Sheet music with 18 instruments

Raining Tacos Remix

18 parts7 pages07:443 years ago1,255 views
Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Bass, Percussion(4), Piano, Voice
Original song for a bit. Added the best (but impossible) tuba line ever. Added some cool s#!t.

It gets better. Unfinished, I need help.

Oh, yes. The "Raining Tacos" song is based off the chord changes from Canon in D by Pachelbel. It appears at the end in Vocal, and towards the middle in Bass.

Update! Longer

Rockstar (Concert Band)

18 parts17 pages03:03a month ago76 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Percussion(4), Timpani
A concert band arrangement of Post Malone and 21 Savage's Rockstar.
You will be able to differentiate their verses easily, I'm sure. :)

UPDATE 9/5/18:
--Made the metering for (primarily) Tuba, Bassoon, & Bass Clarinet easier to read, hopefully.
--In Measure 21, added the Baritone part to Tuba. Hopefully it isn't too loud for you guys, since the Baritone and Tuba play the same octave.
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Discussions

I'm not a brass player, I'm a violinist. I'm just writing for myself with MuseScore, trying to build my composition and orchestration skills. How do you decide which tuba to use in compositions? Wikipedia says that some tubas are more commonly used in UK, the other is more commonly used in US. If I ever have a real player to write for, then I'll write for that persons instrument. Until that happens, can you give me any suggestions, comments etc? (I posted one of my composition exercises , with a tube, to this group, it's the variations on Swanee river) Thanks.
Hey guys! I love the program! But there's one flaw, writing a Bb Tuba part is really the same as C-Tuba. It is rather annoying because when you write a Bb Tuba part, it doesn't match the other musical parts when you test them with a MIDI file. They both appear to be tuned in C, can you fix it please?
I am working up a short concert or Suite of mostly film and television music for a performance and the ape cave near Mount Saint Helens. This is for solo tuba.I got permission from the head park ranger to play a short concert less than 15 minutes and during a time of day when there's not a lot of foot traffic, say early in the morning. After I get this entered into musescore I'll post it for you. After I perform and record it, I'll send a link.

Il mondo prima di te

18 parts13 pages03:215 months ago252 views
Trumpet(6), French Horn(6), Trombone(4), Tuba, Percussion
"Il mondo prima di te" (in English "The world before you") is a song, sung by the Italian singer Annalisa Scarrone at the Sanremo Festival 2018, ranking in third place.
Annalisa Scarrone's song was arranged by Gianmarco Tuzi for brass band, respecting the original tone of the piece.
If you want make comparisons between the arrangement and the original song, go to this YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZGGmO9dXxs.

The musical instruments involved in the arrangement are:
small Trumpet Bb, Bb Trumpet, Bb soprano flugelhorn, C Trumpets, F Horns, Eb Horns, C Euphonium, C Trombones, C Tuba and Percussion.

The Survival Games: The Hunt

18 parts26 pages04:136 months ago83 views
Keyboard, Piano(2), Percussion(4), Organ(2), Harmonica, Guitar(2), Brass Ensemble, Voice, Strings(2), Bass, Viola
*Select Optimal Audio From Drop-Down Menu Above Score*

An orchestral piece composed by Timothy Schmidt.
This YouTube video has the original version and additional information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6BAnVqpYzE

Actual Instrumentation: Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in Bb, Bassoon, Horns in F (2), Trumpet in Bb, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani (3), Drumset, Bass Drum, Piano, String Ensemble

Music performed primarily using Virtual Playing Orchestra: http://virtualplaying.com/virtual-playing-orchestra/
Samples from the following are also used:
Musyng Kite: https://www.kvraudio.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=351893
Anthony Percussion: http://www.anthonydeaton.com/philharmonic.html

Livin' On A Prayer

18 parts11 pages03:385 years ago11 views
for Symphony/Chamber orchestra, trombone/tuba play string bass, etc etc figure it outt :P :)

Wings Of The Prairies

18 parts10 pages02:345 months ago51 views
Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet(3), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone(2), Tuba(2), Percussion(3)
For the 2018 781 Squadron Annual Cadet Review.

Aquatic Rest

18 parts4 pages01:364 months ago25 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn(3), Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(4), Timpani
This serene concert band song is composed to calm those in both the audience and the performers before an upbeat, powerful piece is played (See my other composition, Action and Adventure). Free to use in concert bands who, of course, have flutes, oboes, clarinets (Bb and Bass), saxophones (In Alto, Tenor, and Baritone), F horns, Bb trumpets, baritones (As in the small tuba that can read in Treble or Bass Clef), tuba, and varied percussion instruments (Like a marimba!)

The Foreign King

18 parts6 pages01:484 months ago33 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn(3), Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(4), Timpani
Using my staple pantry of musical concert band instruments (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone Sax, Horn, Bb Trumpet, Trombone, Baritone (written in Treble Clef and Bass Clef), and Tuba, I have written this procession for a king who is most certainly called the Foreign King. Each instrument has a feature alongside other instruments (Such as Flute and Oboe, Trumpet and Horn, or Saxophones), until the percussion prepares the winds for a stunning finale! For a beginner concert band. Free to use!
Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra

18 parts15 pages06:294 months ago455 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England.

The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums.

Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major.

The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400).

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the Overture from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 1) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra

18 parts5 pages01:394 months ago393 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Trumpet(2), French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Most music lovers have encountered Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) through holiday-time renditions of the Messiah's "Hallelujah" chorus. And many of them know and love that oratorio on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, as well as a few other greatest hits like the orchestral Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music, and perhaps Judas Maccabeus or one of the other English oratorios. Yet his operas, for which he was widely known in his own time, are the province mainly of specialists in Baroque music, and the events of his life, even though they reflected some of the most important musical issues of the day, have never become as familiar as the careers of Bach or Mozart. Perhaps the single word that best describes his life and music is "cosmopolitan": he was a German composer, trained in Italy, who spent most of his life in England.

The War of Austrian Succession was brought to an end by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, signed in October 1748. Although England had been a somewhat reluctant participant and had gained little from the war, preparations for celebrations commenced the following month with the erection of a large wooden structure incorporating a triumphal arch in London's Green Park -- the framework for a large and impressive display of fireworks. Peace was formally declared in the following February, and Handel, who had then just completed two contrasting oratorios, Susanna and Solomon, was commissioned to provide music for the occasion. Obviously, such music would have to be both grand in scale and suitable for open-air performance -- this latter aspect, in practical terms, calling for a large contingent of wind and brass instruments. Handel originally intended to make use of no fewer than 16 each of trumpets and horns. However, he ran into trouble with the organizers, evidenced by a sequence of bad-tempered letters. Ultimately, he settled for something a little more "modest": 24 oboes, 12 bassoons (including a contrabassoon), nine each of trumpets and horns, three pairs of kettledrums, and an unspecified number of side drums.

Music for the Royal Fireworks consists of five movements, commencing with a suitably pompous and ceremonial Overture in the French style: a slow, dotted-rhythm introduction followed by a contrapuntal Allegro. The suite continues with a lively Bourée, a quieter movement entitled "La paix," the ebullient "La réjouissance," and a final Minuet. A second Minuet, in D minor, which seems to have been added later, was probably used by the composer as a trio section before a final triumphant return to the main Minuet in D major.

The rehearsal of Music for the Royal Fireworks in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21, 1749 takes a place as one of the best attended in the history of musical performance. A huge crowd, said to number in excess of 12,000, is reported to have turned up, blocking many surrounding streets and causing traffic chaos. The actual event was rather less successful; observers reported that in particular, many of the fireworks failed to impress. To make matters worse, the display set fire to one of the pavilions that formed part of the structure. A month later, the music was performed in the rather more peaceful surroundings of the Foundling Hospital. For this occasion Handel reverted to a traditional combination of strings and winds. This is the version in which the music, one of Handel's most popular works, is most often heard today.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/suite-for-keyboard-suite-de-piece-vol1-no6-in-f-sharp-minor-hwv-431-mc0002366400).

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this Arrangement of the La Rejouissance from the Fireworks Suite (HWV 351 No. 4) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet in A, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Fluglehorn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass).

The Tempest

18 parts10 pages02:243 years ago3,488 views
Flute, Clarinet(2), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn(2), Bassoon, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion(4), Timpani, Guitar
Time Signature: 4/4
Key Signature: Bb
Tempo: Quarter note = 136 - 144
Other Information: The Tempest provides a great deal of learning opportunities for a young band. The first teachable concept that stands out is differentiating articulation markings (staccato, accents and slurs). This piece will also offer you the opportunity to teach students about playing four bar phrases as well as ostinato lines. The low brass line gives directors a chance to reinforce correct counting of rests, and the whole band will be introduced to sudden dynamic changes. Finally, this will offer the band the chance to work on playing two different styles (staccato and legato) at the same time.

Program Notes
The Tempest was conceived and written as a concert/festival work for the developing band. It also serves as a musical vehicle to teach the concepts of phrasing, articulation, key modifications (accidentals), and musical texture.

The introductory statement in the clarinets and low woodwinds should be conveyed with a sense of mystery and impending energy. The entire woodwind choir begins the second phrase culminating the brass entrance as the storm is unleashed.

Measure 9 should be interpreted as aggressively as possible. The accents in the low brass and saxophones should be carefully rehearsed for consistency. The flute/clarinet/percussion ostinato at measure 18 should be carefully balanced to ensure the rhythmic intensity among parts. In contrast, the melodic statement in the horns and saxophones should be as legato as possible.

The conductor should take whatever liberties are necessary at measure 45 to ensure the proper balance between musical lines. the instrumentation of your ensemble should dictate the exact dynamic marking for each part. In the same fashion, please pay particular attention to the dynamic indications beginning in measure 69. Depending upon instrumentation, adjust teh dynamic level of each entrance to ensure an even crescendo. The dissonant crescendo in the horns, saxophones, and clarinets in measure 73 should be exaggerated. You may wish to divisi the clarinets as well if you have students who are comfortable over the break.

Small School Considerations
It is clear from the notes included with the score that Robert W. Smith kept smaller beginning bands in mind as he was composing The Tempest, going so far as to suggest to directors that they should adjust the dynamics to achieve the desired balance. The piece is well suited for small bands and should not need much in the way of changes. Bands without bass clarinets or bassoons will want to add a low voice to the first 8 measures.

Instrumentation
Flute
Oboe
Bb Clarinet
Bb Bass Clarinet
Alto Saxophone
Tenor Saxophone
Baritone Saxophone
Trumpet
Horn
Trombone/Baritone/Bassoon
Tuba
Mallet Percussion 1, 2
Timpani
Percussion 1, 2


Percussion Requirements and Possible Substitutions
Bells
Xylophone
Timpani
Snare Drum
Bass Drum
Triangle
Wind Chimes
Suspended Cymbal
Tambourine

To cover every percussion part in The Tempest will take 6 players. If you cannot cover all of the parts, consider having a wind player cover the percussion 2 part since the rhythms are pretty simplistic. If you have to cover only one of the two mallet parts, consider covering the bells instead of the xylophone since it has the moving line.