Sheet music with 6 instruments

"Scotland the Brave" for Steel Orchestra

6 parts6 pages03:154 years ago6,551 views
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I created this arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessible to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan, Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums & Percussion (Bass Drum & Snare Drum) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Joy to the World" for Piano, Organ and Choir

6 parts13 pages03:447 years ago5,912 views
An ensemble for piano, organ and church choir arranged for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) from the United Methodist Church Hymnal #246. "Joy to the World" was adapted and arranged to the English hymn writer Isaac Watts' lyrics by Lowell Mason in 1839 from an older melody which was then believed to have originated from Handel, not least because the theme of the refrain (And heaven and nature sing...) appears in the orchestra opening and accompaniment of the recitative Comfort ye from Handel's Messiah, and the first four notes match the beginning of the choruses Lift up your heads and Glory to God from the same oratorio. However, Handel did not compose the entire tune. The name "Antioch" is generally used for the tune. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"The Ants Go Marching" for Steel Orchestra

6 parts5 pages01:124 years ago3,932 views
Percussion(6)
"The Ants Go Marching One by One" "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again") is a popular song of the American Civil War that expressed people's longing for the return of their friends and relatives who were fighting in the war.

The lyrics to When Johnny Comes Marching Home were written by the Irish-American bandleader Patrick Gilmore during the American Civil War. Its first sheet music publication was deposited in the Library of Congress on September 26, 1863, with words and music credited to "Louis Lambert"; copyright was retained by the publisher, Henry Tolman & Co., of Boston. Why Gilmore chose to publish under a pseudonym is not clear, but popular composers of the period often employed pseudonyms to add a touch of romantic mystery to their compositions. Gilmore is said to have written the song for his sister Annie as she prayed for the safe return of her fiancé, Union Light Artillery Captain John O'Rourke, from the Civil War, although it is not clear if the engagement already existed in 1863 and the two were not married until 1875.

Gilmore later acknowledged that the music was not original but was, as he put it in an 1883 article in the Musical Herald, "a musical waif which I happened to hear somebody humming in the early days of the rebellion, and taking a fancy to it, wrote it down, dressed it up, gave it a name, and rhymed it into usefulness for a special purpose suited to the times."

The melody was previously published around July 1, 1863, as the music to the Civil War drinking song Johnny Fill Up the Bowl. A color-illustrated, undated slip of Gilmore's lyrics, printed by his own Boston publisher, actually states that When Johnny Comes Marching Home should be sung to the tune of Johnny Fill Up the Bowl. The original sheet music for Johnny Fill Up the Bowl states that the music was arranged (not composed) by J. Durnal. There is a melodic resemblance of the tune to that of John Anderson, My Jo (to which Robert Burns wrote lyrics to fit a pre-existing tune dating from about 1630 or earlier), and some have suggested a connection to the seventeenth-century ballad The Three Ravens.

When Johnny Comes Marching Home is also sung to the same tune as Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye and is frequently thought to have been a rewriting of that song. However, Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye was not published until 1867, and it originally had a different melody.

I created this arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessible to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan), Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums & Percussion (Bass Drum, Snare Drum and High Hat).

"Away in a Manger" Ensemble for Piano, Organ & Choir

6 parts10 pages02:557 years ago3,135 views
Voice(4), Piano, Organ
The song was first published with two verses in an Evangelical Lutheran Sunday School collection, Little Children's Book for Schools and Families (1885), edited by James R. Murray (1841–1905), where it simply bore the title "Away in a Manger" and was set to a tune called "St. Kilda," credited to J.E. Clark.

I created this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) for Choir (SATB) Piano & Organ.

"Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross" (UMH # 301) Ensemble for Piano, Organ and Choir

6 parts7 pages03:247 years ago2,893 views
The blind poet Fanny Crosby originally wrote "Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross" on November 20, 1850 at Thirtieth Street Methodist Church in Cincinnati. Businessman William Doane gave her a melody he had written. Fanny, listening to it, felt it said, “Jesus keep me near the cross,” and she promptly wrote the words. This represents an organ and choral arrangement of thei work, with my introduction measures, and prepared for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC). Best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software.

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" for Steel Orchestra

6 parts2 pages01:134 years ago2,764 views
John Rosamond Johnson (August 11, 1873 – November 11, 1954),[1] most often referred to as J. Rosamond Johnson, was an Bahamian-American composer and singer during the Harlem Renaissance. Johnson is most notable as the composer of the hymn "Lift Every Voice and Sing" which has come to be known in the United States as the "Black National Anthem". His brother, the poet James Weldon Johnson, wrote the lyrics of the famous piece. It was first performed live by 500 Black American students from the segregated Stanton School (elementary/middle/junior high-level), Jacksonville, FL, in 1900. The song was published by the Edward B. Marks Music Company, formerly the Joseph W. Stern & Co., Manhattan, NY.

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" — often referred to as "The African American National Anthem"— is a song written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson (1871--1938) in 1899 and set to music by his brother John Rosamond Johnson (1873--1954) in 1900.

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" was publicly performed first as a poem as part of a celebration of Lincoln's Birthday on February 12, 1900, by 500 school children at the segregated Stanton School. Its principal, James Weldon Johnson, wrote the words to introduce its honored guest Booker T. Washington. The poem was later set to music by Johnson's brother John in 1905.

In 1939, Augusta Savage received a commission from the World's Fair and created a 16-foot plaster sculpture called Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing which was destroyed by bulldozers at the close of the fair.

In Maya Angelou's 1969 autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the song is sung by the audience and students at Maya's eighth grade graduation, after a white school official dashes the educational aspirations of her class.

In 1990, singer Melba Moore released a modern rendition of the song, which she recorded along with others including R&B artists Stephanie Mills, Anita Baker, Dionne Warwick, Bobby Brown, Stevie Wonder, Jeffrey Osborne, and Howard Hewett; and gospel artists BeBe & CeCe Winans, Take 6, and The Clark Sisters, after which, "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" was entered into the Congressional Record by Del. Walter Fauntroy (D-DC),.

In 2008, jazz singer Rene Marie was asked to perform the national anthem at a civic event in Denver, Colorado, where she caused a controversy by substituting the words of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" into the song. This arrangement of the words of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" with the melody of "The Star Spangled Banner" became part of the titular suite on her 2011 CD release, "The Voice of My Beautiful Country".

On January 20, 2009, the Rev. Joseph Lowery, who was formerly president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, used a near-verbatim recitation of the song's third stanza to begin his benediction at the inauguration ceremony for President Barack Obama.

Although originally written for accompanied voice, I created this arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessible to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan, Double Lead (2), Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"God and Faith of Our Fathers" Medley for Piano, Organ & Choir

6 parts12 pages07:177 years ago2,634 views
A piano, organ and choir (SATB) arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) from a medley of both "God of Our Fathers" and "Faith of Our Fathers". "God of Our Fathers" is a 19th-century American Christian hymn, written to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the United States Declaration of Independence in 1876. "Faith of Our Fathers" was written by Frederick W. Faber and sung at the funeral of American president Franklin Roosevelt, held in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Trumpet Shall Sound" (HWV 56 No. 48) for Trumpet, Horn & Strings

6 parts9 pages08:384 years ago2,578 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Strings(4)
Messiah (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

The work begins quietly, with instrumental and solo movements preceding the first appearance of the chorus, whose entry in the low alto register is muted. A particular aspect of Handel's restraint is his limited use of trumpets throughout the work. After their introduction in the Part I chorus "Glory to God", apart from the solo in "The trumpet shall sound" they are heard only in "Hallelujah" and the final chorus "Worthy is the Lamb".

Handel wrote "The trumpet shall sound" as the final Bass Aria for Part III Scene II (No. 48). Although written for Trumpets, Chorus (SATB), Bass Soloist and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Bb Trumpet, French Horn & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"It Came upon the Midnight Clear" for English Handbells and Choir (SATB)
Video

"It Came upon the Midnight Clear" for English Handbells and Choir (SATB)

6 parts8 pages03:327 years ago2,477 views
"It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (sometimes rendered as "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear") is a poem and Christmas carol written by Edmund Sears, pastor of the Unitarian Church in Wayland, Massachusetts.

In this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC), Sears' lyrics are set to "Carol," composed by Richard Storrs Willis.

I incorporated the English handbells to add brillance and elegance to the pastorale melody. This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"Sing unto God" from "Judas Maccabäus" (HWV 63) for Harpsichord & Woodwind Quintet

6 parts9 pages02:485 years ago2,264 views
"Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24. Morell's libretto is based on the deuterocanonical 1 Maccabees (2-8), with motives added from the Antiquitates Judaicae by Flavius Josephus.

The events depicted in the oratorio are from the period 170-160 BC when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid Empire which undertook to destroy the Jewish religion. Being ordered to worship Zeus, many Jews obeyed under the threat of persecution, however some did not. One who defied was the elderly priest Mattathias who killed a fellow Jew who was about to offer a pagan sacrifice. After tearing down a pagan altar, Mattathias retreated to the hills and gathered others who were willing to fight for their faith.

"Sing unto God" is from ACT III and was written for Chorus Duet (Alto, Tenor; Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass). Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Harpsichord & Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sinfonia in C Major for Piano & Strings

6 parts13 pages04:115 years ago2,236 views
Violin, Strings(4), Piano
Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (1671 – 1751) was an Italian Baroque composer. While famous in his day as an opera composer, he is mainly remembered today for his instrumental music, such as the concertos, some of which are regularly recorded.

Born in Venice, Republic of Venice, to Antonio Albinoni, a wealthy paper merchant in Venice, he studied violin and singing. Relatively little is known about his life, especially considering his contemporary stature as a composer, and the comparatively well-documented period in which he lived. In 1694 he dedicated his Opus 1 to the fellow-Venetian, Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni (grand-nephew of Pope Alexander VIII); Ottoboni was an important patron in Rome of other composers, such as Arcangelo Corelli. His first opera, Zenobia, regina de Palmireni, was produced in Venice in 1694. Albinoni was possibly employed in 1700 as a violinist to Charles IV, Duke of Mantua, to whom he dedicated his Opus 2 collection of instrumental pieces. In 1701 he wrote his hugely popular suites Opus 3, and dedicated that collection to Cosimo III de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

His instrumental music greatly attracted the attention of Johann Sebastian Bach, who wrote at least two fugues on Albinoni's themes (Fugue in A major on a theme by Tomaso Albinoni, BWV 950, Fugue in B minor on a theme by Tomaso Albinoni, BWV 951) and frequently used his basses for harmony exercises for his pupils. Part of Albinoni's work was lost in World War II with the destruction of the Dresden State Library. As a result, little is known of his life and music after the mid-1720s. The famous "Albinoni Adagio in G minor" for violin, strings and organ, the subject of many modern recordings, is now thought to be a musical hoax composed by Remo Giazotto, although the recent discovery by musicologist Muska Mangano, Giazotto's last assistant, of a modern but independent manuscript transcription of the figured bass portion and six fragmentary bars of the first violin, "bearing in the top right-hand corner a stamp stating unequivocally the Dresden provenance of the original from which it was taken," provides some support for Giazotto's account that Albinoni was his source.

Althpugh originally written for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 violins, 2 violas, bassoon and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Piano and Strings (Solo Violin, 2nd Violins (2), Viola & Cello).
Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Oboes & Strings
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Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Oboes & Strings

6 parts17 pages04:284 years ago2,092 views
Oboe, Strings(5)
The harpsichord concertos, BWV 1052-1065, are concertos for harpsichord, strings and continuo by Johann Sebastian Bach. Of these, there are seven complete concertos for a single harpsichord, (BWV 1052-1058), three concertos for 2 harpsichords (BWV 1060-1062), two concertos for 3 harpsichords (BWV 1063-1064), and one concerto for 4 harpsichords, (BWV 1065).

All of Bach's harpsichord concertos (with the exception of the Brandenburg concerto) are thought to be arrangements made from earlier concertos for melodic instruments probably written in Köthen. In many cases, only the harpsichord version has survived.

While the existing score is in the form of a concerto for harpsichord and strings, Bach scholars believe it to be a transcription of a lost double concerto in D minor; a reconstructed arrangement of this concerto for two violins or violin and oboe is classified as BWV 1060R. The subtle and masterful way in which the solo instruments blend with the orchestra marks this out as one of the most mature works of Bach's years at Köthen. The middle movement is a cantabile for the solo instruments with orchestral accompaniment.

Although this Concerto in C Minor was originally written for 2 Harpsichords and orchestra, I created this arrangement for 2 Oboes and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
"Morning Has Broken" for Woodwind Sextet
Custom audio

"Morning Has Broken" for Woodwind Sextet

6 parts2 pages02:246 years ago2,073 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon
"Morning Has Broken" is a popular and well-known Christian hymn first published in 1931. It has words by English author Eleanor Farjeon and is set to a traditional Gaelic tune known as "Bunessan" (it shares this tune with the 19th century Christmas Carol "Child in the Manger"). It is often sung in children's services. English pop musician and folk singer Cat Stevens included a version on his 1971 album Teaser and the Firecat. The song became identified with Stevens when it reached number six on the US pop chart and number one on the US easy listening chart in 1972.

This hymn (UMH #145) is sung during Holy Communion at the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) as well as other United Methodist churches.

Although originally written for Chorus, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Sextet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon).
Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp & String Ensemble
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Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp & String Ensemble

6 parts15 pages12:576 years ago1,887 views
The baroque composer George Frideric Händel, was born in Germany on the 23rd February 1685 and died on the 14th April 1759. He was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. He spent most of his adult life in England and his most well known works are Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks.

He wrote the Op 4 No 6 in B flat major as a Harp Concerto. In that guise it was first performed on 19 February 1736 along with the Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1 at the premiere of Alexander’s Feast. Handel's purpose in providing so diverse a program was a clear and practical one—to give the paying audience enough entertainment to keep them in their seats during the singers' much-needed intermissions. Nevertheless, as Dryden's Ode (on which Alexander's Feast is based) contains an episode wherein noble Timotheus is found playing his harp for Alexander the Great, there is a certain amount of purely dramatic justification for the insertion of a harp concerto into the narrative flow of the oratorio.

Handel composed the music in January 1736, and the work received its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 19 February 1736. In the Opus 4 publication, this Harp Concerto was issued as a work for organ and orchestra (making it congruous with the other five works in the volume), and it is on this instrument that the work is most often played today. A quick glance at the pared-down orchestra parts—the violins are muted, bass parts played pizzicato, and the wind family is represented by two lone flutes—and streamlined textures of Op. 4, No. 6, however, reveals immediately that it was originally conceived of for the quieter and gentler harp. The piece is cast in three movements, more or less following the then-emerging modern concerto fast-slow-fast ordering.

As with many of the organ concertos, the orchestra is entirely subordinate to the soloist in Op. 4, No. 6. In the first movement (Andante allegro), for instance, forty-six of the sixty-six measures are the exclusive province of the harp; the tutti appears just four times (double that if we account for the necessary repeat of each half)—at the movement's opening and close, and to lend its strength to two major internal cadences. However, unlike the organ concertos, whose keyboard parts were played by the very skilled Handel himself, the Harp Concerto features little in the way of virtuosic flair. Certainly there are running sixteenth notes to spare in the first movement, but these are almost always built around repetitive Alberti bass-like figures that fall easily to the hand.

The transparent opening movement, with its main theme built of seven broken-up, individual gestures, gives way to the thicker, more "well-glued" melody of the G minor Larghetto. Throughout the movement, the tutti is consumed with pondering repeated dotted figures while, each time it is given a chance, the harp/organ breaks out with improvisatory musings of a far more flexible nature.

Wholly dance-like is the concluding Allegro moderato, with its bouncing 3/8 meter and 1 + 2 metric grouping.

This arrangement was created for Dr. Sophia Momand and the Corelli Ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Scotland the Brave" (Alba an àigh) for String Ensemble

6 parts5 pages03:152 years ago1,818 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I arranged it for String Ensemble (2 Violins, 2 Violas, Cello & Bass) at the request of a follower.

Concerto I in C Major (RV 537) for Trumpets & Woodwind Quartet

6 parts14 pages07:145 years ago1,796 views
Antonio Vivaldi's popular Double Trumpet Concerto in C major, RV 537, is remarkable in that the work itself is among Vivaldi's best-known creations and yet we know practically nothing about it. The source of this concerto is a single manuscript located in the Renzo Giordano Collection at the National Library of Turin, a large gathering of manuscripts believed to preserve what is left of the ones Vivaldi himself accumulated during his lifetime. This served as the source used by Gian Francesco Malipiero, who first edited this concerto for publication in 1950. The second movement also appears in Vivaldi's Violin Concerto in C major, RV 110, another undated manuscript found in the same collection.

The material is appropriately flashy and fanfare-like in the outer movements, both of which are marked Allegro and propelled by vigorous rhythmic support from the strings. The trumpets usually play together in the solo passages and add some interesting color to the strings when playing along in the tutti. In the first movement the strings take a turn toward the minor mode, which the trumpets turn back to the major. The central Largo is basically serves as a short bridge between the two outer movements; the soloists are not heard, and the strings tread through a series of nonmelodic repeated chords. The third movement dashes forward vigorously and emphatically in triple meter. When the strings turn to the minor mode this time the trumpets respond in kind.

This is Vivaldi's only concerto featuring trumpets; the Double Concerto in D major, RV 781 (formerly RV 563), was believed at one time to be a second Vivaldi two trumpet concerto, but more recent scholarly investigation has revealed that it is a double oboe concerto.

Although originally written for Trumpets and Small Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Trumpet Duet & Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Concerto in C Major (RV 537) for Trumpets & Strings

6 parts14 pages07:144 years ago1,704 views
Trumpet(2), Strings(4)
Antonio Vivaldi's popular Double Trumpet Concerto in C major, RV 537, is remarkable in that the work itself is among Vivaldi's best-known creations and yet we know practically nothing about it. The source of this concerto is a single manuscript located in the Renzo Giordano Collection at the National Library of Turin, a large gathering of manuscripts believed to preserve what is left of the ones Vivaldi himself accumulated during his lifetime. This served as the source used by Gian Francesco Malipiero, who first edited this concerto for publication in 1950. The second movement also appears in Vivaldi's Violin Concerto in C major, RV 110, another undated manuscript found in the same collection.

The material is appropriately flashy and fanfare-like in the outer movements, both of which are marked Allegro and propelled by vigorous rhythmic support from the strings. The trumpets usually play together in the solo passages and add some interesting color to the strings when playing along in the tutti. In the first movement the strings take a turn toward the minor mode, which the trumpets turn back to the major. The central Largo is basically serves as a short bridge between the two outer movements; the soloists are not heard, and the strings tread through a series of nonmelodic repeated chords. The third movement dashes forward vigorously and emphatically in triple meter. When the strings turn to the minor mode this time the trumpets respond in kind.

This is Vivaldi's only concerto featuring trumpets; the Double Concerto in D major, RV 781 (formerly RV 563), was believed at one time to be a second Vivaldi two trumpet concerto, but more recent scholarly investigation has revealed that it is a double oboe concerto.

Although originally written for Trumpets and Small Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Trumpet Duet & String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Aria: "Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen" (BWV 51 No 1) for Trumpet, Horn & Strings

6 parts11 pages05:015 years ago1,631 views
Trumpet, French Horn, Strings(4)
One of the most enduringly popular of Bach's solo cantatas, Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen, BWV 51 (for soprano, trumpet, strings and continuo), was originally written for the fifteenth Sunday after Trinity. It is thought to have been composed around 1730, during Bach's seventh year as Kantor of the Thomaskirche in Leipzig. Bach may have written the cantata text himself; it does not correspond closely to the readings for its appointed Sunday, which speak of vanity and faithlessness, hence his addition of "et in ogni tempo" (at any time) to the designation for its use.

The four movements are structured in the traditional chorale cantata form. The opening da capo aria, in ritornello form, features brilliant passagework for both soloists, with a forthright, unison C major arpeggio announcing the initial, somewhat Vivaldian, theme. The intricate counterpoint between trumpet and soprano throughout the first movement is an outstanding example of Bach's writing for voice and obbligato instrument. Each of the solo lines interlocks with the other in a finely balanced duet, and abundantly illustrates the call to "praise God in every nation."

The second movement is a recitative that begins with a clear, restrained chordal accompaniment in the upper strings coupled with a bass ostinato. The soprano melody is gentle and mostly syllabic until the eighth bar, when the bassline "walks" underneath a highly ornate, melismatic vocal line. At the word "lallen" (stammer) Bach displays his interest in word-painting with a particularly elongated phrase that is both meandering and jagged.

The ensuing dal segno aria, in an expansive 12/8 meter, accompanied by continuo, features a largely stepwise bassline that constantly flows upward. Although it is nominally in A minor, no hint of melancholy intrudes. The text, a prayer for God to bestow his mercies every new day, is set to a complex, wide-ranging melodic line that has an instrumental quality. Offbeats and weak beats are given particular stress in an unusual section where the bassline abruptly drops away as the vocal phrases become suddenly rapturous and quite independent of the occasional continuo punctuation.

The final movement starts as a violin duet, while the soprano sings the chorale tune "Nun Lob', mein Seel', den Herren," exhorting all to "give praise, glory, and honor to Father, Son, and Holy Ghost." In a gracious 3/4 meter, its long instrumental sections are both playful and confident, making much of imitative passages for the violins that tumble against and tease each other. The lengthy, concluding "Alleluja," rejoined by trumpet, is a noteworthy example of the virtuosic demands Bach often places on soloists. Its rollicking exuberance lends a particularly joyous tone to the cantata's conclusion.

The cantata in five movements is scored for solo soprano, trumpet, two violins, viola and basso continuo. It is the only church cantata by Bach scored for solo soprano and trumpet.

Source Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jauchzet_Gott_in_allen_Landen,_BWV_51).

I created this arrangement of the Opening Aria "Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen" (Exult in God in all lands) for Bb Trumpet, French Horn & string Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello)
"Ukrainian Bell Carol" (Carol of the Bells) for Steel Orchestra
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"Ukrainian Bell Carol" (Carol of the Bells) for Steel Orchestra

6 parts3 pages01:124 years ago1,527 views
"Carol of the Bells" is a choral miniature work composed by the Ukrainian Mykola Leontovych. Leontovych's composition, is characterised by the use of a four note motif as an ostinato figure throughout the work. This ostinato figure is an ancient pagan Ukrainian New Year's (originally celebrated in April) magical chant known in Ukrainian as "Shchedryk" [the Generous One].

I created this arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessible to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pans (2), Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Erbarme dich, mein Gott" (BWV 244 No. 39) for Oboes & Strings

6 parts11 pages05:272 years ago1,525 views
Oboe(2), Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The St. Matthew Passion (also frequently but incorrectly referred to as St. Matthew's Passion; German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244 is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew"

Bach did not number the sections of the St Matthew Passion, all of them vocal movements, but twentieth-century scholars have done so. The two main schemes in use today are the scheme from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe (NBA, New Bach Edition) which uses a 1 through 68 numbering system, and the older Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV, Bach Works Catalog) scheme which divides the work into 78 numbers. Both use lettered subsections in some cases.

Many composers wrote musical settings of the Passion in the late 17th century. Like other Baroque oratorio passions, Bach's setting presents the Biblical text of Matthew 26–27 in a relatively simple way, primarily using recitative, while aria and arioso movements set newly written poetic texts which comment on the various events in the Biblical narrative and present the characters' states of mind in a lyrical, monologue-like manner.

The St Matthew Passion is set for two choirs and two orchestras. Both include two transverse flutes (Choir 1 also includes 2 recorders for No. 19), two oboes, in certain movements instead oboe d'amore or oboe da caccia, two violins, viola, viola da gamba, and basso continuo. For practical reasons the continuo organ is often shared and played with both orchestras. In many arias a solo instrument or more create a specific mood, such as the central soprano aria No. 49, "Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben", where the absence of strings and basso continuo mark a desperate loss of security.

The Passion was written for two choruses and orchestras. Choir I consists of a soprano in ripieno voice, a soprano solo, an alto solo, a tenor solo, SATB chorus, two traversos, two oboes, two oboes d'amore, two oboes da caccia, lute, strings (two violin sections, violas and cellos), and continuo (at least organ). Choir II consists of SATB voices, violin I, violin II, viola, viola da gamba, cello, two traversos, two oboes (d'amore) and possibly continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Matthew_Passion).

I created this arrangement of the Aria: "Erbarme dich, mein Gott, um meiner Zähren Willen!" (Have mercy, my God, for the sake of my tears!) for Oboe Duet & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).