Sheet music

Swan Lake - Complete Ballet - Up.4

32 parts35 pages07:36a year ago3,282 views
Piccolo, Flute(3), Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, French Horn(3), Trumpet(2), Trombone(3), Tuba, Timpani, Percussion(8), Harp, Violin, Cello, Strings(5)
Yes, I do intent to transcribe the whole ballet. I intent to transcribe as faithfully as possible from the original (available here https://goo.gl/P6arZ ). And yes, instrument names and titles are in portuguese. Update 1 - Introduction complete; no.13 IV. still needs post copy-and-paste review, but I wanted to upload this already. I didn't incorporated no.14 in this because copy-and-paste doesn't seem to work well when dealing a lot of bars. It is available here separately. Update 2 - No.13 IV. reviewed and completed. Proper titles added. Update 3 - Instrumentation page added; first bars of no.1; minor fixes. Update 4 - No.1 completed; minor fixes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sumary and details: Swan Lake ; Лебединое озеро ; Le Lac des Cygnes ; Der Schwansee ; O Lago dos Cisnes. Composer: Tchaikovsky, Pyotr Ilich Composer Time Period: Romantic Piece Style: Romantic Year of Composition: 1875–77 Opus/Catalogue Number: Op.20 ; TH 12 Movements/Sections: 4 acts Average Duration: 140 minutes Instrumentation: orchestra piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (C, B♭, A), 2 bassoons, 4 horns (F), 2 cornets (A, B♭), 2 trumpets (F, D, E), 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle, tambourine, castanets, side drum, cymbals, bass drum, tam-tam, glockenspiel, harp, strings Introduction. Moderato assai (62 bars) Act I 1. Scène. Allegro giusto (109 bars) 2. Valse. Tempo di Valse (399 bars) 3. Scène. Allegro moderato (125 bars) 4. Pas de trois I. Intrada. Allegro (68 bars) II. Andante sostenuto (66 bars) III. Allegro semplice (72 bars) IV. Moderato (40 bars) V. Allegro (59 bars) VI. Coda. Allegro vivace (64 bars) 5. Pas de deux I. Tempo di Valse ma non troppo vivo quasi Moderato (104 bars) II. Andante (104 bars) III. Tempo di Valse (88 bars) IV. Coda. Allegro molto vivace (149 bars) 6. Pas d'action. Andantino quasi Moderato (75 bars) 7. Sujet (16 bars) 8. Danse des coupes. Tempo di Polacca (202 bars) 9. Finale. Andante (49 bars) Act II 10. Scène. Moderato (76 bars) 11. Scène. Allegro moderato—Moderato—Allegro vivo (274 bars) 12. Scène. Allegro (96 bars) 13. Danses des cygnes I. Tempo di Valse (144 bars) II. Moderato assai (50 bars) III. Tempo di Valse (100 bars) IV. Allegro moderato (38 bars) V. Pas d'action. Andante—Andante non troppo (146 bars) VI. Tempo di Valse (88 bars) VII. Coda. Allegro vivo (73 bars) 14. Scène. Moderato (70 bars) Act III 15. Allegro giusto (176 bars) 16. Danses du corps de ballet et des nains. Moderato assai—Allegro vivo (136 bars) 17. Scène: La sortie des invités et la valse. Allegro—Tempo di Valse (362 bars) 18. Scène. Allegro (63 bars) 19. Pas de six Intrada. Moderato assai (62 bars) Var. I. Allegro (65 bars) Andante con moto (86 bars) Moderato (38 bars) Allegro (32 bars) Moderato - Allegro semplice (66 bars) Coda. Allegro molto (129 bars) 19a. Pas de deux: Moderato—Andante (55 bars) Allegro moderato (25 bars) Allegro (49 bars) Allegro molto vivace (153 bars) 20. Danse hongroise. Czardas. Moderato assai—Allegro moderato (107 bars) 20a. Danse russe. Moderato Andante semplice (160 bars) 21. Danse espagnole. Allegro non troppo. Tempo di Bolero (103 bars) 22. Danse napolitaine. Allegro moderato—Andantino quasi Moderato (91 bars) 23. Mazurka. Tempo di Mazurka (192 bars) 24. Scène. Allegro—Valse (152 bars) Act IV 25. Entr'acte. Moderato (33 bars) 26. Scène. Allegro non troppo (56 bars) 27. Danses des petits cygnes. Moderato (108 bars) 28. Scène. Allegro agitato (96 bars) 29. Scène finale. Andante—Allegro agitato (217 bars) Supplementary Numbers (inserted after premiere) First Performance: 1877-03-04 – Moscow, Bolshoy Theatre Stepan Ryabov (conductor), Julius Reisinger (choreographer) 1895-01-27 – St. Petersburg, Maryinsky Theatre Riccardo Drigo (conductor), Marius Petipa/Lev Ivanov (choreographers) First Publication: 1877 – Moscow: P. Jurgenson 1895 – Full score, Plate 4432, 642 pages. 1957 – Moscow: Muzgiz (in vols. A and Б of Pyotr Tchaikovsky: Complete Collected Works) Full score. Plates M. 26458-a Г. (Acts I and II) ; Plate M. 26458-б Г. (Acts III and IV). Suites: A 6 movements: Scène [No.10 (or 14) from Act II in the ballet] Valse [No.2 from Act I] Danse des cygnes [No.13, Var.IV from Act II] Scène [No.13, Var.V from Act II - first 100 bars, with new 7-bar codetta added] Czardas: Danse hongroise [No.20 from Act III] Scène [No.28, plus the first 26 bars of No.29 (Finale) from Act IV] B 8 movements: Scène [No.10 (or 14) from Act II in the ballet] Valse [No.2 from Act I] Danse des cygnes [No.13, Var.IV from Act II] Scène [No.13, Var.V from Act II - first 100 bars, with new 7-bar codetta added] Czardas: Danse hongroise [No.20 from Act III] Danse espagnole [No.21 from Act III] Danse napolitaine [No.22 from Act III] Mazurka [No.23 from Act III]

Encelande

1 part2 pages01:453 years ago77 views
Un des mes composition. Passez un agréable moment !

Hadéen

2 parts4 pages01:183 years ago49 views
Une de mes composition, avec deux piano cette fois-ci

Chorale: "Christus, der ist mein Leben" (BWV 95 No 1) for Brass & Strings

8 parts11 pages06:152 years ago515 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba, Strings(4)
Christus, der ist mein Leben (Christ, he is my life), BWV 95, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 12 September 1723. Bach wrote the cantata in his first year Bach in Leipzig for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 12 September 1723. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13–21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11–17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed as a desire to die soon. As Salomon Franck expressed in his text for cantata Komm, du süße Todesstunde, BWV 161, composed in Weimar in 1715, the unknown poet concentrates on a desire to die, in hope to be raised like the young man from Nain. The poet includes four stanzas from four different chorales. Two stanzas from chorales are already presented in the first movement, "Christus, der ist mein Leben" (Jena 1609) and Martin Luther's "Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin" (1524), a paraphrase of the canticle Nunc dimittis. Movement 3 is Valerius Herberger's "Valet will ich dir geben", and the closing chorale is the fourth stanza of Nikolaus Herman's "Wenn mein Stündlein vorhanden ist". A week before, Bach had included three stanzas from a chorale in Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138. In this cantata he includes four stanzas from four different funeral hymns. The first three movements combine three of them, first stanzas throughout. The first chorale on a melody by Melchior Vulpius is embedded in a concerto of oboes and strings in syncopated motifs in parallels of thirds and sixths. The melody in the soprano is enforced by the horn. The line "Sterben ist mein Gewinn" (Death is my reward) is slower than the others, in a tradition observed already by Johann Hermann Schein. The recitative alternates between secco and accompagnato, with the same accompanying motifs as in the chorale. The second chorale on Luther's melody is graced by an independent violin part, and every line is preceded by an entry of the horn. A secco recitative leads to the third chorale, which is sung by the soprano alone like an aria, accompanied for the first line only by the continuo, but for the rest of the text by the oboes, playing an obbligato melody in unison. The only aria of the cantata is dominated by the oboes and accompanied by pizzicato in the strings which symbolizes funerary bells. The closing chorale is again enriched by a soaring additional violin part. Although originally scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, horn, two oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, violoncello piccolo and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & F Tuba) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Aria: "Ach, schlage doch bald, selge Stunde" (BWV 95 No 5) for Wind Trio & Strings

7 parts12 pages08:303 years ago313 views
Flute, Oboe, French Horn, Strings(4)
Christus, der ist mein Leben (Christ, he is my life), BWV 95, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 12 September 1723. Bach wrote the cantata in his first year Bach in Leipzig for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 12 September 1723. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13–21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11–17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed as a desire to die soon. As Salomon Franck expressed in his text for cantata Komm, du süße Todesstunde, BWV 161, composed in Weimar in 1715, the unknown poet concentrates on a desire to die, in hope to be raised like the young man from Nain. The poet includes four stanzas from four different chorales. Two stanzas from chorales are already presented in the first movement, "Christus, der ist mein Leben" (Jena 1609) and Martin Luther's "Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin" (1524), a paraphrase of the canticle Nunc dimittis. Movement 3 is Valerius Herberger's "Valet will ich dir geben", and the closing chorale is the fourth stanza of Nikolaus Herman's "Wenn mein Stündlein vorhanden ist". A week before, Bach had included three stanzas from a chorale in Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz, BWV 138. In this cantata he includes four stanzas from four different funeral hymns. The first three movements combine three of them, first stanzas throughout. The first chorale on a melody by Melchior Vulpius is embedded in a concerto of oboes and strings in syncopated motifs in parallels of thirds and sixths. The melody in the soprano is enforced by the horn. The line "Sterben ist mein Gewinn" (Death is my reward) is slower than the others, in a tradition observed already by Johann Hermann Schein. The recitative alternates between secco and accompagnato, with the same accompanying motifs as in the chorale. The second chorale on Luther's melody is graced by an independent violin part, and every line is preceded by an entry of the horn. A secco recitative leads to the third chorale, which is sung by the soprano alone like an aria, accompanied for the first line only by the continuo, but for the rest of the text by the oboes, playing an obbligato melody in unison. The only aria of the cantata is dominated by the oboes and accompanied by pizzicato in the strings which symbolizes funerary bells. The closing chorale is again enriched by a soaring additional violin part. Although originally scored for three vocal soloists (soprano, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, horn, two oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, violoncello piccolo and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Wind Trio (Flute, Oboe & French Horn) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Komm, du süße Todesstunde" (BWV 161 No 1) for Trumpet & Strings

5 parts5 pages06:273 years ago348 views
Komm, du süße Todesstunde (Come, o sweet hour of death), BWV 161, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 6 October 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule, aiming at a complete annual cycle within four years. Bach wrote the cantata in 1715 for the 16th Sunday after Trinity. According to the musicologist Alfred Dürr and other sources it was first performed on 6 October 1715. The text for this and other cantatas of 1715 was written by Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer in 1715. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13--21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11--17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed in words of desire to die soon. The closing chorale is the fourth verse of Christoph Knoll's "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (1611). The first performance is dated as likely to have been 27 September 1716 by the publisher Carus-Verlag and others. The cantata was performed again in Leipzig, also for the feast of the Purification of Mary on 2 February. The Phrygian chorale melody is the musical theme of the cantata, appearing in movement 1 both in its original form and also in the alto line derived from it. The themes of both other arias (3 and 5) are also derived from the same melody, uniting the music of the cantata. The melody appears five times in chorales of Bach's St Matthew Passion. The tenor recitative (2) ends in an arioso when the words paraphrase a Bible line of Phil 1:23, "Ich habe Lust abzuscheiden und bei Christo zu sein" (I desire to pasture soon with Christ. I desire to depart from this world). The alto recitative (4) is accompanied by all instruments, creating the images of sleep (in a downward movement, ending in long notes), the waking up (in fast movement upwards), and funeral bells in the recorders and pizzicato of the strings. Movement 5, marked aria by Franck, is set for four parts by Bach, using homophony and like a song. The first part is not repeated da capo, according to the last words "Dieses sei mein letztes Wort" (May this be my last word). The closing chorale is illuminated by a fifth part of the two recorders playing in unison a lively counterpoint. Although the cantata was originally scored for alto and tenor soloists, a four-part choir, two recorders, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Bb Trumpet & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorus: "Wenn es meines Gottes Wille" (BWV 161 No 5) for Winds & Strings

10 parts14 pages05:123 years ago340 views
Komm, du süße Todesstunde (Come, o sweet hour of death), BWV 161, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 6 October 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule, aiming at a complete annual cycle within four years. Bach wrote the cantata in 1715 for the 16th Sunday after Trinity. According to the musicologist Alfred Dürr and other sources it was first performed on 6 October 1715. The text for this and other cantatas of 1715 was written by Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer in 1715. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13--21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11--17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed in words of desire to die soon. The closing chorale is the fourth verse of Christoph Knoll's "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (1611). The first performance is dated as likely to have been 27 September 1716 by the publisher Carus-Verlag and others. The cantata was performed again in Leipzig, also for the feast of the Purification of Mary on 2 February. The Phrygian chorale melody is the musical theme of the cantata, appearing in movement 1 both in its original form and also in the alto line derived from it. The themes of both other arias (3 and 5) are also derived from the same melody, uniting the music of the cantata. The melody appears five times in chorales of Bach's St Matthew Passion. The tenor recitative (2) ends in an arioso when the words paraphrase a Bible line of Phil 1:23, "Ich habe Lust abzuscheiden und bei Christo zu sein" (I desire to pasture soon with Christ. I desire to depart from this world). The alto recitative (4) is accompanied by all instruments, creating the images of sleep (in a downward movement, ending in long notes), the waking up (in fast movement upwards), and funeral bells in the recorders and pizzicato of the strings. Movement 5, marked aria by Franck, is set for four parts by Bach, using homophony and like a song. The first part is not repeated da capo, according to the last words "Dieses sei mein letztes Wort" (May this be my last word). The closing chorale is illuminated by a fifth part of the two recorders playing in unison a lively counterpoint. Although the cantata was originally scored for alto and tenor soloists, a four-part choir, two recorders, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Winds (2 Flutes, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Chorale: "Der Leib zwar in der Erden" (BWV 161 No 6) for Flute & Strings

5 parts2 pages01:313 years ago339 views
Komm, du süße Todesstunde (Come, o sweet hour of death), BWV 161, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 6 October 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule, aiming at a complete annual cycle within four years. Bach wrote the cantata in 1715 for the 16th Sunday after Trinity. According to the musicologist Alfred Dürr and other sources it was first performed on 6 October 1715. The text for this and other cantatas of 1715 was written by Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer in 1715. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13--21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11--17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed in words of desire to die soon. The closing chorale is the fourth verse of Christoph Knoll's "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (1611). The first performance is dated as likely to have been 27 September 1716 by the publisher Carus-Verlag and others. The cantata was performed again in Leipzig, also for the feast of the Purification of Mary on 2 February. The Phrygian chorale melody is the musical theme of the cantata, appearing in movement 1 both in its original form and also in the alto line derived from it. The themes of both other arias (3 and 5) are also derived from the same melody, uniting the music of the cantata. The melody appears five times in chorales of Bach's St Matthew Passion. The tenor recitative (2) ends in an arioso when the words paraphrase a Bible line of Phil 1:23, "Ich habe Lust abzuscheiden und bei Christo zu sein" (I desire to pasture soon with Christ. I desire to depart from this world). The alto recitative (4) is accompanied by all instruments, creating the images of sleep (in a downward movement, ending in long notes), the waking up (in fast movement upwards), and funeral bells in the recorders and pizzicato of the strings. Movement 5, marked aria by Franck, is set for four parts by Bach, using homophony and like a song. The first part is not repeated da capo, according to the last words "Dieses sei mein letztes Wort" (May this be my last word). The closing chorale is illuminated by a fifth part of the two recorders playing in unison a lively counterpoint. Although the cantata was originally scored for alto and tenor soloists, a four-part choir, two recorders, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Mein Verlangen ist, den Heiland zu umfangen" (BWV 161 No 3) for Viola & Strings

5 parts5 pages04:123 years ago251 views
Komm, du süße Todesstunde (Come, o sweet hour of death), BWV 161, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Weimar for the 16th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 6 October 1715. On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schlosskirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule, aiming at a complete annual cycle within four years. Bach wrote the cantata in 1715 for the 16th Sunday after Trinity. According to the musicologist Alfred Dürr and other sources it was first performed on 6 October 1715. The text for this and other cantatas of 1715 was written by Salomon Franck, published in Evangelisches Andachts-Opffer in 1715. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Ephesians, praying for the strengthening of faith in the congregation of Ephesus (Ephesians 3:13--21), and from the Gospel of Luke, the raising from the dead of the Young man from Nain (Luke 7:11--17). In Bach's time the story pointed immediately at the resurrection of the dead, expressed in words of desire to die soon. The closing chorale is the fourth verse of Christoph Knoll's "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (1611). The first performance is dated as likely to have been 27 September 1716 by the publisher Carus-Verlag and others. The cantata was performed again in Leipzig, also for the feast of the Purification of Mary on 2 February. The Phrygian chorale melody is the musical theme of the cantata, appearing in movement 1 both in its original form and also in the alto line derived from it. The themes of both other arias (3 and 5) are also derived from the same melody, uniting the music of the cantata. The melody appears five times in chorales of Bach's St Matthew Passion. The tenor recitative (2) ends in an arioso when the words paraphrase a Bible line of Phil 1:23, "Ich habe Lust abzuscheiden und bei Christo zu sein" (I desire to pasture soon with Christ. I desire to depart from this world). The alto recitative (4) is accompanied by all instruments, creating the images of sleep (in a downward movement, ending in long notes), the waking up (in fast movement upwards), and funeral bells in the recorders and pizzicato of the strings. Movement 5, marked aria by Franck, is set for four parts by Bach, using homophony and like a song. The first part is not repeated da capo, according to the last words "Dieses sei mein letztes Wort" (May this be my last word). The closing chorale is illuminated by a fifth part of the two recorders playing in unison a lively counterpoint. Although the cantata was originally scored for alto and tenor soloists, a four-part choir, two recorders, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Viola & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Geb descend de la montagne

1 part2 pages02:199 months ago81 views
Piano
Le nain Geb fréquente la montagne du Taennchel dans les Vosges ainsi que les galeries et puits de Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines. Pour l'apercevoir il faut fermer les yeux et regarder.

BAND

5 parts2 pages00:2815 days ago3 views
Flute, Tenor Saxophone, Trumpet, Tuba, French Horn

He is We - I Wouldn't Mind

3 parts6 pages03:517 months ago664 views
Violin, Cello, Piano
I don't own this song. It includes main vocal, back-up vocal and piano. Hope you enjoy it.