Flute

"Ave Maria" for Piano & Flute

2 parts3 pages047 years ago18,453 views
Flute, Piano
"Ave Maria" is a popular and much recorded aria composed by Vladimir Vavilov around 1970. It is a musical hoax generally misattributed to Baroque composer Giulio Caccini.

Vavilov himself published and recorded it on the Melodiya label with the ascription to "Anonymous" in 1970. It is believed that the work received its ascription to Giulio Caccini after Vavilov's death, by an organist Mark Shakhin (one of its performers on the mentioned "Melodiya" longplay), who gave the "newly discovered scores" to other musicians; then in an arrangement made by the organist Oleg Yanchenko for the recording by Irina Arkhipova in 1987, then the piece came to be famous worldwide.
"Ave Maria" based on a prelude by J.S. Bach for Flute & Piano
Video

"Ave Maria" based on a prelude by J.S. Bach for Flute & Piano

2 parts4 pages02:157 years ago15,039 views
Flute, Piano
Ave Maria based on a prelude by J.S. Bach written by French Romantic composer Charles Gounod in 1859 as the "Consideration on Bach's prelude". His Ave Maria consists of a melody superimposed over the Prelude No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, from Book I of The Well-Tempered Clavier, written by J.S. Bach some 137 years earlier.

I transcribed his original piece for Flute & Piano.
Three Gymnopédies for Flute & Piano
Video

Three Gymnopédies for Flute & Piano

2 parts18 pages07:517 years ago3,233 views
Satie's Gymnopedies are what many consider to be the groundwork for today's ambient music; it's as ignorable as it is interesting (although, I find it hard to ignore such great music). These three beautiful pieces for acoustic piano and flute are calming, reflective, ethereal, relaxing, soothing, and elegant.

Gymnopedie No. 1 - Lent et douloureux (slow and mournfully):


With a hollow, but eerily warm melody gently floating atop an accompaniment of steady short-long rhythms, Gymnopedie No. 1 is as expressive as it is transparent. Its simplicity and openness masterfully disguises its apparent dissonances.

Gymnopedie No. 2 - Lent et triste (slow and sad):


Gymnopedie No. 2, although sharing the same short-long accompaniment in the left hand, the mood of this piece is entirely different from No. 1 and 3. Its lack of a commitment to a steady key leads the melody on a nebulous path wandering aimlessly through a series of chords.

Gymnopedie No. 3 - Lent et grave (slowly and solemnly):


Similar in melodic structure, Gymnopedie No. 3 is a minor key version of Gymnopedie No. 1. Its hypnotic-like accompaniment leads the listener in an almost out of body experience. If played as it is intended, the texture of this piece is as smooth as silk.

"Air" in D Major (BWV 1068) for Crystal Flute & Piano

2 parts4 pages04:147 years ago7,107 views
The four Orchestral Suites or Overtures BWV 1066–1069 are a set of compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach. The Air is one of the most famous pieces of baroque music. An arrangement of the piece by German violinist August Wilhelmj (1845–1908) has come to be known as Air on the G String.

I created this arrangement for the Hall Crystal Flute (http://hallflutes.com) and piano supporting the limited range of the instrument.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Aria for Flute & Piano
Video

Aria for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages01:487 years ago3,124 views
Flute, Piano
I created this "Aria for Flute & Piano" by adding a gentle and dissonant flute melody onto an acoustic piano adaptation to the dramatic C Minor little prelude (BWV 999) by J.S. Bach.

The Prelude in C Minor (BWV 999) was a musical work for solo lute written by Bach, probably during the late 1710s or early 1720s. Although intended for sacred service, I used his beautiful, haunting mantra to construct this "Aria" (light, self-contained piece intended for a single voice: flute).

"The Old Year is Gone" (BWV 1091) for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages01:087 years ago742 views
Like the more famous setting in the Liturgical Year, Bach expresses sadness at the passing of the old year.

Bach's compositions have been performed and enjoyed for over two-and-a-half centuries. Some of them, however, are relative newcomers to the music scene, including this chorale prelude and the other 37 by Bach found in the Neumeister Collection by scholar Christoph Wolff in 1985.

This one, "Das alte Jahr vergangen ist" (The old year is gone), is one of the composer's more somber efforts from that set, but perhaps one of his more rewarding. Though it is a very early work, showing the influence of Buxtehude, it is still a worthwhile composition.

Like many of the Neumeister chorale preludes, it presents the chorale theme in skeletal sonorities at the outset. Atypically, though, the theme remains shrouded in rather modest dress and somber tones throughout, the music seeming to look back upon the year passed in the title with a nostalgic, melancholy gaze. As the piece progresses, its contrapuntal elements and deft harmonies impart a more varied character and depth, but the gloomy mood is never quite dispelled.

Although originally created as an organ choral prelude, I adapted this work for flute and piano. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php)..

"If You are With Me" (BWV 508) for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages02:157 years ago1,842 views
"Bist du bei mir" (If you are with me) BWV 508 is an aria in the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach. It was therefore attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach, but the melody is part of the Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel opera Diomedes, oder die triumphierende Unschuld that was performed in Bayreuth on November 16, 1718.

Although the opera score is lost, the aria had been part of the Berlin Singakademie music library and it too was considered lost in the Second World War, until it was rediscovered in 2000 in the Kiev Conservatory. The continuo part of BWV 508 is more agitated and continuous in its voice leading than the Stölzel aria; it is uncertain who provided it, as the entry in the Notebook is by Anna Magdalena Bach herself.

In an essay in the Bach-Jahrbuch 2002, Andreas Glöckner speculates that either she obtained the song from the inventory of the Leipzig Opera that had gone bankrupt in 1720, or that it simply was a favorite known to nearly everybody in Leipzig that was particularly suitable for Hausmusik.

Although originally created as an organ opera aria, I adapted this work for flute and piano. The piece has become a very popular choice for wedding ceremonies and other such occasions and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php)..

"Trio Sonata" in E Minor Movement II Andante (BWV 528) for Flute & Piano

2 parts8 pages03:457 years ago1,577 views
The trio sonata is a musical form that was popular in the 17th and early 18th centuries.

A trio sonata is written for two solo melodic instruments and basso continuo, making three parts in all, hence the name trio sonata. However, because the basso continuo is usually made up of at least two instruments (typically a cello or bass viol and a keyboard instrument such as the harpsichord).

It is generally accepted that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his six Sonatas for Organ for his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, as the not always reliable W.F. often asserted. There is no strong reason to disbelieve it, for they appeared at about the right time and, moreover, are teaching pieces par excellence. There is a world of difference between the familiar Bach organ works in the mold of the various preludes or toccatas and fugues and the Six Sonatas. Compared to those works, these Sonatas are light, transparent in texture, never concerned with display or Baroque flamboyance. They are Trio-Sonatas, works in three voices, irrespective of how many actual players were needed. The voices in these works are independent: one in either hand, the third on the pedals. Ordinarily, each hand plays on its own manual. Thus, the Sonatas test and cultivate the student's physical and mental ability to coordinate all these separate motions of hands and feet, the interpretive ability to project each voice equally and clearly to the audience, and the musical ability to make them meaningful.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for alto flute and piano. This (fourth) Sonata is written in the form of a concerto for organ and is a transcription of a sinfonia of the cantata Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76 (1723). The slow (second) movement seems to have originated as a separate piece.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Trio Sonata" in E Minor Movement I Adagio & Vivace (BWV 528) for Alto Flute & Piano

2 parts7 pages02:267 years ago1,532 views
The trio sonata is a musical form that was popular in the 17th and early 18th centuries.

A trio sonata is written for two solo melodic instruments and basso continuo, making three parts in all, hence the name trio sonata. However, because the basso continuo is usually made up of at least two instruments (typically a cello or bass viol and a keyboard instrument such as the harpsichord).

It is generally accepted that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his six Sonatas for Organ for his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, as the not always reliable W.F. often asserted. There is no strong reason to disbelieve it, for they appeared at about the right time and, moreover, are teaching pieces par excellence. There is a world of difference between the familiar Bach organ works in the mold of the various preludes or toccatas and fugues and the Six Sonatas. Compared to those works, these Sonatas are light, transparent in texture, never concerned with display or Baroque flamboyance. They are Trio-Sonatas, works in three voices, irrespective of how many actual players were needed. The voices in these works are independent: one in either hand, the third on the pedals. Ordinarily, each hand plays on its own manual. Thus, the Sonatas test and cultivate the student's physical and mental ability to coordinate all these separate motions of hands and feet, the interpretive ability to project each voice equally and clearly to the audience, and the musical ability to make them meaningful.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for alto flute and piano. This (fourth) Sonata is written in the form of a concerto for organ. This first movement is a Vivace preceded by a short slow introduction. It is a transcription of a sinfonia of the cantata Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76 (1723). This number was already a trio for oboe d'amore, viola, and bass line. It is in a ritornello form, with a lively main episode interspersed with contrasting sections.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Trio Sonata" in E Minor Movement III Allegro (BWV 528) for Flute & Piano

2 parts11 pages02:267 years ago1,986 views
The trio sonata is a musical form that was popular in the 17th and early 18th centuries.

A trio sonata is written for two solo melodic instruments and basso continuo, making three parts in all, hence the name trio sonata. However, because the basso continuo is usually made up of at least two instruments (typically a cello or bass viol and a keyboard instrument such as the harpsichord).

It is generally accepted that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his six Sonatas for Organ for his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, as the not always reliable W.F. often asserted. There is no strong reason to disbelieve it, for they appeared at about the right time and, moreover, are teaching pieces par excellence. There is a world of difference between the familiar Bach organ works in the mold of the various preludes or toccatas and fugues and the Six Sonatas. Compared to those works, these Sonatas are light, transparent in texture, never concerned with display or Baroque flamboyance. They are Trio-Sonatas, works in three voices, irrespective of how many actual players were needed. The voices in these works are independent: one in either hand, the third on the pedals. Ordinarily, each hand plays on its own manual. Thus, the Sonatas test and cultivate the student's physical and mental ability to coordinate all these separate motions of hands and feet, the interpretive ability to project each voice equally and clearly to the audience, and the musical ability to make them meaningful.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for flute and piano. This (fourth) Sonata is written in the form of a concerto for organ and is a transcription of a sinfonia of the cantata Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76 (1723). This concluding (Un Poco Allegro) section is vigorous and tests coordination by throwing in triplets that cross hands on Keyboard as well as on flute.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Baroque Trill Styles Chart

1 part2 pages00:367 years ago31,343 views
Piano
The trill (or shake, as it was known from the 16th until the 19th century) is a musical ornament consisting of a rapid alternation between two adjacent notes, usually a semitone or tone apart, which can be identified with the context of the trill. It is sometimes referred to by the German triller, the Italian trillo, the French trille or the Spanish trino. A cadential trill is a trill associated with a cadence.

In the baroque period, a number of signs indicating specific patterns with which a trill should be begun or ended were used. In the Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach lists a number of these signs together with the correct way to interpret them. Unless one of these specific signs is indicated, the details of how to play the trill are up to the performer. In general, however, trills in this period are executed beginning on the auxiliary note, before the written note, often producing the effect of a harmonic suspension which resolves to the principal note. But, if the note preceding the ornamented note is itself one scale degree above the principal note, then the dissonant note has already been stated, and the trill typically starts on the principal note.

Several trill symbols and techniques common in the Baroque and early Classical period have fallen entirely out of use, including for instance the brief Pralltriller, represented by a very brief wavy line, referred to by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in his Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments (Versuch) (1753–1762).

Beyond the baroque period, specific signs for ornamentation are very rare. Continuing through the time of Mozart, the default expectations for the interpretation of trills continued to be similar to those of the baroque. In music after the time of Mozart, the trill usually begins on the principal note.

All of these are only rules of thumb, and, together with the overall rate of the trill and whether that rate is constant or variable, can only be determined by considering the context in which the trill appears, and is usually to a large degree a matter of opinion with no single "right" way of executing the ornament.

"Trio Sonata" in G Major Movement I Vivace (BWV 530) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts15 pages04:307 years ago1,251 views
At some time in the vicinity of 1727 to 1730, Johann Sebastian Bach finished compiling a set of six organ sonatas that, records show, he intended as practice pieces for his oldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. It seems that the purpose was fulfilled; W.F. Bach got a prestigious appointment as organist of the Sophienkirche of Dresden, in 1733, and became widely known for his outstanding playing.

The pieces in the set are sometimes called trio sonatas because in texture they resemble works of that period made up of three independent musical lines; two in the treble function more or less as a duet and a third is in the pedal register of the organ.

Bach tended to follow the form of the Italian concerto, particularly examples of it by Vivaldi, in shaping these six sonatas. Whether or not it is true that Bach wrote them as teaching pieces for his son, the works are in fact excellent both as concert works and as practice pieces. They promote independence of the hands from each other and from the feet and are on the curriculum for every student organist. Often the texture evokes a flute and a violin, frequent choices for the top two instruments in trio sonatas of the time, plus a mellow bass line.

It is suspected by musical scholars that some of the movements of some of these six sonatas may have been originated considerably earlier, but there seems to be agreement that the sixth and final sonata was written specifically for this set.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon). The opening Vivace movement of this sonata number six (6), has a rapid unison figure for the melody lines that is quite reminiscent of Vivaldi.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Trio Sonata" in G Major Movement III Allegro (BWV 530) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts13 pages03:257 years ago969 views
At some time in the vicinity of 1727 to 1730, Johann Sebastian Bach finished compiling a set of six organ sonatas that, records show, he intended as practice pieces for his oldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. It seems that the purpose was fulfilled; W.F. Bach got a prestigious appointment as organist of the Sophienkirche of Dresden, in 1733, and became widely known for his outstanding playing.

The pieces in the set are sometimes called trio sonatas because in texture they resemble works of that period made up of three independent musical lines; two in the treble function more or less as a duet and a third is in the pedal register of the organ.

Bach tended to follow the form of the Italian concerto, particularly examples of it by Vivaldi, in shaping these six sonatas. Whether or not it is true that Bach wrote them as teaching pieces for his son, the works are in fact excellent both as concert works and as practice pieces. They promote independence of the hands from each other and from the feet and are on the curriculum for every student organist. Often the texture evokes a flute and a violin, frequent choices for the top two instruments in trio sonatas of the time, plus a mellow bass line.

It is suspected by musical scholars that some of the movements of some of these six sonatas may have been originated considerably earlier, but there seems to be agreement that the sixth and final sonata was written specifically for this set.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon). The final allegro movement of this sonata number six (6), is one of Bach's most up-to-date compositions, being composed in the new galant style that would soon supplant the counterpoint-rich Baroque style.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Trio Sonata" in G Major Movement II Lento (BWV 530) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts14 pages08:017 years ago1,060 views
At some time in the vicinity of 1727 to 1730, Johann Sebastian Bach finished compiling a set of six organ sonatas that, records show, he intended as practice pieces for his oldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. It seems that the purpose was fulfilled; W.F. Bach got a prestigious appointment as organist of the Sophienkirche of Dresden, in 1733, and became widely known for his outstanding playing.

The pieces in the set are sometimes called trio sonatas because in texture they resemble works of that period made up of three independent musical lines; two in the treble function more or less as a duet and a third is in the pedal register of the organ.

Bach tended to follow the form of the Italian concerto, particularly examples of it by Vivaldi, in shaping these six sonatas. Whether or not it is true that Bach wrote them as teaching pieces for his son, the works are in fact excellent both as concert works and as practice pieces. They promote independence of the hands from each other and from the feet and are on the curriculum for every student organist. Often the texture evokes a flute and a violin, frequent choices for the top two instruments in trio sonatas of the time, plus a mellow bass line.

It is suspected by musical scholars that some of the movements of some of these six sonatas may have been originated considerably earlier, but there seems to be agreement that the sixth and final sonata was written specifically for this set.

Although originally created for organ, I adapted this work for woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon). Bach leaves his Italian models to use a Germanic binary form for this slow movementof this sonata number six (6), "Lento".

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Méditation" from the Opera "Thaïs" by Jules Massenet
Video

"Méditation" from the Opera "Thaïs" by Jules Massenet

2 parts4 pages04:217 years ago6,622 views
Flute, Piano
Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet was a French composer lived from May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912 and is best known for his operas. His compositions were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and he ranks as one of the greatest melodists of his era. Soon after his death, Massenet's style went out of fashion, and many of his operas fell into almost total oblivion. Apart from Manon and Werther, his works were rarely performed. However, since the mid-1970s, many of his operas such as Thaïs (pronounced tah-eess / ta:'i:s) and Esclarmonde have undergone periodic revivals.

Thaïs was created as an opera in three acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Louis Gallet based on the novel Thaïs by Anatole France. It was first performed at the Opéra Garnier in Paris on 16 March 1894, starring the American soprano Sybil Sanderson, for whom Massenet had written the title role.

This famous "Méditation", the entr'acte for violin and orchestra played between the scenes of Act II, is often performed as a concert music piece; it has been arranged for many different instruments as with the flute and piano here.

"Fantasy" for Flute & Piano

2 parts7 pages05:047 years ago4,715 views
Flute, Piano
Inspired after rediscovering the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto "No. 5" in E minor, I created this Fantasy for Flute & Piano. The title reflects this pieces imagery rather than the musical form, as it is not an actual fantasy.

It should be noted that Soviet émigré Alexander Warenberg, a composer for film and television, arranged Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 as a concertante work for piano and orchestra. The work contains majority of the source material from Rachmaninoff's Second Symphony with some original scoring by Warenberg, modification of the original score and a change to many of the score’s harmonies "to improve the sound and balance". Technically, it is Warenberg's work that I refer to here; only peripherally Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2.

This work still feels somewhat “rough” within the confines of MuseScore and I consider it a "work in progress" and I welcome your constructive comments and suggestions.

"Lord, if only I have You" (BuxWV 38) For Woodwind Quartet

4 parts6 pages02:597 years ago676 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

Buxtehude writes two different settings of the text from Psalm 73:25-26. Both are scored for soprano and strings. "Herr, wenn ich nur dich habe" (BuxWV 39), the shorter of the two, is a typical seventeenth century small-scale sacred concerto with each segment of text set with new music. The piece concludes with a joyfully imitative alleluia. While the psalm setting starts off like any other seventeenth century sacred concerto, Buxtehude tacks on a two verse strophic aria at the end of the psalm followed by a jubilant amen.

Although originally created for soprano and strings, I adapted this work for woodwind quartet (Flute, Alto Flute, Oboe and Bassoon). Note that I chose the Alto Flute as opposed to the Clarinet commonly used in Woodwind Quartets due to its uniquely responsive lower register and a very warm and projecting sound over all octaves.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"I Shall not Abandon God" (BuxWV 221) For Woodwind Quartet

4 parts4 pages01:417 years ago450 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

"Von Gott will ich nicht lassen" (BuxWV 221) is much less like anything else Buxtehude wrote. Most of Buxtehude's chorale preludes feature some sort of solo voice with accompaniment, even if the melody is not in the soprano, but this prelude features four mostly equal voices in a polyphonic texture. The setting is only loosely tied to the chorale, and while the chorale melody migrates from voice to voice, there are moments when the tune is not really present, but just hinted at. Buxtehude's chorale fantasy-type chorale settings do involve a migrating cantus firmus and can appear a little bit lenient in their treatment of the chorale melody; however, this piece doesn't really look much like the typical Buxtehude chorale fantasy either.

Although originally created for choir, I adapted this work for the traditional woodwind quartet (Flute, Clarinet (Bb), Oboe and Bassoon).

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Rose and the Nightingale" for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages037 years ago3,449 views
Flute, Piano
The Rose and the Nightingale (Роза и Соловей - Roza i Solovey) was composed in 1866 by the young and not yet famous Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The composer used the words of Alexei Koltsov's poem Nightingale: Pushkin's Imitation, which was written in 1831. "The Rose and The Nightingale" was written for someone called Malvina Kyui, most likely Rimsly-Korsakov's romantic interest. The music tells the story of Nightingale, who fell in love with [a] Rose and sings to her all day and night, but [the] Rose just silently listens to his songs.

The translation of the song is, "Nightingale fell in love with Rose, and sings to her all days and nights, but Rose silently listens to his songs. Other singer plays the lyre for young maiden, but sweet maiden doesn't know, to whom he sings and why his songs are so solemn".

This is a haunting and elegant arrangement for solo Flute Acoustic Piano.
"Romance" for Flute & Piano
Video

"Romance" for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages01:457 years ago3,142 views
Flute, Piano
Arthur Honegger (March 10, 1892 – November 27, 1955) was a Swiss composer, who was born in France and lived a large part of his life in Paris. He was a member of Les Six. His most frequently performed work is probably the orchestral work Pacific 231, which imitates the sound of a steam locomotive. Honegger was widely known as a train enthusiast, and once notably said: “I have always loved locomotives passionately. For me they are living creatures and I love them as others love women or horses.”

This intimate little 'Romance' was published in 1953, two years before the end of his short life. The tempo marking is 'Andantino'. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music tells us: " Unfortunately, some composers use it (andantino) meaning a little slower than 'andante', and others as meaning a little quicker. In this score I opted for a slightly quicker (86bpm) tempo being that one of the chief difficulties for the flute, is finding the 'best' breathing places in the middle section, while respecting the composer's phrasing and expression marks.
"Romance" from Opus 36 for Flute & Piano
Video

"Romance" from Opus 36 for Flute & Piano

2 parts5 pages03:027 years ago1,733 views
This "Romance", originally composed for french horn and orchestra by Camille Saint-Saëns in 1874, has characteristics that have come to be considered typically French: elegant line and proportions scored with the utmost clarity. It is a highly compact example of Saint-Saëns' approach to composition.

Saint-Saëns composed the Romance in response to the need for original concert works for various neglected solo instruments, whose repertoires were then largely dependent on transcriptions. (He later wrote similar works for harp and flute.) The work is dedicated to the famous hornist Henri Garigue.

The Romance's moderato tempo and triple meter give it a waltz-like feel. The work's ternary form resembles a da capo aria, in that the final section is a near-literal return to the first. Considering the brevity of the piece, the main theme is rather long. It falls into two sections, both of which share the opening arching eighth note figure and a dotted idea, and, indeed, the entire rhythmic pattern. The more animated central section, marked by a wide dynamic range, develops fragments of the main theme, most notably the opening eighth note figure. Throughout the Romance, the piano is clearly subordinate to the flute, providing support for the melody.

Although originally composed for Horn and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for piano and flute to give it additional elegance and clarity. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Now pray we all God, the Comforter" (BuxWV 209) For Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:587 years ago457 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

"Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist" (BuxWV 209) was sung at Pentecost Sunday mass. The text of the chorale asks the Holy Ghost for various favors. The first verse reads as follows: "Now we ask the Holy Ghost for a righteous faith, and that he protect us up to the our end, when we travel home from this misery. Kyrieleis." Buxtehude places the chorale melody in the soprano range and ornaments it freely and elegantly. Unlike the other setting of the same chorale BuxWV 208, the ornamentation never shifts the octave placement of the melody.

Although originally created for choir, I adapted this work for the traditional woodwind quartet (Flute, Clarinet (Bb), Oboe and Bassoon).

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"In Sweet Rejoicing" (BuxWV 197) For Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages02:107 years ago621 views
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

This chorale sets the fourteenth-century macaronic hymn "In Dulci Jubilo" (Its text is both in Latin and German). The text of the first verse reads, "In sweet jollity now sing and rejoice: The delight of our heart lies in a manger and shines like the sun at his mother's breast. He is alpha and omega." The last two verses of the hymn end with the expression of the desire to have actually been there when all of this happened. Buxtehude places the hymn melody in the soprano, as he frequently does in his chorale treatments, and deploys it with liberal embellishment. When the text speaks of rejoicing, Buxtehude uses some tricks with octave displacement to paint a picture of extroverted celebration. Like the chorale prelude on Puer natus in Bethlehem, this piece is in 3/2 time.

Although originally created for as a chorale-cantata in 1683 for soprano, alto and bass accompanied by two violins and continuo (BuxWV 52) and here as a chorale prelude for organ (BuxWV 197) c. 1690, I adapted this work for a non-traditional woodwind quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn and Bassoon) to accentuate their warm rich tones.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Missa Brevis" (BuxWV 114) For Woodwind Quintet

5 parts9 pages15:297 years ago965 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637 to 1639) was a German-Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period. His organ works represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire and are frequently performed at recitals and in church services. He composed in a wide variety of vocal and instrumental idioms, and his style strongly influenced many composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude, along with Heinrich Schütz, is considered today to be one of the most important German composers of the mid-Baroque.

The commemoration of Buxtehude's death in 2007 resulted in widespread interest in his vocal works. Buxtehude left more than 120 such pieces, which is remarkable considering that as organist of St Mary's in Lübeck he was not responsible for the vocal music for the liturgy. Some of his sacred music may have been performed during the services on Sundays and feastdays, but most of it was probably intended for performance during public concerts, in particular the famous Abendmusiken.

His vocal works are written on texts in four different languages: German, Latin, Swedish and Italian. The largest proportion has a German text, but the number of pieces on a Latin text is considerable. This is not as odd as one may think. When Martin Luther reformed the liturgy he stressed the importance of the use of texts in the vernacular, but he never wanted to abolish Latin altogether. It seems there was a preference for liturgical music in Latin in St Mary's in Lübeck. An inventory of the printed music in the possession of the church shows that a large portion set Latin texts.

This traditional Protestant "Missa alla brevis" is written in the stile antico, the old style of the renaissance which was still held in high esteem in the 17th century. The surviving copy, in the Duben Collection, dates from 1675. The title refers to the longer note values and the tactus on the brevis, but also to the fact that it is a missa brevis, consisting of Kyrie and Gloria only. Although it was originally scored for five voices with basso continuo (2 sopranos, alto, tenor and bass accompanied by organ), I adapted this work for the traditional woodwind quintet (Flute, Oboe, clarinet (Bb) French Horn and Bassoon) to accentuate their warm rich tones.
"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio
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"The Flower Duet" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:207 years ago4,914 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
The Flower Duet (Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in Act 1 of the three act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river. The Hindus go to perform their rites in a sacred Brahmin temple under the high priest, Nilakantha. Nilakantha's daughter Lakmé (which derives from the Sanskrit Lakshmi) and her servant Mallika are left behind and go down to the river to gather flowers where they sing the famous "Flower Duet."

I created this simplified version of the main theme for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) to highlight as well as provide haunting undertones.
"Song of the Indian Guest" for Flute & Piano
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"Song of the Indian Guest" for Flute & Piano

2 parts4 pages03:047 years ago5,523 views
Flute, Piano
"Song of the Indian Guest" or, less accurately, "Song of India" from the Opera Sadko by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. It's sweet, peaceful and majestic.

Sadko (Russian: Садко, the name of the main character) is an opera in seven scenes by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The libretto was written by the composer, with assistance from Vladimir Belsky, Vladimir Stasov, and others. Rimsky-Korsakov was first inspired by the bīlina of Sadko in 1867, when he completed a tone poem on the subject, his Op. 5. After finishing his second revision of this work in 1892, he decided to turn it into a dramatic work. The opera was completed in 1896.

The music is highly evocative, and Rimsky-Korsakov's famed powers of orchestration are abundantly in evidence throughout the score. I created this arrangement or Flute & Acoustic Piano
Sonata No. 1 (BWV 1030) for Flute & Harpsichord
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Sonata No. 1 (BWV 1030) for Flute & Harpsichord

2 parts46 pages17:097 years ago1,871 views
The original complete collection of Bach’s works, the Bach-Gesellschaft edition, appeared in Leipzig in 46 volumes between 1851 and 1899. It was the first “complete works” edition to publish a composer's notation without deliberate editorial tampering, to include almost every composition, and to provide a critical apparatus, serving as a model for virtually every critical edition since that day. Vol. IX, with a preface dated April 1860 signed by the editor, Wilhelm Rust, contained three sonatas for flute and keyboard.

Although most of the flute sonatas by Johann Sebastian Bach pose questions of authenticity, the B minor sonata BWV 1030 is undoubtedly his own work. Of the eight existing sources of the sonata, there is a manuscript with his own signature, which leaves little room for doubt. However, there is also copy of a harpsichord part in the key of G minor which dates earlier than the signed manuscript. This raises the issue of chronology. Popular theory suggests that Bach composed most of his chamber works while he was director of Collegium Musicum (a group of musicians dedicated to the art of performance) in Leipzig from 1729-1737. Thus, it is most likely that the G minor version was composed in his first few years as director and transcribed it to B minor around 1736.

Of his flute sonatas, the B minor is one of two (the other being BWV 1032) in which the harpsichord part is fully composed. This differs from the past style of continuo, which left the keyboard player plenty of room for his/her own ornamentation. Given this, the harpsichordist acts as an equal partner to the solo flute and shares the melodic material.

The first movement, marked Andante, is the most distinctive. Its free ritornello (short recurring passages) form make for stimulating interplay between the flute and harpsichord. Another slow movement follows (Largo e dolce) and encompasses two beautifully simple themes, which serve as a release from the complexity of the first movement. The third movement (Presto--Allegro) is in two parts, beginning with a fugal presto that leads straight into a gigue-like section which is most notable for its witty syncopations and technical demands.

The B minor sonata is the greatest and most difficult of Bach's flute works. Its historical significance, technical demands and timeless beauty, bring it to the forefront of his compositions and takes the rightful place as a staple in the solo flute literature.

This is my transcription of the 3 movements (technically 4) from the 1st Sonata in B Minor (BWV 1030) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Caprice on Danish and Russian Airs" (Opus 79) for Piano and Woodwind Trio
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"Caprice on Danish and Russian Airs" (Opus 79) for Piano and Woodwind Trio

4 parts48 pages10:097 years ago1,971 views
Once described as the French Mendelssohn , Saint-Saëns was a talented and precocious child, with interests by no means confined to music. As a child he had lessons with Stamaty and Boëly, and made his debut as a pianist at the age of ten. He entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1848, where he was taught by Halévy. His extraordinary gifts won him the admiration of Gounod, Rossini, Berlioz and especially Liszt, who described him as the world’s greatest organist. He wrote on various musical, scientific and historical subjects, and tried to revive interest in older music, particularly that of J. S. Bach, Handel and Rameau. In 1871 he founded, together with Romain Bussine, the Société Nationale de Musique to revive the artistic and cultural value of French music.

This unlikely pairing of national sources is the result of the marriage of the Czar of Russia to a Danish princess, and was dedicated to the Czarina. It is a twelve-minute fantasy for flute, oboe, clarinet, and piano. It was composed in 1887, by which time the royal couple had been married for some years.

It is in four brief movements. In the opening part, all the woodwind instruments are given equal parts, participating in dialogues with each other. The second movement features the flute and soloist. The third has the oboe in the spotlight. The final movement is a lively Allegro vivace with solo passages for all the instruments, especially the clarinet.

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet
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"Funeral March of a Marionette" for Wind Quintet

5 parts8 pages04:267 years ago3,080 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Charles Gounod was born in Paris, the son of a pianist mother and an artist father. His mother was his first piano teacher. Under her tutelage, Gounod first showed his musical talents. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Fromental Halévy and Pierre Zimmermann.

Gounod wrote "Funeral march of a marionette" as a light-hearted piece of musical grotesquerie, a mock funeral procession with a jaunty beat and a carefree tune over a humorously not-slow-enough funeral march. The music in the beginning is supposed to tell the listener that two of the members of the Marionette troupe have had a duel and one of them has been killed. A party of pallbearers is organized and the procession sets out for the cemetery in march time. The music soon takes on a more cheerful spirit, for some of the troupe, wearied with the march, seek consolation at a wayside inn, where they refresh themselves and also descant upon the many virtues of their late companion. At last they get into place again and the procession enters the cemetery to the march rhythm -- the whole closing with the bars intended to reflect upon the briefness and weariness of life, even for marionettes.

The "Funeral March of a Marionette", received a new and unexpected lease of life from 1955 when it was first used as the theme for the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. The "Funeral March of a Marionette," slight as it is, has never lost its charm. It was originally written as one of the movements of a Suite Burlesque, which was never completed.

Although originally written for Piano, this arrangement was created for Wind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).
"Dance of the Blessed Spirits" for Flute and Piano
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"Dance of the Blessed Spirits" for Flute and Piano

2 parts4 pages06:027 years ago15,323 views
Flute, Piano
The "Orfeo ed Euridice" (Orpheus and Eurydice) is an opera composed by Christoph Willibald Gluck based on the myth of Orpheus and set to a libretto by Ranieri de' Calzabigi.

Gluck's "Orfeo and Euredice", one of the turning points in the history of opera, received its premiere in Vienna on 5th October 1762. "Beautiful simplicity" was the phrase used by Gluck and his librettist Ranieri de Calzabigi for what they had set out to achieve, and the work without doubt offered the clearest challenge yet seen or heard to the moribund conventions of Italian "opera seria". Musically it proved to be a work of unparalleled directness, concise in its effects, plain in its speech, overwhelming in its impact.

The subject of the opera is the Orpheus of Greek mythology, the famous poet and singer who could charm wild animals with his music. When his wife Euradice died he followed her to Hades and won her back by his art with the condition that he should not look at her until he reached the world again. (He did, with predictably disastrous consequences!)

The Dance of the Blessed Spirits occurs in Act 2 of the opera, and consists of a 'roundelay' for strings with two flutes floating above the melody, a tune which nobody who has once heard it is likely to forget. The calm contemplative beauty of the Elysian Fields is perfectly captured by this music which is both tranquil yet at the same time seems to be somehow threaded with melancholy.

Although originally written for opera, this arrangement highlights the haunting elegance of the flute.

"The Church's One Foundation" (Aurelia) for Flute and Piano

2 parts2 pages03:207 years ago1,734 views
Dr. Samuel Sebastian Wesley was born 14th August 1810 in London. His grandfather was the famous Charles Wesley.

One of eighteen children, Charles lived to his 80th birthday. After studying at Oxford he became a minister, college tutor and in 1729 started the Methodist Church with his older brother John. In 1735 he sailed over to the American colony for a short time and became secretary to the Governor of Georgia.

In 1738, in England as a travelling preacher, he married, started a family and began writing hymns. He wrote continuously until he died (dictating the last lines of a poem on his deathbed), and is reputed to have written around 6,000 hymns, which equates to a new one every three days.

Samuel John Stone was born in Whitmore, Staffordshire, England, in 1839. Following his graduation from Oxford, he spent most of his remaining ministry in just two parishes in London, where he was affectionately known as the poor man’s pastor. Here his time was spent in ministering to the poor and underprivileged populace in the East End of London, where it was said “he created a beautiful place of worship for the humble folk, and made it a center of light in the dark places.” Stone was known as a man of spotless character; he was compassionate toward the weak and needy, yet he was a violent fighter for the fundamentals of the faith that was being so sternly attacked in his day.

The "The Church's One Foundation" (Aurelia hymn) was a one born of conflict. This is not a subjective "feel good" hymn. The author Samuel John Stone was contending for the
historic Christian faith against the "liberals" or "modernists" of his day. That is why the hymn (as it appears in the book) speaks against the "False sons and traitors."

I created this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) for Flute and Piano and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Menuet et Valse" (Opus 56) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts6 pages03:437 years ago759 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon(2)
Camille Saint-Saëns was born in Paris, France, on 9 October 1835. His father, a government clerk, died three months after his birth. He was raised by his mother, Clémence, with the assistance of her aunt, Charlotte Masson, who moved in. Masson introduced Saint-Saëns to the piano, and began giving him lessons on the instrument. At about this time, age two, Saint-Saëns was found to possess perfect pitch.

"Menuet et Valse" (Opus 56) is an excellent concert work composed in 1878 for solo piano. In this the composer has very cleverly joined a minuet of classical style to a brilliant modern waltz.

Although originally written for Piano, I adapted this minuet to a non-standard Woodwind quartet (Flute, Oboe, Basoon and Contrabasoon) to cover the entire range of the modern piano as well as highlight the delicate tempo and pitch depth.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) and using the Bassoon and Contrabasoon soundfont from SoundFont Downloads at (http://www.soundfontdownloads.com).
"Sicilienne" (Opus 78) for Flute and Piano
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"Sicilienne" (Opus 78) for Flute and Piano

2 parts5 pages02:526 years ago19,164 views
Flute, Piano
The "Sicilienne" is among Gabriel Fauré's most familiar pieces; it began life as an orchestral sketch in March 1893, intended as incidental music for a revival of Molière's Le Bourgeois gentilhomme at Paul Porel's Eden-Théâtre. Left incomplete as that establishment went bankrupt, Fauré rounded it off and arranged it for cello and piano only in 1898, even as he passed the score along to his pupil Charles Koechlin to orchestrate as an item in the incidental music for a London production of Maeterlinck's Pelléas et Mélisande, where it introduces the scene at the beginning of Act Two, in which Mélisande's wedding ring slips from her finger and disappears into a well as she plays gently with Pelléas -- a use for which it seems predestined. In this form it was first heard with the play's opening at the Prince of Wales' Theatre on June 21, 1898, with Fauré conducting. Given its effectiveness, it was inevitable that Fauré should have included it among the four numbers of his Pelléas et Mélisande Suite, heard for the first time on December 1, 1912, conducted by André Messager. The common practice of publishers in issuing multiple arrangements of works likely to catch on -- for piano, or piano and solo instrument -- ensured that the Sicilienne's lilting wistfulness would become known around the world in the version for cello and piano, published in London by Metzler and Hamelle in Paris in 1898. Like a zephyr, the Sicilienne, with its hypnotically fluid melody carried, as it were, on waves of soothing arpeggiation, evokes a mood of mildly delirious nostalgia. If all music, as Vladimir Jankélévitch has remarked, is nostalgic in a certain manner, the Sicilienne is nostalgic music par excellence, for it embodies a truly existential, or perhaps mysterious, yearning for some undefined, imagined place, a Sicily in the luxuriant realm of dreams.

Although originally written for Cello and Piano, I transcribed his work for Flute and Piano.
"Pavane" (Opus 50) for Flute and Piano
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"Pavane" (Opus 50) for Flute and Piano

2 parts6 pages056 years ago15,076 views
Flute, Piano
The "Pavane" in F# minor, Op. 50, is a composition by the French composer Gabriel Fauré, written in 1887. It was originally a piano piece, but is better known in Fauré's version for orchestra and optional chorus. Obtaining its rhythm from the slow processional Spanish court dance of the same name, the Pavane ebbs and flows from a series of harmonic and melodic climaxes, conjuring a cool, somewhat haunting, Belle Époque elegance.

The original version of the Pavane was written for piano in the late 1880s. The composer described it as "elegant, but not otherwise important." Fauré intended it to be played more briskly than it has generally come to be performed in its more familiar orchestral guise.

Since its premiere in 1888, Gabriel Fauré ’s Pavane Op. 50 has been an enormously popular piece of classical music. Its beautiful main melody, evocative harmonies and effective orchestration create a very stirring and infectious work, which is why it has become such a favourite with audiences and is so frequently heard time and time again. It was used as the theme to the 1998 World Cup, and has also been the basis for various popular music songs, such as Charlotte Church’s "Dream a Dream".

Although originally written for Piano and later Orchestra, I arranged his work for Flute and Piano.

"Capriccio" from Partita 2 (BWV 826) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts8 pages02:376 years ago1,110 views
The Partitas, BWV 825–830, are a set of six Harpsichord suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach, published from 1726 to 1730 as Clavier-Übung I, and the first of his works to be published under his direction. They were, however, among the last of his keyboard suites to be composed, the others being the 6 English Suites, BWV 806-811 and the 6 French Suites, BWV 812-817.

I created this unique arrangement of the "Capriccio" (movement 6) of Partita No.2 in C minor, (BWV 826) for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Pavane" (from Étienne Marcel) for Flute and Piano
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"Pavane" (from Étienne Marcel) for Flute and Piano

2 parts5 pages02:046 years ago1,740 views
For much of the 19th century any new opera performed at the Paris Opéra was required to include a ballet sequence, usually during the second Act, something that famously caused Wagner considerable difficulty when Tannhäuser was staged there in 1861. For a fastidious composer like Saint-Saëns the production of engaging and wonderfully melodic divertissements was no problem.

From the long forgotten grand opera ‘Etienne Marcel’ with its patriotic and revolutionary themes of six dances from the third act including the "Pavane". Tchaikovsky had a low opinion of this opera and in a letter to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, wrote, “it is a completely insignificant, even undistinguished work. It's banal, dry, boring, shameless, and without any character.” Whilst that damming critique may be true of the opera as a whole it could hardly be levelled at these lively dances that even include a ‘Valse’ worthy of Tchaikovsky himself.

The pavane, pavan, paven, pavin, pavian, pavine, or pavyn is a slow processional dance common in Europe during the 16th century (Renaissance). The Pavane is taken from act III of the Etienne Marcel and although originally written as an opera with orchestra, this arrangement for flute and piano was made by the famous French flutist Paul Taffanel and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Romance" (Opus 37) for Flute & Harp
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"Romance" (Opus 37) for Flute & Harp

2 parts15 pages06:356 years ago4,939 views
One can hardly imagine a less likely memento of the Franco-Prussian War and its grisly aftermath than the sweetly yearning Romance for flute and piano in D flat.

Inevitably, Saint-Saëns composed other pieces specifically alluding to those events -- a cantata, Chants de guerre, for instance, recomposed as the orchestral Marche héroïque (1871) -- but it is the Romance that has proven evergreen. News of the French defeat at Sedan reached Paris on September 3, 1870. With his fellow composers Bizet, Duparc, d'Indy, Fauré, Widor -- to name the most prominent -- Saint-Saëns joined the National Guard (Fourth Seine Battalion) and served during the Siege of Paris, which ended with an armistice on January 28, 1871, and the Germans' triumphal parade down the Champs Elysées on March 1.

Toward the end of that bleak January, Saint-Saëns' close friend, the talented painter Henri Regnault, was killed by a stray German bullet. Redressing French humiliation -- culturally, at least -- Saint-Saëns and Conservatoire professor Romain Bussine met with Duparc at the latter's apartment February 25 to establish the Société Nationale de Musique, under the rubric "Ars Gallica," for the performance and promotion of French music. With the German withdrawal, a new revolutionary contingent within the French populace defied the Republican government and established the Paris Commune on March 18.

Knowing that the anti-bourgeois Commune did not speak for him, Saint-Saëns decamped on the last train to leave Paris for the Channel. On a visit to London in 1880 he was to play before Queen Victoria, but in 1871 he arrived a penniless émigré. Meanwhile, before or during his flight he completed the Romance in D flat -- the manuscript is dated March 25, 1871 -- lending a new facet to anecdotes of his famed facility. In May, as the Republic moved to crush the Commune, the Communards arrested and shot the Archbishop of Paris with Abbé Duguerry of the Madeleine, where Saint-Saëns was organist. By May 28 the Commune was over and Saint-Saëns returned to Paris in time for Duguerry's funeral. The Société Nationale gave its first concert in November, and the Romance received its première at an SNM concert in the Salle Pleyel with renowned flutist Paul Taffanel accompanied by Saint-Saëns on April 6, 1872. By 1878 the composer had scored the work for orchestra. In either version, the Romance has remained a repertoire staple, affording a winning epitome of Saint-Saëns' characteristic mixture of elegant melancholy with brilliance in easily graspable lied form, the caressing first and final strains enclosing a more animated elegy.

Although originally created for Flute and Piano, I created this orchestral harp arrangement to highlight the light and airy arpeggios (the word comes from the Italian word "arpeggiare" , which means "to play on a harp"). It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Locus Iste" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:366 years ago910 views
Josef Anton Bruckner was born on September 4, 1824 in the upper Austrian town of Ansfelden. His father was a schoolteacher and church organist, and Bruckner's initial studies followed similar lines. When Bruckner was 13, his father died, and he enrolled in the church school at St. Florian (some ten miles from Linz) as a chorister. There, he studied organ, piano, and music theory.

Bruckner's thirty-odd motets are often ignored but they are a crucial part of his compositional output. They express his devout Roman Catholic beliefs, using the modal chords and long, Gregorian chant-like lines of the Renaissance masters. But the harmonic shifts and compositional techniques display a clearly Romantic sensibility, and the blocks of contrasting sound display Bruckner's roots as an organ improviser.

A typical Mass service draws its musical texts from two sources: a group of texts that are repeated at every service (the "Ordinary") and a group of texts whose meaning is specifically applicable to that week or that service (the "Propers", which include graduals, antiphons, and responsories).

The gradual Locus iste is used in Mass services for the dedication of a church; the sacrament is a visible manifestation of God's invisible grace. This setting in four parts was written in 1869, to celebrate the dedication of the votive chapel of the cathedral at Linz. It is in a simple but spare three-section setting, with exposition and similar recapitulation separated by an imitative three-part section on the text "irreprehensibilis est" (it is blameless, or without reproof).

Although originally written for Organ and Choir, I adapted this piece to a non-standard Woodwind quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and English Horn) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software.

Rondo from the Sonata Concertante (Opus 113) for Harp and Flute

2 parts24 pages06:406 years ago795 views
Violinist, teacher, and composer Louis Spohr (1784 - 1859) was described by Paganini, no less, as "The most outstanding singer on the violin." One of the leading virtuosos of his era, Spohr was a man of exceptional stature (physically, as well as morally and intellectually—he stood over six feet six inches in height), and as a liberal-minded freemason he was noted for his nobility of thought and deed. By his own admission, however, Spohr had been "from earliest youth, very susceptible to female beauty," and in 1805 (soon after he had become director of music to the Court at Gotha), he became infatuated with the brilliant and beautiful young harpist Dorette Scheidler, the talented daughter of one of the court singers. Scheidler became Spohr's wife in February 1806. Spohr's series of sonatas and other pieces for violin and harp were written for the couple to play together. Each work employed an ingenious solution to the outwardly ill-matched registral characteristics of the instruments. Spohr realized that the range in which the violin sounded most effective was, coincidentally, that which suited the harp least of all. He overcame this problem by stipulating that the harp should be tuned a semitone below regular concert pitch (in a flat key), while the violin was pitched a semitone below the harp part so that (as in this case) a harp part written in E flat major equated with a violin part in the key of D. The Sonata Concertante, Op. 113 (written in 1805 but published much later), was in fact the first work in which this novel solution was used. The piece comprises three movements and lasts around 20 minutes in all.

This is the finale, in Rondo form (Allegretto) and deploys several carefree and affable melodies, again shared on more or less equal terms between both instruments. Although originally written for violin, I createdthis arrangement for Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes
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"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes

3 parts4 pages02:216 years ago4,440 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Carrickfergus" is an Irish folk song, named after the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, "Do bhí bean uasal" ("There Was a Noblewoman"), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in County Clare.

The song appears on a ballad sheet in Cork City in the mid Nineteenth Century in macaronic form.

I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Concert (Pedal) or Celtic Harp.

"The Lark in the Clear Air" for Harp, Flute & Cello

3 parts5 pages01:146 years ago1,614 views
This Traditional Irish tune is also known as “Caisléan U, Néill” in Ireland, which means “O'Neill's Castle” in English. As regards the title “The Lark in the Clear Air”, it comes from a poem by Samuel Ferguson (1810–1886).

I created this arrangement for Harp, Flute & Cello to bring the rich depth of the cello for serenity, the high pich of the flute as the Lark and the harp to provide a soothing mantra.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet
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"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:046 years ago6,854 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, this piece has been adapted to the standard Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) configuration.

"Red is the Rose" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts6 pages02:556 years ago4,759 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lomond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song (Roud No. 9598). It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland.

This is the Irish variant of the song called "Red Is the Rose" and is sung with the same melody but different (although similarly themed) lyrics. It was popularized by Irish folk musician Tommy Makem. Even though many people mistakenly believe that Makem wrote "Red is the Rose", it is a traditional Irish folk song.

There remains today a general debate is which is older "Red Is The Rose" or "Loch Lomond", because one clearly borrowed the other's tune. To date, no one has found the answer, but Some of "older" Irish singers swear that "Red Is The Rose" is the original. Others in Scotland respond that tune had been well known in Scotland since the middle of the 18th century as "Kind Robin Lo'es Me". I do not know.

I created this arrangement for Flute Duet & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Pavan on 4 Notes" For Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages01:526 years ago1,164 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Alfonso Ferrabosco (1543 - 1588) was from a Bolognese musical family, but served intermittently between 1562 and 1578 in the court of Elizabeth 1. He is known as a composer of both vocal and instrumental work including lute music and music for the bandora. His half dozen known (or attributed) compositions represent a fair proportion of the surviving solo repertory for the instrument and the following are two of his bandora pieces.

Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger (b. Greenwich, c. 1575; bur. Greenwich, March 11, 1628) was an English composer and viol player of Italian descent. He straddles the line between the Renaissance and Baroque eras. He was the illegitimate son of the Italian composer Alfonso Ferrabosco the Elder. His mother might have been Susanna Symons, whom Alfonso the elder later married. Ferrabosco the younger was left under the guardianship of Gomer van Awsterwyke, a member of the queen's court. Although Alfonso the elder asked for Alfonso the younger to be sent to him in Italy, where he had moved with his wife, the queen insisted that he stay in England. Ferrabosco remained in Gomer van Awsterwyke's care until his death in 1592. At this time he started a long career as a court musician, including as the private music tutor of Prince Henry.

Although created for Chorus, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Here the Deities Approve" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts5 pages03:126 years ago1,231 views
Oboe, Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon
"Welcome to all the pleasures" is the earliest of the three Odes written by Henry Purcell, and the smallest in scale.

An organization called ‘The Musical Society’ commissioned Purcell to set Christopher Fishburn’s libretto for their first celebration of St Cecilia’s Day in 1683. The event proved popular, for Purcell’s setting of the Ode was published the next year, and the Musical Society had to move to larger premises for its next celebration, although they did not call on Purcell again until 1692 when he produced Hail! bright Cecilia.

For the 1683 occasion the youthful Purcell, only twenty-four at the time, produced a work of great freshness, notable amongst many features for its wonderfully original string ritornelli with which he concludes many of the vocal sections. The work also produced one particularly successful alto solo over a ground bass, ‘Here the Deities approve’ (which moves into a most elegant string ritornello) published separately in 1689 under the title ‘A new Ground’ in the second part of Musick’s Hand-Maid.

Fishburn’s text gave the composer an opportunity for gentle word-setting at ‘Beauty, thou scene of love’, and Purcell obliged with a movement given first to a solo tenor (with a delicious, and maybe slightly malicious, discord at the mention of the lute), and then taken up by the string ensemble. Unusually, Purcell employs a quiet ending to the work, with the texture of the last line of music ‘Iô Cecilia’ fading away to leave just the bass instruments and singers to conclude the Ode.

Although originally written for Choir, I adapted this piece to a non-standard Woodwind quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and English Horn).

Sonata in 7 Parts for Wind Septet

5 parts13 pages06:146 years ago730 views
Leopold I, who ruled Austria from 1658 to 1705, supported a large musical staff at the Imperial Palace in Vienna. Leopold was himself a musician and composer who enjoyed large musical spectacles. Many masses, requiems, and magnificats, as well as music for court ceremonies and festivals were scored to include large brass ensembles. The fact that competant wind and brass players were retained by the Emperor on a full time basis to provide music for many diverse functions is shown by employment records which have been preserved to this day. Johann Heinrich Schmelzer served at Leopold's court from 1649 until his death in 1680. During that period he rose from a chamber musician (violinist) to Capelmeister. As a composer Schmelzer contributed both sacred and secular music for the Emperor's musical ensembles. His works include religious instrumental and vocal pieces, instrumental chamber compositions, and music for open-air festivals, such as the Royal Equestrian Ballets. The present edition is based on a manuscript in the castle archives of Kromeriz, Czechoslovakia, where Prince-Bishop Karl Liechtenstein-Castelcorn of Olmlitz maintained a fine court orchestra and chorus. The prince is also known to have borrowed composers from his Emperor in Vienna. Robert S. Tennyson The American University December, 1976.

Although originally written for 7 Flutes (Recorders), this arrangement for wind Septet highlights the subtle dynamics and charactistics of the wood pieces. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"In Vain the Amorous Flute" for Harp and Flutes

3 parts9 pages06:216 years ago872 views
Henry Purcell's ode Hail! Bright Cecilia is a celebratory work comprised of masterful instrumental sections, majestic and ingenious choruses, and varied solos, duets and trios. It was composed in 1692 for performance on St. Cecilia's Day (November 22) at an annual celebration to honor the patron saint of music. Odes are secular works, similar in form to cantatas, which were particularly popular in 17th century England. They commemorated civic and state occasions such as royal birthdays, marriages, or even the king's return from a holiday. Purcell's work is a great hymn of praise to music. The text, written by Nicholas Brady, honors St. Cecilia, her gift of music, and all the various musical instruments at her command.

"In vain the amorous flutes" begins with a short instrumental segment of flutes and continuo. An alto and tenor alternate the melodic material and weave it together over the instruments. "The fife and the harmony of war" is introduced by dramatic trumpet calls and drums, followed by the alto, who picks up the theme.

Although originally written for Flutes and Continuo, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and 2 Flutes and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Chaconne" for Flutes and Harp

3 parts5 pages02:336 years ago958 views
Henry Purcell (1659 - 1695), was an English organist and Baroque composer of secular and sacred music. Although Purcell incorporated Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, his legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music.

A chaconne (Italian: ciaccona) is a type of musical composition popular in the baroque era when it was much used as a vehicle for variation on a repeated short harmonic progression, often involving a fairly short repetitive bass-line (ground bass) which offered a compositional outline for variation, decoration, figuration and melodic invention. In this it closely resembles the Passacaglia.

The ground bass, if there is one, may typically descend stepwise from the tonic to the dominant pitch of the scale, the harmonies given to the upper parts may emphasize the circle of fifths or a derivative pattern thereof.

Although originally written for Flutes and Continuo, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and 2 Flutes and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"In These Delightful Pleasant Groves" for Harp & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts4 pages01:426 years ago764 views
Henry Purcell (ca.1659 - 1695), was an English composer. Although incorporating Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, Purcell's legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music. He is generally considered to be one of the greatest English composers; no other native-born English composer approached his fame until Edward Elgar.

Taken from the incidental music to Shadwell’s play "The Libertine" or "The Libertine Destroyed", Purcell's original choral piece "In these delightful pleasant groves" is a genuine highlight of British choral music of the baroque period with its lively exuberance of dance and his onomatopoeic effects.

He died in 1695 at the height of his powers; he was only in his mid-thirties. He breathed his last at his house in Dean's Yard, Westminster, leaving a widow and three living children (three others predeceased him). His widow died in 1706, having published a number of his works, including the now famous collection called Orpheus Britannicus (two books, 1698 and 1702).

Although originally written for Chorus and Basso continuo, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Hark! How the Songsters of the Grove" for Harp and Woodwinds

3 parts5 pages01:416 years ago529 views
The flute (recorder) has long been used to imitate birds in music, as many of the references to Purcell and Handel and their contemporaries demonstrate. Lines like "Hark how the songsters of the air", "Hark how the lark and linnet sing", "Hark! how the songsters of the grove", "Hush ye pretty warbling quire" say it all.

Henry Purcell's "Timon of Athens" (1694) calls for "a Symphony of Pipes [ie alto recorders] imitating the Chirping of Birds".

Although originally written for Chorus and Recorders, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwinds (2 Flutes & 2 Oboes) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Fantaisie-Impromptu" (Opus 66) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Fantaisie-Impromptu" (Opus 66) for Flute & Harp

2 parts13 pages04:416 years ago4,097 views
Flute, Harp
Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-sharp minor (Opus 66), is a solo piano composition and one of his best-known pieces. It was composed in 1834 and dedicated to Julian Fontana, who published the piece in spite of Chopin's request not to do so.

In the original pioan version, the piece uses many cross-rhythms (the right hand plays sixteenth notes against the left hand playing triplets) and a ceaselessly moving note figuration and is in cut time (2/2). It concludes in an ambiguous fantasy-like ending, in a quiet and mysterious way, playing the first few notes of the moderato section theme, while continuing with the sixteenth notes (semiquavers). The piece resolves and gently ends on a C-sharp major rolled chord.

Although originally composed for solo Piano, I adapted his work for flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Sei gegrüßet, Jesu gütig" (BWV 768) for Woodwind Quartet
Custom audio

"Sei gegrüßet, Jesu gütig" (BWV 768) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts13 pages09:286 years ago1,507 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
The terms "Partita diverse," "partite diverse," "chorale partite," and "chorale variations" are fairly interchangeable and refer to a set of variations on a church chorale prelude or organ chorale. These, in turn, are terms that refer to a solo organ presentation of a Lutheran chorale melody (in whole or in part), rooted in the idea of playing the melody of a hymn before the congregation was to sing it, in order to familiarize them with the tune. Church organists of Bach's caliber often improvised on these familiar chorale themes and sometimes preserved their improvisations as sets of variations.

Bach left four sets of chorale variations that are fully accepted as his, of which this one is the largest, best integrated, and most comprehensive in the variety of variation techniques and textures that it employs. The first three sets are all relatively early works. The final set of chorale variations, the Canonic Variations on "Vom Himmel hoch," was written quite late in Bach's life.

The exact timing of composition of this and the other early chorale partitas causes lively discussion among Bach scholars. The first two might have been written when he worked in Lüneberg when he was between 15 and 17 years old and had a chance to work with Georg Böhm, a composer prolific in the chorale variation genre. Others point to the fine part-writing and motivic development that developed later in Bach's career. The style is consistent with compositions written in Arnstadt and Mühlhausen, where Bach worked until 1708, when he entered the service of Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Saxe-Weimar. Some scholars point out that Bach was known to write music in the style of this partita during his Weimar years.

For the purpose of this arrangement, I chose 6 of the 11 variations that lent themselves to adaptation for woodwind quartet. I took some creative license with the parts as necessary to remain playable within the ranges of the respective instruments.

Although written for organ, I arranged this piece for a non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn and Bassoon).

"Christmas Oratorio" (BWV 248) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages04:476 years ago2,675 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the aria "Bereite dich, Zion" (Prepare yourself, Sion) for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon).

Adagio from the Easter Oratorio (BWV 249 No. 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages03:246 years ago932 views
Flute, Harp
The Easter Oratorio (BWV 249) is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, beginning with Kommt, eilet und laufet ("Come, hasten and run"). Bach composed it in Leipzig and first performed it
on 1 April 1725.

The first version of the work was completed as a cantata for Easter Sunday in Leipzig on 1 April 1725, then under the title Kommt, gehet und eilet. It was named "oratorio" and given the
new title only in a version revised in 1735. In a later version in the 1740s the third movement was expanded from a duet to a four-part chorus. The work is based on a secular cantata, the
so-called Shepherd Cantata Entfliehet, verschwindet, entweichet, ihr Sorgen, BWV 249a which is now lost, although the libretto survives. Its author is Picander who is also likely the
author of the oratorio's text. The work is opened by two instrumental movements that are probably taken from a concerto of the Köthen period. It seems possible that the third movement is
based on the concerto's finale.

Unlike the Christmas Oratorio, the Easter Oratorio has no narrator but has four characters assigned to the four voice parts: Simon Peter (tenor) and John the Apostle (bass), appearing in
the first duet hurrying to Jesus' grave and finding it empty, meeting there Mary Magdalene (alto) and "the other Mary", Mary Jacobe (soprano). The choir was present only in the final
movement until a later performance in the 1740s when the opening duet was set partly for four voices. The music is festively scored for three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, oboe d'amore,
bassoon, two recorders, transverse flute, two violins, viola and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Adagio for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Dawning of the Day" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:176 years ago1,713 views
"The Dawning of the Day" (Irish: "Fáinne Gael an Lae") is an old Irish air composed by the blind harpist Thomas Connellan in the 17th Century.

An Irish-language song with this name (Fáinne Gael an Lae) was published by Edward Walsh (1805-1850) in 1847 in Irish Popular Songs and later translated into English as The Dawning of the Day.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (second flute optional) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

The melody of this song was used by Irish poet Patrick Kavanagh to his poem, "Raglan Road".

"Bonnie Kellswater" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages01:216 years ago765 views
This is a popular irish melody of unknown origin however, "Kellswater" is a hamlet near to the village of Kells in Northern Ireland. The name of the hamlet comes from the nearby Kells Water.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flute and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Meeting of the Waters" for Harp, Flute & Oboe
Video

"Meeting of the Waters" for Harp, Flute & Oboe

3 parts5 pages02:366 years ago1,508 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
"The Meeting of the Waters" is a wonderful song that conjures up a sense of warmth and friendship and links them to a beautiful location. The words were written by Thomas Moore, one of the greatest Irish poets and songwriters of all time. Moore wrote numerous songs which have become Irish classics such as The Minstrel Boy, The Last Rose of Summer, and Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms.

Moore wrote the lyrics to "The Meeting of the Waters" in 1807 and only later set it to an old Irish melody with the rather curious title, "The Old Head of Denni"s.

The Meeting of the Waters is the name of a well known beauty spot in the Vale of Avoca in Co Wicklow in Ireland. As the name suggests, it’s the place where two rivers – the Avonmore and the Avonbeg – meet and flow into each other and form the River Avoca.

There are actually two spots in Avoca where the two rivers meet. One is at Woodenbridge and one is at Castle Howard. This led to some debate when the song was first published as to which spot was the subject of the song.

Moore cleared up the confusion in a letter to his friend Lord John Russell saying: “I believe the scene under Castle Howard was the one which suggested the song to me.”

It’s not hard to see why Moore was enchanted by the scene and felt inspired to write his song. It was, and still remains, beautiful and idyllic. However, it’s not just the natural beauty of the scene that gives the song its power and its appeal; it’s the evocation of love and friendship.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp, Flute & Oboe.

"The Young Prince & Princess" for Flute & Piano

2 parts2 pages02:036 years ago3,388 views
Flute, Piano
As far as stories go, it's hard to top Nikolai Rimsky Korsakov's Scheherazade. It's a treasure trove—a story about one of history's greatest storytellers and the tales she weaves.

Scheherazade is the young bride of the Sultan. After one of his wives cheats on him, he decides to take a new wife every day and have her executed the next morning. But it all stops with Scheherazade. She marries the Sultan in order to save all future young women from this fate. She tells the Sultan fascinating stories, leaving him in such suspense each night that he can't execute her the next morning for fear of not hearing the end of the story. After 1,001 of these well-told tales, the Sultan relents.

Rimsky-Korsakov wrote Scheherazade (a symphonic suite) in the summer of 1888. The piece opens with the Sultan, a big and burly theme (audio) filled with gravitas and ego, almost saying "Here I am, strong and powerful. What do you have to say for yourself?"

The main love story in Scheherazade is found in this, the third movement, called "The Young Prince and the Young Princess." Although originally written for Orchestra, I created this simplified adaptation for Flute and Piano as a recital piece.
"Après un Rêve" (Opus 7 No. 1) for Flute & Piano
Video

"Après un Rêve" (Opus 7 No. 1) for Flute & Piano

2 parts3 pages02:436 years ago2,093 views
Flute, Piano
Trois mélodies is a set of mélodies for solo voice and piano, by Gabriel Fauré. It is composed of Après un rêve (Op. 7, No. 1), one of Faure's most popular vocal pieces, Hymne (Op. 7, No. 2), and Barcarolle (Op. 7, No. 3). The songs were written between 1870 and 1878.

In "Après un rêve", a dream of romantic elopement with a lover, away from darkness, and towards an awakening light is described. However, the dreamer longs to return to the "mysterious night". The text of the poem is an anonymous Italian poem freely adapted into French by Romain Bussine.

This piece is the first in the series of three and has been adapted to Piano and Flute.

"Hymne" (Opus 7 No. 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts9 pages02:066 years ago584 views
Trois mélodies is a set of mélodies for solo voice and piano, by Gabriel Fauré. It is composed of Après un rêve (Op. 7, No. 1), one of Faure's most popular vocal pieces, Hymne (Op. 7, No. 2), and Barcarolle (Op. 7, No. 3). The songs were written between 1870 and 1878.

"Hymne" is set to a poem by Charles Baudelaire. The meaning of the text follows Baudelaire's ongoing theme of paradox: the spirituality of what is sensual and the sensuality of what is sanctified. Fauré's setting of the text centers subtly around this idea. Hymne, just like Après un rêve, retains an ethereal mood. The unchanged harmonic motion after "Forever hail!" indicates the entrance to the untroubled world of spirituality. After the word "sel" which literally means salt but in this case refers figuratively to something engaging, the harmony begins to change. Under a soft, but highly chromatic piano line the stanza about "incorruptible love" brings the song to a dramatic climax. After this stint, the piece returns to its tranquil state; however, the piece does end with the melody's tonic note and the piano's leading tone clashing for a stunning effect.

This piece is the second in the series of three and I created this arrangement for Harp and Flute. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Spleen" (Opus 51 No. 3) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:106 years ago640 views
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

As a young man Fauré had been very cheerful; a friend wrote of his "youthful, even somewhat child-like, mirth." From his thirties he suffered bouts of depression, which he described as "spleen", possibly first caused by his broken engagement and his lack of success as a composer.

After receiving La Croix de Guerre as a young man for army service in the Franco-Prussian War, Fauré returned to Paris in 1871 to be assistant organist and accompanist to the choir at Saint-Sulpice, then later at the Madeleine Church - again following in Saint Saëns footsteps. Following a series of misunderstandings, the fraught and fragile engagement to his beloved Marianne Viardot was broken and he married Marie Fremiet. This was a rather unhappy marriage, as it transpired, but he remained married to Marie for the rest of his life in spite of his relationships with other women.

They had two sons and to support his family, Fauré supplemented his church income by teaching piano and harmony - composing during summer holidays but making very little money from it as his publisher bought the works and their outright copyrights for a mere fifty francs each. In the 1880s, after these tribulations, the previously cheerful Fauré became prone to bouts of depression. Described by him as 'spleen', this is reflected in many of his songs. Disappointed, self critical and uncompromising, he destroyed many of his works during this period. 

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp to accentuate the sorrow and unhappiness. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Le Moucheron" for Flute & Oboe

2 parts3 pages01:576 years ago549 views
François Couperin (1668-1733) was certainly the greatest of the French claveinists and surely one of the greatest of French composers. In his four books of Pièces de clavecin, Couperin took the harpsichord music of Chambonnières, Marchand, and especially his uncle Louis Couperin to the pinnacle of the French musical art with clear forms, graceful melodies, elegant harmonies, and a tone that eschews virtuosity in favor of expressivity. The six ordres or suites from Couperin's second book are no longer the series of stylized dance movements in diverse keys familiar from his first book, but rather collections of works more often than not bearing some sort of descriptive title, all of which are in the same key (with the major and minor modes being considered in some sense equivalent).

"Le Moucheron" (the Gnat) is number 8 of his harpsichord collection, Deuxieme Livre, Ordre Six, published in 1717 by François Couperin and captures the essence of the flying, annoying gnat.

Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Flute and Oboe, allowing the musicians to "duel" as gnats in a dynamic point-counterpoint epic battle! It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Au Bord de L'eau" (Opus 8 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages026 years ago640 views
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

Fauré is regarded as one of the masters of the French art song, or mélodie. His devotion to the mélodie spans his career, from the ever-fresh "Le papillon et la fleur" of 1861 to the masterly cycle L'horizon chimérique, composed sixty years and more than a hundred songs later. Fauré's songs are now core repertoire for students and professionals, sung in conservatories and recital halls throughout the world.

The first volume of Fauré 3 songs is called "Au bord de l'eau" (by the water's edge) -- a reference to the French master's fondness for aquatic, nautical, and natural subjects in poetry, as well as to the title of one of his most famous songs. Having decided against a purely chronological survey of Fauré's songs, an approach that would have progressed from the lyrical outpourings of the composer's youth to the much thornier works of his later years.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fantaisie sur des thèmes de Händel et Abbé Vogler" (Opus 118) for Flute & Harp

2 parts38 pages12:516 years ago671 views
Louis Spohr (1784-1859) was born in Brunswick Germany and his father was an amateur flutist. In his early years he studied harp but, later changing to violin. In 1860, He married the harpist Dorette Scheidler, who fascinated him by her virtuosic playing. His preoccupation with harp and violin led to the decision to tune the harp a semitone lower. Thus it was possible to play together with the violin in her preferred tonalities without using the harps pedals.

During his lifetime he was more famous than Beethoven or Schumann and supported Wagner by playing the Fliegende Holländer in Kassel. His fame being a violin virtuoso was only topped by Paganini.

Although "Fantaisie sur des thèmes de Händel et Abbé Vogler" was originally written for Harp and Violin, there were problems with the manuscript in the public domain archive therefore, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Adagio Variation" (BWV 593) for Woodwind Quartet
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"Adagio Variation" (BWV 593) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts4 pages02:276 years ago1,217 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
It was in the early 1710s, in the middle of his days in Weimar, that J.S. Bach first became acquainted with Antonio Vivaldi's remarkable instrumental concertos; they would prove to have a tremendous influence not only upon Bach's own instrumental concertos, but also upon his style as a whole. One of the ways that Bach learned and absorbed new music was by making adaptations and transcriptions of it. So he did with many Vivaldi concertos during his Weimar residency, recrafting them, along with concertos by other composers, into series of concertos for harpsichord and for organ (in both cases without orchestral accompaniment). Bach's Concerto for organ No. 2 in A minor, BWV 593, is an arrangement—or a condensation and refinement—of Vivaldi's famous Concerto for two violins in A minor, RV 522, No. 8—from the volume L'estro armonico, Op.3, which first appeared in print in Amsterdam in 1711.

Bach's reduction of the concerto for two soloists, strings, and basso continuo to a work for just two hands and pedals was a process that requireed some alteration of the music. Bach went beyond simple necessity, and in fact tightened and enriched the very contrapuntal fabric of his source piece. BWV 593 is in three movements, the second of which Bach gives to the manuals alone. It is this second movement that I re-arranged non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn & Bassoon).

"The Lakes of Pontchartrain" for Harp, Flute & Cello

3 parts8 pages02:386 years ago1,150 views
The Lakes of Pontchartrain is an Irish ballad about an unfortunate immigrant from Ireland who is given shelter by a beautiful Louisiana Creole woman. He falls in love with her and asks her to marry him, but she is already promised to a sailor and declines the offer.

The exact origin of the song is unknown, though it is commonly held to have originated in the southern United States in the 19th century. In the liner notes of Déanta's album Ready for the Storm, which includes the song, it is described as a "traditional Creole love song." The liner notes accompanying Planxty's version state that the tune was probably brought back by soldiers fighting for the British or French armies in Louisiana and Canada in the War of 1812.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute (melody), Cello (Drone) and Harp (arpeggios) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Sonata No. 2 (BWV 1031) for Flute & Harpsichord
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Sonata No. 2 (BWV 1031) for Flute & Harpsichord

2 parts13 pages086 years ago3,011 views
Flute, Harpsichord
Johann Sebastian Bach, was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He enriched established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organization, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Mass in B minor, two Passions, and over three hundred cantatas of which around two hundred survive. His music is revered for its technical command, artistic beauty, and intellectual depth.

Bach's abilities as an organist were highly respected during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.

Today, he is probably the most famous composer of the Baroque Period in music (1600-1750) and definitely represents the culmination of Baroque style. One of the main differences between Baroque style and that of the Classical Period (1750-1825) which followed, was the use of counterpoint - literally note (i.e., “point”) against (“counter”) note (“point”). With 21st Century ears, we tend to hear music as a single melody, usually, the highest part, with (harmonic) accompaniment; however, much of his music consists of several melodies, all of equal importance, being played simultaneously.

In this piece, the Flute often has the melody, but it is not necessarily the melody (i.e., the left and/or right hand of the keyboard part may have an equally important melody).

He composed for the Flute over a period of about twenty year, beginning with the Sonata in A Minor for unaccompanied Flute (BWV 1013). Sonata No. 2 in Eb Major (BWV 1031) was written while he was the conductor of the court orchestra in Cöthen, between 1717 and 1723, for the French flautist Pierre-Gabriel Buffardin (1690-1768), who he had met at the Dresden court in 1717; Sonata No. 1 in B Minor (BWV 1030) was also probably written for Buffardin.

One of the two surviving manuscript copies of Sonata No. 2 in Eb Major (BWV 1031) was in copied by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788) - Bach’s second oldest son, also a composer, who himself wrote many works for the Flute; this has caused much debate about the authenticity of Sonata No. 2 in Eb Major (BWV 1031) and, for the same reason, Sonata No. 4 in C Major (BWV 1033, now believed to have been originally composed for unaccompanied Flute by J. S. Bach with a figured bass line added later by C. P. E. Bach): were these works by Johan Sebastian or Carl Philipp Emanuel? Either way, they are Bach Flute Sonatas!

This is my transcription of the 3 movements from the 2nd Sonata in Eb Major (BWV 1031).
Sonata No. 3 (BWV 1032) for Flute & Harpsichord
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Sonata No. 3 (BWV 1032) for Flute & Harpsichord

2 parts36 pages12:056 years ago2,568 views
The Bach-Gesellschaft edition, the original complete collection of Bach’s works, was in 46 volumes published in Leipzig between 1851 and 1899. It included 3 Sonatas for Flute and Keyboard (i.e., an actual keyboard part - BWV 1030 in B Minor, BWV 1031 in A Major and BWV 1032 in Eb Major) and a Sonata for Violin and Keyboard (BWV 1020 in G Minor) as well as 3 Sonatas for Flute and Continuo (i.e., a figured bass part - BWV 1033 in C Major, BWV 1034 in E Minor and BWV 1035 in E Major). The Sonata in A Minor BWV 1013 (for unaccompanied Flute) was discovered in 1917 by Karl Straub.

In this sonata # 3, the keyboard is no mere continuo instrument filling chords in a purely accompanimental role; it's a full partner, with the right and left hands providing melodic lines of their own. This is the only Bach flute sonata to survive into the twentieth century in a manuscript by Bach himself (the autographed score, however, was destroyed during World War II). Unfortunately, 46 bars of the first movement were at some point scissored out, and modern editions fill this gap with new material derived from the movement's first half. The work falls into three movements, like a Vivaldi concerto, rather than the four-movement church sonata structure Bach employed in several other flute sonatas. The first movement, Vivace, begins with a full harpsichord introduction, music that will return through the movement, sometimes abbreviated, in ritornello fashion. The flute arrives with its own take on this material, and the flute and harpsichord proceed to work through this and related, bouncy music in full three-voice writing (although the left-hand harpsichord part is comparatively rudimentary). The slow movement, Largo e dolce, is a poignant flute aria with the harpsichord sometimes providing restless counter material, sometimes echoing the flute melody and at one point reducing its role to a long trill. The concluding Allegro proceeds along lines similar to the first movement, but with a steady forward melodic drive replacing the earlier movement's more rhythmic propulsion.

The score for Sonata No. 3 in A Major (BWV 1032) was on the same manuscript as Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C Minor (BWV 1062), using the blank lines at the bottom of that score. As (Unfortunately) 45 measures were cut (and lost) from the 1st Movement Vivace - only the first 62 and last 2 measures survived! There are several modern “reconstructions” available however, this transcription uses the Ubaldo Di Gregprio reconstruction and is noted in red.

This is my transcription of the 3 movements from the 3rd Sonata in A Major (BWV 1032) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Woodwind Trio

3 parts11 pages02:576 years ago1,455 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

I arranged this work for woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Adagio from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
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Adagio from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts4 pages02:286 years ago2,134 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Prelude from "Actus Tragicus" (BWV 106) for Wind Ensemble

6 parts5 pages02:366 years ago986 views
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685~1750) wrote "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" (God's Time is the very best Time), BWV 106, also known as Actus Tragicus, as a sacred cantata in Mühlhausen for a funeral. The work is one of the earliest Bach cantatas. It was probably composed in 1708 in Mühlhausen, possibly as a cantata for the funeral of Mayor Strecker.

Bach was probably only 22 years old when he composed (this) the opening sonatina, in which two obbligato alto recorders mournfully echo each other over a sonorous background of viola da gambas and continuo. The cantata ranks among his most important works. Inspired directly by its biblical text, it exhibits a great depth and intensity. It is one of those art works that stands at the crossroads of time, seeming to look both forward and backwards. In the latter instance it is highly sectional, with little in the way of the extended, developed movements of the later years.

From his earliest essays into the cantata genre Bach had been attracted to the notion of making the instrumental introduction an organic part of the total composition

Although originally written for period instruments and chorus, I created this arrangement for Wind Ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
Video

Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts14 pages04:126 years ago840 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
Video

Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts10 pages05:456 years ago836 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Wind & Strings

6 parts19 pages04:126 years ago1,050 views
The harpsichord concertos, BWV 1052-1065, are concertos for harpsichord, strings and continuo by Johann Sebastian Bach. Of these, there are seven complete concertos for a single harpsichord, (BWV 1052-1058), three concertos for 2 harpsichords (BWV 1060-1062), two concertos for 3 harpsichords (BWV 1063-1064), and one concerto for 4 harpsichords, (BWV 1065).

All of Bach's harpsichord concertos (with the exception of the Brandenburg concerto) are thought to be arrangements made from earlier concertos for melodic instruments probably written in Köthen. In many cases, only the harpsichord version has survived.

While the existing score is in the form of a concerto for harpsichord and strings, Bach scholars believe it to be a transcription of a lost double concerto in D minor; a reconstructed arrangement of this concerto for two violins or violin and oboe is classified as BWV 1060R. The subtle and masterful way in which the solo instruments blend with the orchestra marks this out as one of the most mature works of Bach's years at Köthen. The middle movement is a cantabile for the solo instruments with orchestral accompaniment.

Although this Concerto in C Minor was originally written for 2 Harpsichords and orchestra, I created this arrangement for a unique Wind (Flutes, Oboe, Clarinet & French Horn) and String (Cello & Bass) ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Galway City" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages00:566 years ago1,181 views
"Galway City" is a traditional Irish Folk Song celebrating one of it's largest cities, situated on the west coast of Ireland, and with a complex history going back around 800 years; the city being the only medieval city in the province of Connacht.

Galway has always had a special relationship with the Irish language. The term ‘Gaeltacht’ is used to refer collectively to those areas where Irish is used as an everyday language by a majority of residents.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon) and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Canzon II" (Ch. 187) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts7 pages02:136 years ago774 views
Giovanni Gabrieli was born in Venice in or about 1557. He studied With his uncle, Andrea Gabrieli, who was considered to be a master of the Venetian school. More than any of the Venetians who had preceded him, Giovanni Gabrieli devised an instrumental style as opposed to a vocal one. He had the ability to handle instruments with such mastery and variety of means that the history book is sometimes inclined to describe him as the "father of orchestratlon.

"Canzon Duodecimi Toni" by Gabrieli was penned in 1597 and represents one of the earliest earliest periods of wind band history. The work is an excellent example of the polychoral style of music which t>1aS performed in the cathedrals by 1600 A. D. It also represents a type of music which is beginning to enjoy a renaissance today.

Although originally written for brass instruments, I created this arrangement for non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon) and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Sonata Pian' e Fort" for Wind Ensemble

8 parts5 pages05:246 years ago568 views
Giovanni Gabrieli (ca. 1557-1612), having spent part of his youth studying with the Flemish composer Orlande de Lassus at the court of the Duke of Bavaria in Munich, retured quite accustomed to the lavish festivities for which he would later be commissioned to compose. Both he and his uncle Andrea Gabrieli (ca. 1553-1585) were native Venetians, both became organists at St. Mark's Cathedral and would perform their music in the artistic treasure-house of the Western World, La Serenissima, the "most serene city" of Venice.

"Sonata pian' e forte", written in 1597 is an instrumental piece using soft and loud dynamics. A more technical definition of this is a Venetian polychoral style which arose from architectural peculiarities with regards to St Marks cathedral.

A Sonata (during the Renaissance) means a piece for instruments. It was probably written to be played as part of a Roman Catholic Church service at St Marks cathedral in Venice. It was written for 8 instruments divided into 2 groups of 4 and placed in opposing galleries in the cathedral.

The whole piece is in [transposed] Dorian mode onto G. This means that this uses all the notes of F Major, but the tonic note is G. The whole piece is designed for singers, even though it is played on instruments due to the conjunct melody moving in small steps.

Although originally written for Renaissance period instruments and chorus, I created this arrangement for Wind Ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fugue" from 6 Etudes (Opus 52 No. 5) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts7 pages02:526 years ago972 views
Saint-Saëns was one of the great pianists of his age, albeit in the strict, prim style severe of the previous epoch, whose crackling precision he carried into the twentieth century. A lifelong Parisian surrounded by a dazzling array of talent, the sheer edge of his genius seemed to cut him off from more than superficial attachments to those less gifted. But encountering Liszt in 1866, in Paris for the first performance of his "Gran" Mass -- the aged Liszt whose mightiest works lay behind him -- Saint-Saëns experienced the shock of recognition, the deep artistic impact of another personality. On March 8, in the salon of Princess Metternich, he was tapped to play beside Liszt, reading (that is, transposing at sight) from the orchestral score two movements from Liszt's Mass, occasioning Liszt's remark, "It is possible to be as much of a musician as Saint-Saëns; it is impossible to be more of one!" Then, Liszt played solo. Saint-Saëns recalled, "...from beneath his fingers, almost unconsciously, and with an astonishing range of nuances, there murmured, surged, boomed, and stormed the waves of the Legend of St. Francis of Paule walking on the waters. Never again shall we see or hear anything to compare with it." The consequences of this meeting would take decades to shake out, interrupted by the Franco-Prussian War. Through the 1870s Saint-Saëns emulated Liszt in the composition of symphonic poems, but it was inevitable that he should follow Liszt's lead in the Transcendental and Paganini Études in the exploration of keyboard technique. He composed his own set of Études (6), 1877.

This fugue from the fifth etude (Originally in A Major) shadowds a confiding melody in a shimmer of tremolos in fifths and sixths to introduce a ruminative contrapuntal exercise.

Although originally written for piano, I created this arrangement for non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon) and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Les Berceaux" (Opus 23 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:236 years ago984 views
Flute, Harp
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

Fauré is regarded as one of the masters of the French art song, or mélodie. His devotion to the mélodie spans his career, from the ever-fresh "Le papillon et la fleur" of 1861 to the masterly cycle L'horizon chimérique, composed sixty years and more than a hundred songs later. Fauré's songs are now core repertoire for students and professionals, sung in conservatories and recital halls throughout the world.

Gabriel Fauré's "Les berceaux," Op. 23 No. 1 (written in 1879), a setting of a poem by Sully Prudhomme, uses a flowing melodic line in the vocal part and a characteristic accompaniment in the piano to evoke the movement of both ships and of cradles (berceaux), linking the two together in motion and emotion.

The poem describes large ships rocked by the water and cradles rocked by women: "But the day of farewells will come, because women must weep, and curious men must dare the lure of the horizon." But though ships carry men away from their cradles, the ships sense, and are momentarily held back by, the soul of the cradles.

The song opens with the lulling motion of arpeggios in the piano bass line, underpinning a soothing, quietly sung vocal line. At the line "But the day of farewells will come, " a crescendo slowly builds to a forte climax on "dare the lure of the horizon." The piano leads the way back to the more flowing sprit of the opening, ending the song in the tone in which it began.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Elégie" for Flute & Harp
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"Elégie" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:116 years ago698 views
Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (1842 – 1912) was a French composer best known for his operas. His compositions were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and he ranks as one of the greatest melodists of his era. Soon after his death, Massenet's style went out of fashion, and many of his operas fell into almost total oblivion. Apart from Manon and Werther, his works were rarely performed.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"There Were Three Ravens" for Flute Ensemble

3 parts1 page01:116 years ago863 views
"There Were Three Ravens" (There were three rauens) English folk ballad dates back to 1611 where it appears in Melismata. "Musicall Phansies Fitting the Court", "Citti"e, and "Countrey Humours" by T. Ravenscroft. It is also known as "The Twa Corbies".

The ballad takes the form of three scavenger birds conversing about where and what they should eat. One mentions a recently slain knight, but they find he is guarded by his loyal hawks and hounds. Furthermore a "fallow doe", an obvious metaphor for the knight's pregnant ("as great with young as she might go") lover or mistress (see "leman") comes to his body, kisses his wounds, bears him away, and buries him, leaving the ravens without an apparent meal. The narrator, however, gradually departs from the ravens' point of view, ending with “God send euery gentleman/Such haukes, such hounds, and such a Leman” - the comment of the narrator on the action, rather than the ravens whose discussion he earlier describes.

Although this piece was originally written for Voices (SATB), I arranged it for Flute Ensemble (Piccolo, Flute & Alto Flute) at the request of a member and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Star of the County Down" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:136 years ago3,780 views
Flute, Harp
"Star of the County Down" is an old Irish ballad set near Banbridge in County Down, in Northern Ireland. The tune is a pentatonic melody, similar to that of several other works, including the almost identical English tune "Kingsfold", well known from several popular hymns, such as "Led By the Spirit". The folk tune was the basis for Ralph Vaughan Williams' Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus.

The melody was also used in an old Irish folk song called "My Love Nell". The lyrics of "My Love Nell" tell the story of young man who courts a girl but loses her when she emigrates to America. The only real similarity with "Star of the County Down" is that Nell too comes from County Down. This may have inspired McGarvey to place the heroine of his new song in Down as well (McGarvey was from Donegal).

"The Star of the County Down" uses a tight rhyme scheme. Each stanza is a double quatrain, and the first and third lines of each quatrain have an internal rhyme on the second and fourth feet: [aa]b[cc]b. The refrain is a single quatrain with the same rhyming pattern.

The song is sung from the point of view of a young man who chances to meet a charming lady by the name of Rose (or Rosie) McCann, referred to as the "star of the County Down". From a brief encounter the writer's infatuation grows until, by the end of the ballad, he imagines wedding the girl.

Although this piece was originally written for traditional folk instruments, I arranged it for Flute and Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp

"Shenandoah" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:276 years ago6,222 views
Flute, Harp
"Oh Shenandoah!" seems to have originated in the early nineteenth century as a land ballad in the areas of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, with a story of a Scots/Irish trader who fell in love with the daughter of the Indian chief Shenandoah. The song was taken up by sailors plying these rivers, and thus made its way down the Mississippi to the open ocean. The song had great appeal for American deep-sea sailors, and its rolling melody made it ideal as a capstan shanty, where a group of sailors push the massive capstan bars around and around in order to lift the heavy anchor.

Before and during the French and Indian War, the Scots/Irish were among the first to suffer, and among those who suffered most because of their inhabitation of the frontier and their proximity to the various Indian tribes, many of whom couldn’t get along with each other, let alone, with the white settlers. The Scots/Irish had fresh memories of the border raids from the days back in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

The song reached its first height of popularity perhaps a little before the 1840s, the beginning of the fast clipper ship era that added so much to American growth. The song was traditional with the U.S. Army cavalry, who called it “The Wild Mizzourye”. In fact, “Shenandoah” was known by countless names, including: “Shennydore”, “The Wide Missouri”, “The Wild Mizzourye”, “The Oceanida” and “Rolling River”.

The song "Oh, Shenandoah" became almost a hymn in Virginia, commemorating these early Scots/Irish settlers and their land that they loved.

Although this piece was originally written for traditional folk instruments, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Old Orange Flute" for Flute Ensemble

3 parts3 pages02:076 years ago1,135 views
The "Old Orange Flute" is an anonymous 19th century composition that was originally an "Orange" song but is now played by both Loyalists and Republicans.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, Irish political ballads dealt less with the struggles of the Irish peasantry over land and concentrated on the struggle for independence. They told anew the story of Ireland’s troubled history with its more powerful neighbour, Britain, and captured and supported the political dreams of new generations who sought an independent nation."The Old Orange Flute" reflected the Irish Protestant fears of the Roman Catholic Church.

Although this piece was originally written for folk instruments, I arranged it for Flute Ensemble (Piccolo, Flute & Alto Flute) at the request of a member and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Rêverie" for Flute & Harp
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"Rêverie" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages03:286 years ago2,044 views
Flute, Harp
Claude Debussy was born into a poor family in France, but his obvious gift at the piano sent him to the Paris Conservatory at age 11. At age 22, he won the Prix de Rome, which financed two years of further musical study in the Italian capital. After the turn of the century, Debussy established himself as the leading figure of French music.

Debussy showed an early affinity for the piano, and he began taking lessons at age seven. By age 10 or 11, he had entered the Paris Conservatory, where his instructors and fellow students recognized his talent but often found his attempts at musical innovation strange.

His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch. Often Debussy's work reflected the activities or turbulence in his own life. In French literary circles, the style of this period was known as symbolism, a movement that directly inspired Debussy both as a composer and as an active cultural participant.

Some of the greatest works of the impressionist artists Renoir and Monet are paintings of a dreamy young woman gazing at reflections in water, water’s depths, or the sky. The idea of reflection is very important, as in impressionism, the reflection is more “real” than the actuality. In art works such as The Boat (1867) by Renoir, the impressionist technique allowed the state of reverie to be boldly explored. It is no coincidence that one of Debussy’s most popular piano works is entitled ‘Rêverie’.

‘Rêverie’ moves slowly and deliberately, and yet with a rhythm that brings to mind water flowing and bubbling in a fountain. As the song continues, the music becomes more wavelike in tone. It then becomes soft and tranquil and moves back and forth in a slight crescendo only to die away again.

Although this piece was originally written for piano, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Albinoni's Adagio" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages05:326 years ago8,630 views
Flute, Harp
The Adagio in G minor for strings and organ continuo is believed to be a neo-baroque composition by Remo Giazotto. It is usually referred to as "Albinoni's Adagio", or "Adagio in G minor by Albinoni, arranged by Giazotto", but many scholars believe it is an entirely original work by Giazotto.

It was supposedly based on a fragment of a second-movement basso continuo line from a "Sonata in G minor" by Tomaso Albinoni purportedly found among the ruins of the old Saxon State Library, Dresden, after it was firebombed by the Allies during World War II, but since Giazotto's death in 1998 it has emerged that no such fragment has been found or recorded to have been in possession by the Saxon State Library, and it is presumed the piece is entirely his own composition.

The piece is most commonly orchestrated for string ensemble and organ, or string ensemble alone, but has achieved a level of fame such that it is commonly transcribed for other instruments.

The piece has also permeated popular culture, having been used as background music for such films as Gallipoli, television programs and in advertisements.

Although this Work was originally written for Strings, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Elegie" (Opus 29) for Flute & Harp

2 parts11 pages05:526 years ago369 views
This is a little known and seldom performed work of Robert Lehmann. Although penned in 1882, the "Elegie" (Opus 29) was first published in 1899.

Although this piece was originally written for Harp and Cello, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Mélancolie" (Opus 30) for Flute & Harp

2 parts8 pages03:186 years ago358 views
Next to nothing is known about either Gabriel Verdalle (1845-1912) or this "Mélancolie" (Opus 30) written for Violin and Concert (Pedal) harp. Many feel that Verdalle possessed a "Satie-esque" circularity that is most engaging.

This piece is the 30th in a series of about 90 works spanning his professional career. The original manuscript indicates that this is a solo from the Opera Mélancolie (A Firmin Touche).

Although this piece was originally written for Violin and Concert (Pedal) Harp, I arranged it for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Lied Ohne Worte" (Opus 19 No. 1) for Flute & Harp
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"Lied Ohne Worte" (Opus 19 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts9 pages04:206 years ago663 views
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn (1809 – 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

He wrote "Songs Without Words" (Lieder ohne Worte) is a series of short, lyrical piano pieces by the Romantic composer Felix Mendelssohn, written between 1829 and 1845.

The eight volumes of Songs Without Words, each consisting of six "songs" (Lieder), were written at various points throughout Mendelssohn's life, and were published separately. The piano became increasingly popular in Europe during the early nineteenth century, when it became a standard item in many middle-class households. The pieces are within the grasp of pianists of various abilities and this undoubtedly contributed to their popularity. This great popularity has caused many critics to under-rate their musical value.

The first volume was published by Novello in London (1832) as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, but the later volumes used the title Songs Without Words.

Although this work was originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"O Holy Night" In C♭ Major for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:106 years ago6,343 views
Flute, Harp
"O Holy Night" ("Cantique de Noël") is a well-known Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem "Minuit, chrétiens" (Midnight, Christians) by Placide Cappeau (1808–1877). Cappeau, a wine merchant and poet, had been asked by a parish priest to write a Christmas poem. Unitarian minister John Sullivan Dwight, editor of Dwight's Journal of Music, created a singing edition based on Cappeau's French text in 1855. In both the French original and in the two familiar English versions of the carol, the text reflects on the birth of Jesus and of mankind's redemption.

"Cantique de Jean Racine" (Opus 11) for Harp & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts5 pages03:146 years ago1,023 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Harp
Cantique de Jean Racine (Op. 11) is a work for mixed chorus and piano or organ by Gabriel Fauré. Written by the nineteen year old composer in 1864-5, the piece won Fauré the first prize when he graduated from the École Niedermeyer and was first performed the following year on August 4, 1866, with accompaniment of strings and organ. It was first published around 1875 or 1876 (Schoen, Paris, as part of the series Echo des Maîtrises) and appeared in a version for orchestra (possibly by the composer) in 1906.

The text is a French translation, by the 17th century French dramatist Jean Racine, of a medieval Latin hymn, Consors paterni luminis. When Gabriel Fauré set the translation to music, he gave it the title Cantique de Jean Racine, rather than the title of the original hymn.

Although originally written for Organ and Chorus, I created this arrangement for Harp & Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon).

Sonata in B♭ Major (FaWV N:B1) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts17 pages07:506 years ago1,123 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Descended from a distinguished family of Lutheran cantors and theologians, Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688–1758) began his musical studies as a choirboy under Johann Kuhnau at the Thomasschule, where Sebastian Bach would eventually spend the remainder of his professional career. Fasch’s musical education eventually led him to the court at Darmstadt, where he studied with Johann Christoph Graupner. Further travels led Fasch to Bayreuth and Greiz, and he accepted a position in Zerbst. Unhappy there, he submitted his credentials for a position in Freiburg, but was turned down. Fasch remained in Zerbst until his death.

Even though he was considered one of the most significant contemporaries of Bach, once the 19th-century Bach revival was under way, Fasch’s music—like that of many of his contemporaries—dropped below the radar. It dwelt in another of those dark and musty corners of music history until the beginning of the 20th century, when the respected musicologist Hugo Riemann—based upon his familiarity with several of Fasch’s orchestral suites—noted that Fasch “set instrumental music on its feet and displaced fugal writing with modern ‘thematic’ style.” A gradual arousal of interest in Fasch’s music followed, and it has grown to the extent that there is now an International Fasch Society, which has commissioned a number of scholarly publications and is also preparing critical editions of previously unpublished works.

Fasch’s music was well known outside of the confines of the court where he was employed. Telemann performed a number of Fasch’s cantatas in Hamburg and other works were performed in Prague, Vienna, and Dresden, where the Kapellmeister Johann Georg Pisendel performed many of his concertos. The extensive body of Fasch’s compositions remained in manuscript for many years and since they were widely disseminated, an assessment is difficult. Most of the vocal works—including nine cantata cycles, 14 masses, and four operas—are lost, but much of the extensive corpus of instrumental music survives. There are 86 orchestral suites, 64 concertos, 19 symphonies, and 33 sonatas for three or four instruments.

Although he was just three years younger than J.S. Bach, Johann Friedrich Fasch was a leader in making the transition from late Baroque to early Classical in Germany. Fasch also manages to create a style that marries polyphony to the emerging sonata form in such a way that it defies categorization. The architecture of most of these sonatas is that of the Italian sonata da chiesa, i.e., a four-movement sequence following the slow-fast-slow-fast pattern, but in the Sonata in F for Two Oboes and Bassoon, Fasch appends an additional Allegro as a sort of musical caboose.

Although originally written for Oboe, Recorder, Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Les Papillons" for Flute Duet

2 parts3 pages01:186 years ago1,037 views
François Couperin (1668-1733) was certainly the greatest of the French claveinists and surely one of the greatest of French composers. Musically, Francois Couperin bridged two eras, the Baroque and the Classical, to which many of his ideas look forward. He was born in Paris into a family with a musical tradition stretching back 200 years. Their church, St Gervais, employed a member of the Couperin family as organist for an unbroken period of 173 years.

In his four books of Pièces de clavecin, Couperin took the harpsichord music of Chambonnières, Marchand, and especially his uncle Louis Couperin to the pinnacle of the French musical art with clear forms, graceful melodies, elegant harmonies, and a tone that eschews virtuosity in favor of expressivity. The six ordres or suites from Couperin's second book are no longer the series of stylized dance movements in diverse keys familiar from his first book, but rather collections of works more often than not bearing some sort of descriptive title, all of which are in the same key (with the major and minor modes being considered in some sense equivalent).

These Ordres are like suites of a succession of dance movements. Each Ordre has a title that might be the name of a person or object, or might be intended to evoke a particular scene or mood. Examples are Les ombres errantes (The roving shadows), La visionaire (The dreamer), and Papillons (Butterflies). The works demonstrate a great variety of techniques, and display clearly Couperin's success at fusing elements of French and Italian music.

Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Flute Duet to highlight the interplay between the two fluttering insects. this piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sonata in D Minor (FaWV N:d2) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts17 pages07:096 years ago1,136 views
Descended from a distinguished family of Lutheran cantors and theologians, Johann Friedrich Fasch (1688–1758) began his musical studies as a choirboy under Johann Kuhnau at the Thomasschule, where Sebastian Bach would eventually spend the remainder of his professional career. Fasch’s musical education eventually led him to the court at Darmstadt, where he studied with Johann Christoph Graupner. Further travels led Fasch to Bayreuth and Greiz, and he accepted a position in Zerbst. Unhappy there, he submitted his credentials for a position in Freiburg, but was turned down. Fasch remained in Zerbst until his death.

Fasch did not publish any music during his lifetime, and sources for performances of Fasch have to be drawn from either original manuscripts or the few modern editions that have been prepared from his music. This is partly why this collection of Fasch's chamber music comes as a bit of a surprise as the core of his instrumental output is made up of orchestral music -- he has 87 "overture" suites, 64 concerti, and 19 symphonies. Fasch's surviving chamber output is modest by comparison -- 18 trio sonatas and 12 sonatas in four parts; the seven works here account for slightly more than one-fifth of Fasch's entire chamber music legacy. Most of the music was probably composed in the mid-1730s for a Collegium musicum that Fasch had founded in Zerbst in the 1710s, which went head to head for a time with similar ensembles led by Bach and Telemann. Of the seven pieces included, the Sonata in C for bassoon is the most interesting. Fasch manages to keep the bassoon out of its usual barking or percolating role and writes for it in the same flowing manner as one would for the flute -- the first-movement Largo is particularly lovely, and Epoca Barocca wisely includes a lute in the continuo to provide contrast with the low-throated solo instrument. The D minor Quadri for oboe, violin and bassoon is missing its alleged violin part however; Epoca Barocca reconstituted it through having the violin answer to the bassoon part.

Although originally written for 2 Oboes, Obbligato Basson & Continuo , I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sonata III (Op. 1 No. 3 HWV 363b) for Flute & Piano

2 parts8 pages08:136 years ago6,215 views
The Flute sonata in G major (HWV 363b) was composed (circa 1711-16) by George Frideric Handel for flute and keyboard (harpsichord). The work is also referred to as Opus 1 No. 5, and was first published in 1732 by Walsh. Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxvii,19; and HHA iv/3,28. The sonata was originally composed as an oboe sonata in F major (HWV 363a).

Both the Walsh edition and the Chrysander edition indicate that the work is for recorder ("Flauto"), and published it as Sonata V.

The sonata begins with an Adagio that is derived from an aria in Handel's opera Rinaldo. Over a stately harpsichord accompaniment, the flute delivers a long-lined melody punctuated by brief sighing phrases. This leads with an unresolved cadence to the Allegro, which launches itself with the aforementioned stuttering trumpet call. The motif reappears frequently, and provides the basis of much of the harpsichord accompaniment, while the flute spins out highly florid melodic lines.

A second Adagio begins with a falling, stepwise figure in the continuo, whereupon the flute develops a broader, pensive melody that allows for generous ornamentation. The concluding Minuet (Handel uses the Italian spelling, Menuetto) is a lively, truly dancing piece that wouldn't be out of place in Water Music. Its duration is less a matter of tempo than how many repeats the performers choose to observe.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Coventry Carol" for Flute & Harp
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"Coventry Carol" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:476 years ago1,304 views
Flute, Harp
The "Coventry Carol" is a Christmas carol dating from the 16th century. The carol was performed in Coventry in England as part of a mystery play called The Pageant of the Shearmen and Tailors. The play depicts the Christmas story from chapter two in the Gospel of Matthew (Chapter 2). The carol refers to the Massacre of the Innocents, in which Herod ordered all male infants under the age of two in Bethlehem to be killed. The lyrics of this haunting carol represent a mother's lament for her doomed child. It is the only carol that has survived from this play.

The oldest known text was written down by Robert Croo in 1534, and the oldest known printing of the melody dates from 1591 however, the author is unknown. As a town’s plays and songs were once valuable commodities, the original copy of the play was kept by the town council for safe keeping, but, disappeared. Fortunately, the Coventry antiquarian Thomas Sharp saved copies in two volumes dating from the 1800s.

While it’s a little too dark to land on everyone’s Christmas carol A-list, it is tempered in this arrangement with Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:496 years ago3,252 views
The eighth number in Claude Debussy's first book of piano Preludes, a volume the composer worked on between about 1907 and 1910, is the celebrated "La fille aux cheveux de lin" (The Girl with the Flaxen Hair), two pages of delicate, superbly-crafted music that rival the Clair de lune from the Suite bergamasque and the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun as the most widely recognized entry in the composer's catalog.

One of Debussy's happiest decisions when composing his Preludes is, sadly, one that has been all but undone by publishers. Nowadays one finds the Preludes' picturesque little descriptions (such as "girl with the flaxen hair") at the top of each piece in bold, assertive type. When Debussy put the pieces to paper, however, he placed the descriptions at the end of each piece, as hints, even questions -- these are not the miniature, concrete-subjected tone poems we are sometimes led to believe. Indeed, the title La fille aux cheveux de lin is so famous that it can sometimes distract from the fact that the piece is as perfectly poised and flawlessly balanced a work of piano music as one might hope for.
The unaccompanied melody at the opening glistens (it is really just an arpeggio, so guilelessly drawn that one marvels at the effect it has). The mild climax in the middle of the piece is fine china -- radiant but ever so brittle, always in danger of being irreparably cracked or even smashed by an over-zealous pianist. The uncertain parallel fourths of the final pianissimo "murmuring" (called thus by Debussy) are turned on their heads after four bars, rising up into the warm sun of one last sonorous G flat major chord.

Although originally written for Solo Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Golliwog's Cakewalk" (L. 113 No. 6) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:116 years ago2,183 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Children's Corner (L. 113) is a six-movement suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was published by Durand in 1908, and was given its world première in Paris by Harold Bauer on December 18 of that year. In 1911, an orchestration of the work by Debussy's friend André Caplet received its première and was subsequently published.

It is dedicated to Debussy's daughter, Claude-Emma (known as "Chou-Chou"), who was three years old at the time. The pieces are not intended to be played by children; rather they are meant to be evocative of childhood and some of the toys in Claude-Emma's toy collection.

At the time of its composition, Golliwoggs were in fashion, due partly to the popularity at that time of the novels of Florence Kate Upton ("golliwog" is a later usage). They were stuffed black dolls with red pants, red bow ties and wild hair, somewhat reminiscent of the black-face minstrels of the time. This is a ragtime piece with its syncopations and banjo-like effects. The dynamic range is quite large and very effective. The B section of this dance is interrupted on several occasions by the love-death leitmotif of Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde, marked avec une grande émotion (with great feeling). Each quotation is followed with banjo imitations. The cakewalk was a dance or a strut and the dancer with the most elaborate steps won a cake ("took the cake").

Although originally written for Piano, I created this abbreviated arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

Sonata VI (Op. 1 No. 15 HWV 373) for Flute & Piano

2 parts8 pages08:166 years ago1,288 views
George Frideric Handel (1685 – 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727.

The Violin sonata in E major (HWV 373) is a work for violin and keyboard (harpsichord) that was originally thought to have been composed by George Frideric Handel. Modern scholars however believe it doubtful that the work was composed by Handel, and have labelled it as "spurious". The work was first published in 1730 by John Walsh.

John Walsh (1665 or 1666–1736) was an English music publisher of Irish descent, established off the Strand, London, by c. 1690. He was appointed musical instrument-maker-in-ordinary to the king in 1692.

Although originally written for Violin and period keyboard, I created this arrangement for Flute & Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Aria" from Sonata in F Major (Op. 1 No. 7) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages03:586 years ago828 views
Jean-Marie Leclair (1697 - 1764) was a French composer and violinist. Initially a dancer, he lived from 1723 in Paris, where he became a prominent soloist and began producing violin sonatas (from 1723). He also appeared abroad, and in 1733 became ordinaire de la musique du roi at the French court. In 1738-43 he served the court of Orange in the Netherlands and (in 1740-43) François du Liz at The Hague. He then lived mainly in Paris, where he was murdered (probably by his nephew).

Foremost in Leclair's output are over 60 solo, duet and trio sonatas for violin. In these he imbued the Italian style with French elements more successfully than most of his contemporaries, using short ornamented phrases and colourful harmonies; the idiom reflects his own virtuoso technique. He also composed concertos, minuets, suites etc, ballet music, an opera (Scylla et Glaucus, 1746) with many striking features and other vocal music. He was an influential teacher and is considered the founder of the French violin school.

Leclair was one of several musical brothers. The most important were Jean-Marie (1703-77), a violinist, who directed the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Lyons and composed sonatas and other works, Pierre (1709-84) and Jean-Benoît (1714-after 1759), both violinists and composers in Lyons.

Although originally written for Cello and period keyboard, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Londonderry Air" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:536 years ago3,602 views
Flute, Harp
Londonderry Air is an air that originated from County Londonderry in Ireland (now Northern Ireland). It is popular among the Irish diaspora and is very well known throughout the world. The tune is played as the victory anthem of Northern Ireland at the Commonwealth Games. "Danny Boy" is a popular set of lyrics to the tune.

The title of the air came from the name of County Londonderry in Ireland. The air was collected by Jane Ross of Limavady. Ross submitted the tune to music collector George Petrie, and it was then published by the Society for the Preservation and Publication of the Melodies of Ireland in the 1855 book The Ancient Music of Ireland, which Petrie edited. The tune was listed as an anonymous air, with a note attributing its collection to Jane Ross of Limavady.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

"Spanish Dance" No. 1 for Flute & Harp

2 parts11 pages03:346 years ago8,063 views
Flute, Harp
The Spanish Dance No. 1 is from the opera "La Vida Breve" and was composed by Manuel de Falla in 1905 and was first performed in 1913. The Opera was styled after a libretto of Carlos Fernández Shaw.

Manuel de Falla y Matheu (1876 – 1946) was a Spanish Andalusian composer. With Isaac Albéniz, Enrique Granados and Joaquín Turina he is one of Spain's most important musicians of the first half of the 20th century.

"La Vida Breve" always has captivated musicians all over the world. It has been arranged for solo guitar, guitar duo, solo piano, piano duo, and violin and piano. The opera was a turning point for classical music in Spain; for the first time, Falla sought to bring elements of Spanish folk music, flamenco, and especially the gypsy 'cante jondo', or 'deep song', to the classical stage. "La Vida Breve" won first prize in a competition for Spanish opera sponsored by the Royal Academy in 1905.

Although originally written for orchestra (an later arranged for solo Piano), I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

"The Skye Boat Song" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts4 pages01:516 years ago3,519 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Skye Boat Song" is a Scottish folk song, which can also be played as a waltz, recalling the escape of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) from Uist to the Isle of Skye after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. The song tells how Charles escaped in a small boat, with the aid of Flora MacDonald, disguised as a serving maid. The song is a traditional expression of Jacobitism and its story has also entered Scotland as a national legend.

The song was not in any older books of Scottish songs, though it is in most miscellanies like The Fireside Book of Folk Songs. It is often sung as a lullaby, in a slow rocking 6/8 time. In addition to being extremely popular in its day, and becoming a standard among Scottish folk and dance musicians, it has become more widely known in the modern mainstream popular music genre.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement at the request of Belgian flautist, Jenne Van Antwerpen for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).

"Come by the Hills" for Oboe, Flute & Harp

3 parts7 pages02:516 years ago1,362 views
Buachaill Ón Eirne (“A Lad from the Éirne.” also known as “Come By The Hills”)

Little is known about this traditional Irish folk song however, the air is Irish, the song is Scottish, as the lyrics of Come By The Hills were composed by a Scottish television producer W. Gordon Smith to this very old tune.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Oboe, Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fair Fa' The Minstrel" for Flute Trio

3 parts6 pages01:516 years ago699 views
"Fair Fa' The Minstrel"
(Mart dhe crodh a' Mheineirich) is a Scottish reel of unknown authorship. The story goes that, "The ancient family of Menzies, Bart., have immemorially inherited the beautiful banks of Tay, which, before assuming their present perfect cultivation, must have grazed some of the finest cattle of any part in the central Highlands. These were, of course, subject to the spoliations of their mire predatory neighbors; hence, when music was well performed, the prize allotted the minstrel was one of Menzies' cows, in other words, 'Fair fa' the minstrel, he is worthy of one of Menzies' cows.' The expression is so common that a better definition of it may be given than this one, compressed within a note, merely to shew the allusion"

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Piccolo, Flute, and Alto Flute and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Will You Go Blackbird?" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages026 years ago503 views
During the eighteenth century, the Methodist revival and puritanical reforms nearly obliterated Welsh folk song. Some secular songs were lost altogether, but enough survived to reflect the old traditions, and folksong periodically flourished during subsequent eras. Little is known about this early Welsh tune.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The First Noël" (UMH # 245) for Woodwind Quintet

4 parts1 page02:156 years ago2,324 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
The First Nowell (also written The First Noël) is a traditional classical English carol, most likely from the 18th century, although possibly earlier. The word Noel comes from the French word Noël meaning "Christmas", from the Latin word natalis "birthday".

In its current form it is of Cornish origin, and it was first published in Carols Ancient and Modern (1823) and Gilbert and Sandys Carols (1833), both of which were edited by William B. Sandys and arranged, edited and with extra lyrics written by Davies Gilbert Hymns and Carols of God. Today, it is usually performed in a four-part hymn arrangement by the English composer John Stainer, first published in his Carols, New and Old of 1871.

The melody is unusual among English folk melodies in that it consists of one musical phrase repeated twice, followed by a refrain which is a variation on that phrase. All three phrases end on the third of the scale. It is thought to be a version of an earlier melody sung in a church gallery setting "The First O Well"; a conjectural reconstruction of this earlier version can be found in the New Oxford Book of Carols.

Although traditionally sung as a hymn, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (2 Flutes, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon).
"Ave Maria" (D.839) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Ave Maria" (D.839) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages04:446 years ago2,689 views
Ellens dritter Gesang (Ellens Gesang III, D.839, Op. 52, No. 6, 1825), in English: "Ellen's Third Song", was composed by Franz Schubert in 1825 as part of his Opus 52, a setting of seven songs from Walter Scott's popular epic poem The Lady of the Lake, loosely translated into German.

It has become one of Schubert's most popular works under the title of Ave Maria, in arrangements with various lyrics which commonly differ from the original context of the poem.

Schubert's arrangement is said to have first been performed at the castle of Countess Sophie Weissenwolff in the little Austrian town of Steyregg and dedicated to her, which led to her becoming known as "the lady of the lake" herself.

The opening words and refrain of Ellen's song, namely "Ave Maria" (Latin, "Hail Mary"), may have led to the idea of adapting Schubert's melody as a setting for the full text of the traditional Roman Catholic prayer Ave Maria. The Latin version of the Ave Maria is now so frequently used with Schubert's melody that it has led to the misconception that he originally wrote the melody as a setting for the Ave Maria.

I transcribed this piece for Harp and Flute for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"I Vow To Thee, My Lord" for Flute & Piano

2 parts2 pages01:386 years ago5,187 views
Flute, Piano
Originally: "I Vow to Thee, My Country" was a British patriotic song created in 1921 when a poem by Sir Cecil Spring-Rice was set to music by Gustav Holst. Gustav Holst adapted the music from a section of Jupiter from his suite The Planets to create a setting for the poem. The music was extended slightly to fit the final two lines of the first verse.

I modified the Lyrics set by Sir Cecil Spring-Rice in the first verse and created the second verse in service to our lord, Jesus Christ and offer this arrangement as "I Vow to Thee, My Lord".

Aria: "Ich will nur dir zu Ehren leben" (BWV 248 No. 41) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts8 pages05:236 years ago1,208 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the aria "Ich will nur dir zu Ehren leben" (I just want you to live in honor) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Dieu d'Amour" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:326 years ago1,045 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (8 February 1741 – 24 September 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

Les mariages samnites (The Samnite Marriages) is an opéra comique, described as a drame lyrique, in three acts by André Grétry, The French text was by Barnabé Farmain de Rosoi based on a work by Jean François Marmontel. Although initially unpopular, Mozart created a set of eight variations in 1786 to subscribe to the aria 'Dieu d'amour' (God of Love) from this work (KV 352/374c).

Although originally for Opera, This arrangement features the Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Air from "Zémire et Azor" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:396 years ago374 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zemir and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

"Du moment qu'on aime" (The moment one loves) is from Act 3 Scene 5 No. 15 and although written for Opera, this arrangement features the Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The King of the Færies" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:226 years ago5,619 views
Flute, Harp
A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural.

The Irish banshee (Irish Gaelic "bean sí" or Scottish Gaelic "bean shìth", which both mean "fairy woman") is sometimes described as a ghost

Historians believe that the fairy queens and kings are in fact the old pagan gods and goddesses 'in disguise' who have long been revered by the Irish. Once stated that, "the Celtic gods of Ireland had long been wiped out, buried under the sway of Catholicism". Many who have been to the Emerald Isle, or listened to many folk tales can see that the old gods live on in folk tales as the giants of the hill; the Gobhan Saor who built all the bridges of Ireland; the Gille Decair, a clown and trickster; the carl (serf) of the drab coat and many others. The old deities were once worshipped throughout Ireland, however it is in the west that they are best remembered now, the east having been more Christianized and anglicised, and subject to more invasions. By contrast, the west of Ireland, to which the native Irish were driven ("to hell or Connaught") has held on longer to her ancient heritage.

Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.

"Entrée des Genies" from “Zémire et Azor” for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages03:076 years ago591 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

This arrangement of the "Entrée des Genies" (meaning 'genius' in a protecting the spirit way -- Dutch:beschermgeest) features a Woodwind with Brass Harmonie (Quintet) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Merci à mon ami Van Antwerpen Jenne pour sa critique et de la débrouillardise.

"Passepied" from “Zémire et Azor” for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages02:196 years ago451 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The passepied (French [pasˈpje] 'passing feet') is a 17th- and 18th-century dance that originated in Brittany. The term can also be used to describe the music to which a passepied is set. The music is an example of a dance movement in Baroque music and is almost always a movement in binary form with a fast tempo and a time signature of three quavers (eighth notes) per bar, each section beginning with an upbeat of a single quaver.

This arrangement of the "Passepied" features a Woodwind Quartet and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Pantomime" from “Zémire et Azor” for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page04:306 years ago919 views
Flute, Harp
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The Pantomime (portraying a dramatic act, through gestures, facial expressions, music and, dance) is from Act III Scene IV of "Zémire et Azor" with this arrangement featuring a solo flute with a Concert (Pedal) Harp accompaniment.

"Finale" from “Zémire et Azor” for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts8 pages04:356 years ago575 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

This arrangement of the Finale (Finale: Ali's Ariette, ''Je Suis Encore Tremblant'') is from Act IV Scene I and features a Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Pantomime" from “Zémire et Azor” for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts2 pages03:026 years ago599 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The Pantomime (portraying a dramatic act, through gestures, facial expressions, music and, dance) is from Act III Scene IV of "Zémire et Azor" with this arrangement featuring a a Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon).

"Veillons, mes Soeurs" from the Opera “Zémire et Azor” for Piano & Flutes

3 parts8 pages05:056 years ago593 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The "Veillons, mes Soeurs" ("Let us, my sisters") is from Act II Scene I of "Zémire et Azor" with this arrangement featuring a flute duet with an acoustic piano accompainment and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Madrigal" (Opus 35) for Piano & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts11 pages03:146 years ago702 views
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

Fauré is regarded as one of the masters of the French art song, or mélodie. His devotion to the mélodie spans his career, from the ever-fresh "Le papillon et la fleur" of 1861 to the masterly cycle L'horizon chimérique, composed sixty years and more than a hundred songs later. Fauré's songs are now core repertoire for students and professionals, sung in conservatories and recital halls throughout the world.

Fauré’s haunting Madrigal (Opus 35) is at first a dialogue between the young men and women of the world, and later an admonishment to both by the older, wiser heads around them. The opening melodic idea is an exact quote of the Armand Silvestre's poem Aus tiefer Noth (Out of deep need), perhaps used as a joke by Fauré for his friend, André Messager, who received the piece as a wedding gift in 1883.

Although this piece was originally written for Chorus and Piano or Orchestra, I arranged it for Piano and Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Ad Te Suspirimus" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts4 pages04:016 years ago824 views
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741), nicknamed il Prete Rosso ("The Red Priest") because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over forty operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

Though Vivaldi's music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded of Baroque composers.

Although this piece was originally written for period instruments and chorus, I arranged it for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & Clarinet) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Flute Concerto in G Major for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts24 pages12:426 years ago3,000 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710 – 1736) was an Italian composer, violinist and organist born at Iesi, Pergolesi and studied music there under a local musician, Francesco Santini. In 1725 he travelled to Naples where he studied under Gaetano Greco and Francesco Feo among others. He spent most of his brief life working for aristocratic patrons like the Colonna principe di Stigliano, and duca Marzio IV Maddaloni Carafa.

The flute concerto is a concerto for solo flute and instrumental ensemble, customarily the orchestra. This work by Pergolesi was written in the Baroque period, when the solo concerto form was first developed, and continues up through the present day. Some major composers have contributed to the flute concerto repertoire, with the best known works including those by Mozart and Vivaldi.


Although this piece was originally written for Flute, Violins and Basso Continuo, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon).

"La Cupis" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts4 pages06:066 years ago1,101 views
In 1683, Jean-Philippe Rameau, the seventh of eleven children, was born into a musical family in Dijon. His father played the organ at two churches there. At eighteen he decided to become a musician, although his father preferred that he enter the legal profession. He traveled to Italy and spent a few months in Milan, playing violin with a group of itinerant musicians. Subsequently, he held various organ posts in Dijon (replacing his father), Lyons, Clermont, and Paris. Two years after settling in Paris at the age of forty-two, he married a nineteen-year old girl, Marie-Louise Mangot. They had four children. He composed cantatas and motets, and he published books and articles on music theory and several small collections of solo harpsichord works. All the while he longed to compose for the operatic stage. He sublimated this desire in his harpsichord works, lavishing on them all the imagination, passion, and drama that would later enliven his great operas.

Rameau published his Pieces de Clavecin en concerts in 1741. He followed the lead of Gaspar LeRoux and Jean-Joseph Cassanea de Mondonville, who had published harpsichord pieces with violin accompaniment.

Five of the titles are names of Rameau’s musical acquaintances (La Laborde, La Boucon, La Forqueray, La Marais, and La Cupis) while La Livri and La popliniere were two patrons of the arts, the former having died the year Rameau published this collection. To which family member he dedicated La Rameau, we have no idea. Le Vezinet, now a suburb of Paris, was part of the countryside in Rameau’s day. One can imagine a jaunt on horseback or carriage through a fragrant, pastoral scene. La Coulicam is a corruption of Thomas Kouli Khan, eponymous hero of a pseudo-historical novel about a revolution, set in Persia. The rest are dances (Menuet, Tambourin, La Pantomime) and character pieces (L’Agacante, La Timide, and L’Indiscrete).

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I arranged it for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon). There is a delicate somewhat dissonant interplay between the main and secondary voices played by the flute, oboe and clarinet and an echo from the second voice provides melancholic memories on a cold winter evening of a beautiful summer day, spent with someone near a quiet and peaceful wooded river (even birds can be heard). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings
Video

Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings

7 parts33 pages10:186 years ago12,234 views
Piccolo, Strings(5), Harpsichord
Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) started playing the violin in his early years. He started studying to become a priest when he was 15 and was ordained in 1703 at the age of 25. In September 1703 Vivaldi became a violin teacher at an orphanage where he started writing concertos and sacred vocal music for the oprhans. Later on he became responsible for all the musical activity of the institution. Around 1717 Vivaldi was offered a new position as Maestro di Cappella (in charge of music in a chapel) of the governor of Mantua. During this period Vivaldi wrote his famous four violin concertos the Four seasons.

Antonio Vivaldi's concertos cut a revolutionary swath through the more fustian rituals of high Baroque music in much the way that minimalism gutted academic serialism 250 years later. They standardized the fast-slow-fast movement scheme that has survived as the classic concerto pattern, and developed the ritornello form (in which a refrain for the ensemble alternates with free episodes for the soloist), using it as a vehicle for thematic integration and elaboration. Vivaldi's 500-plus concertos were athletic entertainments that swept continental Europe, influencing not only younger composers, but causing a wave of stylistic conversion in older ones.

Vivaldi wrote this "Concerto per Flautino" sometime between 1728 and 1729 and although there is not a reliable evidence that the frontispiece information "Concerto per Flautino" means the sopranino recorder (in 'F') as a soloist. The Italian term flautino means simply a "small flute". There is however, a written instruction "Gl'istromti trasportati alla 4a" ("The instruments transposed a fourth"), witch corroborate which the conjecture that this concert was written for a soprano recorder (in 'C'), the standard transposition for recorder in 18th century, where the recorder player needs to read the recorder part like playing with an alto recorder in 'F'.

This arrangement was created for solo Piccolo and String Ensemble (Violins, Viola, Cello & String Bass).

Larghetto from Concerto II (Opus 31 Mvt 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages03:236 years ago928 views
Franz Ignaz Danzi, cellist and composer, was born on June 15, 1763 in Schwetzinger, Germany and died on April 13, 1826 in Karlsruhe, Germany. His father, cellist Innozenz Danzi (1730-1798) was one of the highest paid musicians of the famous Mannheim Orchestra.

Franz began playing cello with that orchestra in 1778, eventually succeeding his father in 1783 (in Munich). In 1807 Franz became Kapellmeister in Stuttgart where he became good friends with Carl Maria von Weber, 23 years his junior (born 1786 - ironically, Weber died on June 5, 1826, less than 2 months after Danzi).

Danzi lived at a significant time in the history of European concert music. His career, spanning the transition from the late Classical to the early Romantic styles, coincided with the origin of much of the music that lives in our concert halls and is familiar to contemporary classical-music audiences. As a young man he knew Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, whom he revered; he was a contemporary of Ludwig van Beethoven, about whom he—like many of his generation—had strong but mixed feelings; and he was a mentor and promoter for the young Carl Maria von Weber.

He composed 4 Flute Concertos between 1806 and 1814 including the Concerto No. 2 in D Minor, Op. 31 in 1806. In addition, he wrote several chamber works for the Flute and 9 Woodwind Quintets (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and F Horn), a medium he is often credited with inventing.

Although originally written for solo flute and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Cliff's End" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:336 years ago636 views
Flute, Harp
Jenne Van Antwerpen is a Flautist, amateur composer and my friend. I am also an amateur with music in general. One day I asked Jenne to "whistle" a tune or jot down a melody using her newly acquired MuseScore typesetting skills. I was pleasantly surprised when she sent me this lovely flute line. I created the corresponding harp accompaniment and we worked together to refine the timbre, range and overall sound.

To me the piece is reminiscent of a lonely Irish woman waiting patiently on the edge of an Éire cliff anticipating the return of her seafaring mate.

This piece was created for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and I enjoyed working with Jenne to create this short work.

"The Echo Song" for Double Woodwind Quartet

4 parts3 pages01:206 years ago1,427 views
Renaissance composer Orlande de Lassus was born in Mons and got his start as a choirboy. An often disputed story has the child Lassus kidnapped three times on account of his beautiful singing voice; the only certainty is that by 1544 he had joined the service of Ferrante Gonzaga, Viceroy of Sicily. A stopover in Mantua allowed Lassus to absorb prevailing Italian influences. Lassus spent less than a year in Sicily and transferred to Milan for the remainder of the 1540s. He often used an Italian form of his name, Orlando di Lasso. In 1551, Lassus was made choirmaster at St. John of Lateran in Rome, but remained only until 1553, being succeeded by Palestrina. Lassus returned to Mons in 1554, receiving word that his parents were ill, but upon his arrival found them already dead and buried. In 1555, Lassus' first book of madrigals and a collection of various secular works appeared simultaneously in Antwerp and Venice, thus beginning his status as a one-man industry of musical publications. Lassus' work accounts for three-fifths of all music printed in Europe between 1555 and 1600.

In 1557, the German Duke Albrecht V engaged Lassus' services as a singer at the court in Munich. Lassus' status was upgraded to Kapellmeister in 1561. His position enabled considerable travel, and Lassus made frequent trips to Venice, where he met and made friends with the Gabrielis. Judging from the range of settings, both sacred and secular, coming from Lassus in these years, it is apparent he was asked to supply music for a wide variety of events at the court of Duke Albrecht. The flood of published editions, both authorized and not, of Lassus' music during this time established him as the most popular composer in Europe, and in 1574 he was made a Knight of the Golden Spur by Pope Gregory XIII.

In 1579, Duke Albrecht V died, and the longstanding extravagance of his court left his successor, Duke Wilhelm, with little choice but to make deep cuts in the entertainment budget. This had a direct and negative effect on Lassus' fortunes, but nonetheless he declined an offer in 1580 to relocate to the Court at Dresden. By the late 1580s, the number of new pieces Lassus undertook began to slow down. In the months before his death, Lassus succeeded in bringing to life his last great masterwork, the Lagrime di San Pietro, in itself a summation of the highest forms of Renaissance musical art. He died at about the age of 62, and in 1604 his sons published an edition of his collected works entitled Magnus opus musicum. This was used as the basis for the first modern edition of Lassus' music, published in Leipzig between 1894 and 1926.

Among his key works, the Sibylline Prophecies (1553) and Penitential Psalms (1560) reflect the influence of Italian mannerism. While later music contains occasional chromatic alterations, mature Lassus works favor a unique style that combines an intensely dramatic sense of text painting, nervous and excited rhythmic figurations, and glorious, rolling counterpoint. Late works demonstrate a concern for terseness in expression, and texts are realized in a highly compressed state. No verifiable instrumental music is known from Lassus, and his masses are generally considered unfavorably in light of Palestrina's achievement in that realm. But his other works—motets, madrigals, French chansons, and German lieder—are considered second to none in the context of the late Renaissance, and several of his secular songs were known from king to peasant in the second half of the sixteenth century.

The Echo Song (O La, O Che Bon Eccho!) was originally written for Choral-Mixed a cappella (SSAATTBB) cleverly placed face-to-face in a mimic of the classic echo.

Although this piece was originally written for voices, I arranged it for a Double Woodwind Quartet (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets & 2 Bassoons) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Ständchen" (Warum bist du so Ferne) For Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages02:436 years ago1,325 views
Adolf Eduard Marschner (Grünberg, Schlesien, 5 March 1819 – Leipzig, 9 September 1853), was a Romantic German composer.

Marschner was related to the well known Heinrich Marschner. He studied music from the age of 10 and then studied at the University of Leipzig where he also later became a music teacher.

In the field of vocal music he has composed app. 30 pieces for voice and piano accompaniment and several songs for men’s choir. The most popular among those are Und hörst du das mächtige Klingen, Das Königslied and Gute Nacht.

Together with Ludwig Richter in 1844-47 he published two song collections named Alte und neue Studenten-Lieder (Old and new Student Songs), and Alte und neue Volks-Lieder (Old and new Folk Songs).

"Ständchen" is a serenade for male chorus and this piece, "Warum bist du so Ferne" (Why are you so far away?). Although this piece was originally written for male voices (TTBB), I arranged it for a non-standard Woodwind Quartet (Alto Flute, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Regendruppels" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:146 years ago520 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon
Door toedoen en met hulp van mijn woestijnvriend Mike heb ik het plezier ontdekt van zelf composities te maken. Dit is mijn tweede poging: "Regendruppels". In België hebben we er meer dan genoeg (oktober 2012 was de natste maand in 14 jaar) en in Arizona hebben ze te weing regen! Ondanks de afstand (ongeveer 8.800 kilometer) en de verschillen in taal, klimaat en cultuur begrijpen we elkaar en kunnen dankzij internet alles overbruggen en bewijzen dat muziek geen grenzen kent. --Jenne--

"Regendruppels" (Raindrops) is meant to invoke a vision of rain replicating the cacophony of raindrops using the Woodwind Trio (flute, Oboe & Bassoon). Rain can represent change. It can be peaceful or it can be powerfully destructive. It can conjure up images of renewal and joy or depression and sadness. --Mike--

This piece was created for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon) and is intended to be a playful caprice.

"Benedictus" for Flute & Horn

2 parts1 page01:206 years ago1,229 views
Renaissance composer Orlande de Lassus was born in Mons and got his start as a choirboy. An often disputed story has the child Lassus kidnapped three times on account of his beautiful singing voice; the only certainty is that by 1544 he had joined the service of Ferrante Gonzaga, Viceroy of Sicily. A stopover in Mantua allowed Lassus to absorb prevailing Italian influences. Lassus spent less than a year in Sicily and transferred to Milan for the remainder of the 1540s. He often used an Italian form of his name, Orlando di Lasso. In 1551, Lassus was made choirmaster at St. John of Lateran in Rome, but remained only until 1553, being succeeded by Palestrina. Lassus returned to Mons in 1554, receiving word that his parents were ill, but upon his arrival found them already dead and buried. In 1555, Lassus' first book of madrigals and a collection of various secular works appeared simultaneously in Antwerp and Venice, thus beginning his status as a one-man industry of musical publications. Lassus' work accounts for three-fifths of all music printed in Europe between 1555 and 1600.

In 1557, the German Duke Albrecht V engaged Lassus' services as a singer at the court in Munich. Lassus' status was upgraded to Kapellmeister in 1561. His position enabled considerable travel, and Lassus made frequent trips to Venice, where he met and made friends with the Gabrielis. Judging from the range of settings, both sacred and secular, coming from Lassus in these years, it is apparent he was asked to supply music for a wide variety of events at the court of Duke Albrecht. The flood of published editions, both authorized and not, of Lassus' music during this time established him as the most popular composer in Europe, and in 1574 he was made a Knight of the Golden Spur by Pope Gregory XIII.

In 1579, Duke Albrecht V died, and the longstanding extravagance of his court left his successor, Duke Wilhelm, with little choice but to make deep cuts in the entertainment budget. This had a direct and negative effect on Lassus' fortunes, but nonetheless he declined an offer in 1580 to relocate to the Court at Dresden. By the late 1580s, the number of new pieces Lassus undertook began to slow down. In the months before his death, Lassus succeeded in bringing to life his last great masterwork, the Lagrime di San Pietro, in itself a summation of the highest forms of Renaissance musical art. He died at about the age of 62, and in 1604 his sons published an edition of his collected works entitled Magnus opus musicum. This was used as the basis for the first modern edition of Lassus' music, published in Leipzig between 1894 and 1926.

Among his key works, the Sibylline Prophecies (1553) and Penitential Psalms (1560) reflect the influence of Italian mannerism. While later music contains occasional chromatic alterations, mature Lassus works favor a unique style that combines an intensely dramatic sense of text painting, nervous and excited rhythmic figurations, and glorious, rolling counterpoint. Late works demonstrate a concern for terseness in expression, and texts are realized in a highly compressed state. No verifiable instrumental music is known from Lassus, and his masses are generally considered unfavorably in light of Palestrina's achievement in that realm. But his other works—motets, madrigals, French chansons, and German lieder—are considered second to none in the context of the late Renaissance, and several of his secular songs were known from king to peasant in the second half of the sixteenth century.

Although this piece was originally written for voices, I arranged it for Flute and French Horn and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Come Away" (Z.323) for Flute & Piano

2 parts1 page01:416 years ago1,256 views
In the time of Purcell, odes were composed by the Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal. Although Purcell was never appointed to head the Chapel Royal, he was a favorite composer of the king, so it fell to him to compose odes for the birthday of Queen Mary II in 1694. Come, Ye Sons of Art, Away was the final birthday ode Purcell composed for Queen Mary; by the end of 1695 both she and Purcell had passed away. It has seven movements, plus an opening symphony, which Purcell later rewrote and incorporated into his opera The Indian Queen. The overture has three movements. The refined and majestic Largo is followed by a fugal Canzona and a lush Adagio. The opening chorus is on the words "Come, Ye sons of Art," and serves as an introduction to the poetic text. "Sound the Trumpet" is a striking duet for two countertenors. The melody dances over a ground bass as the singers imitate the sound of trumpets. "Strike the Viol" is a haunting countertenor solo in three, with an instrumental ritornello. The solo features an obbligato for two flutes, and the ritornello has the flutes and violins answer one another. Each of these movements is a complete work in itself. Purcell changes the orchestration, the voice to which he gives the solo line, the form, and the mood of each. After the two countertenor pieces, he writes the bass solo with chorus "No day that such a blessing gave." It is a prayer that this day be a day of jubilee, and with the remaining portion of the composition, the prayer is heard. Jubilation and rejoicing are in every note. "Bid the Virtues" is a fanciful soprano solo with oboe obbligato, followed by a florid bass solo over a ground bass called "These are the Sacred Charms that Shield." A soprano and bass duet comprises the main body of the final movement, with a choral ritornello. This is Purcell at his happiest and most innocent. When the chorus enters to restate the final verse, it is accompanied by the entire ensemble of instruments, which emphasizes the joyful mood.

Although originally written for orchestra, I created this arrangement for flute and acoustic piano accompainment and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Dansmuziek" for Flute & Harp
Video

"Dansmuziek" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages05:206 years ago466 views
Flute, Harp
"Dansmuziek" (Dance Music) is a piece I composed with Jenne Van Antwerpen in 2012. I created the harp part and Jenne the Flute. We worked together to refine the sound in an attempt to create a sultry, sometimes lively modern baroque dance piece.

A sense of longing and melancholy, even a certain element of gloom, has been characteristic of Baroque music since its early days (roughly 1600–1750). This type of dance is closely linked with Baroque music, theatre and opera and in the latter, inherits it's theatrical form.

This work was created entirely for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Ubi Caritas et Amor" for Woodwind Ensemble

7 parts3 pages01:336 years ago2,572 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon(2)
Maurice Duruflé (1902 – 1986) was a French composer, organist, and pedagogue.

Duruflé was born in Louviers, Eure. In 1912, he became chorister at the Rouen Cathedral Choir School, where he studied piano and organ with Jules Haelling. At age 17, upon moving to Paris, he took private organ lessons with Charles Tournemire, whom he assisted at Basilique Ste-Clotilde, Paris until 1927. In 1920 Duruflé entered the Conservatoire de Paris, eventually graduating with first prizes in organ, harmony, piano accompaniment, and composition. His harmony professor was Jean Gallon.

Ubi caritas is a hymn of the Western Church, long used as one of the antiphons for the washing of feet on Maundy Thursday. The Gregorian melody was composed sometime between the fourth and tenth centuries, though some scholars believe the text dates from early Christian gatherings before the formalization of the Mass. It is usually sung at Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament and on Holy Thursday evening at the Mass of the Lord's Supper. The current Roman Catholic Missal (1970, 3rd typical edition 2000) reassigned it from the foot-washing mandatum to the offertory procession at the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord's Supper, and it also is found in current Anglican and Lutheran hymnals.

Although originally created for chorus, I created this arrangement for a Woodwind Ensemble (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon and Contrabassoon) to highlight the pure power and rich bass of this piece.

"Dialoog" for Flute & Piano

2 parts6 pages06:176 years ago692 views
Flute, Piano
"Dialoog" (Dutch for Dialog) started out as a musical game between Jenne and me. The goal was to complete a short piece by each sequentially contributing 2 or 3 measures in the form of a question and answer. Upon completion (read, tired), I created the piano accompaniment to the flute montage.

This piece emerged as a result of the musical interaction and is aptly named, “Dialoog”. It is created for Flute and Acoustic Piano. It has been structured to use the musical interplay between flute and piano to mimic a conversation (dialog) between people. It is calm at times, gentle, animated and cacophonous at other times.

"Ships in Full Sail" for Piccolo & Flutes

3 parts2 pages01:096 years ago1,246 views
"Ships in Full Sail" (Gaelic: Long faoi Lán Seoil) is also known as The Faraway Wedding, Grainne's, Gráinne's, John Naughton's, Kitty's Wedding, Paddy The Dandy, Ship In Full Sail, The Ship In Full Sail, The Ship Is In Full Sail, The Ships In Full Sail. However, little is know about this traditional Irish (Double) Jig.

The Jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound meter, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th century England, and was quickly adopted on the Continent where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga). Today it is most associated with Irish dance music and Scottish country dance music. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement as a three part round for Piccolo & 2 Flutes and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Yellow Stockings Jig" for Oboe, Flute & Cellos

3 parts4 pages02:366 years ago1,463 views
"Yellow Stockings" is an undeniably Irish tune. The very name has a reference to the saffron truis of the mediaeval Irish. Shakespeare introduces it in "Twelfth Night," and the air dates from the sixteenth century, being known by the natives as Cuma liom, "It is indifferent to me," or "I don't care." Playford printed it as early as 1680, and in 1705, Dean Swift adapted a nursery song, "Hey my kitten, my kitten," to it. Other verses for our Irish tune are "Mad Moll" (1698) and "The Virgin Queen" (1703); and, finally, Tom Moore set it to his lyric, "Fairest put on awhile."

The Jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound meter, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th century England, and was quickly adopted on the Continent where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga). Today it is most associated with Irish dance music and Scottish country dance music. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this unusual arrangement for Oboe (mimicking a pipe solo), Flute (in a strange role as percussion) and Cellos (providing the drone). It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Pie Jesu" (Opus 48 No. 4) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:326 years ago3,543 views
Flute, Harp
Composed around 1887 in response to the death of his father, Gabriel Faure's Pie Jesu is actually an orchestral piece written for Soprano. He actually composed his Requiem in D minor, (Opus 48) between 1887 and 1890. This choral–orchestral setting of the Roman Catholic Mass for the Dead is the best known of his large works.

Pie Jesu (Merciful Jesus) is a motet derived from the final couplet of the Dies irae and often included in musical settings of the Requiem Mass. The settings of the Requiem Mass by Luigi Cherubini, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Duruflé, John Rutter, Karl Jenkins and Fredrik Sixten include a Pie Jesu as an independent movement. Of all these, by far the best known is the Pie Jesu from Fauré's Requiem; Camille Saint-Saëns said of it, "just as Mozart's is the only Ave verum corpus, this is the only Pie Jesu".

Although this work was originally created for Soprano and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"My Lodging Is on the Cold Ground" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:306 years ago525 views
Matthew Locke (1621-1677) was born in Exeter England and later trained in the choir of Exeter Cathedral, under Edward Gibbons, the brother of Orlando Gibbons. At the age of eighteen Locke travelled to the Netherlands, possibly converting to Roman Catholicism at the time.

"My Lodging Is on the Cold Ground" was originally written by Locke in 1665. it appearedfor the first time in a book in 1775 when Thomas Moore wrote the lyrics "Believe Me,If All Those Endearing Youg Charmes" to Locke's piece.

It is occasionally wrongly credited to Sir William Davenant, whose older collection of tunes may have been the source for later publishers, including a collection titled General Collection of Ancient Irish Music, compiled by Edward Bunting in 1796. Sir John Andrew Stevenson has been credited as responsible for the music for Moore's setting.

Although this piece was originally created for folk instrument(s), I created this arrangement for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"When I am Laid in Earth" (Z. 626 No. 37) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages05:156 years ago1,135 views
Henry Purcell (1659 - 1695), was an English composer. Although incorporating Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, Purcell's legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music. He is generally considered to be one of the greatest English composers; no other native-born English composer approached his fame until Edward Elgar.

Dido and Aeneas (Z. 626)[1] is an opera in a prologue and three acts, written by the English Baroque composer Henry Purcell with a libretto by Nahum Tate. The first known performance was at Josias Priest's girls' school in London no later than the summer of 1688. The story is based on Book IV of Virgil's Aeneid. It recounts the love of Dido, Queen of Carthage, for the Trojan hero Aeneas, and her despair when he abandons her. A monumental work in Baroque opera, Dido and Aeneas is remembered as one of Purcell's foremost theatrical works. It was also Purcell's first opera, as well as his only all-sung dramatic work. One of the earliest English operas, it owes much to John Blow's Venus and Adonis, both in structure and in overall effect.

The soprano aria "When I am laid in Earth" is the 37th song from the opera (Z. 626/37) and is the most famous excerpt from this work. It can be counted among the finest moments in all of opera. Deserted by her lover, Aeneas, Dido sings her final lament, knowing that she must die without him. She sings first to her handmaiden, Belinda, in a tender and affecting recitative; the aria which follows is built on a five-bar ground bass. Purcell's manipulation of this compositional device, as well as his scrupulous avoidance of sentimental indulgence accounts for the scene's fame. Richard Wagner must surely have known of this scene when he composed his own "Love-Death" in Tristan und Isolde.

Although this piece was originally written for Operatic String Orchestra, I arranged it for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Excerpt from "Carillon" (L'Arlésienne Suite No 1 Mvt 4) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages02:326 years ago2,470 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Georges Bizet formally Alexandre César Léopold Bizet, (1838 – 1875) was a French composer, mainly of operas. In a career cut short by his early death, he achieved few successes before his final work, Carmen, became one of the most popular and frequently performed works in the entire opera repertory.

After the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, in which Bizet served in the National Guard, he had little success with his one-act opera Djamileh, though an orchestral suite derived from his incidental music to Alphonse Daudet's play L'Arlésienne was instantly popular.

The incidental music to Alphonse Daudet's play L'Arlésienne (usually translated as 'The Girl from Arles') was composed by Georges Bizet for the first performance of the play on 1 October 1872 at the Vaudeville Theatre (now known as the Paramount Theatre). It consists of 27 numbers (some only a few bars) for voice, chorus, and small orchestra, ranging from short solos to longer entr'actes. Bizet himself played the harmonium backstage at the premiere performance. The incidental music has survived and flourished, however, in the form of two suites for orchestra.


Although this piece was originally written for Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Lydia" (Opus 4 No. 2) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts1 page01:246 years ago1,383 views
Gabriel Fauré (1845 - 1924) was a French composer, born into the minor aristocracy, he enrolled at age nine in a Paris music school, where he studied with Camille Saint-Saens and remained 11 years. He held the prestigious organist positions at the churches of Saint-Sulpice (187174) and the Madeleine (1896- 1905). In 1896 he also became professor of composition at the Paris Conservatory, where he taught students such as Maurice Ravel and Nadia Boulanger. He served as its director 1905-20. In 1909 he accepted the presidency of the Socit Musicale Indpendante, a group of dissident young composers. His works include the operas Promthe (1900), Pnlope (1913), and Masques et bergamasques (1919), the orchestral suite Pellas et Mlisande (1898), two piano quartets (1879, 1886), numerous piano nocturnes and barcaroles, a famous Requiem (1900), and many beautiful songs.

Gabriel Fauré has long been criticized for sullying his otherwise esteemed body of art songs with settings of poems by inferior authors. His settings of Verlaine, for example, are among his most beloved. But other poems, such as that used in Lydia, the second song for voice and piano from Gabriel Fauré's Op. 2, are regarded more coolly in academic circles. This, of course, unfairly projects modern tastes onto fin de siècle culture, and at any rate fails to address the innovations and seminal stylistic characteristics that this early song exhibits. The text, taken from Leconte de Lisle, plays on the ageless European literary conceit of using "death" or "dying" as a euphemism for the erotic. The poet hardly casts the image as a metaphor, describing a "death" imposed by the physical beauty of the beloved. Fauré, on the other hand, paces the dramatic curve of the song, with its hushed repeated chords and chromatic chord progressions growing more intense as the singer's melody arches ever higher. The song, of course, reaches its zenith at the moment of death: "Oh Lydia, return my life to me/That I might die, die forever." Fauré's biographers and others, recognizing the composer's penchant for self-borrowing, have traced the vocal melody of Lydia, with its stepwise ascents and descents and subsequent scalar figure that together chart an underlying upward incline, through nearly four decades of Fauré's oeuvre: first in "La lune blanche" from La bonne chanson (1893), then Act III of Prométhée (1900), and finally, the Kyrie from Messe basse (1906). Scholar Carlo Caballero, for example, traces Fauré's frequent use of the sharped-fourth scale degree or (appropriately enough) Lydian mode to this early song. These borrowings beg no particular cross-readings or intertextual connections, but, intentionally explicit or not, rather point up the general stylistic consistency one finds throughout Fauré's work, beginning with these early songs.

Although this piece was originally written for voices, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Tarantelle" (Opus 10 No. 2) for Piccolo, Flute & Harp

3 parts9 pages02:446 years ago1,155 views
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 – 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th-century composers. Among his best-known works are his Pavane, Requiem, nocturnes for piano and the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune". Although his best-known and most accessible compositions are generally his earlier ones, Fauré composed many of his greatest works in his later years, in a harmonically and melodically much more complex style.

Though Gabriel Fauré frequently incorporated vocal duets into his sacred works, few duets are to be found among the composer's chansons. One rare example is the Two Duets, Opus 10 (1863 & 1873). The first of these (Puisqu' Ici-bas ), with its strophic arrangement, lends itself naturally to a duet setting. This, the second (Tarantelle) is far less structured and even folkish, and the composer here combines the two voices to evoke the unrestrained nature of the dance. The duet ends with a wild yet graceful refrain that suggests a couple enjoying the abandon of dancing together. While both duets are quick-paced, the strong structure of the first and the looser structure of the second provide a vivid contrast.

Fauré conceived "Two Duets" (Opus 10) for Claudie and Marianne Viardot (his being in love with Marianne at the time). Tarantelle is as much of an erotic song as the times allowed. the first performance of both the duets of Opus 10 was given a concert at the societe Nationale de la Musique (SNM) on 10 April 1875. With the help of Messager, Fauré orchestrated this duet later in the same year.

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Soprano Voices, I created this arrangement for Piccolo (or Flute), Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Puisqu'ici-bas Toute Âme" (Opus 10 No. 1) for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts7 pages02:436 years ago1,540 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 – 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th-century composers. Among his best-known works are his Pavane, Requiem, nocturnes for piano and the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune". Although his best-known and most accessible compositions are generally his earlier ones, Fauré composed many of his greatest works in his later years, in a harmonically and melodically much more complex style.

Though Gabriel Fauré frequently incorporated vocal duets into his sacred works, few duets are to be found among the composer's chansons. One rare example is the Two Duets, Opus 10 (1863 & 1873). The first of these (Puisqu' Ici-bas ), with its strophic arrangement, lends itself naturally to a duet setting. This, the second (Tarantelle) is far less structured and even folkish, and the composer here combines the two voices to evoke the unrestrained nature of the dance. The duet ends with a wild yet graceful refrain that suggests a couple enjoying the abandon of dancing together. While both duets are quick-paced, the strong structure of the first and the looser structure of the second provide a vivid contrast.

This music comes from the same period as Mai. The melody is similarly ingratiating and anxious to please – a good match for the ardour of the poem which also inspired one of Reynaldo Hahn’s most successful early songs. If the packaging of this duet is much more refined and accomplished than Mai it is because Fauré took the sketch of the solo song out of the cupboard and revised it a decade later for those duet-singing sisters, the daughters of Pauline Viardot. At the time Fauré was engaged to Marianne Viardot. This is a hybrid work where the spontaneity of the teenager’s original sketches is checked by the suave manners of the twenty-eight year-old. It is little wonder that this music comes across like an exquisitely delivered calling card, a veritable compliment galant. The piano-writing is typical of the young master’s flawless weave – a silken carpet of sound. Semiquaver arpeggios waft up and down the keyboard. These seem effortless except to the person who has to play them; as always with this composer they contain countless tiny harmonic shifts to catch out the unwary. Fauré can always take us anywhere he likes, and on any degree of the scale; here he proceeds to do just that, like a dentist accomplishing the most difficult bridge-work while his patients (in this case the listeners) are scarcely aware of the drill. The mezzo soprano makes her entrance after a nine-bar solo for the soprano. When the two voices first come together it is in a falling line of seductive thirds (at ‘Puisque, lorsqu’elle arrive / S’y reposer’). Jean-Michel Nectoux has defined this phrase as an example of the ‘Viardot motif’ in Fauré’s music – ‘the formula of a rising sixth or octave followed by a descent through conjunct steps’. There is a masterly interplay between the voices – one can hear the fruits of assiduous study of fugue and counterpoint. But high learning is disguised by a sweetness of diction and gentleness of intent. Even when in love Fauré is a master of self-effacement.

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Soprano Voices, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"As Lately We Watched" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages02:206 years ago1,105 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
From Austria comes this traditional carol, sung to a tune similar to the old English "We Wish You a Merry Christmas." As with such other carols as "Angels We Have Heard on High," "Angels from the Realms of Glory" and "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night," the song tells the story of the Nativity from the point of view of the shepherds near Bethlehem who follow the path of the star, hear the angels proclaim the birth of the newborn King and finally see the Infant in His manger-throne.

Although this piece was originally written for Voices, I arranged it for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Snow Falls Soft in the Night" for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:126 years ago779 views
"Snow Falls Soft in the Night" (Leise rieselt der Schnee) is a contemporary German Christmas Carol was written by Eduard Ebel (1839-1905). The English translation for this German Christmas Carol was provided by Loralee Jo Kurzius.

I created this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) using Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Ave Maria" for Woodwind Septet

7 parts3 pages02:086 years ago1,099 views
Josef Anton Bruckner was born on September 4, 1824 in the upper Austrian town of Ansfelden. His father was a schoolteacher and church organist, and Bruckner's initial studies followed similar lines. When Bruckner was 13, his father died, and he enrolled in the church school at St. Florian (some ten miles from Linz) as a chorister. There, he studied organ, piano, and music theory.

At the age of 16, he entered a teacher-training school in Linz, and began work as a schoolteacher at St. Florian in 1845. He became the cathedral organist in 1848. At St. Florian he began to compose sacred music. In 1855, he went to Vienna to formally study harmony and counterpoint at the Vienna Conservatory under Professor Simon Sechter. The next year, he became the cathedral organist in Linz, and began studies in orchestration with Otto Kitzler, a cellist who introduced Bruckner to Wagner's operas.

On his own, Bruckner assiduously studied the music of Renaissance Italian polyphonic masters such as Palestrina and German Baroque composers, especially J.S. Bach. He completed his studies with Sechter in 1861, and began to make a name for himself as a composer and an improviser at the organ. He moved to Vienna in 1868 to take appointments as the Emperor's court organist and to take over Sechter's professorship in harmony and counterpoint at the Vienna Conservatory.

Bruckner spent the 1870's and 1880's giving masterful organ recitals and composing symphonies. Due to his failing health, he resigned from the Conservatory in 1891, and devoted his last years to work on his ninth symphony. This symphony, sadly, remained incomplete at the time of his death in Vienna on October 11, 1896.

The Ave Maria is a supplication to the Virgin Mary, based on text from the annunciation. Bruckner wrote this seven-part setting in 1861, making it the first major composition that he completed after five years of arduous study with Sechter. The first segment of Bruckner's setting contrasts the three-part women's choir and the four-part men's choir, which unite in the proclamation of the name of Jesus. The second segment is for all seven parts, with a particularly effective diminuendo as the choir asks for intervention for us sinners.

Although this piece was originally written for Voices (SAATTBB), I arranged it for Woodwind Septet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bass Clarinet & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Leaving of Liverpool" for Flute & Bassoon

2 parts1 page03:126 years ago1,564 views
Flute, Bassoon
"Leaving of Liverpool", (Roud 9435), also known as "Fare Thee Well, My Own True Love", is a folk ballad, a popular and wistful song. The song's narrator laments his long sailing trip to America and the thought of leaving his birthplace and loved ones (especially his "own true love"). Liverpool was the natural point of embarkation because it had the necessary shipping lines and a choice of destinations and infrastructure, including special emigration trains directly to The Prince's Landing Stage (which is mentioned in the song's first line).

It was collected as a sailor's song, but noted only twice: from the Americans Richard Maitland and Captain Patrick Tayluer. Maitland learned it from a Liverpool man on board the General Knox around 1885. It was collected from him by Bill Doerflinger, an American folk-song collector particularly associated with sea-songs, in New York.

Although originally written for folk Instruments, I arranged this piece for Edith and Dirk from the Antwerpen Harmonie using Flute & Bassoon.
"Children, Hear Who's Knocking" for Flute & Harp
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"Children, Hear Who's Knocking" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:306 years ago1,389 views
Flute, Harp
Santa Claus, also known as Saint Nicholas, Father Christmas and simply "Santa", is a figure with legendary, mythical, historical and folkloric origins who, in many western cultures, is said to bring gifts to the homes of the good children during the late evening and overnight hours of Christmas Eve, December 24. The modern figure was derived from the Dutch figure of Sinterklaas, which, in turn, may have part of its basis in hagiographical tales concerning the historical figure of gift giver Saint Nicholas. A nearly identical story is attributed by Greek and Byzantine folklore to Basil of Caesarea. Basil's feast day on January 1 is considered the time of exchanging gifts in Greece.

Saint Nicholas of Myra is the primary inspiration for the Christian figure of Sinterklaas. He was a 4th century Greek Christian bishop of Myra (now Demre) in Lycia, a province of the Byzantine Anatolia, now in Turkey. Nicholas was famous for his generous gifts to the poor, in particular presenting the three impoverished daughters of a pious Christian with dowries so that they would not have to become prostitutes. He was very religious from an early age and devoted his life entirely to Christianity. In continental Europe (more precisely the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and Germany) he is usually portrayed as a bearded bishop in canonical robes.

In the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg, Saint Nicholas ("Sinterklaas", often called "De Goede Sint"—"The Good Saint") is an elderly, stately and serious man with white hair and a long, full beard. He wears a long red cape or chasuble over a traditional white bishop's alb and sometimes red stola, dons a red mitre, and holds a gold-coloured crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd's staff with a fancy curled top.

In the Netherlands the Dutch celebrate on the evening of December 5, with a celebration called "pakjesavond". In the Reformation in 16th-17th century Europe, many Protestants and others changed the gift bringer to the Christ Child or Christkindl, and the date for giving gifts changed from December 6 to Christmas Eve.

I created this arrangement with Jenne Van Antwerpen for two beautiful Belgian children Soetkin and Katelijn. This arrangement uses Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"All Through the Night" for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts4 pages02:466 years ago1,980 views
"All Through the Night" (Welsh: Ar Hyd y Nos) is a Welsh folksong sung to a tune that was first recorded in Edward Jones' Musical and Poetical Relics of the Welsh Bards (1784). The Welsh lyrics were written by John Ceiriog Hughes, and has been translated into several languages, including English (most famously by Harry Boulton) and Breton. One of the earliest English versions was by Thomas Oliphant in 1862.

The melody was used by John Gay in The Beggar's Opera. It is also used in the hymn "Go My Children With My Blessing." The song is highly popular with traditional Welsh male voice choirs, and is sung by them at festivals in Wales and around the world.

The song is also sometimes considered a Christmas carol, and as such has been covered by numerous artists on Christmas albums, most recently including Olivia Newton-John and Michael McDonald who performed the song as a duet on Newton-John's 2007 album Christmas Wish. Cerys Matthews has also sung "Ar hyd y nos".

Although this work was originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Imagination" for Flute & Harp

2 parts6 pages02:176 years ago500 views
The mind is infinite. Its beginnings and its endings are intangible. Thanks to God, our powerful imagination (the "MIND" of mankind) came into being - a new, completely unique mental power that is continuously exploring, discovering, and unraveling the mysteries of nature.

This work is my attempt (albeit amateurish) to portray the mind's insatiable curiosity and its ability to continually adapt and refine itself. To this end, I created it especially for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Wonder! Wonder!" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:166 years ago622 views
Although little is written about this 18th century Englisg Christmas Carol, "Wonder! Wonder!" (aslo known as "Wonder, Wonder") is a relevant Americal Christmas tune.

Although this piece was originally written for Chorus, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"O Little One Sweet" (BWV 493) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts1 page01:096 years ago1,368 views
"O Little One Sweet" (O Jesulein süß) is actually an old German tune, harmonized by Johann Sebastian with words first appearing in Scheidt's "Tablaturbuch" (1650).

When Georg Christian Schemelli published his Schemelli Gesangbuch (Schemelli's Songbook) in 1736, he called upon his friend Johann Sebastian Bach to provide the figured bass for many of the well-known Lutheran hymn tunes. One of Bach's 69 settings was for O Jesulein süss, a Christmas hymn by Paul Gerhardt from 1665. Bach let Gerhardt's five-line melody stand almost unaltered but added wonderful harmonies beneath it. The brief piece opens in the minor but cadences in the major by the end of the opening line, modulates briefly to the relative minor in the third and fourth lines and closes with the return of the opening line as the fifth and final line.

Although this piece was originally written for Chorus, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Il est né, le Divin Enfant" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:516 years ago1,584 views
"Il est né, le divin Enfant" (English: He is born, the divine Child) is a traditional French Christmas carol, which was published for the first time in 1862 by R. Grosjean, organist of the Cathedral of Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, in a collection of carols entitled "Airs des noêl lorrains." The text of the carol was published for the first time in a collection of ancient carols, published in either 1875 or 1876 by Dom G. Legeay.

The text of the carol, which is written in four stanzas, details the birth of Jesus and the wait of 4000 years for the event, as told by the prophets. It also calls on the Kings of the Orient to attend the child.

Although this piece was originally written for Chorus, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts3 pages02:596 years ago3,076 views
Johann Sebastian Bach's sacred Cantata No. 147 "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben" ("Heart and Mouth, Deeds and Life"), was written for the feast of the Visitation of the Virgin Mary and first performed in its final definitive form in Leipzig to mark the feast day, July 2, 1723. Much of the work originated during the composer's tenure as Konzertmeister in Weimar, where upon his appointment in 1714 he also assumed responsibility for the provision of a new cantata each month for services held in the Duke's chapel. In its earliest form (BWV 147a), this cantata was intended to be given on the fourth Sunday of Advent, 1716. This version contained four main arias and an opening chorus, but no recitative sections, three of which were added later, along with the great chorale, which brings each of the main sections to its close. The autograph of the Leipzig version survives intact, but all except the opening movement of the first version has perished. Interestingly, the composer's original design for the Advent feasts at Weimar would have been considered entirely unsuitable by the church authorities in Leipzig, who had forbidden the performance of all concert music during this period of the liturgical year. Bach managed to overcome this restriction by incorporating references to the "Magnificat" (Luke 1: 39-56) into the score, thus tailoring the cantata specifically to the Feast of the Visitation.

The final version begins with an elaborate chorus in C major, in which the celebratory tone is established by the fanfare-like opening section for orchestra. Part I concludes with the famous chorale known in English as "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring." Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th movement of the cantata.

Although it is the 32nd surviving cantata that Bach composed, it was assigned the number BWV 147 in the complete catalogue of his works. Bach wrote a total of 200 cantatas during his time in Leipzig, largely to meet the Leipzig Churches' demand for about 58 different cantatas each year.

Contrary to the common assumption, the violinist and composer Johann Schop, not Bach, composed the movement's underlying chorale melody, Werde munter, mein Gemüthe; Bach's contribution was to harmonize and orchestrate it. The frequent use of arrangements of the piece in modern weddings is in no way related to its scope or Bach's intent for it. Rather, it was one segment of an extended, approximately 20-minute treatment of a traditional Church hymn, as is typical of cantatas of the Baroque period.

Although originally composed as a choral cantata, I created this arrangement for Woodwind trio (Flute, Oboe and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Heavens Are Telling" (H.21/2 Part 1 No. 13) for Woodwind Septet

7 parts8 pages03:346 years ago2,573 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon
The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. It is scored for soprano, tenor and bass soloists, chorus and a symphonic orchestra, and is structured in three parts.

No. 13. Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes (The heavens are telling the glory of God)

The text is based on Psalm 19:1–3, which had been set by Bach as the opening chorus of his cantata Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes, BWV 76. Haydn's century, following on the discoveries of Newton, had the view that an orderly universe—particularly the mathematically-governed motion of the heavenly bodies—attests to divine wisdom. Haydn, a naturally curious man, may have had an amateur interest in astronomy, as while in England he took the trouble to visit William Herschel, ex-composer and discoverer of Uranus, in his observatory in Slough.

"Die Himmel erzählen" is not in the home key of Part I, C minor, but is instead in C major, showing the triumph of light over dark. It begins with alternation between celebratory choral passages and more meditative sequences from the three vocal soloists, followed by a choral fugue on the words "Und seiner Hände Werk zeigt an das Firmament", then a final homophonic section. ("The wonder of his works displays the firmament" is the English text here, with word-order calqued from the German, but somewhat awkward compared to the Authorized Version's "And the firmament sheweth the handywork of God".) The unusual intensity of the ending may be the result of Haydn's piling of coda upon coda, each occurring at a point where the music seems about to end.

Although this piece was originally written for Opera, I arranged it for Woodwind Septet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bass Clarinet & Bassoon). This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Wexford Carol" for Flute & Oboe

2 parts1 page01:516 years ago2,711 views
Flute, Oboe
The Wexford Carol (Irish: Carúl Loch Garman, Carúl Inis Córthaidh) is a traditional religious Irish Christmas carol originating from County Wexford, and specifically, Enniscorthy (whence its other name), and dating to the 12th century. The subject of the song is that of the nativity of Jesus Christ.

"The Wexford Carol" is one of the oldest extant Christmas carols in the European tradition. Traditions abound concerning the song. For many years, it was felt that only men should sing it. It was only at the current revival of all things Irish that this attitude changed. Many popular female artists, such as Loreena McKennitt, recorded the “Wexford Carol” during the 1990s.

The song achieved a new popularity because of the work of William Grattan Flood (1859 - 1928), who was organist and musical director at St. Aidan's Cathedral in Enniscorthy. He transcribed the carol from a local singer, and had it published in the Oxford Book of Carols, putting Enniscorthy into most carol books around the world. The song is sometimes known by its first verse, "Good people all this Christmas time."

Although originally written for voice, I created this arrangement for Flute and Oboe.

"Bring a Torch Jeanette Isabella" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts1 page01:356 years ago827 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
"Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabelle" (French: Un flambeau, Jeannette, Isabelle) is a Christmas carol which originated from the Provence region of France in the 16th century.

The carol was first published in 1553 in France, and was subsequently translated into English in the 18th century. The song was originally not a song to be sung at Christmas, but rather dance music for French nobility.

In the carol, visitors to the stable have to keep their voices down so the newborn can enjoy his dreams. To this day in the Provence region, children dress up as shepherds and milkmaids, carrying torches and candles to Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve, while singing the carol. The painter Georges de La Tour painted a nativity scene based on the carol.

Although this piece was originally written for Chorus, I arranged it for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) and although this carol is usually notated in 3/8 time, I arranged in 3/4 time for readability.

"Let Us Christians Rejoice" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts1 page00:536 years ago755 views
"Nuż my dziś, krześcijani" ("Let Us Christians Rejoice") was transcribed from the "Kolędy polskie: Średniowiecze i wiek XVI" by PAX, Warszawa in 1966. It was issued for a 1000th anniversary of the baptism of Poland (A.D. 966), regarded as the beginning of the state of Poland. This piece dates back to ca. 1586.

The tradition of singing carols was, and is, very strong in Poland. Many of the origins of the songs cannot be traced however since the Folk tunes, Church melodies, old texts, modern compositions in folk style all blend together and are difficult to differentiate.

Although originally composed for voice, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Little Cuckoo" for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:116 years ago553 views
"Y Gwcw Fach" (The Little Cuckoo), is one of the many Welsh songs dealing with cuckoos, which are a sign of spring. This song asks the cuckoo to carry a message of hope and comfort to the singer’s lover.

Collected just outside Chicago by the Reverend R Silyn Roberts, Gwcw Fach was published by Robert Bryan in Alawon y Celt.

Although written for voice, this arrangement was created for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Scotland the Brave" for Wind Quintet
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"Scotland the Brave" for Wind Quintet

5 parts3 pages03:146 years ago6,599 views
Flute(2), Trumpet, Clarinet(2)
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I arranged it especially for the Physicians of "Music of the Heart" (http://www.hfmhealth.org/musicfromtheheart) Wind Quintet (2 Flutes, Bb Clarinet, Trumpet & Bass Clarinet).

"King of the Pipers" for Piccolo

1 part4 pages02:566 years ago2,327 views
Piccolo
The "King of the Pipers" is a traditional Irish Jig of unknown origin. Although usually associated with the bagpipes, it is not actually played much at all on the Uilleann pipes (traditional bagpip[es of Ireland). The tune is strongly associated with the fiddle playing of Donegal and is annotated in "the Northern Fiddler" an out of print classic which collects the tunes of well known fiddlers from that county.

The Jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound meter, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th century England, and was quickly adopted on the Continent where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga). Today it is most associated with Irish dance music and Scottish country dance music. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Although originally written for uilleann pipes, I created this arrangement for solo Piccolo.

"The Gartan Mother's Lullaby" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts5 pages04:286 years ago2,294 views
"Gartan Mother's Lullaby" is an old Irish song and poem written by Herbert Hughes and Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil, first published in Songs of Uladh [Ulster] in 1904. Hughes collected the traditional melody in Donegal the previous year and Campbell wrote the lyrics. The song is a lullaby by a mother, from the parish of Gartan in County Donegal, to her child. The song refers to a number of figures in Irish mythology, places in Ireland and words in the Irish language.

It is interesting on a personal note that both Hughes & Campbell were from Belfast, Hughes being a Protestant (Methodist) and Campbell a Catholic. Hughes collected the trad melody in Donegal the previous year, and Campbell wrote the lyrics. In the second line, there is a word that sounds something like Eeval, but it refers to "Aoibheal", the fairy or bean sidhe who guards the Grey Rock. According 'True Irish Ghost Stories', "The most famous [sídhe] of ancient times was that attached to the kingly house of O'Brien, Aibhill [Aoibheall], who haunted the rock of Craglea above Killaloe, near the old palace of Kincora. In A.D. 1014 was fought the battle of Clontarf, from which the aged king, Brian Boru, knew that he would never come away alive, for the previous night Aibhill had appeared to him to tell him of his impending fate."

Jenne Van Antwerpen (http://musescore.com/user/53615) and I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Harp with emphasis on the quite solace of a bedtime lullaby. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Nun komm' der Heiden Heiland" (BWV 659) for Flute & Harpsichord

2 parts3 pages03:246 years ago906 views
The Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes, BWV 651–668, are a set of chorale preludes for organ prepared by Johann Sebastian Bach in Leipzig in his final decade 1740-1750, from earlier works composed in Weimar, where he was court organist. The works form an encyclopedic collection of large scale chorale preludes, in a variety of styles harking back to the previous century, that Bach gradually perfected during his career. Together with the Orgelbüchlein, the Schübler Chorales and the third book of the Clavier-Übung, they represent the summit of Bach's sacred music for solo organ.

"Now comes the gentiles' Saviour" (Nun komm' der Heiden Heiland), BWV 659, is written in meantone temperament over the quavers of the continuo-like "walking bass" in the pedal, the two inner parts move forward meditatively in canon, beneath the florid and melismatic cantus firmus. The beautiful melody, endlessly prolonged and never fully perceptible amid the freely spiraling arabesques, evokes the mystery of the incarnation; it is matched by the perfection of the accompaniment.

BWV 659a (the original version) was composed in weimar between 1711 and 1713. By the end of his life he reworked it (this version is known as BWV 659, composed by Bach in the late 1740s).

Although this work was written for solo voice and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Harpsichord and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Queen's Farewell" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:046 years ago1,191 views
Thomas Tollett was born in Dublin Ireland in the early 1600;s. he was one of three brothers (John & Charles) who were members of the Dublin city music from 1678 to 1688. In 1689, he came to London and lived as a composer. 1n 1695 he received an appointment to the royal court (King's Musick) but without fee.

In the time of Henry Purcell, odes were composed by the Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal. Thomas Tollett was a court musician at the Chapel Royal during the reign of Queen Mary and was called upon to produce a funeral march for the procession at her death. His manuscript remains at the Bodleian Library.

Although originally written for period brass ensemble, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Trio (Fllute, Oboe & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Gavotta" (Opus 5 No. 2 RV 30) for Flute & Bassoon

2 parts2 pages03:036 years ago1,570 views
Flute, Bassoon
Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) started playing the violin in his early years. He started studying to become a priest when he was 15 and was ordained in 1703 at the age of 25. In September 1703 Vivaldi became a violin teacher at an orphanage where he started writing concertos and sacred vocal music for the oprhans. Later on he became responsible for all the musical activity of the institution. Around 1717 Vivaldi was offered a new position as Maestro di Cappella (in charge of music in a chapel) of the governor of Mantua. During this period Vivaldi wrote his famous four violin concertos the Four seasons.

Antonio Vivaldi's concertos cut a revolutionary swath through the more fustian rituals of high Baroque music in much the way that minimalism gutted academic serialism 250 years later. They standardized the fast-slow-fast movement scheme that has survived as the classic concerto pattern, and developed the ritornello form (in which a refrain for the ensemble alternates with free episodes for the soloist), using it as a vehicle for thematic integration and elaboration. Vivaldi's 500-plus concertos were athletic entertainments that swept continental Europe, influencing not only younger composers, but causing a wave of stylistic conversion in older ones.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote a set of sonatas, Op. 5, in 1716. This arrangement is from the Gavotta (Allegro) movement of the Sonata No. 2 in A Major, RV 30 à violino solo e Basso Continuo, Opera Quinta.

Although originally written for Violin and Basso Continuo, I arranged this piece for Flute & Bassoon.
"Echo Duet" for Flute & Oboe
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"Echo Duet" for Flute & Oboe

2 parts2 pages02:256 years ago10,834 views
Flute, Oboe
Jenne Van Antwerpen (http://musescore.com/user/53615) and I created this piece as a brisk duet for two woodwinds (flute & oboe). It is set in a canonistic style and meant to invoke images of a mountain echo because, in the mountains, there's always an echo. Before there was phone or internet or texting, people used yodeling or whistling to send messages from one top of the mountain to another and of course; with an echo! It is still used today as fail-safe warning for avalanches.

This piece was created for Flute & Oboe Duet and is intended to be performed fast!

"Concerto I" in A Minor (BWV 1041) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts26 pages13:496 years ago1,229 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
The "Concerto I" in A minor, BWV 1041, was composed by Johann Sebastian Bach as a Violin Concerto. It is unknown exactly when the work was composed, but copies dated 1730 suggest it may have been composed later than the other two concertos for violin, perhaps during Bach's time as director of the Collegium Musicum in Leipzig.

The piece has three movements:

1. Allegro moderato
2. Andante — with an ostinato style theme
3. Allegro assai

The motifs of the theme of the Allegro moderato appear in changing combinations and are separated and intensified throughout the movement.

In the Andante Bach uses an insistent pattern in the bass part that is repeated constantly in the movement. He focuses the variation in the harmonic relations.
In the final movement Bach relies on bariolage figures to generate striking acoustic effects.

The piece is a baroque concerto which is in ritornello form. This means that there is a main section that comes back in fragments in both the solo and orchestral parts. This 'ritornello' can be found in the first movement up until bar 24.

Although this piece was originally written for String Orchestra, I arranged it for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon).

"Fürchte Dich Nicht, Ich Bin Bei Dir" (BWV 228) for Woodwind Quartet

8 parts16 pages09:066 years ago517 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon(2)
There are five extant motets firmly attributed to Bach -- a small number compared with his huge output of cantatas. Whereas the more plentiful cantatas served a liturgical purpose, the Lutheran church had no need of such short choral works, utilizing instead the large stock of motets already available in Leipzig and elsewhere. Bach's motets were therefore all composed for special occasions in Leipzig, primarily funerals -- events particularly suited to such serious contrapuntal compositions.

The text of BWV 228 ("Be not afraid, for I am with thee") clearly marks it out as falling within this category, although the exact circumstances for which it was composed remain unknown. Taken from two verses from chapters 41 and 43 of Isaiah and the hymn "Warum sollt ich mich denn grämen" by Paul Gerhardt, the text is divided into three interlinked sections; the opening phrase acts as a link that gives the motet strong structural coherence. Certain stylistic features of the writing suggest that the work may have originated earlier than Bach's time in Leipzig. It is scored for two four-part choruses, possibly intended to be supported by continuo bass (the original score was lost, leaving some issues of instrumentation open to question).

The motet opens with a largely homophonic eight-part chorus that introduces some striking dissonant harmony; this gives way to a more lightly scored four-part chorus, in which the hymn tune is heard in long notes in the soprano line. Later the eight-part opening phrase again returns, now embellished by the second stanza of the hymn.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%BCrchte_dich_nicht,_BWV_228).

I created this arrangement of the Chorus "Fürchte dich nicht, ich bin bei dir" (Do not fear, I am with you) for Double Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon).

"O Lamm Gottes, Unschuldig" (BWV 401) for Flute & Piano

2 parts1 page01:386 years ago530 views
Compared to most other major composers, Johann Sebastian Bach's life and career were confined to a very limited geographical space. Born and raised in Thuringia, he never went farther north than Hamburg and Lübeck, or farther south than Carlsbad. In a similarly confined way, his east-west range stretched from Dresden (east) to Kassel (west). His complete geographical space can be found on a map derived from Christoph Wolff's great scholarly Bach study (Chr. Wolff, Bach, Essays on His Life and Music. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1991).

"O Lamm Gottes, Unschuldig" (BWV 401: O Lamb of God, Most Holy) is an An amazing, trancelike choral work, based on a Lenten Chorale and utilizing a pervasive grief motive accompanying a canon at the fifth. It is taken from from the Vocal Works (other than Cantatas) of J. S. Bach. Written both in German and Dutch, the work translates to English as:

O Lamb of God all holy,
Who on the Cross didst sufer,
And patient still and lowly,
Thyself to scorn didst offer:
Our sins by Thee were taken,
Or hope had us forsaken:
Have mercy upon us, o Jesu.

Although originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for Flute & Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Thine be the Glory" (HWV 63) for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts1 page02:206 years ago1,081 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
George Frideric Handel (1685–1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalized British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Judas Maccabaeus (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24.

In 1884 the Swiss writer Edmond Louis Budry wrote new French words to the same chorus, creating the Easter hymn " À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!", which was later translated into English as "Thine Be the Glory".

Although this work was originally written for Orchestra and Chorus, Daniel Rouwkema created an arrangement for accompanied chorus and I transcribed it for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Schlage Doch, Gewünschte Stunde" (BWV 53) for Woodwind Quintet

6 parts10 pages05:366 years ago344 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, Percussion
Something of an oddity, the single movement cantata BWV 53 is now considered of uncertain provenance and it has been suggested that the work may be by G.M. Hoffman (thought also to be responsible for BWV 189). The work remains in Anhang II of the BWV (reserved for those works whose attribution is still uncertain). Listening to the cantata, some of its thematic material is suggestive of Bach but the accompanying bells would be unique amongst Bach's surviving output!

Schlage doch, gewünschte Stunde, BWV 53, is an funeral cantata aria, composed for contralto Georg Melchior Hoffmann in around 1730 in Leipzig. The instrumentation was originally written for two violins, viola, glockenspiel, bass and contralto solo.

Please note that I took creative license with this piece and as such, it may not appeal to all listeners (musically, spiritually or emotionally). I do not intend to offend anyone so I will apologize up front!

I created this inusual arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bass Clarinet & Bassoon) and optional Tubular Bells.

"Qui Sedes ad Dexteram Patris" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 10) for Wind Sextet

6 parts9 pages03:386 years ago767 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Qui Sedes ad Dexteram Patris" (The Seat at the right hand of the Father) for Wind Sextet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon).
"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes
Video

"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:446 years ago4,236 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Gloria in excelsis Deo" (Latin for "Glory to God in the highest") is a hymn known also as the Greater Doxology (as distinguished from the "Minor Doxology" or Gloria Patri) and the Angelic Hymn. The name is often abbreviated to Gloria in Excelsis or simply Gloria.

It is an example of the psalmi idiotici ("private psalms", i.e. compositions by individuals in imitation of the biblical Psalter) that were popular in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Other surviving examples of this lyric poetry are the Te Deum and the Phos Hilaron.

The hymn begins with the words that the angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds in Luke 2:14. Other verses were added very early, forming a doxology, which in the 4th century became part of morning prayers, and is still recited in the Byzantine Rite Orthros service.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote several settings of the Gloria. RV 589 is the most familiar and popular piece of sacred music by Vivaldi; however, he was known to have written at least three Gloria settings. Only two survive (RV 588 and RV 589) whilst the other (RV 590) is presumably lost and is only mentioned in the Kreuzherren catalogue. The two were written at about the same time (it is disputed which came first) in the early 18th century.

Although originally composed for voice and orchestra, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).
"Ombra Mai Fu" (HWV 40) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Ombra Mai Fu" (HWV 40) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:406 years ago2,731 views
Flute, Harp
Serse (Xerxes, HWV 40) is an opera seria in three acts by George Frideric Handel. It was first performed in London on 15 April 1738. The Italian libretto was adapted by an unknown hand from that by Silvio Stampiglia for an earlier opera of the same name by Giovanni Bononcini in 1694. Stampiglia's libretto was itself based on one by Nicolò Minato that was set by Francesco Cavalli in 1654. The opera is set in Persia (modern day Iran) in 480 BC and is very loosely based upon Xerxes I of Persia, though there is little in either the libretto or music that is relevant to that setting. Xerxes, originally sung by a castrato, is now generally performed by a mezzo-soprano, contralto or countertenor. Although the English title Xerxes is widely used, the original Italian title was Serse.

The opening aria, "Ombra mai fu", sung by Xerxes to a tree (Platanus orientalis), is set to one of Handel's best-known melodies, and is often played in an orchestral arrangement, known as Handel's "largo" (despite being marked "larghetto" in the score).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

March from "Judas Maccabäus" (HWV 63) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts2 pages01:306 years ago549 views
"Judas Maccabaeus" (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24. Morell's libretto is based on the deuterocanonical 1 Maccabees (2-8), with motives added from the Antiquitates Judaicae by Flavius Josephus.

The events depicted in the oratorio are from the period 170-160 BC when Judea was ruled by the Seleucid Empire which undertook to destroy the Jewish religion. Being ordered to worship Zeus, many Jews obeyed under the threat of persecution, however some did not. One who defied was the elderly priest Mattathias who killed a fellow Jew who was about to offer a pagan sacrifice. After tearing down a pagan altar, Mattathias retreated to the hills and gathered others who were willing to fight for their faith.

The March is from ACT III depicting Victory that has finally been achieved for the Jewish people. News arrives that Rome is willing to form an alliance with Judas against the Seleucid empire. The people rejoice that peace has at last come to their country (O lovely peace).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Smiling Hours" from "Hercules" (HWV 60) for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:306 years ago670 views
Handel characterized this piece as a "musical drama," to be sung in the theater, but unstaged, rather than either oratorio or opera, but it has been performed as both during its history. Like many of his masterworks, such as Messiah, it was written in a short time, from mid-July to mid-August, but it shows no signs of haste. At its first performances at the King's Theater in London, it was very badly received, and many of the composer's supporters blamed this on the extra-musical vagaries of fashionable society rather than on any deficiencies in the work itself. In addition, Handel had hoped to make his music more accessible to the general public by lowering ticket prices, but this did not draw the larger audiences he had hoped for, which also contributed to his calling off further performances. He was deeply disappointed by its failure, which probably contributed to his later illness. Today it is considered one of his strongest musical-dramatic works, behind only Samson and Semele.

The musical characterization is extremely vivid, though the male characters are rather stock types. The music for Hercules is appropriately robust and extroverted, even a bit simple-minded and pompous. Iole's is deeply tragic, as she relives the death of her father, supported by the almost weeping punctuation of the orchestra. This scene is one of the strongest of the opera, coming immediately after the lively march introducing Hercules and his chained captives, and all the more vivid for the contrast. Later her character is developed a bit more, as she expresses her refusal to consider Hyllas' proposal in firm, dignified music, or the crystalline clarity Handel uses to depict her innocence and compassion for those caught up in the tragedy of Dejanira's jealousy. It is Dejanira herself, though, who is the most three-dimensional of the characters, as we see her love, jealous anger, and final desperate remorse, expressed accordingly in melting pathos, furious runs and biting stacatto phrases, and burningly frenzied lines. Handel's mastery is made clear in the way that even when one emotion dominates, others are hinted at. For example, in her first aria, chromatic phrases alternate between more direct cadences, giving her emotions more complexity and a foreshadowing of the darker side of her love.

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Every Valley Shall Be Exalted" (HWV 56 No. 3) for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages03:326 years ago1,683 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

"Every Valley Shall Be Exalted" is a tenor aria from Part 1 (No. 3) with the lyrics: "Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned. The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low; the crooked straight, and the rough places plain."


Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet , French Horn and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fanfare-Rondeau" for Woodwind Quintet

5 parts3 pages01:516 years ago1,937 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon
Jean-Joseph Mouret (1682 - 1738) was a French composer whose dramatic works made him one of the leading exponents of Baroque music in his country. Even though most of his works are no longer performed, Mouret's name survives today thanks to the popularity of the Fanfare-Rondeau from his first Suite de symphonies, which has been adopted as the signature tune of the PBS program "Masterpiece Theatre" and is a popular musical choice in many modern weddings.

Although originally written for Orchestra in 1729, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quintet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet , French Horn and Bassoon).

"Allein Gott in Der Höh' Sei Ehr" for Woodwind Trio

3 parts1 page01:286 years ago826 views
Johann Christoph Bach (1642 – 1703) was a German composer and organist of the Baroque period. He was born at Arnstadt, the son of Heinrich Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach's great uncle, hence he was Johann Sebastian's first cousin once removed. He was also the uncle of Maria Barbara Bach, J.S. Bach's first wife. He is not to be confused with Johann Sebastian's Bach's son, Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach.

Johann Christoph had a reputation as a composer that was only equalled by that of Johann Sebastian within the Bach family during his lifetime. He was organist at Eisenach and later a member of the court chamber orchestra there. His brother, Johann Michael Bach (Johann Sebastian Bach's father-in-law and Maria Barbara's father), was also a composer. Some of the works were later attributed to Johann Sebastian, but were recently recognized as written by Johann Christoph. One of the most famous works is the cantata Meine Freundin, du bist schön, based on the Song of Solomon. His eldest son, Johann Nicolaus Bach, was also a composer.

Allein Gott in der Höh sei Her-- The German Gloria (in excelsis Deo) is based in part on the Gregorian chant “Gloria in excelsis” from the Latin Late Medieval Liturgy and on a “Sanctus in festis duplicibus” of the “Graduale Romanum”. The first section (Stollen) of “Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr” is similar to a 10th century Easter song which subsequently spread to other countries. It was Nikolaus Decius (c1485-after 1546) who pulled together various existing melodic strands and probably used this melody with a slightly different text in Braunschweig in 1522. Unfortunately, the original sources of Decius’s melodies and texts from this period have been lost; this is why later dates such as 1525 (Rostock) are generally given where sources have confirmed his authorship. Nevertheless, Decius is considered to be the author and composer of the oldest Evangelical Lutheran chorales (Luther wrote his first chorale a year later). His [Decius’s] melodies are based on those used in the Latin Mass, but he reformed and reshaped them to reflect the style of the folksongs of his time. There are three chorales which can be traced back to him. They are (with the original Low German titles): 1. "Aleyne God yn der Höge sy eere", 2. "Hyllich ys Godt de vader", 3. "O Lam Gades vnschüldich" [“Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr”, "Heilig ist Gott der Vater”, and “O Lamm Gottes unschuldig”]. These chorales were designed to replace the “Gloria”, “Sanctus”, and “Agnus dei” of the Roman Mass and were to be sung by the congregation. Originally a firm supporter of Luther, Decius later sided more with reformed doctrine. This may explain why Luther later accepted only the Decius melody, but not his original text. Just what the differences in text may have amounted to is not clear, but certainly Luther’s task also involved translating the Low German into Luther’s language, Middle German (which later became the main basis for High German).

Although originally written for voice, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Trio (Flute, Bb Clarinet and Bass Clarinet) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).