had been required of him during his time in office in Köthen. Only in its final two movements does Bach again use simple forms to emphasize the work's character of a church cantata, implying that earthly powers do not last, but God – the supreme ruler – is entitled to have the last word.

In addition to its dotted rhythms, the opening chorus is remarkable for the musical opposition between the trumpets and the rest of the instrumental parts. The middle section is faster, incorporating both fugal techniques and paired entries. The coda is an adaptation of the first section.

After a secco recitative, the oboes da caccia present the dotted-rhythm ritornello to introduce the tenor aria. The vocal entry is before the ritornello cadence. The following bass recitative is introduced and concluded with a fanfare-like trumpet and timpani line.

The fifth movement is an alto aria with two obbligato recorders, the only minor-mode movement. The obbligato presents high repeated notes beginning midway through the ritornello theme, which recurs as episodes and at the conclusion of the movement. The movement is, in effect, a trio sonata.

A soprano recitative precedes the second chorus, which is introduced by a long ritornello theme featuring an "imperious" trumpet melody. This theme plays four times during the da capo movement, which also includes elements of fugue. A very short yet harmonically adventurous alto recitative serves as the penultimate movement. The cantata ends "with the subtlest touches of flamboyance" in a chorale.

Although originally scored for four soloists—soprano, alto, tenor and bass—a four-part choir, four trumpets, timpani, two recorders, three oboes, two oboes da caccia, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, French Horn, Timpani, violins, Violas, Cellos & Basses).

Chorus: "Das Lamm, das erwürget ist" (BWV 21 No 11) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages03:183 years ago282 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis (I had much grief), BWV 21,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar, possibly in 1713, partly even earlier, and used it in 1714 and later for the third Sunday after Trinity. The work marks a transition between motet style on biblical and hymn text to operatic recitatives and arias on contemporary poetry. He catalogued the work as e per ogni tempo (and for all times), indicating that due to its general theme the cantata is suited for any occasion.

The text is probably written by the court poet Salomon Franck, including four biblical quotations from three psalms and the Book of Revelation, juxtaposed in one movement with two stanzas from Georg Neumark's hymn "Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten". The cantata possibly began as a work of dialog and four motets on biblical verses. In its 1723 version, it is structured in eleven movements, including an opening sinfonia and additional recitatives and arias. It is divided in two parts to be performed before and after the sermon, and scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor, and bass), a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, oboe, strings and basso continuo. Bach led a performance in the court chapel of Schloss Weimar on 17 June 1714, known as the Weimar version. He revised the work for performances, possibly in Hamburg and several revivals in Leipzig, adding for the first Leipzig version four trombones doubling the voices.

Bach composed the cantata in Weimar, but the composition history is complicated and not at all stages certain. Findings by Martin Petzoldt suggest that the cantata began with the later movements 2–6 and 9, most of them on biblical text, performed at a memorial service of Aemilia Maria Haress, the wife of a former prime-minister of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt at the St. Peter und Paul in Weimar on 8 October 1713. Bach may then have expanded it and presented it for his application in December 1713 at the Liebfrauenkirche in Halle. The performance material of this event, the only surviving source, shows on the title page the designation e per ogni tempo, indicating that the cantata with its general readings and texts is suitable for any occasion.

The music for this early cantata uses motet style in the choral movements. Biblical words are used in a prominent way. They are treated in choral movements, different from other cantatas of the Weimar period where they were typically composed as recitatives. John Eliot Gardiner, who conducted all of Bach's church cantatas in 2000 as the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage, termed the cantata "one of the most extraordinary and inspired of Bach's vocal works'. He notes aspects of the music which are similar to movements in Bach's early cantatas, suggesting that they may have been composed already when Bach moved to Weimar in 1708: the psalm verses resemble movements of cantatas such as Nach dir, Herr, verlanget mich, BWV 150, and Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir, BWV 131, the dialogue of the Soul and Jesus (movement 8) is reminiscent of the Actus tragicus, and the hymn in motet style (movement 9) recalls movements 2 and 5 of the chorale cantata Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4.

The cantata in eleven movements is structured in two parts, Part I (movements 1–6) to be performed before the sermon, Part II (7–11) after the sermon. It is scored for three vocal soloists (soprano (S), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir SATB, three trumpets (Tr) and timpani only in the final movement, four trombones (Tb) (only in later versions to double voices in the second stanza of the chorale), oboe (Ob), two violins (Vl), viola (Va), and basso continuo (Bc), with bassoon (Fg) and organ (Org) explicitly indicated. The duration is given as 44 minutes.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ich_hat...).

The concluding movement is a motet on a quotation from Revelation, "Das Lamm, das erwürget ist" (The Lamb, that was slain). Three trumpets and timpani appear only in this triumphant movements of praise. It begins in homophony and expresses the text "Lob und Ehre und Preis und Gewalt" (Glory and honour and praise and power) in another permutation fugue with a climax in the subject played by the first trumpet.

I created this Arrangement of the closing Chorus: Das Lamm, das erwürget ist" (The Lamb, that was slain) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorus: "Dem Gerechten muss das Licht immer wieder aufgehen" (BWV 195 No 1) for Winds & Strings

14 parts35 pages05:174 years ago252 views
Johann Sebastian Bach was better known as a virtuoso organist than as a composer in his day. His sacred music, organ and choral works, and other instrumental music had an enthusiasm and seeming freedom that concealed immense rigor. Bach's use of counterpoint was brilliant and innovative, and the immense complexities of his compositional style -- which often included religious and numerological symbols that seem to fit perfectly together in a profound puzzle of special codes -- still amaze musicians today. Many consider him the greatest composer of all time.

Bach's wedding Cantata No. 195 "Dem Gerechten muss das Licht immer wieder augehn" (The Righteous must always sow the light) (BWV 195) exists in three versions composed at different times. The first was written in 1727, then revised in 1742, and then revised again sometime between August 1748 and October 1749. The first version was in eight movements, five before the ceremony and three after it. In the final version, Bach dropped the original sixth through eighth movements and wrote a newly composed sixth movement. The author of the text is unknown. The cantata is scored for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass soloists and chorus and a huge orchestra consisting of three trumpets plus tympani, pairs of transverse flutes and oboes, strings, and basso continuo consisting of cello, bass, and harpsichord. The first movement is a grandly festive chorale fantasia setting of Psalm 97:11-12 for full orchestra and chorus with the soloists. The second is a severe secco recitative for muscular bass soloist and continuo. The third is a massive aria for bass soloist, pairs of oboe d'amore, and transverse flutes plus continuo. The fourth is sorrowful recitative for soprano soloist and continuo with weeping transverse flutes and sighing oboes. The fifth is a second festive chorale fantasia scored in the same manner as the opening movement. The final version of "Dem Gerechten muss das Licht immer wieder augehn" concludes with a harmonization of a chorale by Paul Gerhardt for chorus and orchestra, but with two horns in place of the three trumpets.

Although this cantata was originally scored for soprano and bass vocal soloists, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two horns, two flutes, two oboes, two English horns, two violins, viola, violone, basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (3 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Trumpets, French Horn and F Tuba) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

"Patrem omnipotentem" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 14) for Small Orchestra

14 parts17 pages02:502 years ago190 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Patrem omnipotentem" (the Father, the Almighty) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).