Sheet music with 5 instruments

"Come, Sweet Death, Come Blessed Rest" (BWV 478) for Organ and Choir

5 parts5 pages08:226 years ago16,920 views
Voice(4), Organ
"Come, Sweet Death, Come Blessed Rest" (Komm, süßer Tod, komm selge Ruh) was originally written by Johann Sebastian Bach for solo voice and basso continuo from the 69 Sacred Songs and Arias that he contributed to Georg Christian Schemelli's Musicalisches Gesangbuch (Schemelli Gesangbuch No. 868 -- BWV 478) edited by Georg Christian Schemelli in 1736.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komm,_s%C3%BC%C3%9Fer_Tod,_komm_selge_Ruh).

For most of these sacred songs, Bach had only to devise bass lines and figured bass indications -- the melodies selected were old and famous Lutheran tunes. Komm, süßer Tod, however, is an exception. The song has five verses, written around 1724 by some unknown poet, each of which begins which the text "Komm, süßer (süsser) Tod, komm selige Ruh" (Come, sweet death; come, blessed rest), and each of which is set to the same eight short phrases of triple-meter music. Its melody is known in no other source than the Schmelli Gesang-Buch, and it is generally believed that Bach wrote the piece from scratch. (There are two or three other entries in the Gesang-Buch that seem also to have been newly composed) .

Those familiar with ordinary German chorales will find themselves on familiar ground with Komm, süsser Tod, but its solo vocal line seems especially to exemplify Bach's supremely confident devotional side. Bach, by means of melody and harmony, expresses the desire for death and heaven.A beautiful orchestral version of this piece was made by Leopold Stokowski in 1946 (see VideoScore); it opens with all the strings muted except for a solo cello that "sings" the melody.

In my own inexperienced interpretation, the lyrics read more like a suicide note or death wish than other pieces from this time. It really seems to express the misery with things in the world and longing to end the suffering. Perhaps it was the loss of his beloved wife Maria Barbara Bach or the loss of many of his children. This piece touches me; sad to think of the suffering of a great master like this. One listener offered, "This is not a death wish in the way we normally think of it but the deep longing of a devout man of God desiring to be with his Savior. The music pulls forward and back just as the Apostle Paul was torn between the desire to be useful here on earth yet more to be with his Lord. In this piece the tension ebbs and flows until the final resolution gives full release."

I created this arrangement for Pipe Organ and created English lyrics for Choir (SATB).

"Lascia Ch'io Pianga" from the Opera Rinaldo (HWV 7) for Organ and Choir

5 parts8 pages02:296 years ago8,155 views
Adapted from the opera "Rinaldo" (HWV 7) by George Frideric Handel composed in 1711. This is an arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) of the the soprano aria "Lascia Ch'io Pianga" adapted for Organ and Choir (SATB). Best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software.
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"Hallelujah, Amen" from "Judas Maccabäus" (HWV 63) for Piano & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts5 pages01:255 years ago7,087 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Piano
"Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24. Morell's libretto is based on the deuterocanonical 1 Maccabees (2-8), with motives added from the Antiquitates Judaicae by Flavius Josephus.

The events depicted in the oratorio are from the period 170-160 BC when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid Empire which undertook to destroy the Jewish religion. Being ordered to worship Zeus, many Jews obeyed under the threat of persecution, however some did not. One who defied was the elderly priest Mattathias who killed a fellow Jew who was about to offer a pagan sacrifice. After tearing down a pagan altar, Mattathias retreated to the hills and gathered others who were willing to fight for their faith.

"Hallelujah, Amen" is from ACT III depicting Victory that has finally been achieved for the Jewish people. News arrives that Rome is willing to form an alliance with Judas against the Seleucid empire. The people rejoice that peace has at last come to their country (O lovely peace).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Acoustic Piano & Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon).

"The First Noël" for Organ and Choir (SATB)

5 parts3 pages04:416 years ago5,978 views
Voice(4), Organ
"The First Noël" is a traditional classical English carol, most likely from the 18th century, although possibly earlier.

The original version of The First Noel dates back to at least the 17th century. In 1823, William B. Sandys (1792-1874), and Davies Gilbert (1767-1839) edited and added lyrics to create the version we sing today. The origin of the current melody is uncertain.

This arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) highlights the range of the Choir and adds organ accompaniment.

"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:046 years ago5,793 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, this piece has been adapted to the standard Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) configuration.

"Scotland the Brave" for Wind Quintet

5 parts3 pages03:145 years ago5,721 views
Flute(2), Trumpet, Clarinet(2)
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I arranged it especially for the Physicians of "Music of the Heart" (http://www.hfmhealth.org/musicfromtheheart) Wind Quintet (2 Flutes, Bb Clarinet, Trumpet & Bass Clarinet).

"Je te Veux" for String Quintet

5 parts7 pages04:513 years ago5,535 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"Je te veux" (French for I want you) is a song composed by Erik Satie to a text by Henry Pacory. A sentimental, slow waltz, it was originally written for the singer Paulette Darty, whose accompanist Satie had been for a period of time.

During the 1900's, Erik Satie produced several first rate cafe songs and music hall pieces, which include "Je te veux" - a graceful French waltz and "Le Piccadilly" - with a strong Scott Joplin ragtime flavour.

This song was registered on November 1902, but some argue it had actually been composed in 1897. Satie composed various versions of the Je te veux waltz, including one for piano. I created this arrangement from the Piano version for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Wind Quintet (Opus 88 No. 1) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts43 pages24:285 years ago4,692 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Anton Reicha (1770 – 1836) was a Bohemian-born, later naturalized French composer of music very much in the German style. A contemporary and lifelong friend of Beethoven, he is now best remembered for his substantial early contributions to the wind quintet literature and his role as teacher of pupils including Franz Liszt and Hector Berlioz. He was also an accomplished theorist, and wrote several treatises on various aspects of composition. Some of his theoretical work dealt with experimental methods of composition, which he applied in a variety of works such as fugues and études for piano and string quartet.

Reicha was born in Prague. His town piper father died when the boy was just 10 months old, leaving him in custody of a mother who had no interest in educating him. The young composer ran away from home when only ten years old, and was subsequently raised and educated in music by his paternal uncle Josef Reicha. When they moved to Bonn, Josef secured for his nephew a place playing violin in the Hofkapelle electoral orchestra alongside the young Beethoven on viola, but for Reicha this was not enough. He studied composition secretly, against his uncle's wishes, and entered the University of Bonn in 1789. When Bonn was captured by the French in 1794 Reicha fled to Hamburg, where he made a living teaching harmony and composition and studied mathematics and philosophy. Between 1799 and 1801 he lived in Paris, trying to gain recognition as an opera composer, without success. In 1801 he moved on to Vienna, where he studied with Salieri and Albrechtsberger and produced his first important works. His life was once again affected by war in 1808, when he left Vienna when it was occupied by the French under Napoleon and returned to Paris, where he spent the rest of his life teaching composition and in 1818 was appointed professor at the Conservatoire.

Reicha's output during his Vienna years included large semi-didactic cycles of works such as 36 Fugues for piano (in a "new method of fugal writing"), L'art de varier (a set of 57 variations on an original theme), and exercises for the treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples). During the later Paris period, however, he focused his attention mostly on theory and produced a number of treatises on composition. Works of this period include 25 crucially important wind quintets which are considered the locus classicus of that genre and are his best known compositions. None of the advanced ideas he advocated in the most radical his music and writings (not used in the 25 great wind quintets), including polyrhythm, polytonality and microtonal music, were accepted or employed by nineteenth-century composers. Due to Reicha's unwillingness to have his music published (like Michael Haydn before him), he fell into obscurity soon after his death and his life and work have yet to be intensively studied.

Musically, the wind quintets represent a more conservative trend in Reicha's oeuvre when compared to his earlier work, namely the compositions of the Viennese period. Instead, Reicha was inspired by the supreme artistry of his players from the Opéra Comique to explore the technical limits of the five instruments comprising the wind quintet, with writing that combines elements from comic opera, folk tradition, military marches and fanfares with his lifelong interests in variation form and counterpoint. Technical wizardry also prevails in compositions that illustrate Reicha's theoretical treatise Practische Beispiele (Practical Examples) of 1803, where techniques such as bitonality and polyrhythm are explored in extremely difficult sight-reading exercises. 36 fugues for piano, published in 1803, was conceived as an illustration of Reicha's neue Fugensystem, a new system for composing fugues. Reicha proposed that second entries of fugue subjects in major keys could occur in keys other than the standard dominant), to widen the possibilities for modulations and undermine the conservative tonal stability of the fugue. The fugues of the collection not only illustrate this point, but also employ a variety of extremely convoluted technical tricks such as polyrhythm (no. 30), combined (nos. 24, 28), asymmetrical (no. 20) and simply uncommon (no. 10 is in 12/4, no. 12 in 2/8) meters and time signatures, some of which are derived from folk music, an approach that directly anticipates that of later composers such as Béla Bartók. No. 13 is a modal fugue played on white keys only, in which cadences are possible on all but the 7th degree of the scale without further alteration. Six fugues employ two subjects, one has three, and No. 15 six. In several of the fugues, Reicha established a link with the old tradition by using subjects by Haydn (no. 3), Bach (no. 5), Mozart (no. 7), Scarlatti (no. 9), Frescobaldi (no. 14) and Handel (no. 15). Many of the technical accomplishments are unique to fugue literature.

Although originally written for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in C, Horn in E & Bassoon I created this arrangement forWoodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Concerto II" for Oboe & Strings in D Minor

5 parts13 pages09:316 years ago4,040 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Alessandro Marcello (1669 - 1747) was an Italian nobleman, poet, philosopher, mathematician and musician. A contemporary of Tomaso Albinoni, Marcello was the son of a senator in Venice. As such, he enjoyed a comfortable life that gave him the scope to pursue his interest in music. He held concerts in his hometown and also composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello, being a slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747.

The Concerto for Oboe and Strings in D minor by Alessandro Marcello is one of the most performed oboe concertos in the repertory. It was written in the early 18th century and has become Marcello's most famous work. In the past, and continuing to the present, it has been mistakenly attributed to both Alessandro Marcello's brother Benedetto Marcello and to Antonio Vivaldi. Johann Sebastian Bach made the piece famous by writing a transcription of the piece in C minor for harpsichord (BWV 974).

I have also ccreated an arrangement of the adagio (Movement 2) for English Horn & Harp at: http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/adagio-from-concerto-ii-for-english-horn-and-harp

"March of the Grenadier Guards" (HWV 20) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages02:145 years ago3,913 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
George Frideric Handel (1685 – 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Scipione was the eighth of the full-length operas Handel composed for the Royal Academy of Music, the London promoters of Italian opera at the King's Theatre. Even for a composer famed for the speed with which he composed, it was written in considerable haste. According to Handel's librettist, Paolo Antonio Rolli, it was composed in only three weeks, with Handel completing the score just ten days before the opening night, March 12, 1726. Handel had good reason to be in such a hurry. It had been his intention to open the season with Alessandro, composed as a showpiece to display the talents of three of the greatest singers of the day, the castrato Senesino, and the rival sopranos, Francesca Cuzzoni and Faustina Bordoni, newly engaged by the Royal Academy. When it became obvious Bordoni would not arrive in England in time, Handel, obviously feeling he needed a new opera with which to open the season, turned to Scipione.

Rolli's text, cast in the usual three acts, is based on an earlier libretto by Antonio Salvi, Publio Cornelio Scipione (1704). In keeping with many of the operas Handel composed during this period, the plot has a historical context, in this instance the capture of the Spanish port of Cartagena by the young Roman general Publius Cornelius Scipio in 209 B.C. The opera opens with the famous March that accompanies Scipio's triumphant entry into the city, but the subsequent plot is centered around his love for Berenice (soprano), a captured princess. Berenice, however is already betrothed to the prince Luceius (a role taken by Senesino in the first performances), who disguises himself as a Roman in a vain attempt to rescue her. After much misunderstanding and imbroglio, Luceius is revealed as Berenice's lover. Scipio, true to the magnanimous character of opera seria heroes, renounces his claim to Berenice. Most commentators agree that Scipione shows signs of the haste with which it was written, the Handel authority Winton Dean suggesting that, with the exception of Floridante of 1721, it is the weakest of all his Royal Academy operas. Nevertheless, it contains some fine music particularly in Act II, where the drama reaches a peak in the confrontation between Scipio and Luceius, and Berenice's avowal of constancy articulated in her aria "Scoglio d'immota fronte." The scoring is lightweight, largely being restricted to strings with a pair of flutes included in one aria and two recorders in another. Although the opera achieved a respectable initial run of 13 performances, it was revived by Handel only once, in 1730, when the composer made extensive alterations.

Although originally written for Brass, Woodwinds & Strings, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Rondo Alla Turca" (K. 331 No. 11 Mvt. 3) for Steel Orchestra

5 parts6 pages03:584 years ago3,286 views
The Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is a piano sonata in three movements. It is uncertain where and when Mozart composed the sonata; however, Vienna or Salzburg around 1783 is currently thought to be most likely (Paris and dates as far back as 1778 have also been suggested).

The last movement, "Alla Turca", popularly known as the "Turkish March", is often heard on its own and is one of Mozart's best-known piano pieces; it was Mozart himself who titled the rondo "Alla Turca". It imitates the sound of Turkish Janissary bands, the music of which was much in vogue at that time. Various other works of the time imitate this Turkish style, including Mozart's own opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail. In Mozart's time, the last movement was sometimes performed on pianos built with a "Turkish stop", allowing it to be embellished with extra percussion effects.

Although originally written for Piano, I created this Arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessable to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan, Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Hallelujah, Amen" from "Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) for Piano & String Quartet

5 parts5 pages01:254 years ago3,271 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Piano
"Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24. Morell's libretto is based on the deuterocanonical 1 Maccabees (2-8), with motives added from the Antiquitates Judaicae by Flavius Josephus.

The events depicted in the oratorio are from the period 170-160 BC when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid Empire which undertook to destroy the Jewish religion. Being ordered to worship Zeus, many Jews obeyed under the threat of persecution, however some did not. One who defied was the elderly priest Mattathias who killed a fellow Jew who was about to offer a pagan sacrifice. After tearing down a pagan altar, Mattathias retreated to the hills and gathered others who were willing to fight for their faith.

"Hallelujah, Amen" is from ACT III depicting Victory that has finally been achieved for the Jewish people. News arrives that Rome is willing to form an alliance with Judas against the Seleucid empire. The people rejoice that peace has at last come to their country (O lovely peace).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Acoustic Piano & String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Rondo Alla Turca" (K. 331 No. 11 Mvt. 3) for String Quintet

5 parts6 pages04:013 years ago3,087 views
Violin(3), Viola, Cello
The Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is a piano sonata in three movements. It is uncertain where and when Mozart composed the sonata; however, Vienna or Salzburg around 1783 is currently thought to be most likely (Paris and dates as far back as 1778 have also been suggested).

The last movement, "Alla Turca", popularly known as the "Turkish March", is often heard on its own and is one of Mozart's best-known piano pieces; it was Mozart himself who titled the rondo "Alla Turca". It imitates the sound of Turkish Janissary bands, the music of which was much in vogue at that time. Various other works of the time imitate this Turkish style, including Mozart's own opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail. In Mozart's time, the last movement was sometimes performed on pianos built with a "Turkish stop", allowing it to be embellished with extra percussion effects.

Although originally written for Piano, I created this Arrangement at the request of a school group's String Quintet (3 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for String Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:073 years ago3,052 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, I created this arrangement for String Quintet (2 Violins, 2 Violas & Cello).
"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet
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"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet

5 parts8 pages04:266 years ago2,757 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Charles Gounod was born in Paris, the son of a pianist mother and an artist father. His mother was his first piano teacher. Under her tutelage, Gounod first showed his musical talents. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Fromental Halévy and Pierre Zimmermann.

Gounod wrote "Funeral march of a marionette" as a light-hearted piece of musical grotesquerie, a mock funeral procession with a jaunty beat and a carefree tune over a humorously not-slow-enough funeral march. The music in the beginning is supposed to tell the listener that two of the members of the Marionette troupe have had a duel and one of them has been killed. A party of pallbearers is organized and the procession sets out for the cemetery in march time. The music soon takes on a more cheerful spirit, for some of the troupe, wearied with the march, seek consolation at a wayside inn, where they refresh themselves and also descant upon the many virtues of their late companion. At last they get into place again and the procession enters the cemetery to the march rhythm -- the whole closing with the bars intended to reflect upon the briefness and weariness of life, even for marionettes.

The "Funeral March of a Marionette", received a new and unexpected lease of life from 1955 when it was first used as the theme for the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. The "Funeral March of a Marionette," slight as it is, has never lost its charm. It was originally written as one of the movements of a Suite Burlesque, which was never completed.

Although originally written for Piano, this arrangement was created for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Ave Maria" for Flute & Strings

5 parts4 pages03:592 years ago2,716 views
Flute, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
"Ave Maria" is a popular and much recorded aria composed by Vladimir Vavilov around 1970. It is a musical hoax generally misattributed to Baroque composer Giulio Caccini.

Vavilov himself published and recorded it on the Melodiya label with the ascription to "Anonymous" in 1970. It is believed that the work received its ascription to Giulio Caccini after Vavilov's death, by an organist Mark Shakhin (one of its performers on the mentioned "Melodiya" longplay), who gave the "newly discovered scores" to other musicians; then in an arrangement made by the organist Oleg Yanchenko for the recording by Irina Arkhipova in 1987, then the piece came to be famous worldwide.

I took creative license and created this arrangement for Solo Flute & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Music for the Young" for Wind Quintet

5 parts21 pages10:065 years ago2,544 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 – 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time, and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1865. The formal Western-oriented teaching he received there set him apart from composers of the contemporary nationalist movement embodied by the Russian composers of The Five, with whom his professional relationship was mixed. Tchaikovsky's training set him on a path to reconcile what he had learned with the native musical practices to which he had been exposed from childhood. From this reconciliation, he forged a personal but unmistakably Russian style—a task that did not prove easy. The principles that governed melody, harmony and other fundamentals of Russian music ran completely counter to those that governed Western European music; this seemed to defeat the potential for using Russian music in large-scale Western composition or from forming a composite style, and it caused personal antipathies that dented Tchaikovsky's self-confidence. Russian culture exhibited a split personality, with its native and adopted elements having drifted apart increasingly since the time of Peter the Great, and this resulted in uncertainty among the intelligentsia of the country's national identity.

Tchaikovsky's Album for the Young (Opus 39) is a collection of 24 short songs that vary in meter, tempo, style, and harmonic structure.Inspired by Robert Schumann's children's works like Kinderszenen and Album fur die Jugend, Tchaikovsky, dissatisfied with the quality of children's music and lack thereof, composed these piano works in 1878, hoping to improve piano literature for children. These pieces are very much adult-like. Tchaikovsky masterfully demonstrates an adult understanding of childhood adolescence and innocence. Though these scores were dedicated to his seven year old nephew, Vladimir Davidoff, these pieces are certainly not for beginners.

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, this arrangement fetures ten (10) pieces for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Sweet Dreams" (Opus 39 No 21) for String Quintet

5 parts4 pages02:033 years ago2,439 views
Violin(3), Viola, Cello
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 1840 -- 1893) was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time, and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1865. The formal Western-oriented teaching he received there set him apart from composers of the contemporary nationalist movement embodied by the Russian composers of The Five, with whom his professional relationship was mixed. Tchaikovsky's training set him on a path to reconcile what he had learned with the native musical practices to which he had been exposed from childhood. From this reconciliation, he forged a personal but unmistakably Russian style—a task that did not prove easy. The principles that governed melody, harmony and other fundamentals of Russian music ran completely counter to those that governed Western European music; this seemed to defeat the potential for using Russian music in large-scale Western composition or from forming a composite style, and it caused personal antipathies that dented Tchaikovsky's self-confidence. Russian culture exhibited a split personality, with its native and adopted elements having drifted apart increasingly since the time of Peter the Great, and this resulted in uncertainty among the intelligentsia of the country's national identity.

Tchaikovsky's Album for the Young (Opus 39) is a collection of 24 short songs that vary in meter, tempo, style, and harmonic structure.Inspired by Robert Schumann's children's works like Kinderszenen and Album fur die Jugend, Tchaikovsky, dissatisfied with the quality of children's music and lack thereof, composed these piano works in 1878, hoping to improve piano literature for children. These pieces are very much adult-like. Tchaikovsky masterfully demonstrates an adult understanding of childhood adolescence and innocence. Though these scores were dedicated to his seven year old nephew, Vladimir Davidoff, these pieces are certainly not for beginners.

Although these pieces were originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of Sweet Dreams (Сладкая греза) for String Quintet (3 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Fantaisie Brillante" from "Carmen" for Oboe & Strings

5 parts28 pages09:34a year ago2,375 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
François Borne (1840 – 1920): Fantasie Brillante on Themes from Bizet’s Carmen (based on the opera Carmen by Georges Bizet, 1837 – 1875).

Mozart, Verdi, Rossini and Wagner rank high among the many composers whose operas have inspired fantasias and transcriptions by their composer-colleagues. “La ci darem la Mano”, a duet from Mozart’s Don Giovanni, is the basis for dozens of theme-and-variations. But since its premiere in 1875, Bizet’s Carmen has surely taken the lead as a subject for virtuosic showpieces by other composers. The opera’s color and passion have given rise to spectacular arrangements for guitar, piano, full orchestra, and – in the case of François Borne – flute.

Borne was a flutist with the principal opera company in Bordeaux as well as a composer and professor at the conservatory in Toulouse. Expert in both instrumental technique and in the development of the flute as an instrument, he is still recognized for his technical contributions to the Böhm flute. His Fantasie Brillante on Themes from Bizet’s Carmen is by far his most famous composition.

Borne’s setting of Carmen’s luscious melodies – like those by Sarasate for the violin, and by Busoni and Horowitz for the piano – combine the virtuoso’s understanding of the solo instrument with a flair for the dance rhythms and passionate colors of the opera. Borne fills his setting with spectacular arpeggios that require fleet fingering and consummate breath control. Carmen’s brilliant Habanera, a traditional dance that she performs with castanets (and with abundant flirting), anchors the work. But the mood of Borne’s Carmen is far brighter than that of the fatalistic Gypsy girl of Bizet’s opera. In Borne’s showpiece, a set of brilliant variations on her showy Habanera leads to a triumphant close – in marked contrast with the opera’s violent, tragic ending.

Source: Utah Symphony notes (http://www.utahsymphony.org/insight/program-notes/1193-borne-fantasie-brillante-on-themes-from-bizet-s-carmen).

Although originally composed for Flute & Piano, I created this Interpretation for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Toccata & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 565) for String Quintet

5 parts16 pages08:392 years ago2,260 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
The Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, is a piece of organ music written, according to its oldest extant sources, by Johann Sebastian Bach. Its time of origin, narrowed down depending on author, lies between c.1704 and the 1750s. The piece opens with a toccata section, followed by a fugue that ends in a coda. To a large extent the piece complies to the characteristics deemed typical for the north German organ school of the baroque era, but divergent stylistic influences, such as south German characteristics, have been described in scholarly literature on the piece.

For a century after its creation the only certainty about this Toccata and Fugue is that it survived in a manuscript written by Johannes Ringk. The first publication of the piece, in the Bach Revival era, was in 1833, through the efforts of Felix Mendelssohn, who also performed the piece in an acclaimed concert in 1840. The piece knew a fairly successful piano version by Carl Tausig in the second half of the 19th century, but it was not until the 20th century that its popularity rose above that of other organ compositions by Bach. That popularity further expanded until the Toccata and Fugue in D minor came to be considered as the most famous work in the organ repertoire.

A wide, and often conflicting, variety of analyses has been published about the piece: for instance in literature on organ music it is often described as some sort of program music depicting a storm, while in the context of Disney's Fantasia it was promoted as absolute music, nothing like program music depicting a storm. In the last quarter of the 20th century scholars like Peter Williams and Rolf-Dietrich Claus published their studies on the piece, and argued against its authenticity. Bach scholars like Christoph Wolff defended the attribution to Bach. Other commentators ignored the authenticity doubts or considered the attribution issue undecided. No edition of the Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis listed the Toccata and Fugue among the doubtful works, nor does its entry on the website of the Bach Archive in Leipzig even mention alternative views on the attribution issue. Johann Sebastian Bach's most famous organ piece is notable for its rhythmic drive as well for as its arresting opening motif.

Considered the epitome of scary organ music by the many who associate it with melodramatic silent-film scenes, it has been transcribed in various ways. Through much of the twentieth century it was often heard in an orchestral arrangement by Leopold Stokowski. The romanticized, roaring registration often used in organ performances is still effective, although interpretations aiming for historical accuracy tend to give the work a lighter touch. It is difficult to establish a chronology of Bach's organ works, for most of their autograph manuscripts (except for those from the end of his career) have been lost. Works such as this one have come down to us only in copies made by his students. In the absence of clues provided by the composer's handwriting, the paper he wrote on, inscriptions that appear on the manuscript, and so forth, scholars have tried to guess the date of this work based on stylistic considerations. Because of its most salient structural aspect -- the interpenetration of the toccata material and the contrapuntal fugue -- the work has been assigned to the beginning of Bach's career, before his 1708 move to Weimar. It is perhaps the very earliest among Bach's well-known masterpieces. The alternation of quasi-improvisatory and contrapuntal sections was characteristic of the works of the north German organist Dietrich Buxtehude, whom Bach walked some two hundred miles to hear in 1704, taking a leave of absence from his post as organist at the Neukirche in Arnstadt. By fully realizing the dramatic potential inherent in this technique, Bach created a timeless work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toccata_and_Fugue_in_D_minor,_BWV_565).

Although originally composed for Organ, I created this modern interpretation of the Toccata & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 565) for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).