Sheet music with 9 instruments

"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Piano, Organ, English Handbells and Choir
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"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" for Piano, Organ, English Handbells and Choir

9 parts13 pages03:347 years ago6,890 views
Voice(4), Percussion(2), Piano, Organ
"Hark! the Herald Angels Sing" music is from the second chorus of a cantata by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) written in 1840 to commemorate Johann Gutenberg and the invention of printing. The words are from a hundred years earlier, written in 1739 by Charles Wesley whose brother, John, Wesley founded the Methodist Church.

My arrangement for Piano, Organ, English Handbells and Choir is an ensemble for piano, organ, English handbells and SATB choir arranged for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) from the United Methodist Church Hymnal #240.

I added English Handbells in order to add brilliance to this magnificent work. I arranged it into a full orchestral score, in modified keys of F and G Major.

The addition of English Handbells was not written to replace the piano and organ accompaniment. Rather, it adds color and brilliance to the fanfare – like sections of the score.

The full score, including the English Handbell part, is not necessary for performance. Conductors should simply mark English Handbell entrance cues in their score.

Care should be taken so that English Handbells are not overwhelmed by the accompanying piano and organ, especially the organ. I suggest that the manual stops be bright flutes or brass and strings (as noted in the “Organ Registration” section) with no doubling of pitches, with eight and sixteen foot pedal stops only. Four foot manual stops should be avoided.

This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" SoundFont by FMJ Software.(http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
"In Dulci Jubilo" (BUXWV 52) for Chorus (SATB) & Wind Quintet
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"In Dulci Jubilo" (BUXWV 52) for Chorus (SATB) & Wind Quintet

9 parts22 pages06:584 years ago1,624 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637/39 – 1707) was a Danish-German organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Today, Buxtehude is considered one of the most important composers in Germany of the mid-Baroque.

He is thought to have been born with the name Diderich Buxtehude. Scholars dispute both the year and country of his birth, although most now accept that he was born in 1637 in Helsingborg, Skåne, at the time part of Denmark (but now part of Sweden). His obituary stated that "he recognized Denmark as his native country, whence he came to our region; he lived about 70 years". Others, however, claim that he was born at Oldesloe in the Duchy of Holstein, which at that time was a part of the Danish Monarchy (but is now in Germany). Later in his life he Germanized his name and began signing documents Dieterich Buxtehude. Buxtehude was exposed to the organ at a young age, as his father, Johannes Buxtehude, was the organist at St. Olai church in Helsingør. Dieterich was employed as an organist, first in Helsingborg (1657–1658), and then at Helsingør (1660–1668). St. Mary’s in Helsingør is the only church where Buxtehude was employed that still has the organ in its original location.

In Dulci Jubilo ("In sweet rejoicing") is a traditional Christmas carol. In its original setting, the carol is a macaronic text of German and Latin dating from the Middle Ages. Subsequent translations into English, such as J.M. Neale's arrangement "Good Christian Men, Rejoice" have increased its popularity, and Robert Pearsall's 1837 macaronic translation is a mainstay of the Christmas Nine Lessons and Carols repertoire. J.S. Bach's chorale prelude based on the tune (BWV 729) is also a traditional postlude for Christmas services.

Although Dieterich Buxtehude set the melody as a chorale-cantata in 1683 for soprano, alto and bass accompanied by two violins and continuo (BuxWV 52) and as a chorale prelude for organ (BuxWV 197) c. 1690, I created this arrangement for Chorus (SATB) and Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) at the request of Hans Dingemans from The Netherlands and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Glory to God" (HWV 56 No. 17) for Chamber Orchestra

9 parts5 pages02:225 years ago1,381 views
Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Clarinet, Bassoon, Strings(4)
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

The final recitative of this section is in D major and heralds the affirmative chorus "Glory to God". where, Handel marked the entry of the trumpets as da lontano e un poco piano, meaning "quietly, from afar"; his original intention had been to place the brass offstage (in disparte) at this point, to highlight the effect of distance. In this initial appearance the trumpets lack the expected drum accompaniment, "a deliberate withholding of effect, leaving something in reserve for Parts II and III" according to Luckett.

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Small (Chamber) Orchestra (Wind & Strings) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Canon in D for Harp and Strings (AND BRASS)

9 parts45 pages06:192 years ago465 views
Strings(3), Contrabass, Harp
Another piece made by my good buddy Mike Magatagan, so all credit goes to him. Link to the original: (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/canon-in-d-for-harp) Or, you could check out the piece on Lyra's account (https://musescore.com/user/4421/scores/49610).

I only added the strings and brass. You may use the piece, but credit both Matt and I. Thanks. Blessings.

The Sabre Dance (from the ballet 'Gayane') for Winds & Strings

9 parts21 pages02:31a year ago856 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Sabre Dance" (Armenian: Սուսերով Պար) is a movement in the final act of the ballet Gayane, written by Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian and completed in 1942. It evokes a whirling war dance in an Armenian dance, where the dancers display their skill with sabres. Its middle section incorporates an Armenian folk song from Gyumri.

Due to its exceptionally exciting rhythm, the "Sabre Dance" established a place for itself in common concert practice, leading also to various adaptations in popular music. Its recognizable ostinato and popular melodies have made it a popular concert band piece.

Although other arrangements exist (most noteably the György Cziffra from Gayane), I wanted to remain true to the original orchestral score and as such, I created this arrangement of the "Sabre Dance" movement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe & French Horn) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

I believe the original work is copyright and claim fair use for this arrangement because (1) the selected instrumentation would not readily allow it to be used as a substitute for the original commercial orchestral score or recording, (2) it is not replaceable with an uncopyrighted or freely copyrighted sample of comparable educational value and (3) I believe that this arrangement will not affect the value of the original work or limit the copyright holder's rights or ability to distribute the original orchestral score or recording. If you are the copyright holder of the original orchestral score and you feel that this arrangement does not fall under "fair use", please contact me with information on how to proceed.

"Regina Coeli" (Opus 262b) for Brass, Woodwinds & Piano

9 parts12 pages05:354 years ago742 views
Robert Führer (1807 - 1861) was born in Praha, he became the Director of Music at the Dome in 1839 at the age of 32. He was deemed to be most talented, but he lived a most expensive style of life. To support this extravagant lifestyle he sold a valuable Stradivarius violin which was owned by the Dome. This fact was discovered in 1843, when he was dismissed for the crime. Without a church to call home he wandered through several different towns and villages, but never stayed in any one place for too long. During this period he had to support himself from sales of his church music compositions. Luckily this was successful because his music was well loved. No other composer's works enjoyed as widespread performance amongst the choirs in South Germany and Austria. His musical style varies from a composer such as Mozart, and is more in keeping with that of an early Caecilian. His works were often written for rural choirs, meaning that they were not too musically demanding. In spite of this, larger and more difficult works can be found in his repertoire. Although his works were sometimes judged to not have been "carefully" composed, he surely was a talented and experienced composer, well loved by his public, and had an innate sense for composing a beautiful melodic line.

The Regina Cæli or Regina Cœli ("Queen of Heaven"), is an ancient Latin Marian Hymn of the Christian Church. It is one of the four seasonal Marian antiphons of the Blessed Virgin Mary, prescribed to be sung or recited in the Liturgy of the Hours at the conclusion of the last of the hours to be prayed in common that day, typically night prayer (Compline or Vespers). The Regina Coeli is sung or recited in place of the Angelus during the Easter season, from Holy Saturday through the Saturday after Pentecost.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Piano, Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) and Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & Trombone) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

"Lift up your Heads, O ye Gates" (HWV 56 No. 33) for Winds & Strings

9 parts13 pages06:083 years ago701 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Messiah (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

From the gentle falling melody assigned to the opening words ("Comfort ye") to the sheer ebullience of the "Hallelujah" chorus and the ornate celebratory counterpoint that supports the closing "Amen", hardly a line of text goes by that Handel does not amplify".

"Lift up your heads" is a line from Psalm 24 (Psalms 24:7–10). Since the text has questions ("Who is the King of Glory?") and answers ("He is the King of Glory"), Handel divides the choir in the first section to a high, announcing group (sopranos I and II, alto) and a low, questioning group (alto, tenor, bass).

Although originally written for Vocal soloists (2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass), Chorus, Orchestra and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Let all the Angels of God Worship Him" (HWV 56 No. 35) for Winds & Strings

9 parts6 pages02:443 years ago668 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Messiah (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

From the gentle falling melody assigned to the opening words ("Comfort ye") to the sheer ebullience of the "Hallelujah" chorus and the ornate celebratory counterpoint that supports the closing "Amen", hardly a line of text goes by that Handel does not amplify".

The second verse "Let all the angels of God worship Him" is a festive chorus in D major.
Although originally written for Vocal soloists (2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass), Chorus, Orchestra and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Credo in unum Deum" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 13) for Wind Ensemble

9 parts8 pages02:032 years ago607 views
Flute(2), Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Credo in unum Deum" (I believe in one God) for Wind Ensemble (2 Flutes, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Bb Trumpet, French Horn & F Tuba).

"Christus Factus Est" (No. 2) for Woodwind & Brass

9 parts14 pages03:184 years ago602 views
Johann Caspar Aiblinger (1779 -- 1867) was a German composer. He was born in Wasserburg am Inn, Bavaria. In his eleventh year he commenced his studies at Tegernsee Abbey, where he was instructed in piano and organ-playing. Four years later he entered the gymnasium at Munich, where he studied under Professor Schlett, his countryman.

In 1800 he began his studies at the University of Landshut. Inwardly drawn to the Catholic Church, he completed his philosophy and began theology, but the secularization of many religious orders in Bavaria prevented his entrance into a cloister. He now devoted himself solely to music. Led by the then prevailing idea that without a visit to Italy no musical education is complete, he turned his footsteps southward.

After a stay of eight years at Vicenza, where he fell under the influence of his countryman Johann Simon Mayr, Aiblinger (1811) went to Venice and there met Meyerbeer, who procured for him an appointment at the Conservatory. His failure to establish a school for classical music led him to Milan to assume the direction of the local ballet. On his return to Bavaria, King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria invited him to Munich to direct the Italian opera. King Ludwig I of Bavaria appointed him director of the royal orchestra, and sent him to Italy to collect old Italian masterpieces. On his return be became the organist of the church of All Saints for which he wrote many valuable compositions.

Between 1820 and 1830 he tried operatic composition, but was unsuccessful. A crusade against Italian music, which led to the revival of Christoph Willibald Gluck's Iphigenia in Tauris, followed. Then he took up church music, studying the old masters and procuring performances of their works. He also wrote much church music. His numerous compositions comprise masses and requiems, offertories and graduals, psalms, litanies, and German hymns, many of which have been published at Augsburg, Munich, Regensburg, and Mainz.

The offertory (offering), in the Roman Catholic Mass and in derived liturgical forms, is the preparation of bread and wine on the altar and their formal offering to God. It takes place after the gospel and the creed and before the preface. A short psalm verse from Scriptures is appointed to be said or sung at the beginning; it varies from day to day. This is called the offertory verse. From ancient times it has been customary to collect the alms of the worshipers about the time of the offertory, hence the term has been transferred to the collection taken up in services in Protestant churches and to the music played or sung during the collection. The choice of this selection is usually left to the musicians of the church, and in many Protestant churches the offertory is the choir's principal musical selection in the service.

Although originally written for Voice (SATT), Strings and Organ, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horn & Bassoons) and Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones & F Tuba) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Chorale: "Christ lag in Todesbanden" (BWV 4 No 2) for Winds & Strings

9 parts21 pages05:152 years ago602 views
Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Christ lag in Todes Banden (Christ lay in death's bonds), BWV 4,[a] is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. The title also appears as Christ lag in Todesbanden. It is one of Bach's earliest church cantatas, and was probably intended for a performance at Easter in 1707, related to his application for a post at Mühlhausen. It is an early work in a genre to which he later contributed complete cantata cycles for all occasions of the liturgical year. John Eliot Gardiner describes the work as Bach's "first-known attempt at painting narrative in music".

The cantata is a chorale cantata, a type of composition in which both text and music are based on a Lutheran hymn, in this case Martin Luther's hymn of the same name, the main hymn for Easter in seven stanzas which is based in text and tune on Medieval models. In the format of chorale variations "per omnes versus" (for all stanzas), Bach used in each of the seven vocal movements the unchanged words of a stanza of the chorale, and its tune as a cantus firmus. After an opening sinfonia, the variations are arranged in symmetry: chorus – duet – solo – chorus – solo – duet – chorus, with the focus on the central fourth stanza, about the battle between Life and Death. Although all movements are in the same key of E minor, Bach employs a variety of musical forms and techniques to intensify the meaning of the text.

Christ lag in Todes Banden is Bach's first cantata for Easter, also his only extant original composition for the first day of the feast. He later repeatedly performed it as Thomaskantor in Leipzig, beginning in 1724 when he celebrated Easter there for the first time. Only the performance material from Leipzig is extant. It shows a scoring for four vocal parts, a string section of two violins, two violas and continuo, and a choir of cornetto and trombones doubling the voices at times. The scoring of the first performances was possibly similar, in the style of a "Choralkonzert" (chorale concerto) from the 17th century.

Gardiner calls Bach's setting of Luther's hymn "a bold, innovative piece of musical drama" and observes "his total identification with the spirit and letter of Luther's fiery, dramatic hymn".

Bach is believed to have written the work in 1707 when he was a professional organist aged twenty-two. He had been employed for a few years in Arnstadt as organist of St Boniface's church and was seeking promotion to a more important post, which he found at Mühlhausen in 1707. His duties as a church musician involved some responsibility for choral music, but the year when he began composing cantatas is unknown. Christ lag in Todes Banden is one of a small group of cantatas which survive from his years at Arnstadt or Mühlhausen, and these early works include some fine writing. The Bach scholar Christoph Wolff suggests that Bach may have composed other early cantatas which he did not think worth preserving.

In his first years of composing vocal music, until 1708, Bach wrote cantatas only for special occasions such as wedding and funeral. They were based on texts built from biblical passages and hymns. Features which were characteristic of his later cantatas, such as recitatives and arias on contemporary poetry, were not yet present. Instead, the works included elements from the seventeenth century such as motets and chorale concertos. The following table lists the seven extant works composed by Bach before he moved on to the Weimar court in 1708.

Bach structured the cantata in eight movements: an instrumental sinfonia, and seven vocal movements corresponding to the stanzas of the hymn. The duration is given as 22 minutes.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_lag_in_Todes_Banden,_BWV_4).

I created this arrangement of the first Chorale: "Christ lag in Todes Banden" (Christ lay in death's bonds) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Chorale: "Was willst du dich betrüben" (BWV 107 No 1) for Winds & Strings

9 parts13 pages05:033 years ago586 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Was willst du dich betrüben (Why do you want to distress yourself), BWV 107, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the seventh Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 23 July 1724. The chorale cantata is based on the unchanged words of Johann Heermann's chorale in seven stanzas Was willst du dich betrüben (1630).

The cantata is based on Johann Heermann's hymn in seven stanzas, "Was willst du dich betrüben" (1630), which is focused on trust in God, even when facing adversaries including the devil. Trust in God is also a theme of the Gospel. The chorales in Heermann's 1630 publication Devoti musica cordis (Music of a devoted heart), which also included "Herzliebster Jesu, was hast du verbrochen", the first chorale in Bach's St Matthew Passion, have been described as "the first in which the correct and elegant versification of Opitz was applied to religious subjects, … distinguished by great depth and tenderness of feeling, by an intense love of the Saviour, and earnest but not self-conscious humility".

The opening chorus is a chorale fantasia, the vocal part embedded in an independent concerto of the instruments. The cantus firmus on the melody of "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen" is in long notes, partly embellished, in the soprano and horn; the lower voices are mostly set in homophony. The lines of the chorale are not rendered separately, but accenting the bar form (Stollen–Stollen–Abgesang) of the text, 1 and 2 are combined, 3 and 4 are combined, 5 is single and 6 to 8 are combined. The scoring is rich in woodwinds.

The only recitative is accompanied by the oboes d'amore, shows an extended melisma on the word "Freuden" (joy) and culminates in an arioso in the final line, with a melisma on "retten" (rescue). The following four stanzas are composed as arias, not as the typical da capo arias, but mostly in two parts, due to the bar form of the poetry. Bach achieves variation by changing voice type, key and time signature. He also varies the mode, alternating major and minor keys, expresses different Affekts, and he successfully "blurs" the bar form of the stanzas.

The first aria depicts a "hunting scene" for bass and strings. Bach plays on the double meaning of the German word "erjagen", which in the text has the sense "achieve by great exertion", but he expresses the word's literal meaning ("to hunt") by an "outrageous hunting call trill" of the bass. The second aria for tenor and continuo begins with strong words on Satan as an enemy: "Wenn auch gleich aus der Höllen / der Satan wollte sich / dir selbst entgegenstellen / und toben wider dich" ("Even if, out of hell, Satan wishes to set himself against you, and vent his rage on you"). The music is termed by Gardiner "a vivid pen-portrait of Satan and his wiles, delivered with typically Lutheran relish". The rhythm alternates between 6/8 and 3/4 one measure to the next, but the change is irregular and unpredictable. The bass line (marked "organo e continuo") is "extravagantly animated and angular. Albert Schweitzer likens it to the contortions of a huge dragon".

The third aria for soprano and the two oboes d'amore begins with an embellished version of the chorale tune, and the last line quotes the tune exactly on the words "was Gott will, das geschicht" ("What God wants, that happens"). The fourth aria is scored for tenor, the flutes in unison and muted violin.

The closing chorale is set in four parts for the voices, but embedded in a rich orchestral Siciliano concerto. The lines of the chorale are grouped as in the first stanza, again highlighting line 5, "O Vater, Sohn und Geist" ("Oh Father, Son and Spirit") as a miniature doxology.

Source: Wilipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Was_willst_du_dich_betr%C3%BCben,_BWV_107).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorale "Was willst du dich betrüben" (Why do you want to distress yourself) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Sinfonia: "Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes" (BWV 76 No 1) for Winds & Strings

9 parts28 pages05:193 years ago586 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes (English: The heavens are telling the glory of God), BWV 76, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the church cantata in Leipzig for the second Sunday after Trinity within the liturgical year and first performed it on 6 June 1723.

Bach composed the cantata at a decisive turning point in his career. Moving from posts in the service of churches and courts to the town of Leipzig on the first Sunday after Trinity, 30 May 1723, he began the project of composing a new cantata for every occasion of the liturgical year. He began his first annual cycle of cantatas ambitiously with Die Elenden sollen essen, BWV 75, in an unusual layout of 14 movements in two symmetrical parts, to be performed before and after the sermon. Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes has the same structure.

Similar to the opening chorus of BWV 75, Bach sets the psalm in two sections, comparable to a prelude and fugue on a large scale. An instrumental concerto unites the complete "prelude", the trumpet "calls" to tell the glory of God. The fugue in C major is a permutation fugue, which develops the subject twice, starting with the voices, up to a triumphal entrance of the trumpet, similar in development to the first chorus of Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir, BWV 29, composed much later and used twice in the Mass in B minor. Joseph Haydn later set the same words, also in C major, in his oratorio The Creation.

In the first recitative the strings accompany the voice, most keenly in motifs in the arioso middle section, in Gardiner's words "to evoke the spirit of God moving upon the face of the waters". Trumpet and bass voice are used to convey the call "to banish the tribe of idolaters", while the strings possibly illustrate "the hordes of infidels". The last recitative leads in an arioso to the chorale. In the chorale, Bach has the violin play an obbligato part to the four-part setting of the voices and separates the lines by interludes, with the trumpet anticipating the line to follow. The continuo plays ostinato a motif which is derived from the first line of the chorale.

Whereas Part I begins with a trumpet announcing ("erzählen") God's glory, Part II starts on an intimate chamber music scale with oboe d'amore and viola da gamba, concentrating on "brotherly devotion" (brüderliche Treue). A sinfonia in E minor for these two instruments is reminiscent both of Bach's compositions for the court in Köthen and of a French overture, marked "adagio", then "vivace". Bach used the music of this movement later in his organ trio, BWV 528. Gardiner calls the movement "in effect a sonata da chiesa". The tenor aria illustrates the "masochistic" "Hate me, then, hate me with all your might, o hostile race!" by a first dissonant entry on an ostinato bass line full of chromatic, leaps and interrupting rests. Oboe d'amore and viola da gamba return to accompany the last aria, and "the sombre qualities of both voice and instruments create a feeling of peace and introspection". The music of the closing chorale is identical to that of Part I.

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists—soprano, alto, tenor and bass—a four-part choir, trumpet, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, viola da gamba and continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (Bb Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben" (BWV 147 No 1) for Winds & Strings

9 parts20 pages04:544 years ago571 views
Trumpet, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben (Heart and mouth and deed and life), BWV 147, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. It was written originally in Weimar in 1716 (BWV 147a) for Advent and expanded in 1723 for the feast of the Visitation in Leipzig, where it was first performed on 2 July 1723.

Bach composed the cantata in his first year as Thomaskantor in Leipzig for the Marian feast "Mariae Heimsuchung" (Visitation). The prescribed readings for the feast day were Isaiah 11:1–5, the prophecy of the Messiah, and from the Gospel of Luke, Luke 1:39–56, Mary's visit to Elizabeth, including her song of praise, the "Magnificat". He used as a base a cantata in six movements composed in Weimar for the fourth Sunday in Advent. As Leipzig observed tempus clausum (time of silence) from Advent II to Advent IV, Bach could not perform the cantata for that occasion and rewrote it for the feast of the Visitation. The original words were suitable for a feast celebrating Mary in general; more specific recitatives were added, the order of the arias changed, and the closing chorale was replaced and repeated on a different verse to expand the cantata to two parts. The words are verses 6 and 16 of the hymn "Jesu, meiner Seelen Wonne" (1661) by Martin Jahn (de).

The opening chorus renders the complete words in three section, the third one a reprise of the first one and even the middle section not different in character. An instrumental ritornello is heard in the beginning and in the end as well as, slightly changed, in all three sections with the choir woven into it. In great contrast all three sections conclude with a part accompanied only by basso continuo. Sections one and three begin with a fugue with colla parte instruments. The fugue subject stresses the word Leben (life) by a melisma extended over three measures. The soprano starts the theme, the alto enters just one measure later, tenor after two more measures, bass one measure later, the fast succession resulting in a lively music as a good image of life. In section three the pattern of entrances is the same, but building from the lowest voice to the highest.

The three recitatives are scored differently, the first accompanied by chords of the strings, the second by continuo, the third as an accompagnato of two oboes da caccia which add a continuous expressive motive, interrupted only when the child's leaping in the womb (in German: Hüpfen) is mentioned which they illustrate.

The three arias of the original cantata are scored for voice and solo instruments (3., 5.) or only continuo, whereas the last aria, speaking of the miracles of Jesus, is accompanied by the full orchestra.

The chorale movements 6 and 10, ending the two parts of the cantata, are the same music based on a melody by Johann Schop, "Werde munter, mein Gemüthe", a melody which Bach also used in his St Matthew Passion on the words "Bin ich gleich von dir gewichen" (movement 40). The simple four-part choral part is embedded in a setting of the full orchestra dominated by a motive in pastoral triplets derived from the first line of the chorale melody.


Although the cantata was scored for four soloists and a four-part choir, a festive trumpet, two oboes (oboe d'amore, oboe da caccia), two violins, viola and basso continuo including bassoon, I created this arrangement for Trumpet in C, Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Litany to the Blessed Virgin Mary" for Wind & Strings

9 parts47 pages13:254 years ago519 views
Anton Cajetan Adlgasser (1729 -- 1777) was a German organist and composer at Salzburg Cathedral and at court, and composed a good deal of liturgical music (including eight masses and two requiems) as well as oratorios and orchestral and keyboard works.

Born in Inzell, Bavaria, he moved to Salzburg, where he studied under Johann Ernst Eberlin. From 1750 he was organist at the Salzburg Cathedral, where he remained the rest of his life. After a visit to Italy in 1764-5 he set Metastasio's La Nitteti (his only opera) performed in Salzburg (1767), and in 1767 he collaborated with Mozart and Michael Haydn on the oratorio Die Schuldigkeit des ersten Gebots. Mozart, who had a high regard for Adlgasser's music, succeeded him as Organist at Salzburg Cathedral in 1777. Adlgasser's first marriage, in 1752, was to Maria Josepha, the daughter of his predecessor, J.E. Eberlin, at Salzburg Cathedral. Four years later he married Maria Barbara Schwab, and in 1769 the court singer Maria Anna Fesemayer (1743--82), who sang in Die Schuldigkeit and created the role of Ninetta in La finta semplice. Leopold Mozart stood witness to the third wedding.

Although originally created for accompanied chorus, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and String Quartet (Violins (2), Viola & Cello).

"But Thanks be to God" (HWV 56 Nos. 50-51) for Winds & Strings

9 parts12 pages03:313 years ago514 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1712, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and no direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah. The text begins in Part I with prophecies by Isaiah and others, and moves to the annunciation to the shepherds, the only "scene" taken from the Gospels. In Part II, Handel concentrates on the Passion and ends with the "Hallelujah" chorus. In Part III he covers the resurrection of the dead and Christ's glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted. A near-complete version was issued on 78 rpm discs in 1928; since then the work has been recorded many times.

From the gentle falling melody assigned to the opening words ("Comfort ye") to the sheer ebullience of the "Hallelujah" chorus and the ornate celebratory counterpoint that supports the closing "Amen", hardly a line of text goes by that Handel does not amplify".

"O death, where is thy sting?" is sung as a duet in E flat major of alto and tenor on a walking bass of the continuo, without strings. The movement is based on the duet for soprano and alto "Se tu non lasci amore" (HWV 193, 1722). Such a movement would remind the London listeners of love duets concluding operas, such as the final scene of "Giulio Cesare." The chorus answers in the same key and tempo "But thanks be to God".

Although originally written for Vocal soloists (2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass), Chorus, Orchestra and Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal" (BWV 146 No 2) for Winds & Strings

9 parts15 pages03:323 years ago508 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Strings(4)
Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal (We must [pass] through great sadness), BWV 146, is a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach, a church cantata for the third Sunday after Easter. Bach composed it in Leipzig in 1726 or 1728.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the third Sunday after Easter, called Jubilate. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle of Peter, "Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man" (1 Peter 2:11–20), and from the Gospel of John, Jesus announcing his second coming in a Farewell discourse (John 16:16–23). Bach contrasted sorrow and joy in earlier cantatas for the same occasion, first in Weimar in 1714, Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12, then in Leipzig in 1725, Ihr werdet weinen und heulen, BWV 103. The unknown poet chose a quote from Acts 14:22 to begin the cantata, "We must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God", which Salomon Franck had already used for the first recitative of "Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen". The three following movements deplore the sufferings in the world, whereas three more movements depict the joyful hope for a better life in the Kingdom of God. The theme throughout his texts is a longing for death. Movement 5 is a paraphrase of Psalms 126:5–20, which Brahms also chose for his Requiem, "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy". Movement 6 refers to Romans 8:18, "For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us". Only the music but not the words of the closing chorale is extant. The ninth stanza of Gregorius Richter's hymn "Lasset ab von euren Tränen" has been suggested by Alfred Dürr as a possible text for this closing chorale. Klaus Hofmann suggested "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele" by Christoph Demantius.

Two movements of the cantata, the Sinfonia and the first movement, are related to Bach's Harpsichord Concerto in D minor, BWV 1052, which was possibly derived from a lost violin concerto. The original music for the cantata is also lost, but scholars are convinced that it is a work of Bach. He used an instrumental concerto in a similar way for movements of his cantatas Gott soll allein mein Herze haben, BWV 169 and Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen, BWV 49, where his authorship is beyond doubt.

Bach reworked the first movement of the harpsichord concerto to an organ concerto, expanding the strings by woodwind instruments. He changed the second movement to a choral movement by embedding vocal parts in the music, but this time without additional woodwinds. The opening chorus is superimposed onto the deeply moving slow movement of the concerto, the anguish of the repeated (ostinato) bass line ideally underlining a text concerned with the tribulation that must be endured before the kingdom of heaven is attained.

The original thirteen-bar throbbing ritornello theme is retained but its function has changed. The voices soar above it from the very first bar and continue to enhance it throughout its six appearances in different tonal environments. The ritornello theme has virtually become a free "ground bass" throughout. The tortuous melodic line, the main focus of attention in the concerto setting, has now become an obbligato melody of secondary significance. It is played by the organ, the first time Bach has used the instrument in this way in a chorus. The choir rises magnificently above everything else establishing itself as the dominant musical force, even appearing to disregard the phrasing of the original composition. All that was of primary importance in the concerto is now secondary to the chorus and its message. This momentous adagio, seemingly complete in its version for strings and harpsichord, has taken on a whole new dimension of musical meaning.

Filled with lamenting in the spirit of the Passion, the movement gains its intensity from the dense and dissonant harmonic expressiveness, and incorporates ostinato phrases whose regular appearances seem to illustrate inevitability.

The third movement is an alto aria with violin obbligato, which transcends "dem Himmel zu" (towards Heaven). The following recitative, a lament on the persecution in the world, is accompanied by long chords of the strings. Movement 5 illustrates in two sections the opposition of sowing with tears and reaping with joy, accompanied by a flute and two oboes d'amore. Movement 7 is probably derived from a secular dance-like movement in da capo form. A ritornello frames the first section, continuo only accompanies the middle section. The final chorale is set for four parts on the melody Werde munter, mein Gemüte.

Although the cantata was scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, flauto traverso, two oboes d'amore, taille (tenor oboe), organ, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The King Shall Rejoice" (HWV 260) for Winds & Strings

9 parts46 pages12:35a year ago495 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 - 1759) was a German, later British, baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos. Handel received important training in Halle and worked as a composer in Hamburg and Italy before settling in London in 1712; he became a naturalised British subject in 1727. He was strongly influenced both by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and by the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Born the same year as Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti, Handel is regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Baroque era, with works such as Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks and Messiah remaining steadfastly popular. One of his four Coronation Anthems, Zadok the Priest (1727), composed for the coronation of George II, has been performed at every subsequent British coronation, traditionally during the sovereign's anointing. Handel composed more than forty operas in over thirty years, and since the late 1960s, with the revival of baroque music and historically informed musical performance, interest in Handel's operas has grown.

In 1727 Handel was commissioned to write four anthems for the Coronation ceremony of King George II. One of these, Zadok the Priest, has been played at every British coronation ceremony since. In 1728 John Gay's The Beggar's Opera premiered at Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre and ran for 62 consecutive performances, the longest run in theatre history up to that time. After nine years the Royal Academy of Music ceased to function but Handel soon started a new company.

The British coronation ceremony has survived essentially unaltered for nearly a thousand years, and Handel's four magnificent Coronation Anthems occupy an illustrious place in its history. The most popular of the set, Zadok the Priest, has been performed at every coronation since it was first heard at the 1727 coronation of King George II and Queen Caroline. The King Shall Rejoice (HWV 260) was also written for this same royal occasion and was specifically intended for the part of the service during which the new monarch receives the crown. The King Shall Rejoice takes its texts (almost word for word) from the Book of Psalms (Ps. 21) and is divided into four sections. The opening sequence based on the first stanza of the Psalm leads to a setting of "Exceeding Glad Shall He Be." After this comes a heaven-storming declaration for full choir and orchestra of "Glory and Worship," before the anthem ends with a final, majestic "Alleluia." The scoring gives special prominence to ceremonial clarino trumpets, which add nobility and brilliance to the most opulent moments, as does the use of the organ. Some sources affirm that it was at the insistence of King George himself that Handel provided the anthems for his coronation. However, organist Maurice Greene was senior to Handel in the royal musical establishment and felt that he, rather than a foreigner, should have been accorded the honor. Handel was also offended when several bishops sent him the Biblical texts for the anthems. He resented any inference that he did not know his scriptures well enough to make his own selections and wrote back saying "I have read my Bible very well, and shall choose for myself." Nor, if some who attended are to be believed, was the event itself a complete musical success. Handel himself presided over a vast orchestra of over 150 players, but had a mere 50 or so singers at his disposal. This fact, combined with the reverberant acoustics of London's Westminster Abbey, probably ccasioned Archbishop of Canterbury William Wake's complaint (noted down on his Order of Service) "The anthems in confusion; all irregular in the music." Even so, the occasion was a remarkable patriotic spectacle, and it is easy to appreciate that this impressive music must have left its first hearers awestruck.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/the-king-shall-rejoice-coronation-anthem-no-2-for-chorus-orchestra-hwv-260-mc0002370038).

Although originally created for Baroque Orchestra, I created this Arrangement of "The King Shall Rejoice" (HWV 260) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorale: "Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben" (BWV 77 No 1) for Winds & Strings

9 parts14 pages04:333 years ago482 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben (You shall love God, your Lord), BWV 77, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the thirteenth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 22 August 1723.

The first movement carries Bach's statement on the most important law, on which, according to the parallel Matthew 22:34–40, "hang all the law and the prophets". The words translate to "You shall love God, your Lord, with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself". Bach had enlarged on the "dualism of love of God and brotherly love" already in his monumental cantata in 14 movements, Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76, at the beginning of his first cycle. In order to show the law's universality, Bach introduces Martin Luther's chorale "Dies sind die heilgen zehn Gebot" (These are the holy ten commandments), referring to the commandments of the Old Testament, as a foundation of the movement's structure. The tune is played in a strict canon, the most rigid musical law as one more symbol. The canon is performed by the trumpet in the highest range, and the continuo, representing the lowest range. The tempo of the trumpet is twice as fast as the tempo of the continuo, therefore the trumpet has time to repeat first single lines and finally the complete melody of the chorale. The trumpet enters ten times, to symbolize once more the completeness of the law. The voices, representing the law of the New Testament, engage in imitation of a theme which is derived from the chorale tune and first played by the instruments.

John Eliot Gardiner, who provided an extended analysis of the movement, concludes: "The end result is a potent mixture of modal and diatonic harmonies, one which leaves an unforgettable impression in the mind's ear, and in context propels one forward to the world of Brahms' German Requiem and beyond, to Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time".

Source: Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Du_sollt_Gott,_deinen_Herren,_lieben,_BWV_77)

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, tromba da tirarsi (Baroque slide trumpet), two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo including bassoon, I created this arrangement for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).