Sheet music with 3 instruments

Bach/Magatagan (continuo by BSG): Ihr Kleingläubigen (BWV 81, #4)

3 parts2 pages01:263 years ago365 views
Viola, Other Woodwinds, Cello
Continuo realization added to Mike Magatigan's (unmodified) viola/cello arrangement of the bass arioso from BWV 81 "Ihr Kleinglåubigen, warum seid ihr so furchtsam?" (https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/908336) .

With Mike's kind permission and encouragement, I have added Bach's original figures (from the Bachgesellschaft Ausgabe, on IMSLP) and realized them for MS's Panflötenkammerorgel, shifting the mood ever so slightly back from "sonata di camera" to "sonata di chiesa". I have followed Bach's figuring, er, religiously, only occasionally introducing passing-tones. The little dactyl ("BAAMP-dada") figures in the continuo in contrary motion to those in the bass, effectively exchanging voices (e.g., C# and A#), are a standard technique to avoid parallel motions on both sides of their beat, and add a great deal of interest (so I added a couple other than in that context, to promote motivic integrity).

Note that while continuo realizations are required to operate in mutual "credible" counterpoint with their bass, they are not considered "three more voices to the composition increasing its voice-complexity by three", but are freely allowed to double (occasionally), even to highlight, obbligato voices gestures, as do JSB cantata instrumental parts (which can also double continuously). Although Mike's 81/4 works just fine as chamber music, the authentic sound of this type of movement requires a stylistically appropriate continuo as I provide here. Skilled continuo improvisers (e.g., the Man himself) were reputed to play continuo parts that sounded like composed concerti (not de facto ensemblewise appropriate, IMO).

While realizing this continuo, I felt Bach's guiding hand insofar as any "problem" I had ("where will this voice go? where will this voice come from?") was always answered by careful thought about the surrounding figures, evidence that Bach thought about the harmony and counterpoint as a whole, even in a two-voiced movement, further evidence of what all the books tell us, that we must imagine and explain the harmony in our head even when composing in two voices. It figures.

I have analyzed the abundant internal references by imitation at all pitches in this wonderful short composition here https://musescore.com/user/1831606/scores/911596.
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (BWV 147 No 10) for String Trio

3 parts2 pages03:124 years ago7,498 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Johann Sebastian Bach's sacred Cantata No. 147 "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben" (BWV 147) (Heart and Mouth, Deeds and Life), was written for the feast of the Visitation of the Virgin Mary and first performed in its final definitive form in Leipzig to mark the feast day, July 2, 1723. Much of the work originated during the composer's tenure as Konzertmeister in Weimar, where upon his appointment in 1714 he also assumed responsibility for the provision of a new cantata each month for services held in the Duke's chapel. In its earliest form (BWV 147a), this cantata was intended to be given on the fourth Sunday of Advent, 1716. This version contained four main arias and an opening chorus, but no recitative sections, three of which were added later, along with the great chorale, which brings each of the main sections to its close. The autograph of the Leipzig version survives intact, but all except the opening movement of the first version has perished. Interestingly, the composer's original design for the Advent feasts at Weimar would have been considered entirely unsuitable by the church authorities in Leipzig, who had forbidden the performance of all concert music during this period of the liturgical year. Bach managed to overcome this restriction by incorporating references to the "Magnificat" (Luke 1: 39-56) into the score, thus tailoring the cantata specifically to the Feast of the Visitation.

The final version begins with an elaborate chorus in C major, in which the celebratory tone is established by the fanfare-like opening section for orchestra. Part I concludes with the famous chorale known in English as "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring." Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th movement of the cantata.

Although it is the 32nd surviving cantata that Bach composed, it was assigned the number BWV 147 in the complete catalogue of his works. Bach wrote a total of 200 cantatas during his time in Leipzig, largely to meet the Leipzig Churches' demand for about 58 different cantatas each year.

Contrary to the common assumption, the violinist and composer Johann Schop, not Bach, composed the movement's underlying chorale melody, Werde munter, mein Gemüthe; Bach's contribution was to harmonize and orchestrate it. The frequent use of arrangements of the piece in modern weddings is in no way related to its scope or Bach's intent for it. Rather, it was one segment of an extended, approximately 20-minute treatment of a traditional Church hymn, as is typical of cantatas of the Baroque period.

Although originally composed as a choral cantata, I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"Brian Boru's March" for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts2 pages01:205 years ago6,094 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
"Brian Boru's March" is a traditional Irish tune typically played with the Celtic Harp.

Brian Boru (c. 941 – 1014, Old Irish: Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig; Middle Irish: Brian Bóruma; modern Irish: Brian Bóroimhe) was an Irish king who ended the domination of the High Kingship of Ireland by the Uí Néill. Building on the achievements of his father, Cennétig mac Lorcain, and especially his elder brother, Mathgamain, Brian first made himself King of Munster, then subjugated Leinster, making himself ruler of the south of Ireland. He is the founder of the O'Brien dynasty. His name is remembered in the title of one of the oldest tunes in Ireland's traditional repertoire: "Brian Boru's March". It is still widely played by traditional Irish musicians.

Although this work was originally written for Voice and Folk Instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Flower Duet" from Lakmé for Viola Duet & Cello

3 parts1 page01:214 years ago5,981 views
Viola(2), Cello
The Flower Duet (Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. The Hindus go to perform their rites in a sacred Brahmin temple under the high priest, Nilakantha. Nilakantha's daughter Lakmé (which derives from the Sanskrit Lakshmi) and her servant Mallika are left behind and go down to the river to gather flowers where they sing the famous "Flower Duet."

I created this simplified version of the main theme for Viola Duet & Cello to highlight as well as provide haunting undertones.
"O Holy Night" In C Major for English Handbells and Piano
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"O Holy Night" In C Major for English Handbells and Piano

3 parts5 pages02:167 years ago4,590 views
Piano(3)
"O Holy Night" ("Cantique de Noël") is a well-known Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem "Minuit, chrétiens" (Midnight, Christians) by Placide Cappeau (1808–1877). Cappeau, a wine merchant and poet, had been asked by a parish priest to write a Christmas poem. Unitarian minister John Sullivan Dwight, editor of Dwight's Journal of Music, created a singing edition based on Cappeau's French text in 1855. In both the French original and in the two familiar English versions of the carol, the text reflects on the birth of Jesus and of mankind's redemption.

I created this arrangement of "O Holy Night" transcribed In C Major for 5-Octave Handbells and Piano for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC).
"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio
Video

"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:206 years ago4,584 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
The Flower Duet (Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. The Hindus go to perform their rites in a sacred Brahmin temple under the high priest, Nilakantha. Nilakantha's daughter Lakmé (which derives from the Sanskrit Lakshmi) and her servant Mallika are left behind and go down to the river to gather flowers where they sing the famous "Flower Duet."

I created this simplified version of the main theme for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) to highlight as well as provide haunting undertones.

"Red is the Rose" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts6 pages02:556 years ago4,557 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lomond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song (Roud No. 9598). It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland.

This is the Irish variant of the song called "Red Is the Rose" and is sung with the same melody but different (although similarly themed) lyrics. It was popularized by Irish folk musician Tommy Makem. Even though many people mistakenly believe that Makem wrote "Red is the Rose", it is a traditional Irish folk song.

There remains today a general debate is which is older "Red Is The Rose" or "Loch Lomond", because one clearly borrowed the other's tune. To date, no one has found the answer, but Some of "older" Irish singers swear that "Red Is The Rose" is the original. Others in Scotland respond that tune had been well known in Scotland since the middle of the 18th century as "Kind Robin Lo'es Me". I do not know.

I created this arrangement for Flute Duet & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Allegro for a Flute Clock" for Flute Trio

3 parts2 pages02:295 years ago4,476 views
Flute(3)
The events of Beethoven's life are the stuff of Romantic legend, evoking images of the solitary creator shaking his fist at Fate and finally overcoming it through a supreme effort of creative will. Born in the small German city of Bonn on or around December 16, 1770, he received his early training from his father and other local musicians. As a teenager, he earned some money as an assistant to his teacher, Christian Gottlob Neefe, then was granted half of his father's salary as court musician from the Electorate of Cologne in order to care for his two younger brothers as his father gave in to alcoholism. Beethoven played viola in various orchestras, becoming friends with other players such as Antoine Reicha, Nikolaus Simrock, and Franz Ries, and began taking on composition commissions. As a member of the court chapel orchestra, he was able to travel some and meet members of the nobility, one of whom, Count Ferdinand Waldstein, would become a great friend and patron to him. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 to study with Haydn; despite the prickliness of their relationship, Haydn's concise humor helped form Beethoven's style. His subsequent teachers in composition were Johann Georg Albrechtsberger and Antonio Salieri. In 1794, he began his career in earnest as a pianist and composer, taking advantage whenever he could of the patronage of others. Around 1800, Beethoven began to notice his gradually encroaching deafness. His growing despondency only intensified his antisocial tendencies. However, the Symphony No. 3, "Eroica," of 1803 began a sustained period of groundbreaking creative triumph. In later years, Beethoven was plagued by personal difficulties, including a series of failed romances and a nasty custody battle over a nephew, Karl. Yet after a long period of comparative compositional inactivity lasting from about 1811 to 1817, his creative imagination triumphed once again over his troubles. Beethoven's late works, especially the last five of his 16 string quartets and the last four of his 32 piano sonatas, have an ecstatic quality in which many have found a mystical significance. Beethoven died in Vienna on March 26, 1827.

These five pieces surfaced after Beethoven's death, bringing with them several very puzzling mysteries. Most challenging of them all was the instrument for which they were written. Piano, strings, harp and most other common instruments were instantly ruled out, building on the perplexing mystery and adding to the frustration. Eventually, Albert Kopfermann set forth a convincing argument that their strange scoring seemed a perfect fit for the Flötenuhr or Spielühr, a mechanical organ or clock. He observed that the notation in No. 1, in F, matched that in Mozart's K. 608 Fantasia (for Flötenuhr), the score of which Beethoven possessed. Other circumstantial factors pointed to the Flötenuhr as the instrument Beethoven designed these pieces for.

A second mystery regarding these five works is the time of their composition. It appears that Nos. 4 and 5, both in C, were written as early as 1794 or perhaps slightly later. The others were likely written in 1799-1800. No. 1, marked Adagio, features a very attractive theme, which Beethoven deftly develops. He obviously took this music very seriously, despite the unorthodox instrumentation. The Scherzo (No. 2), in G, is also well crafted, as is the delightful Minuet (No. 5).

None of these five pieces was published until the twentieth century, and, not surprisingly, all are rarely heard. This arrangement is the Allegro from No. 3 in G Major and although originally written for Mechanical Organ (or Flute Clock), I created this arrangement for Flute Trio.
"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes
Video

"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes

3 parts4 pages02:216 years ago4,263 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Carrickfergus" is an Irish folk song, named after the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, "Do bhí bean uasal" ("There Was a Noblewoman"), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in County Clare.

The song appears on a ballad sheet in Cork City in the mid Nineteenth Century in macaronic form.

I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Concert (Pedal) or Celtic Harp.
"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes
Video

"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:446 years ago4,167 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Gloria in excelsis Deo" (Latin for "Glory to God in the highest") is a hymn known also as the Greater Doxology (as distinguished from the "Minor Doxology" or Gloria Patri) and the Angelic Hymn. The name is often abbreviated to Gloria in Excelsis or simply Gloria.

It is an example of the psalmi idiotici ("private psalms", i.e. compositions by individuals in imitation of the biblical Psalter) that were popular in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Other surviving examples of this lyric poetry are the Te Deum and the Phos Hilaron.

The hymn begins with the words that the angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds in Luke 2:14. Other verses were added very early, forming a doxology, which in the 4th century became part of morning prayers, and is still recited in the Byzantine Rite Orthros service.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote several settings of the Gloria. RV 589 is the most familiar and popular piece of sacred music by Vivaldi; however, he was known to have written at least three Gloria settings. Only two survive (RV 588 and RV 589) whilst the other (RV 590) is presumably lost and is only mentioned in the Kreuzherren catalogue. The two were written at about the same time (it is disputed which came first) in the early 18th century.

Although originally composed for voice and orchestra, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).

"Sound the Trumpet" (Z. 323) for Trumpets & Piano

3 parts3 pages02:526 years ago4,152 views
Trumpet(2), Piano
Come Ye Sons of Art, Z.323, also known as Ode for Queen Mary's birthday, is a musical ode written by Henry Purcell in 1694 in honor of the birthday of Queen Mary II of England. The text is often attributed to Nahum Tate.

Purcell begins the ode with a symphony or overture consisting of three movements: a largo followed by a fugal canzona and an adagio. Purcell later rewrote the opening symphony and incorporated into his opera The Indian Queen. The opening chorus is on the words "Come, Ye sons of Art," and serves as the introduction to the text. For the countertenor duet Sound the Trumpet, instead of using actual trumpets, Purcell choose to incorporate a two-bar modulating ground bass as the singers imitate the sound of trumpets. The day that such a blessing gave is intended to be a prayer for the day be of jubilation. This joy is displayed in the rest of the composition.

"The earliest surviving complete source is a manuscript score signed by one ‘Rob[er]t Pindar’, and dated 1765—some seventy years after Purcell’s death."[4] A new performance edition was published by Stainer & Bell in 2010, edited by Rebecca Herissone. Comparisons of existing manuscript or autograph scores led to the removal of eighteenth-century "enhancement". Dr. Herissone states that Purcell did not incorporate music from The Indian Queen into Come Ye Sons of Art, but that the editor (Robert Pinder) of the only surviving published edition of the work made drastic changes, including incorporating music from several of Purcell's previous theater works. This new edition is based on a comparison of Come Ye Sons of Art with manuscripts of other Odes written by Purcell showing exactly the same instrumental and editorial changes made by Pindar.

Herissone also points out that the "opening solo quite clearly begins ‘Come, ye sons of arts’, in the plural, not ‘Come, ye sons of art’ as in Pindar’s score, so the decision has been taken in the edition to follow the text as given in Purcell’s autograph." It appears the original title was 'Come, ye sons of arts.' The full article, along with a complete list of changes made by Pindar, is available in the 2010 publication by Stainer & Bell.

As the favorite composer of King William III of England, Purcell was given the task of composing odes for the birthday of Queen Mary. Come, Ye Sons of Art, written for performance in April 1694, was the sixth and final ode: Queen Mary died at the end of that year.

Although originally written for Voices (2) and Orchestra, I Arranged this piece for Trumpets (2) and Piano.

"Sailor's Hornpipe" for Flute Trio

3 parts3 pages02:026 years ago3,908 views
The Sailor's Hornpipe (also known as The College Hornpipe and Jack's the Lad) is a traditional hornpipe melody.

The hornpipe is any of several dance forms played and danced in Britain and elsewhere from the late 17th century until the present day. It is said that hornpipe as a dance began around the 16th century on English sailing vessels. Movements were those familiar to sailors of that time: "looking out to sea" with the right hand to the forehead, then the left, lurching as in heavy weather, and giving the occasional rhythmic tug to their breeches both fore and aft.

The usual tune for this dance was first printed as the "College Hornpipe" in 1797 or 1798 by J. Dale of London. It was found in manuscript collections before then – for instance the fine syncopated version in the William Vickers manuscript, written on Tyneside, dated 1770. The dance imitates the life of a sailor and their duties aboard ship. Due to the small space that the dance required, and no need for a partner, the dance was popular on-board ship.

Accompaniment may have been the music of a tin whistle or, from the 19th century, a squeezebox. Samuel Pepys referred to it in his diary as "The Jig of the Ship" and Captain Cook, who took a piper on at least one voyage, is noted to have ordered his men to dance the hornpipe in order to keep them in good health. The dance on-ship became less common when fiddlers ceased to be included in ships' crew members.


Although likely originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute Trio (Flutes (2) or Piccolo/Flute & Alto Flute) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Konzertstück" (Opus 114 No. 2) for Clarinets & Piano

3 parts21 pages07:335 years ago3,817 views
Clarinet(2), Piano
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

Mendelssohn was a true Renaissance man. A talented visual artist, he was a refined connoisseur of literature and philosophy. While Mendelssohn's name rarely arises in discussions of the nineteenth century vanguard, the intrinsic importance of his music is undeniable. A distinct personality emerges at once in its exceptional formal sophistication, its singular melodic sense, and its colorful, masterful deployment of the instrumental forces at hand. A true apotheosis of life, Mendelssohn's music absolutely overflows with energy, ebullience, drama, and invention, as evidenced in his most enduring works: the incidental music to A Midsummer Night's Dream (1826-1842); the Hebrides Overture (1830); the Songs Without Words (1830-1845); the Symphonies No. 3 (1841-1842) and No. 4 (1833); and the Violin Concerto in E minor (1844). While the sunny disposition of so many of Mendelssohn's works has led some to view the composer as possessing great talent but little depth, his religious compositions -- particularly the great oratorios Paulus (1836) and Elijah (1846) -- reflect the complexity and deeply spiritual basis of his personality.

In December 1832 and January 1833, Mendelssohn wrote a pair of works for a trio of clarinet, piano, and the now nearly arcane basset horn: the Concert Piece No. 1 in F major, Op. 113, and the Concert Piece No. 2 in D minor, Op. 114. Mendelssohn dispatched these two works immediately upon completion to clarinetist Heinrich Baermann and his son Carl, a basset horn player, who were touring Germany and Russia at the time. As tokens of the composer's personal friendship with the Baermanns (and his desire to help young Carl establish his career as a professional composer), the two Concert Pieces stand as the only compositions for basset horn in Mendelssohn's oeuvre.

The piece under consideration here, the first in Op. 113, is cast in three brief movements. The first, marked Allegro con fuoco, begins and ends with dramatic recitative-like exchanges between the clarinet and basset horn, establishing a vocally oriented approach to melody. The alternately turbulent and triumphant middle section demonstrates Mendelssohn's characteristic knack for creating textural interplay between monodic instrumental lines and piano accompaniment. The Andante middle movement finds the two woodwinds more closely allied, following tranquil melodies in lush, parallel thirds and sixths above a gentle pitter-patter of piano arpeggios. The pensive minor-mode stirrings that open the final movement cast a temporary shadow over the tranquil glow of the slow movement's final strains, but after a few uneasy recitative exchanges and a chromatic buildup, the clouds part for a playful Presto. The woodwinds assume a more extrovert, sometimes even playfully competitive character here, tossing rapid figurations and scales back and forth, facing off with breakneck runs in contrary motion -- one imagines the seasoned performer Heinrich Baermann and the young up-and-comer Carl bringing this piece to a rousing close.

Although originally created for Bb Clarinet, Basset Horn and Piano, I created this arrangement for Bb Clarinets (2) and Piano.
"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)
Video

"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)

3 parts5 pages02:186 years ago3,459 views
No, it is not only Bach/Gounod when hearing the Ave Maria: Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921), too, set this text to music several times - for example, for organ (without pedal) and two identical voices. The organ is sometimes replaced replaced by a piano (and here, the Harp), the vocal parts can be sung by two sopranos, soprano and mezzo-soprano, or soprano and alto. If the performers are good, one may even consider a performance of this sacred composition in groups. Now available in an attractiv single edition, this setting is valuable addition to the repertoire and impressive alternative to the common Ave settings

This arrangement is created for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Voice Duet (Soprano & Alto) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Skye Boat Song" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts4 pages01:516 years ago3,377 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Skye Boat Song" is a Scottish folk song, which can also be played as a waltz, recalling the escape of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) from Uist to the Isle of Skye after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. The song tells how Charles escaped in a small boat, with the aid of Flora MacDonald, disguised as a serving maid. The song is a traditional expression of Jacobitism and its story has also entered Scotland as a national legend.

The song was not in any older books of Scottish songs, though it is in most miscellanies like The Fireside Book of Folk Songs. It is often sung as a lullaby, in a slow rocking 6/8 time. In addition to being extremely popular in its day, and becoming a standard among Scottish folk and dance musicians, it has become more widely known in the modern mainstream popular music genre.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement at the request of Belgian flautist, Jenne Van Antwerpen for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).

"Ave Maria" on a Prelude by J.S. Bach for String Trio

3 parts4 pages02:414 years ago3,382 views
Violin, Viola, Cello
Ave Maria based on a prelude by J.S. Bach written by French Romantic composer Charles Gounod in 1859 as the "Consideration on Bach's prelude". His Ave Maria consists of a melody superimposed over the Prelude No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, from Book I of The Well-Tempered Clavier, written by J.S. Bach some 137 years earlier.

I took some creative license and added a Violin Part and transcribed the rest for Viola & Cello. I found this to be a hauntingly interesting blend of old and new and utilized the rich strings to accentuate transitions between melody and dissonance; providing musical interest with their overtones to provide suspense and melodic resolution. I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

"Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages02:596 years ago2,973 views
Johann Sebastian Bach's sacred Cantata No. 147 "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben" ("Heart and Mouth, Deeds and Life"), was written for the feast of the Visitation of the Virgin Mary and first performed in its final definitive form in Leipzig to mark the feast day, July 2, 1723. Much of the work originated during the composer's tenure as Konzertmeister in Weimar, where upon his appointment in 1714 he also assumed responsibility for the provision of a new cantata each month for services held in the Duke's chapel. In its earliest form (BWV 147a), this cantata was intended to be given on the fourth Sunday of Advent, 1716. This version contained four main arias and an opening chorus, but no recitative sections, three of which were added later, along with the great chorale, which brings each of the main sections to its close. The autograph of the Leipzig version survives intact, but all except the opening movement of the first version has perished. Interestingly, the composer's original design for the Advent feasts at Weimar would have been considered entirely unsuitable by the church authorities in Leipzig, who had forbidden the performance of all concert music during this period of the liturgical year. Bach managed to overcome this restriction by incorporating references to the "Magnificat" (Luke 1: 39-56) into the score, thus tailoring the cantata specifically to the Feast of the Visitation.

The final version begins with an elaborate chorus in C major, in which the celebratory tone is established by the fanfare-like opening section for orchestra. Part I concludes with the famous chorale known in English as "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring." Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th movement of the cantata.

Although it is the 32nd surviving cantata that Bach composed, it was assigned the number BWV 147 in the complete catalogue of his works. Bach wrote a total of 200 cantatas during his time in Leipzig, largely to meet the Leipzig Churches' demand for about 58 different cantatas each year.

Contrary to the common assumption, the violinist and composer Johann Schop, not Bach, composed the movement's underlying chorale melody, Werde munter, mein Gemüthe; Bach's contribution was to harmonize and orchestrate it. The frequent use of arrangements of the piece in modern weddings is in no way related to its scope or Bach's intent for it. Rather, it was one segment of an extended, approximately 20-minute treatment of a traditional Church hymn, as is typical of cantatas of the Baroque period.

Although originally composed as a choral cantata, I created this arrangement for Woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Benedictus" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 24) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages02:395 years ago2,923 views
Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Benedictus" (Blessed) for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).