Sheet music with 19 instruments

Sinfonia: "Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft" (BWV 50) for Orchestra

19 parts22 pages07:443 years ago477 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(4), Viola(2), Cello(2)
Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft (Now is [come] salvation and strength), BWV 50, is a choral movement long attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach and assumed to be part of a lost cantata. The work was likely composed in 1723 but the date of its first performance is unknown.

American Bach scholar William H. Scheide suggested that the work was written for a Michaelmas celebration. However, the exact dates of composition and first performance are unknown.

The work has fascinated Bach scholars because of questions about its provenance. No autograph sources exist, and the earliest copies extant do not mention Bach's name. In 1982, Scheide argued that the existing version (for double choir) is an arrangement by an unknown hand of a lost original for five voices by J. S. Bach. His argument was based on irregularities in BWV 50's part-writing, which are highly unlike the writing of Bach. In 2000, the American performer and scholar Joshua Rifkin argued that a more plausible solution of this puzzle is that the author of BWV 50 was not Bach at all, but an unknown (but highly gifted) composer of the era. The suggestion is controversial.

The title is from Revelation 12:10: "Now is the salvation and the power and the kingdom and the might of our God and of His Christ come, since he is cast down who accused them day and night before God."

Like other cantatas for Michaelmas, it features texture layering from the lowest range to the highest, and a contrapuntal representation of "battles and massing armies". It is in two distinct sections and uses fugal techniques.

The movement begins with a "strong declaration in unharmonized octaves", pairing the low strings with the bass voice of the first choir. A rhythmic shift creates a "floating, turn-around feeling" before the tenor line enters, followed by alto and soprano. As this choir shifts into rhythmic counterpoint, the second choir, trumpet, and oboes enter. The movement also incorporates call-and-response, military-like tattoos, and an inversion of the previous order of thematic entry. The final twelve bars adopt a chromatic style not heard earlier in the piece.

The piece is written for an unusually large orchestra. The score involves two four-part choirs, three trumpets, timpani, three oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_ist_das_Heil_und_die_Kraft,_BWV_50).

I created this arrangement for Modern Orchestra consisting of Trumpets (Bb Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet & Flugelhorn) Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani and Strings (4 Violins, 2 Violas & 2 Cellos).
"Fecit potentiam" from the Magnificat in D Major (BWV 243 No. 7) for Small Orchestra
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"Fecit potentiam" from the Magnificat in D Major (BWV 243 No. 7) for Small Orchestra

19 parts11 pages01:582 years ago359 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(4), Viola(2), Cello(2), Contrabass
Johann Sebastian Bach's Magnificat is a musical setting of the biblical canticle Magnificat. It is scored for five vocal parts (two sopranos, alto, tenor and bass), and a Baroque orchestra including trumpets and timpani. It is the first major liturgical composition on a Latin text by Bach.

In 1723, after taking up his post as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, Bach set the text of the Magnificat in a twelve movement composition in the key of E-flat major. For a performance at Christmas he inserted four hymns (laudes) related to that feast. This version, including the Christmas interpolations, was given the number BWV 243a in the catalogue of Bach's works.

For the feast of Visitation of 1733, Bach produced a new version of his Latin Magnificat, without the Christmas hymns: instrumentation of some movements was altered or expanded, and the key changed from E-flat major to D major, for performance reasons of the trumpet parts. This version of Bach's Magnificat is known as BWV 243. After publication of both versions in the 19th century, the second became the standard for performance. It is one of Bach's most popular vocal works.

Bach's Magnificat consists of eleven movements for the text of Luke 1:46–55, concluded by a twelfth doxology movement. Each verse of the canticle is assigned to one movement, except verse 48 (the third verse of the Magnificat) which begins with a soprano solo in the third movement and is concluded by the chorus in the fourth movement. The traditional division of the Magnificat, as used by composers since the late Middle Ages, was in 12 verses: it differs from Bach's 12 movements in that Luke's verse 48 is one verse in the traditional division, while the doxology is divided in two verses.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnificat_%28Bach%29).

I created this arrangement of the "Fecit potentiam in bracchio suoi" (He has shown strength with His arm) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clerinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Chorus: "Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft" (BWV 205 No 1) for Orchestra

19 parts26 pages06:553 years ago236 views
Trumpet(3), French Horn(2), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(3), Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft (Destroy, burst, shatter the tomb), BWV 205[a] is a secular cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach.

The cantata was commissioned by the students of Leipzig University for the popular professor August Friedrich Müller and premiered on his name day on 3 August 1725 as a dramma per musica under the title Der zufriedengestellte Aeolus (The contented Aeolus).

Its libretto was written by Christian Friedrich Henrici and begins with Pallas Athene (sung by a soprano) setting up a celebration in honour of Müller. However, she fears that Aeolus (bass) could ruin the celebrations with heavy storms in August. With the help of Zephyrus (tenor) the god of mild winds and Pomona the goddess of fruitfulness (alto), Pallas manages to appease Aeolus and those present grant a vivat in unison for the professor.

Bach wrote other works for university occasions: the cantata is one of twelve surviving Festmusiken zu Leipziger Universitätsfeiern, that is music for festivals of Leipzig University

The cantata is scored for four solo voices – Pallas as soprano, Pomona as alto, Zephyrus as tenor, and Aeolus as bass – a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two horns, two flutes, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, viola d'amore, viola da gamba, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zerrei%C3%9Fet,_zersprenget,_zertr%C3%BCmmert_die_Gruft,_BWV_205).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft" (Destroy, burst, shatter the tomb) for Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 French Horns, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Clarinets, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos and Basses).