Strings

Aria "Behold we go up to Jerusalem" (BWV 159) for Oboe, Strings & Harpsichord
Video

Aria "Behold we go up to Jerusalem" (BWV 159) for Oboe, Strings & Harpsichord

7 parts24 pages05:306 years ago882 views
This cantata for ”Quinquagesima” (the Sunday before Ash Wednesday) focuses on Jesus' prediction in the gospel of his impending death. His going up to Jerusalem is towards his atoning sacrifice on the cross. The text of the cantata treats the reaction of the believer to Jesus' intention - first reluctance to let the beloved Jesus go to his death, then commitment to be with him as he walks his path, finally the giving up of the world and dying to self in order to be with Jesus and in gratitude for the salvation won by his death. The theme is that of Galatians 6:14: "May I never boast of anything except the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world."

Exegetically this cantata is interesting for the way in which it intertwines the Biblical fact of Christ going up to Jerusalem, the devotion of the believer to Christ in his passion, and the believer's dying to the world and living to Christ. These themes are set in very dramatic and emotionally expressive music.

Note that Bach wrote no cantatas for the first and second Sundays of Lent because cantatas were not performed in Lent, except for the third Sunday. His series then resumes on Palm Sunday.

Please note that Piano or Orchestral Harp may be substituted for Harpsichord however, this piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Baroque Trill Styles Chart

1 part2 pages00:366 years ago30,715 views
Piano
The trill (or shake, as it was known from the 16th until the 19th century) is a musical ornament consisting of a rapid alternation between two adjacent notes, usually a semitone or tone apart, which can be identified with the context of the trill. It is sometimes referred to by the German triller, the Italian trillo, the French trille or the Spanish trino. A cadential trill is a trill associated with a cadence.

In the baroque period, a number of signs indicating specific patterns with which a trill should be begun or ended were used. In the Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach lists a number of these signs together with the correct way to interpret them. Unless one of these specific signs is indicated, the details of how to play the trill are up to the performer. In general, however, trills in this period are executed beginning on the auxiliary note, before the written note, often producing the effect of a harmonic suspension which resolves to the principal note. But, if the note preceding the ornamented note is itself one scale degree above the principal note, then the dissonant note has already been stated, and the trill typically starts on the principal note.

Several trill symbols and techniques common in the Baroque and early Classical period have fallen entirely out of use, including for instance the brief Pralltriller, represented by a very brief wavy line, referred to by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in his Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments (Versuch) (1753–1762).

Beyond the baroque period, specific signs for ornamentation are very rare. Continuing through the time of Mozart, the default expectations for the interpretation of trills continued to be similar to those of the baroque. In music after the time of Mozart, the trill usually begins on the principal note.

All of these are only rules of thumb, and, together with the overall rate of the trill and whether that rate is constant or variable, can only be determined by considering the context in which the trill appears, and is usually to a large degree a matter of opinion with no single "right" way of executing the ornament.

"Prélude & Fugue" No. 3 in Eb Major (Opus 99) for Harp

1 part11 pages07:346 years ago528 views
Harp
Paris-born Charles Camille Saint-Saëns was a child prodigy, composing his first piece for piano at the age of three. He was a private student of Gounod and entered the Paris Conservatory at age 13. Saint-Saëns had total recall; any book he read or tune he heard was forever committed to his memory.

The Trois Préludes et Fugues, Op 99 were written in 1894 and are Saint-Saëns' first significant organ pieces for nearly thirty years. Dedicated to Widor, Guilmant and Gigout respectively. They combine characterful preludes with well-worked fugues which Saint-Saëns expressed some hesitation in writing. He was clearly satisfied with the results however as he included them in his 1899 recital in front of the academics at Trinity College, Cambridge. Preludes Nos 1 and 2 are both gentle and graceful.

Although originally created for Organ, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp to highlight the light and airy arpeggios of the prelude as well as the delicate interplay between the voices in the fugue.
"Arabesque" No. 1 for Concert Harp
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"Arabesque" No. 1 for Concert Harp

1 part8 pages04:326 years ago4,272 views
The Two Arabesques (Deux arabesques), L. 66, is a pair of arabesques composed by Claude Debussy. They are two of Debussy's earliest works, composed between the years 1888 and 1891, when he was still in his twenties.

Although quite an early work, the arabesques contain hints of Debussy's developing musical style. The suite is one of the very early impressionistic pieces of music, following the French visual art form. Debussy seems to wander through modes and keys, and achieves evocative scenes through music.

The Arabesque No. 1 (Andantino con moto) is in the key of E major and begins with parallelism of triads in first inversion, a composition technique very much used by Debussy and the impressionist movement. It leads into a larger section beginning with a left hand arpeggio in E major and a descending right hand E major pentatonic progression.

The second quieter (Rubato) section is in A major, which starts with a gesture (E-D-E-C♯), briefly passes through E major, returns to A major and ends with a bold pronouncement of the E-D-E-C♯ gesture, but transposed to the key of C major, played forte.

In the last section (a recapitulation of the first section), the music moves to a higher register and descends, followed by a large pentatonic scale ascending and descending, and resolving back to E major.

The vocabulary of Debussy's music is rich in harmonic dimension. The composer uses 7ths, 9ths, 11th and more, while he intersperses whole tone progressions that are so characteristic of his writing. If density, or volume ever applied to musical performance, this piece meets all requirements for a slow entry into notes, and a swimming motion through them therefore although originally written for Piano (and variations thereof), I chose to create this arrangement for concert harp to accentuate these characteristics of the original work.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Romance Without Words" for Concert Harp

1 part6 pages01:596 years ago626 views
Paris-born Charles Camille Saint-Saëns was a well-known composer In the nineteenth century and he was also well-known as a virtuoso pianist; ranked alongside giants such as Liszt, Clara Schumann, Pugno, Pachmann, Planté, Grieg and Rubinstein.

Camille Saint-Saens was a fascinating figure. As well as a great virtuoso of the piano, he was a celebrated organist, cofounder of the Nationale de Musique, professor of music paying for students’ trips to the Wagner Festivals in Bayreuth and Liszt enthusiast, he was almost a Classicist in his composition and a genius of form.

Very little is written about this obscure work. Unlike the bulk of his compositions, this score (originally published as "Romance sans paroles" in 1871) has no opus designation.

Although this piece was originally composed for Piano (and variations thereof), I consolidated the parts for concert harp solo performance and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Fantasy for Harp" (Opus 95)
Video

"Fantasy for Harp" (Opus 95)

1 part19 pages09:226 years ago1,723 views
Camille Saint-Saens was born in Paris and brought up by his mother. He began music lessons early and by the age of three had already composed his first piano piece. From the age of seven he took composition lessons and soon gained a reputation in Paris as a child prodigy. In 1846, aged 11, he gave a recital of Mozart and Beethoven piano concertos; for an encore he offered to play any one of the Beethoven piano sonatas from memory.

He entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1848 and over the next five years his dazzling gifts won both the friendship and patronage of composers such as Rossini, Gounod, Liszt, and Berlioz. His mentors feared only that his chameleon-like ability to absorb information and musical styles, while in one sense an advantage, might inhibit originality of expression in his own compositions.

The 1860s were probably the most contented and stable years of Saint-Saens's life. During this time he quickly acquired a formidable reputation as a composer and a virtuoso pianist. Saint-Saens spent his final years travelling in Europe and the United States. On his death in 1921 he left a body of music that revealed a passion for order, clarity, and precision, as well as an always attractive - and very French - melodic charm.

Saint-Saëns knew how to write perfectly for harp and wrote the solo Fantasy, Opus 95 as well as a concert piece for harp and orchestra (Opus 154). The Fantasie is full of harp harmonics and has a lovely harp cadenza.

This piece is a beautiful fantasie for late intermediate to advanced pedal harpists and is the original edition of the Saint-Saens Fantasie, written, not arranged for, harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fantasy for Harp" (Opus 95) Full Version

1 part27 pages11:156 years ago438 views
This is the full version of the "Fantasy for Harp" (Opus 95) posted on this site at: http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/fantasy-for-harp-opus-95 and includes the difficult and seldom performed passages between measures 188 and 228. This inclusion increases the length of the piece to 11 minutes.

This piece is a beautiful fantasie for late intermediate to advanced pedal harpists and is the original edition of the Saint-Saens Fantasie, written, not arranged for, harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Souvenir d'Italie" for Concert Harp

1 part23 pages07:526 years ago660 views
The French composer Charles Camille Saint-Saëns was born Oct. 9, 1835 in Paris, France and died Dec. 16, 1921 in Algiers. Astonishingly gifted from childhood, with a phenomenal memory (at his debut piano recital at age 11, he offered to play any Beethoven sonata without music), he became a darling of the salons and a celebrated improviser. To promote new music by French composers, he founded the Socit Nationale de Musique in 1871. His compositions are often brilliant in their effects but not always profound.

He soon came to the notice - and earned the admiration of - such eminent composers as Charles Gounod, Gioacchino Rossini, Hector Berlioz, and Franz Liszt. He was appointed organist at the Madeleine (1857-1875), and taught at the École Niedermeyer from 1861 to 1865, Gabriel Fauré being one of his pupils.

Although this piece was originally composed for solo Piano, I created this arrangement for concert harp solo performance because of it's beautiful arpeggiated passages and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo
Video

Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo

1 part7 pages06:406 years ago6,272 views
The baroque composer George Frideric Händel, was born in Germany on the 23rd February 1685 and died on the 14th April 1759. He was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. He spent most of his adult life in England and his most well known works are Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks.

He wrote the Op 4 No 6 in B flat major as a Harp Concerto. In that guise it was first performed on 19 February 1736 along with the Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1 at the premiere of Alexander’s Feast.

Handel composed the music in January 1736, and the work received its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 19 February 1736. In its original form it contained three concertos: a concerto in B flat major in 3 movements for "Harp, Lute, Lyrichord and other Instruments" HWV 294 for performance after the recitative Timotheus, plac'd on high.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Fantasia" for Harp in C Minor (Opus 35)
Video

"Fantasia" for Harp in C Minor (Opus 35)

1 part21 pages06:366 years ago1,686 views
Louis Spohr (1784 - 1859) was born and raised in the North German duchy of Brunswick, and the eldest of six children, Louis Spohr became one of the towering talents of the first half of the nineteenth century, winning a brilliant reputation as virtuoso violinist, teacher, composer and conductor.

Living through a period of extraordinary musical development – indeed, both Mozart's Figaro and Wagner's Tristan were composed during his lifetime – Spohr was considered by his contemporaries to be worthy of a place in the pantheon of the great musicians, alongside Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. He is also credited with the invention of the violin chin-rest, with being the first to use the baton when conducting an orchestra, with the introduction of rehearsal numbers in orchestral scores, and with his innovative use of a special compositional technique when writing for the single-action pedal harp of his time, which he himself called 'the difference of the keys'.

Until recent years, apart from op 35 and op 36, Spohr’s compositions for the harp were little known. The legacy brought to light since the establishment of the Spohr Gesellschaft in Kassel, the English Spohr Society, the American Spohr Society and the wonderful Göthel thematic catalogue (1981) has revealed an important body of harp music, whether solo, chamber or concertante works with orchestra, now being extensively recorded and published.

When Louis Spohr came to Gotha in 1805 as Orchestra Leader, he met Dorette Scheidler, an excellent and skilful harpist, who became his wife. Her talent as a harpist prompted Spohr´s interest in this instrument and stimulated him into creating many new and diverse musical compositions, such as, Solo for harp; Sonates and Concertantes for violin and harp; Trios for violin and cello etc. Amongst the harp solo works we find the Fantasy in C-minor, op. 35 -- known as the "most significant and ingenious musical composition realised for the harp during these years" (Written in The Allgem. musikal Zeitung, Leipzig 10/27/1807)

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Rondo from the Sonata Concertante (Opus 113) for Harp and Flute

2 parts24 pages06:406 years ago773 views
Violinist, teacher, and composer Louis Spohr (1784 - 1859) was described by Paganini, no less, as "The most outstanding singer on the violin." One of the leading virtuosos of his era, Spohr was a man of exceptional stature (physically, as well as morally and intellectually—he stood over six feet six inches in height), and as a liberal-minded freemason he was noted for his nobility of thought and deed. By his own admission, however, Spohr had been "from earliest youth, very susceptible to female beauty," and in 1805 (soon after he had become director of music to the Court at Gotha), he became infatuated with the brilliant and beautiful young harpist Dorette Scheidler, the talented daughter of one of the court singers. Scheidler became Spohr's wife in February 1806. Spohr's series of sonatas and other pieces for violin and harp were written for the couple to play together. Each work employed an ingenious solution to the outwardly ill-matched registral characteristics of the instruments. Spohr realized that the range in which the violin sounded most effective was, coincidentally, that which suited the harp least of all. He overcame this problem by stipulating that the harp should be tuned a semitone below regular concert pitch (in a flat key), while the violin was pitched a semitone below the harp part so that (as in this case) a harp part written in E flat major equated with a violin part in the key of D. The Sonata Concertante, Op. 113 (written in 1805 but published much later), was in fact the first work in which this novel solution was used. The piece comprises three movements and lasts around 20 minutes in all.

This is the finale, in Rondo form (Allegretto) and deploys several carefree and affable melodies, again shared on more or less equal terms between both instruments. Although originally written for violin, I createdthis arrangement for Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Canon in D Major for Harp

1 part10 pages06:196 years ago10,957 views
Johann Pachelbel was a German Baroque composer, organist and teacher, who brought the south German organ tradition to its peak. He composed a large body of sacred and secular music, and his contributions to the development of the chorale prelude and fugue have earned him a place among the most important composers of the middle Baroque era.

Pachelbel is best known for the Canon in D Major, the only canon he wrote – although a true canon at the unison in three parts, it is often regarded more as a passacaglia, and it is in this mode that I created this somewhat unique arrangement for the pedal harp.

The "Canon" is probably one of the most recognizable piece of classical music and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes
Video

"Carrickfergus" for Harp and Flutes

3 parts4 pages02:216 years ago4,251 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Carrickfergus" is an Irish folk song, named after the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, "Do bhí bean uasal" ("There Was a Noblewoman"), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in County Clare.

The song appears on a ballad sheet in Cork City in the mid Nineteenth Century in macaronic form.

I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Concert (Pedal) or Celtic Harp.

"The Lark in the Clear Air" for Harp, Flute & Cello

3 parts5 pages01:146 years ago1,570 views
This Traditional Irish tune is also known as “Caisléan U, Néill” in Ireland, which means “O'Neill's Castle” in English. As regards the title “The Lark in the Clear Air”, it comes from a poem by Samuel Ferguson (1810–1886).

I created this arrangement for Harp, Flute & Cello to bring the rich depth of the cello for serenity, the high pich of the flute as the Lark and the harp to provide a soothing mantra.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Dona Nobis Pacem" for Harp

1 part4 pages04:286 years ago875 views
"Dona Nobis Pacem" (Grant Us Thy Peace) is a timeless melody from the 16th Century, and its words that are a fervent prayer for peace, are appropriate all year as well as a beautiful message for holiday time.

All the arrangements are appropriate for either lever harp or pedal harp. There are
no lever or pedal changes.

I created this arrangement for Harp to highlight the serenity of the peaceful arpeggios and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Red is the Rose" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts6 pages02:556 years ago4,544 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lomond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song (Roud No. 9598). It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland.

This is the Irish variant of the song called "Red Is the Rose" and is sung with the same melody but different (although similarly themed) lyrics. It was popularized by Irish folk musician Tommy Makem. Even though many people mistakenly believe that Makem wrote "Red is the Rose", it is a traditional Irish folk song.

There remains today a general debate is which is older "Red Is The Rose" or "Loch Lomond", because one clearly borrowed the other's tune. To date, no one has found the answer, but Some of "older" Irish singers swear that "Red Is The Rose" is the original. Others in Scotland respond that tune had been well known in Scotland since the middle of the 18th century as "Kind Robin Lo'es Me". I do not know.

I created this arrangement for Flute Duet & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Alleluia" Harp Duet

2 parts6 pages01:456 years ago528 views
"Alleluia" is a traditional 19th century melody of unknown origin that I have arranged for 2 Harps.

In the Roman Rite, the word "Alleluia" is associated with joy and is especially favoured in Paschal time, the time between Easter and Pentecost, perhaps because of the association of the Hallel (Alleluia psalms) chanted at Passover. During this time, the word is added widely to verses and responses associated with prayers, to antiphons of psalms, and, during the Octave of Easter and on Pentecost Sunday, to the dismissal at the end of Mass ("Ite missa est").

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Swirling Leaves of Autumn" for Harp

1 part11 pages04:476 years ago589 views
Harp
"The Swirling Leaves of Autumn" began as an unfinished and otherwise un-named composition by my pianist friend Paul Saunders. I should note that Paul is sight impaired (blind) and partially with the aid of a MIDI sequencer, I was able to capture his work. His hauntingly elegant work spoke to me as I pictured the rising and falling leaves, tormented in the wind wishing to complete their entropic descent. Just recently,I attempted to transcribe and then finish it as a solo piece for Concert Harp.

"Country Aire" for Harp

1 part4 pages02:026 years ago579 views
I created this arangement for Concert Harp of a traditional Irish Baroque melody "Tír Aire" (ca. 1670-1738).

Structurally, there is a lot to be said about similarities between traditional and Baroque music in Ireland, but there are differences in the prominence of ornamentation and personal reinterpretation. Like in Irish traditional, Irish Baroque manuscripts only show the skeleton of the tune; musicians were not only encouraged but expected to embellish the notes and play them differently almost each time through. This is my own interpretation of this work and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Chaconne" for Flutes and Harp

3 parts5 pages02:336 years ago903 views
Henry Purcell (1659 - 1695), was an English organist and Baroque composer of secular and sacred music. Although Purcell incorporated Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, his legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music.

A chaconne (Italian: ciaccona) is a type of musical composition popular in the baroque era when it was much used as a vehicle for variation on a repeated short harmonic progression, often involving a fairly short repetitive bass-line (ground bass) which offered a compositional outline for variation, decoration, figuration and melodic invention. In this it closely resembles the Passacaglia.

The ground bass, if there is one, may typically descend stepwise from the tonic to the dominant pitch of the scale, the harmonies given to the upper parts may emphasize the circle of fifths or a derivative pattern thereof.

Although originally written for Flutes and Continuo, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and 2 Flutes and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"An Evening Hymn" for Oboe and Harp

2 parts8 pages05:026 years ago1,630 views
Henry Purcell holds a special place in the hearts of Englishmen. The reasons for this can be summed up quite simply. His music is ravishing, full of expressive dissonances, and with an unparalleled manner of setting text. Before his untimely death, at age 26, likely of tuberculosis, he had risen to be organist at Westminster Abbey and the Chapel Royale, penned the first English opera, Dido and Aeneas, and composed music for the coronation of James II and the funeral of Queen Mary II. After his death, England would not have another composer of similar stature until the twentieth century. Purcell is buried next to the organ at London's Westminster Abbey.

"An Evening Hymn" is the opening work of Henry Playford's 1688 collection Harmonia Sacra and is set to words by "Dr. William Fuller, late Lord-Bishop of Lincoln" as published in Nahum Tate's collection of moralizing poems for children Miscellanea Sacra. It's hard to conceive of what sort of context this composition was performed; it certainly wasn't intended for liturgical performance and perhaps not even public performance. If there was any sort of public performance it may have been for small private gatherings or simple domestic devotional services.

Throughout the song, Purcell uses a repeating five measure figure known as a ground bass. It can be heard in its entirety at the very beginning of the song. Atop that he writes a melody that sometimes matches the five-measure phrase of the bass an other times doesn't - it is this tension that propels the work forward and makes it continuously interesting. In performance a continuo group would improvise an accompaniment based on this bassline.

The ground bass itself is an elaboration of a descending four-note figure, a figure that some feel is emblematic of lament owing to its appearance in many laments, among them Purcell's famous aria "Dido's Lament" from Dido and Aeneas.

It is also an example of a ciaccona or chaconne, a composition built on repeating descending bassline in a triple meter. Originaly this was used for upbeat music, but by the mid-17th century had come to be reserved for stately, elegiac music.

Although originally written for Chorus, I adapted this piece for Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"In These Delightful Pleasant Groves" for Harp & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts4 pages01:426 years ago747 views
Henry Purcell (ca.1659 - 1695), was an English composer. Although incorporating Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, Purcell's legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music. He is generally considered to be one of the greatest English composers; no other native-born English composer approached his fame until Edward Elgar.

Taken from the incidental music to Shadwell’s play "The Libertine" or "The Libertine Destroyed", Purcell's original choral piece "In these delightful pleasant groves" is a genuine highlight of British choral music of the baroque period with its lively exuberance of dance and his onomatopoeic effects.

He died in 1695 at the height of his powers; he was only in his mid-thirties. He breathed his last at his house in Dean's Yard, Westminster, leaving a widow and three living children (three others predeceased him). His widow died in 1706, having published a number of his works, including the now famous collection called Orpheus Britannicus (two books, 1698 and 1702).

Although originally written for Chorus and Basso continuo, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Hark! How the Songsters of the Grove" for Harp and Woodwinds

3 parts5 pages01:416 years ago524 views
The flute (recorder) has long been used to imitate birds in music, as many of the references to Purcell and Handel and their contemporaries demonstrate. Lines like "Hark how the songsters of the air", "Hark how the lark and linnet sing", "Hark! how the songsters of the grove", "Hush ye pretty warbling quire" say it all.

Henry Purcell's "Timon of Athens" (1694) calls for "a Symphony of Pipes [ie alto recorders] imitating the Chirping of Birds".

Although originally written for Chorus and Recorders, I adapted this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwinds (2 Flutes & 2 Oboes) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" for Harp

1 part2 pages00:426 years ago1,221 views
Solomon, HWV 67, is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. Its libretto is based on the biblical stories of wise king Solomon and is attributed to Newburgh Hamilton. The music was composed between May 5 and June 13, 1748 and the first performance took place on March 17, 1749.

This is my own interpretation of the main theme of this act and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Élégie for Harp" (Opus 54)

1 part13 pages05:296 years ago448 views
Alphonse Hasselmans (1845-1912) born in Belgium, lived in France many years and was professor of harp at the Paris Conservatoire. His pupils included Renie, Tournier, Sassoli, Salzedo, Kahn, Grandjany, Jamet & Laskine.

He was a harpist and composer, son of Josef H. Hasselmans. He first studied the harp with his father, then with Gottlieb Kruger in Stuttgart, Xavier Desargus in Brussels and Ange-Conrad Prumier (son of Antoine Prumier) in Paris. The early part of his career was spent in Brussels, where he became harpist at the Theatre de la Monnaie. In 1877 he gave eight successful solo concerts in Paris, which brought him appointments as solo harpist with the Paris orchestras of the Conservatoire, Opera and Opera-Comique. In 1884 he succeeded his teacher Prumier as professor of the harp at the Conservatoire. He revised the harp course, and the principles of his teaching appear in his article "La harpe et sa technique"

As a virtuoso Hasselmans was a significant force in the revival of harp playing at the turn of the century. A large number of compositions of value were inspired by his performance and dedicated to him. His own compositions for harp have added much technical value to the repertory of the instrument. He wrote some 50 pieces which include Gitana op. 21, La Source op. 44 and many transcriptions.

Although this piece is seldom performed, I believe it represents one on the best examples of his subtle yet complex works and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando" for Harp

1 part12 pages03:016 years ago813 views
Philippe Gaubert (4 July 1879 – 8 July 1941) was a French musician who was a distinguished performer on the flute, a respected conductor, and a composer, primarily for the flute.

Gaubert eventually joined the staff of the Paris Conservatory and this piece is highly typical of what Conservatory composers would write through the next several decades: music flirting with contemporary trends but remaining essentially conservative in order to showcase the lyrical as well as technical abilities of the players. The Nocturne settles into the piano with gauzy impressionistic harmonies. The flute arrives with a gentle melody that initially seems like foursquare salon material, but within a few measures it wanders off chromatically and takes on the sensuous character associated with flute music by the slightly older Ravel and Debussy. The Nocturne, monothematic and rhapsodic, ends with a little flute flourish and is succeeded by the longer Allegro Scherzando section. Here the style reverts to nineteenth century Romanticism, with its playful will-o'-the-wisp opening melody. Contrasting material arrives in the more languorous middle section, but this is interrupted before it can develop by the main scherzo tune. The broader theme makes one more grand, if again curtailed appearance before the chirping main theme carries the piece through its final bars.

Although composed for Flute and Piano, I adapted his work for Concert (Pedal) Harp to highight the haunting elegance of the waveform through out both the melody and accompainment. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Fantaisie-Impromptu" (Opus 66) for Flute & Harp
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"Fantaisie-Impromptu" (Opus 66) for Flute & Harp

2 parts13 pages04:416 years ago3,954 views
Flute, Harp
Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-sharp minor (Opus 66), is a solo piano composition and one of his best-known pieces. It was composed in 1834 and dedicated to Julian Fontana, who published the piece in spite of Chopin's request not to do so.

In the original pioan version, the piece uses many cross-rhythms (the right hand plays sixteenth notes against the left hand playing triplets) and a ceaselessly moving note figuration and is in cut time (2/2). It concludes in an ambiguous fantasy-like ending, in a quiet and mysterious way, playing the first few notes of the moderato section theme, while continuing with the sixteenth notes (semiquavers). The piece resolves and gently ends on a C-sharp major rolled chord.

Although originally composed for solo Piano, I adapted his work for flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Slovanské Tance" (Opus 46 Number 1) for Harp

1 part18 pages07:546 years ago677 views
The Slavonic Dances (Czech: Slovanské tance) are a series of 16 orchestral pieces composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1878 and 1886 and published in two sets as Opus 46 and Opus 72 respectively. Originally written for piano four hands, the Slavonic Dances were inspired by Johannes Brahms's own Hungarian Dances and were orchestrated at the request of Dvořák's publisher soon after composition. The pieces, lively and overtly nationalistic, were well received at the time and today are among the composer's most memorable works, occasionally making appearances in popular culture. Prior to the publication of the Slavonic Dances, Op. 46, Dvořák was a relatively unknown composer.

Although originally written for orchestra, I adapted his work for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Morfa Rhuddlan" for Harp Duet
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"Morfa Rhuddlan" for Harp Duet

2 parts4 pages02:196 years ago685 views
"Morfa Rhuddlan"
 (The Marsh Of Rhuddlan), the now mostly-drained great sea-marsh (morfa) around Rhuddlan, at the mouth of the River Clwyd. It was the scene of a great battle which has lingered in the local folk memory (the lament of 'Morfa Rhuddlan' is one of the oldest surviving pieces of native music) but this took place in 796 CE when the forces of Offa crushed the Welsh.

Although likely written originally for the Welsh bagpipe, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) harp duet and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Vocalise" (Opus 34 Number 14) for Harp

1 part5 pages03:016 years ago1,752 views
Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 is a song by Sergei Rachmaninoff, published in 1912 as the last of his Fourteen Songs, Op. 34. Written for voice (soprano or tenor) with piano accompaniment, it contains no words, but is sung using any one vowel (of the singer's choosing). It was dedicated to soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Although originally written for voice with piano accompaniment, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Dragonfly on the Sunshine" for Harp
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"Dragonfly on the Sunshine" for Harp

1 part2 pages01:116 years ago684 views
Carl Heinrich Carsten Reinecke (June 23, 1824 – March 10, 1910) was a German composer, conductor, and pianist. He was born in Altona, Hamburg, Germany; until 1864 the town was under Danish rule. He studied with his father, Johann Peter Rudolph Reinecke, a music teacher. Carl began to compose at the age of seven, and his first public appearance as a pianist was when he was twelve years old.

"Dragonfly on the Sunshine" is Number 13 from the "Ein Neues Notenbuch Für Kleine Leute" Opus107 by Carl Reinecke and was arranged for harp by José Hilario Miramontes.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Adagio from the Easter Oratorio (BWV 249 No. 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages03:246 years ago879 views
Flute, Harp
The Easter Oratorio (BWV 249) is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, beginning with Kommt, eilet und laufet ("Come, hasten and run"). Bach composed it in Leipzig and first performed it
on 1 April 1725.

The first version of the work was completed as a cantata for Easter Sunday in Leipzig on 1 April 1725, then under the title Kommt, gehet und eilet. It was named "oratorio" and given the
new title only in a version revised in 1735. In a later version in the 1740s the third movement was expanded from a duet to a four-part chorus. The work is based on a secular cantata, the
so-called Shepherd Cantata Entfliehet, verschwindet, entweichet, ihr Sorgen, BWV 249a which is now lost, although the libretto survives. Its author is Picander who is also likely the
author of the oratorio's text. The work is opened by two instrumental movements that are probably taken from a concerto of the Köthen period. It seems possible that the third movement is
based on the concerto's finale.

Unlike the Christmas Oratorio, the Easter Oratorio has no narrator but has four characters assigned to the four voice parts: Simon Peter (tenor) and John the Apostle (bass), appearing in
the first duet hurrying to Jesus' grave and finding it empty, meeting there Mary Magdalene (alto) and "the other Mary", Mary Jacobe (soprano). The choir was present only in the final
movement until a later performance in the 1740s when the opening duet was set partly for four voices. The music is festively scored for three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, oboe d'amore,
bassoon, two recorders, transverse flute, two violins, viola and continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Adagio for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"La Source" (Opus 44) Étude for Harp
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"La Source" (Opus 44) Étude for Harp

1 part10 pages04:266 years ago2,855 views
Belgian-born Alphonse Hasselmans is generally considered a minor composer, but he was a key figure in the genre of harp playing in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, since he is credited with establishing the French School of harp playing and with helping to revive interest in the harp.

Hasselmans was born in Liège on March 5, 1845, the son of Josef H. Hasselmanns, a prominent conductor, harpist and violinist. Young Alphonse exhibited talent on the harp as a child and began study on the instrument at the Strasbourg Conservatory with his father. He later took instruction on the harp in Stuttgart from Gottlieb Krüger, in Brussels from Xavier Desargas, and at the Paris Conservatory from Ange-Conrad Prumier.

Hasselmans' earliest significant post was harpist for the orchestra at the Théâtre de la Monnaie (Brussels), hardly a venue for him to showcase his rare talent. However, he gave a series of solo appearances in Paris in 1877 that created a sensation. Thereafter, he was able to secure a succession of posts with major ensembles: the Paris Conservatory Orchestra, the Opéra National de Paris, and the Opéra-Comique Paris.

As a solo performer Hasselmans often played his own compositions in concert, many of which were very difficult. Of his fifty-four works all were for solo harp, none for harp and orchestra. His output includes a handful of popular pieces, such as Gitana, Op. 21 and La Source, Op. 44.

In the latter part of his career Hasselmans began to turn toward teaching and the refining of harp techniques. In 1884 he was appointed professor of harp at the Paris Conservatory, a post he held until his death. Over the coming years his students would include some of the greatest harpists of the 20th century: Marcel Grandjany, Marcel Tournier, Pierre Jamet, Henriette Renié and Carlos Salzedo. By all accounts Hasselmans was a strict and difficult teacher, often turning livid at a pupil's inadequacies.

Before his death Hasselmans wrote an important essay, La harpe et sa technique (published in 1913), outlining his principles of harp playing. He died in Paris in 1912.

"La Source" was written by Hasselmans in 1898 and was dedicated to élève Hélène Gayat.
It is written entirely for Harp, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Gitana" (Opus 21) Caprice for Harp

1 part8 pages05:396 years ago771 views
Alphonse Jean Hasselmans was born March 5, 1845 in Liege, Belgium and died May 19, 1912 inParis, France. He was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth, son of Josef H. Hasselmans. He first studied the harp with his father, then with Gottlieb Kruger in Stuttgart, Xavier Desargus in Brussels and Ange-Conrad Prumier (son of Antoine Prumier) in Paris. The early part of his career was spent in Brussels, where he became harpist at the Theatre de la Monnaie. In 1877 he gave eight successful solo concerts in Paris, which brought him appointments as solo harpist with the Paris orchestras of the Conservatoire, Opera and Opera-Comique. In 1884 he succeeded his teacher Prumier as professor of the harp at the Conservatoire. He revised the harp course, and the principles of his teaching appear in his article "La harpe et sa technique".

As a virtuoso Hasselmans was a significant force in the revival of harp playing at the turn of the century. A large number of compositions of value were inspired by his performance and dedicated to him. His own compositions for harp have added much technical value to the repertory of the instrument. He wrote some 50 pieces which include Gitana op. 21, La Source op. 44 and many transcriptions

"Gitana" was written by Hasselmans in 1890 entirely for Harp, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Chanson de Mai" (Opus 40) for Harp
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"Chanson de Mai" (Opus 40) for Harp

1 part7 pages02:476 years ago825 views
Harp
Alphonse Hasselmans was born in Liège, Belgium, in 1845 and studied in Strasbourg, Germany, with Gottlieb Kruger who himself had been a student of Parish-Alvars.

In 1884 he became professor of harp at the Paris Conservatoire, a position he held until his death in 1912. Hasselmans played a major role in the revival of interest in harp-playing towards the end of the nineteenth century.

A good many compositions by other composers were inspired by his virtuoso playing and were dedicated to him, among them Fauré’s Impromptu, Op 86. Hasselmans himself did not attach much importance to his own compositions but his charming salon pieces added greatly to the harp’s repertoire, not least in their technical value.

"Chanson de Mai" was written by Hasselmans in 1897 entirely for Harp, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Dawning of the Day" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:176 years ago1,650 views
"The Dawning of the Day" (Irish: "Fáinne Gael an Lae") is an old Irish air composed by the blind harpist Thomas Connellan in the 17th Century.

An Irish-language song with this name (Fáinne Gael an Lae) was published by Edward Walsh (1805-1850) in 1847 in Irish Popular Songs and later translated into English as The Dawning of the Day.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (second flute optional) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

The melody of this song was used by Irish poet Patrick Kavanagh to his poem, "Raglan Road".

"Bonnie Kellswater" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages01:216 years ago752 views
This is a popular irish melody of unknown origin however, "Kellswater" is a hamlet near to the village of Kells in Northern Ireland. The name of the hamlet comes from the nearby Kells Water.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flute and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Fileuse" (Opus 27) Étude for Harp
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"Fileuse" (Opus 27) Étude for Harp

1 part6 pages05:086 years ago415 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

One such piece is this intriguing "Fileuse", a characteristic etude written by Hasselmans in 1892 entirely for Harp, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Spinning Wheel" for Harp

1 part4 pages01:526 years ago941 views
"The Spinning Wheel" was written in the mid-1800s by an Irish lawyer and poet named John Francis Waller. It's a beautiful ballad written as a waltz.

The waltz has a rigid but gentle beat that seems to echo the foot movements of the one operating the spinning wheel. Listeners talk about their minds drifting peacefully away as the song progresses. It tells the story of a young woman who is spinning in her home in Ireland while looking after her blind grandmother who is sitting by the fireside.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Meeting of the Waters" for Harp, Flute & Oboe

3 parts4 pages02:366 years ago1,471 views
"The Meeting of the Waters" is a wonderful song that conjures up a sense of warmth and friendship and links them to a beautiful location. The words were written by Thomas Moore, one of the greatest Irish poets and songwriters of all time. Moore wrote numerous songs which have become Irish classics such as The Minstrel Boy, The Last Rose of Summer, and Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms.

Moore wrote the lyrics to "The Meeting of the Waters" in 1807 and only later set it to an old Irish melody with the rather curious title, "The Old Head of Denni"s.

The Meeting of the Waters is the name of a well known beauty spot in the Vale of Avoca in Co Wicklow in Ireland. As the name suggests, it’s the place where two rivers – the Avonmore and the Avonbeg – meet and flow into each other and form the River Avoca.

There are actually two spots in Avoca where the two rivers meet. One is at Woodenbridge and one is at Castle Howard. This led to some debate when the song was first published as to which spot was the subject of the song.

Moore cleared up the confusion in a letter to his friend Lord John Russell saying: “I believe the scene under Castle Howard was the one which suggested the song to me.”

It’s not hard to see why Moore was enchanted by the scene and felt inspired to write his song. It was, and still remains, beautiful and idyllic. However, it’s not just the natural beauty of the scene that gives the song its power and its appeal; it’s the evocation of love and friendship.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp, Flute & Oboe and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Passacaglia" (BuxWV 161) for Harp

1 part10 pages06:216 years ago829 views
The "Passacaglia in D minor" (BuxWV 161) is an organ work by Dieterich Buxtehude. It is generally acknowledged as one of his most important works, and was possibly an influence on Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor (BWV 582), as well as Brahms' music.

Philip Spitta discussed Buxtehude's work in his 1873 Bach biography, and remarked that "for beauty and importance [Buxtehude's ostinato works] take the precedence of all the works of the kind of the time, and are in the first rank of Buxtehude's compositions. [Indeed], there is no piece of music of that time known to me which surpasses it, or even approaches it, in affecting, soul-piercing intensity of expression." Spitta's opinion was shared by Johannes Brahms.

I similarily felt that the underlying melodies and intricate harmonies trancended his unique composition as a baroque period work for organ. As such, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp to emphasize it's elegant melodies and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Sérénade Mélancolique" (Opus 45) for Harp
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"Sérénade Mélancolique" (Opus 45) for Harp

1 part4 pages02:296 years ago502 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

"Sérénade mélancolique" (Opus 45) was the first part of the 3 Improvisations faciles "Feuilles d'automne" (Autumn Leaves) written by Hasselmans in 1899 and, entirely for Harp. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Crépuscule" (Opus 46) for Harp

1 part2 pages01:356 years ago245 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

"Crépuscule" (Opus 46) was the second part of the 3 Improvisations faciles "Feuilles d'automne" (Autumn Leaves) written by Hasselmans in 1899 and, entirely for Harp. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Calme" (Opus 47) for Harp

1 part4 pages03:096 years ago285 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

"Calme" (Opus 47) was the third part of the 3 Improvisations faciles "Feuilles d'automne" (Autumn Leaves) written by Hasselmans in 1899 and, entirely for Harp. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Toccata Settima" for Harp

1 part8 pages04:166 years ago429 views
Michelangelo Rossi (ca. 1601/1602 – 1656) was an important Italian composer, violinist and organist of the Baroque era.

Rossi was born in Genoa, where he studied with his uncle, Lelio Rossi (1601-1638), at the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. Around the year 1624 he moved to Rome to enter the services of Cardinal Maurizio of Savoy.

Although Rossi was famed as an outstanding violinist in his lifetime, today his reputation rests chiefly on his keyboard music. In particular his 10 Toccatas are highly regarded (amongst these, this "Toccata Settima" -- Toccata VII with its wildly chromatic ending is best known). They are stylistically close to the music of Girolamo Frescobaldi, Carlo Gesualdo and Johann Jakob Froberger, while being individual, and they enjoy a reputation as a significant milestone in the keyboard literature.

Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp to emphasize it's elegant arpeggios and chromatic finale and, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Le Tic-Toc-Choc" for Harp

1 part6 pages03:236 years ago2,010 views
"Le Tic-Toc-Choc, ou les Maillotins" is from Ordre XVIII, composed in 1722 by François Couperin. Of all the harpsichord repertoire, the works penned by the French Baroque composers were intrinsically wedded to the instrument. One of the most remarkable pieces in the entire harpsichord repertoire is "Le Tic-Toc-Choc", a pièce croisée from his Dixhuitiéme Ordre published in his Troisième Livre of 1722.

The piece is discussed in Jane Clark and Derek Connon’s recent book, ‘The mirror of human life’: Reflections on François Couperin’s Pièces de Clavecin, where it is revealed that the Maillot were a famous family of rope-dancers.

"Tic toc; an indeclinable and artificial term, which expresses a beating, a reiterated movement, a pulse that beats, a horse that walks, the pendulum of a clock, a hammer that knocks". Nobody seems to know for sure what the title means, but many think it's the name of a child's toy.

He wrote that this work as a keyboard crossed part: "to be played on two manuals, of which one will push or draw back. Those who do not have a suitable harpsichord or virginal must play the top part as written and the bottom part an octave lower".

I created this arrangement for Harp seperating the staffs and using the latter approach for playability.

Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and, it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Concerto after Vivaldi" for Harp

1 part4 pages03:066 years ago989 views
Among the wealth of works composed during his Weimar period, J.S. Bach made 22 keyboard transcriptions of concertos by Italian and German composers: six for two keyboards and pedal (BWV 592–596) and sixteen for keyboard (BWV 972–987), the latter of which is this arrangement of BWV 972.

When J.S. Bach first got to know the music of Venetian maestro Antonio Vivaldi during the early 1710s or perhaps just a bit earlier, he was significantly impressed by his Italian colleague's flair and style, and skill. Young Duke Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar, the nephew of Bach's employer at the time, happened to have a taste for Italian instrumental music, so Bach took it upon himself to adapt several Italian (or Italianate) instrumental concertos -- mostly by Vivaldi, but some from Marcello, and even a bit of young Johann Ernst's own music -- for performance on harpsichord alone (there is also a corresponding and contemporaneous set of such adaptations for solo organ: BWV 592-597). In so doing he both pleased the Duke and began to absorb elements of the new Italian style into his own music-making. The first of the Vivaldi concerto transcriptions is the Concerto for keyboard No. 1 in D major, BWV 972, modeled upon Vivaldi's Concerto for four violins and continuo, Op. 3, No. 9 (RV230).

Like its source, BWV 972 is in three movements, fast-slow-fast. The first movement, which has no tempo indication but which would have immediately been recognized by contemporary players as an allegro. The following Largo (Larghetto in the Vivaldi, and also in some editions of the Bach) pulses with warm eighth notes from start to finish. The tuttis are made from these "simple," homophonic tones, but in the solo passages smaller and more flexible lines are drawn in and around this pulsation. The third movement is a dance-like 3/8 time Allegro.

Although originally written for keyboard, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Hymne" (Opus 7 No. 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts9 pages02:066 years ago578 views
Trois mélodies is a set of mélodies for solo voice and piano, by Gabriel Fauré. It is composed of Après un rêve (Op. 7, No. 1), one of Faure's most popular vocal pieces, Hymne (Op. 7, No. 2), and Barcarolle (Op. 7, No. 3). The songs were written between 1870 and 1878.

"Hymne" is set to a poem by Charles Baudelaire. The meaning of the text follows Baudelaire's ongoing theme of paradox: the spirituality of what is sensual and the sensuality of what is sanctified. Fauré's setting of the text centers subtly around this idea. Hymne, just like Après un rêve, retains an ethereal mood. The unchanged harmonic motion after "Forever hail!" indicates the entrance to the untroubled world of spirituality. After the word "sel" which literally means salt but in this case refers figuratively to something engaging, the harmony begins to change. Under a soft, but highly chromatic piano line the stanza about "incorruptible love" brings the song to a dramatic climax. After this stint, the piece returns to its tranquil state; however, the piece does end with the melody's tonic note and the piano's leading tone clashing for a stunning effect.

This piece is the second in the series of three and I created this arrangement for Harp and Flute. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Spleen" (Opus 51 No. 3) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:106 years ago633 views
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

As a young man Fauré had been very cheerful; a friend wrote of his "youthful, even somewhat child-like, mirth." From his thirties he suffered bouts of depression, which he described as "spleen", possibly first caused by his broken engagement and his lack of success as a composer.

After receiving La Croix de Guerre as a young man for army service in the Franco-Prussian War, Fauré returned to Paris in 1871 to be assistant organist and accompanist to the choir at Saint-Sulpice, then later at the Madeleine Church - again following in Saint Saëns footsteps. Following a series of misunderstandings, the fraught and fragile engagement to his beloved Marianne Viardot was broken and he married Marie Fremiet. This was a rather unhappy marriage, as it transpired, but he remained married to Marie for the rest of his life in spite of his relationships with other women.

They had two sons and to support his family, Fauré supplemented his church income by teaching piano and harmony - composing during summer holidays but making very little money from it as his publisher bought the works and their outright copyrights for a mere fifty francs each. In the 1880s, after these tribulations, the previously cheerful Fauré became prone to bouts of depression. Described by him as 'spleen', this is reflected in many of his songs. Disappointed, self critical and uncompromising, he destroyed many of his works during this period. 

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp to accentuate the sorrow and unhappiness. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Au Bord de L'eau" (Opus 8 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages026 years ago624 views
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

Fauré is regarded as one of the masters of the French art song, or mélodie. His devotion to the mélodie spans his career, from the ever-fresh "Le papillon et la fleur" of 1861 to the masterly cycle L'horizon chimérique, composed sixty years and more than a hundred songs later. Fauré's songs are now core repertoire for students and professionals, sung in conservatories and recital halls throughout the world.

The first volume of Fauré 3 songs is called "Au bord de l'eau" (by the water's edge) -- a reference to the French master's fondness for aquatic, nautical, and natural subjects in poetry, as well as to the title of one of his most famous songs. Having decided against a purely chronological survey of Fauré's songs, an approach that would have progressed from the lyrical outpourings of the composer's youth to the much thornier works of his later years.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fantaisie sur des thèmes de Händel et Abbé Vogler" (Opus 118) for Flute & Harp

2 parts38 pages12:516 years ago659 views
Louis Spohr (1784-1859) was born in Brunswick Germany and his father was an amateur flutist. In his early years he studied harp but, later changing to violin. In 1860, He married the harpist Dorette Scheidler, who fascinated him by her virtuosic playing. His preoccupation with harp and violin led to the decision to tune the harp a semitone lower. Thus it was possible to play together with the violin in her preferred tonalities without using the harps pedals.

During his lifetime he was more famous than Beethoven or Schumann and supported Wagner by playing the Fliegende Holländer in Kassel. His fame being a violin virtuoso was only topped by Paganini.

Although "Fantaisie sur des thèmes de Händel et Abbé Vogler" was originally written for Harp and Violin, there were problems with the manuscript in the public domain archive therefore, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp & String Ensemble
Video

Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp & String Ensemble

6 parts15 pages12:576 years ago1,885 views
The baroque composer George Frideric Händel, was born in Germany on the 23rd February 1685 and died on the 14th April 1759. He was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. He spent most of his adult life in England and his most well known works are Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks.

He wrote the Op 4 No 6 in B flat major as a Harp Concerto. In that guise it was first performed on 19 February 1736 along with the Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1 at the premiere of Alexander’s Feast. Handel's purpose in providing so diverse a program was a clear and practical one—to give the paying audience enough entertainment to keep them in their seats during the singers' much-needed intermissions. Nevertheless, as Dryden's Ode (on which Alexander's Feast is based) contains an episode wherein noble Timotheus is found playing his harp for Alexander the Great, there is a certain amount of purely dramatic justification for the insertion of a harp concerto into the narrative flow of the oratorio.

Handel composed the music in January 1736, and the work received its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 19 February 1736. In the Opus 4 publication, this Harp Concerto was issued as a work for organ and orchestra (making it congruous with the other five works in the volume), and it is on this instrument that the work is most often played today. A quick glance at the pared-down orchestra parts—the violins are muted, bass parts played pizzicato, and the wind family is represented by two lone flutes—and streamlined textures of Op. 4, No. 6, however, reveals immediately that it was originally conceived of for the quieter and gentler harp. The piece is cast in three movements, more or less following the then-emerging modern concerto fast-slow-fast ordering.

As with many of the organ concertos, the orchestra is entirely subordinate to the soloist in Op. 4, No. 6. In the first movement (Andante allegro), for instance, forty-six of the sixty-six measures are the exclusive province of the harp; the tutti appears just four times (double that if we account for the necessary repeat of each half)—at the movement's opening and close, and to lend its strength to two major internal cadences. However, unlike the organ concertos, whose keyboard parts were played by the very skilled Handel himself, the Harp Concerto features little in the way of virtuosic flair. Certainly there are running sixteenth notes to spare in the first movement, but these are almost always built around repetitive Alberti bass-like figures that fall easily to the hand.

The transparent opening movement, with its main theme built of seven broken-up, individual gestures, gives way to the thicker, more "well-glued" melody of the G minor Larghetto. Throughout the movement, the tutti is consumed with pondering repeated dotted figures while, each time it is given a chance, the harp/organ breaks out with improvisatory musings of a far more flexible nature.

Wholly dance-like is the concluding Allegro moderato, with its bouncing 3/8 meter and 1 + 2 metric grouping.

This arrangement was created for Dr. Sophia Momand and the Corelli Ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Allemande" (BWV 996) for Harp

1 part2 pages02:116 years ago1,208 views
Nobody knows exactly what instrument J. S. Bach had in mind when composing (and, in some cases, arranging) his many pieces now considered to be for lute; indeed, some of these works are all but unplayable on any known variety of Baroque lute, and it may well be that in these cases he was writing for a peculiar device known as the Lautenwerk--a kind of harpsichord mechanism designed to approximate the timbre of the lute. A surviving manuscript of the Lute Suite in E minor, BWV 996, Bach's earliest work for lute (probably composed in Weimar sometime between 1707 and 1717, perhaps earlier), actually bears the inscription "Aufs Lautenwerk," though the words appear to have been written by another hand. In the end, the question is probably moot: both Lautenwerk and Baroque lute are, sadly, all but extinct, and today one almost always hears the E minor Suite, like all Bach's "lute" works, played on guitar (we must remember that Bach himself was never possessed of the relatively modern notion of absolutely specific instrumentation--his own arrangements of solo violin and cello works for lute prove this, and he would almost certainly not object to hearing the works on another instrument).

The E minor Lute Suite is laid out in the traditional Froberger keyboard suite model, to whose four basic dance movements--allemande, courante, sarabande, and gigue--Bach has added a florid Passaggio (a particular variety of prelude whose origins are to be found in the improvised introductions to Baroque organ toccatas) and a lively Bourrée.

The Allemande is of the traditional kind, steady in rhythm and serious in tone. In this movement, BWV 996's possible keyboard genesis can be seen and heard in the hand-against-hand style of the two voices. Of special beauty is the mix of minor and major scales at the final cadence of the dance's second half.

Although this piece was originally written for period instruments (possibly the Lute), I arranged it for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Concerto in F Major (BWV 978) for Harp

1 part11 pages07:126 years ago1,829 views
Harp
During his employ at Weimar in the early part of his career, and at the request of Prince Johann Ernst, Johann Sebastian Bach completed several transcriptions for solo keyboard instruments of concertos originally written for various solo instruments with ensemble accompaniment. This series included 16 for harpsichord (BWV 972-987) including at least six by Italian master Antonio Vivaldi.

The Concerto for solo keyboard in F major No. 7 (BWV 978) is based on Vivaldi's Violin Concerto (RV 310), Op. 3/3, from the famous collection L'estro armonico. This collection was published in two volumes in 1711 in Amsterdam, where Prince Johann Ernst, a student at the Univesity of Utrecht at the time, probably encountered it during his studies and travels. (The Prince had heard the organist at Amsterdam's Nieuwe Kirke, Jan Jacob de Graaf, perform his own keyboard transcriptions of some Italian concertos and subsequently collected several manuscripts and publications of concertos to take back to Bach at Weimar.)

Bach altered the key from Vivaldi's original G major to F major, but beyond that left the original structure more or less intact. The work is cast in the standard three movements, with a moderately fast opening movement and a fast finale framing a Largo middle movement.

Like Bach's other transcriptions based on concertos from Vivaldi's Op. 3, (BWV 972, 976), this work seems to translate relatively smoothly from its original instrumentation (with solo violin) to harpsichord. While in some of the Vivaldi transcriptions (such as BWV 973 and 975, based on Vivaldi's RV 299 and 316, respectively), Bach adapted certain flashy gestures (idiomatic to the violin) for performance at the keyboard with an emphasis on clarity of line and variety of harmony, with less attention to fingerboard acrobatics. In the opening movement, for example, there seems to be too little time and too much linear momentum for excessive ornamentation, while the D minor second movement relies on the starkness of the repeated chords and chromatic lines, rather than rhapsodic show, for its expression. The quick triple meter and lively solo/tutti exchanges of the final movement likewise propel the piece toward its conclusion.

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Prelude" from the Cello Suite in G Major (BWV 1007) for Harp

1 part4 pages02:286 years ago1,083 views
It is thought that Bach wrote his six suites for unaccompanied cello between 1717 and 1723, while he was in the employ of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and had two superb solo cellists, Bernard Christian Linigke and Christian Ferdinand Abel, at his disposal. However, the earliest copy of the suites dates from 1726, and no autographs survive. Thus a chronological order is difficult to prove, though one guesses that these suites were composed in numerical order from the way that they gradually evolve and deepen, both technically and musically.

A Baroque suite is typically a collection of dance movements, usually in binary form with each half repeated. Common elements of the suite were the Allemande (German dance), a moderately slow duple-meter dance; the Courante, a faster dance in triple meter; the Sarabande, a Spanish-derived dance in a slow triple meter with emphasis on the second beat; and a Gigue (Jig), which is rapid, jaunty, and energetic. Bach took these typical dance forms and abstracted them, and then added a free-form, almost improvisatory Prelude which sets the tone for each suite, and a galanterie, an additional dance interposed between Sarabande and Gigue. (In the first two suites, Bach uses a pair of Minuets.) With these dances, Bach experimented and created the first, and arguably still the finest, solo works for a relatively new instrument.

The first (this) suite, in G major, gives the feel of innocent simplicity, and serves as a marvelous opening to these extraordinary works. The Prelude recalls the C major Prelude which opens Book One of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Each piece sets a remarkable atmosphere with no melodies, only strong rhythmic patterns, cunningly evolving harmonies, and evocative textures. Bach uses short, arpeggiated phrases to build larger-scale crescendos and decrescendos, and these phrases in turn aggregate into still larger structures, evoking an endlessly more complicated fractal pattern. This quality would become a characteristic of Bach's cello writing, along with a distinctive rhythmic quality far removed from the character of the original dances. Bach's suiite may have been inspired by viol writing in France and cello writing in Italy, but there was nothing like it before the first suite, and little like it after, except for the five suites that followed.

Although this piece was originally written for cello, I arranged it for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Lakes of Pontchartrain" for Harp, Flute & Cello

3 parts8 pages02:386 years ago1,134 views
The Lakes of Pontchartrain is an Irish ballad about an unfortunate immigrant from Ireland who is given shelter by a beautiful Louisiana Creole woman. He falls in love with her and asks her to marry him, but she is already promised to a sailor and declines the offer.

The exact origin of the song is unknown, though it is commonly held to have originated in the southern United States in the 19th century. In the liner notes of Déanta's album Ready for the Storm, which includes the song, it is described as a "traditional Creole love song." The liner notes accompanying Planxty's version state that the tune was probably brought back by soldiers fighting for the British or French armies in Louisiana and Canada in the War of 1812.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute (melody), Cello (Drone) and Harp (arpeggios) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Bard of Armagh" for Harp

1 part2 pages03:126 years ago447 views
The Bard of Armagh is an Irish ballad. It is often attributed to Patrick Donnelly. He was made Bishop of Dromore in 1697, the same year as the enactment of the Bishops Banishment Act. Donnelly is believed to have taken the name of the travelling harper Phelim Brady.

The song itself, like many heroic, rebel outlaw ballads, dates from the mid 19th century, when it was printed as a broadside ballad in Dublin.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Cliffs of Dooneen" for Harp & Strings

4 parts8 pages01:556 years ago1,274 views
The Irish folksong "The Cliffs of Dooneen," is a ballad likely about the cliffs around Dooneen Point near Beale, North Kerry in the south west of Ireland. Like many folksongs, does not have a clear point of origin or author. It is a tremendously popular song, though, and in a grand tradition in Irish balladry, speaks of the longing for the Emerald Isle. It's also not clear exactly where the Cliffs of Dooneen are. They may have been just an invention of the author, though based on geographical clues from the song, it seems that they may be a real place as well; probably a high point in either County Kerry or County Clare, overlooking the River Shannon.

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Harp and Strings (Violin, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Adagio from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
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Adagio from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts4 pages02:286 years ago2,057 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
Video

Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts14 pages04:126 years ago800 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute
Video

Allegro from Sonata in G Minor (BWV 1020) for Harp & Flute

2 parts10 pages05:456 years ago822 views
Many believe that the Sonata for violin and keyboard in G minor, BWV 1020 is almost certainly not a work by Bach; or, rather, it is almost certainly not a work by J.S. Bach (it may in fact have been composed by Johann Sebastian's son C.P.E. Bach). Furthermore, it is not really even a violin sonata -- whoever the work's author might be, the intended ensemble seems actually to be flute and harpsichord (or perhaps its smaller-toned cousin the clavichord). But it is an elegant piece of late-Baroque chamber music, and is not put to any shame by its six worthy and unquestionably authentic brethren (BWV 1014 - 1019).

If the Sonata in G minor is the only one of the Bach-attributed violin/harpsichord sonatas to have three rather than four (or, in one case, five) movements. The opening movement has no tempo indication but is built of vintage allegro stock. The entirety of the opening ritornello, with its active figuration and arpeggiated subject, is given to the harpsichord as a solo; when the violin enters some bars later the music briefly takes on a more spacious form -- but soon the energetic ritornello creeps back in. The violin sings a melody that grows from many long-held tones in the Adagio second movement. The third movement is a strong-boned Allegro into which from time to time breaks a wonderfully peculiar repeated-note motif.

Although the Sonata in G Minor was originally written for Violin and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Harp Duet
Video

Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Harp Duet

2 parts12 pages05:306 years ago728 views
The harpsichord concertos, BWV 1052-1065, are concertos for harpsichord, strings and continuo by Johann Sebastian Bach. Of these, there are seven complete concertos for a single harpsichord, (BWV 1052-1058), three concertos for 2 harpsichords (BWV 1060-1062), two concertos for 3 harpsichords (BWV 1063-1064), and one concerto for 4 harpsichords, (BWV 1065).

All of Bach's harpsichord concertos (with the exception of the Brandenburg concerto) are thought to be arrangements made from earlier concertos for melodic instruments probably written in Köthen. In many cases, only the harpsichord version has survived.

Of all Bach's harpsichord concertos, this is probably the only one that originated as a harpsichord work, though not in an orchestral guise. The work originated as a concerto for two harpsichords unaccompanied (in the manner of the Italian Concerto, BWV 971), and the addition of the orchestral parts may not have been by Bach himself. The string orchestra does not fulfil an independent role, and only appears to augment cadences; it is silent in the middle movement. The harpsichords have much dialogue between themselves and play in an antiphonal manner throughout.

Although this Concerto in C Minor was originally written for 2 Harpsichords (and possibly strings and continuo), I created this arrangement for Two (2) Concert (Pedal) Harps and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Allegro from Concerto in C Minor (BWV 1060) for Wind & Strings

6 parts19 pages04:126 years ago1,030 views
The harpsichord concertos, BWV 1052-1065, are concertos for harpsichord, strings and continuo by Johann Sebastian Bach. Of these, there are seven complete concertos for a single harpsichord, (BWV 1052-1058), three concertos for 2 harpsichords (BWV 1060-1062), two concertos for 3 harpsichords (BWV 1063-1064), and one concerto for 4 harpsichords, (BWV 1065).

All of Bach's harpsichord concertos (with the exception of the Brandenburg concerto) are thought to be arrangements made from earlier concertos for melodic instruments probably written in Köthen. In many cases, only the harpsichord version has survived.

While the existing score is in the form of a concerto for harpsichord and strings, Bach scholars believe it to be a transcription of a lost double concerto in D minor; a reconstructed arrangement of this concerto for two violins or violin and oboe is classified as BWV 1060R. The subtle and masterful way in which the solo instruments blend with the orchestra marks this out as one of the most mature works of Bach's years at Köthen. The middle movement is a cantabile for the solo instruments with orchestral accompaniment.

Although this Concerto in C Minor was originally written for 2 Harpsichords and orchestra, I created this arrangement for a unique Wind (Flutes, Oboe, Clarinet & French Horn) and String (Cello & Bass) ensemble and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Gigue from Partita No.1 in B♭ Major (BWV 825) for Harp
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Gigue from Partita No.1 in B♭ Major (BWV 825) for Harp

1 part3 pages02:056 years ago2,440 views
The Partitas, BWV 825–830, are a set of six Harpsichord suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach, published from 1726 to 1730 as Clavier-Übung I, and the first of his works to be published under his direction. They were, however, among the last of his keyboard suites to be composed, the others being the 6 English Suites, BWV 806-811 and the 6 French Suites, BWV 812-817.

The six Partitas (BWV 825-830) are part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, but were published singly, beginning in 1726 with this B flat major effort. A new partita appeared each year thereafter until 1731, when the whole collection was issued. Each of the six is a suite containing allemandes, sarabandes, minuets, and various other dances and numbers. The B flat major Partita consists of seven short movements, the first being a praeludium, a moderately paced piece so typical of Bach's music in its stately confidence, serene joy, and deftly wrought contrapuntal writing. There follow an allemande, corrente (courante), sarabande, and gigue which comprise the standard sequence of dances that make up a partita. Actually, Bach inserted two brief minuets between the sarabande and gigue.

This gigue is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century and usually appears at the end of a suite. The gigue was probably never a court dance, but it was danced by nobility on social occasions and several court composers wrote gigues. This gigue is rhythmic and fast-paced, breathless in its graceful drive and bouncy manner.

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I arranged it for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Concerto in A Minor (BWV 1065) for Harp Quartet

4 parts26 pages10:336 years ago1,867 views
The harpsichord concertos, BWV 1052-1065, are concertos for harpsichord, strings and continuo by Johann Sebastian Bach. Of these, there are seven complete concertos for a single harpsichord, (BWV 1052-1058), three concertos for 2 harpsichords (BWV 1060-1062), two concertos for 3 harpsichords (BWV 1063-1064), and one concerto for 4 harpsichords, (BWV 1065).

All of Bach's harpsichord concertos, with the exception of the Brandenburg concerto and BWV 1061 which was composed for harpsichords from the very beginning (though, without accompaniment) are thought to be arrangements made from earlier concertos for melodic instruments probably written in Köthen. In many cases, only the harpsichord version has survived.

Bach made a number of transcriptions from Antonio Vivaldi's concertos, especially from his op.3 set, entitled L'estro Armonico; he adapted them for solo harpsichord and solo organ, and for the concerto for 4 violins in B minor, op.3 no.10, RV 580, he decided upon the unique solution of using four harpsichords and orchestra. This is thus the only harpsichord concerto by Bach which was not an adaptation of his own material. The middle movement has the four harpsichords playing differently-articulated arpeggios in a very unusual tonal blend, while Bach provided some additional virtuosity and tension in the other movements.

Although this Concerto in C Minor was originally written for 4 Harpsichords and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for four (4) Concert (Pedal) Harps and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Prelude # 9 in D Minor (BWV 539) for Oboe & Strings

3 parts3 pages02:256 years ago647 views
This Prelude (from the Prelude and Fugue in D minor BWV 539) by J.S. Bach is somber and paced slowly, imparting an almost funereal sense, with counterpoint that neither enlivens nor offers brighter colors or mood. But it is the ensuing Fugue that occupies more than two-thirds of the approximately seven-minute duration of the complete piece.

Although this Prelude was originally written for Organ, I created this arrangement for a unique Wind (Oboe) and String (Viola & Cello) trio and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Greencastle Hornpipe" for Harp

1 part3 pages02:066 years ago504 views
"Greencastle" is a very well known hornpipe from Ireland from the 19th century. This tune is also known as "McPartland's Style", which is often paired with the "Buck from the Mountain".

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments (possible Bagpipe or Mandolin), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Carnival of Venice" (Opus 10 MS 59) Theme & Variations for Harp

1 part7 pages03:476 years ago4,369 views
Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini (1782 – 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. He was one of the most celebrated violin virtuosi of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique.

Paganini composed his own works to play exclusively in his concerts, all of which had profound influences on the evolution of violin techniques. His 24 Caprices were probably composed in the period between 1805 to 1809, while he was in the service of the Baciocchi court. Also during this period, he composed the majority of the solo pieces, duo-sonatas, trios and quartets for the guitar. These chamber works may have been inspired by the publication, in Lucca, of the guitar quintets of Boccherini. Many of his variations (and he has become the de facto master of this musical genre), including "Le Streghe", "The Carnival of Venice" (this), and "Nel cor più non mi sento", were composed, or at least first performed, before his European concert tour.

In 1855, Thomas Aptommas created this arrangement was created entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)
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"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)

3 parts5 pages02:186 years ago3,448 views
No, it is not only Bach/Gounod when hearing the Ave Maria: Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921), too, set this text to music several times - for example, for organ (without pedal) and two identical voices. The organ is sometimes replaced replaced by a piano (and here, the Harp), the vocal parts can be sung by two sopranos, soprano and mezzo-soprano, or soprano and alto. If the performers are good, one may even consider a performance of this sacred composition in groups. Now available in an attractiv single edition, this setting is valuable addition to the repertoire and impressive alternative to the common Ave settings

This arrangement is created for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Voice Duet (Soprano & Alto) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Rocks of Bawn" for Harp & Clarinet

2 parts2 pages02:136 years ago956 views
Clarinet, Harp
"The Rocks of Bawn" (Rocks of White) talks about Oliver Cromwell's invasion of Ireland in 1649 and the treatment of the Roman Catholics: In 1652, Oliver Cromwell "subdued" Ireland, a process that often recurred in history before and since. Many Catholic landholders were dispossessed and forced to take their families and belongings beyond the Shannon, to the hard country of Connaught. While English and Scottish Protestant newcomers settled on the lusher vacated farms, the dispossessed Irish hacked out a thin living among the "rocks, bogs, salt water and seaweed" of the barren west coast. In the ensuing centuries, to many a farm-hand even the British Army offerred better prospects than the stony plough-defying soil of Mayo, Galway and Clare. The lament of the Connaught ploughman has become one of the most popular of all Irish folk songs, seemingly within the last few years.

Scholars feel that "Rocks of White is not a good transaltion". In Irish the presence of "of" between Rocks and White denotes the genitive 9 (n tuiseal ginideach). This indicates that both Rocks and White are nouns.

In Cavan it is asserted that the Rocks of Bawn refers to the poor soil (impossible to plough) in west cavan, adjacent to the town of Bawnboy (An Babhún Buí - the yellow earth enclosure - that the earth enclosure is referred to as a Babhún rather than a Lios or Rath indicates that it was enclosure made up during the Elizabethan plantation of Ulster).

Although originally written for traditional folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Bb Clarinet.

"Assez Vivement" (Opus 38 No. 1) for Harp

1 part10 pages04:016 years ago539 views
Charles-Valentin Alkan (1813 – 1888) was a French composer and one of the greatest pianists of his day. His attachment to his Jewish origins is displayed both in his life and his work. He entered the Conservatoire de Paris at the age of six, earning many awards, and as an adult became a famous virtuoso and teacher. Although early in his life he was socially active and good friends with prominent musicians and artists including Eugène Delacroix, Franz Liszt and Frédéric Chopin, he gradually withdrew from the concert platform after 1848, and he lived a reclusive life in Paris until his death in 1888.

His compositions for solo piano include some of the most fiendishly difficult ever written, and performers who can master them are few and far between. "Trente Chants" was published in 1857. and included the romantic first piece: "Assez Vivement" (Deeply enough).

The sweeping Assez vivement that opens the first collection of Chants would seem to be Alkan at his most straightforward -- peremptory, soaring, lyrically arresting -- until a certain nagging similarity to the first piece of Mendelssohn's first set of Lieder ohne Worte (songs without words), Op. 19, is identified, though it is more apparent to the performer than to the listener. If both place an evenly spaced melody over an accompaniment of distinctively purling arpeggios, their effects are very different; Mendelssohn's little piece is an invitation to domesticity, while Alkan's elaborately justifies his direction for playing avec grande passion.

There can be no doubt of Alkan's admiration -- he is found performing Mendelssohn's works early and late. Perhaps their similarity of temperament, tokened by a certain primness, briskness, and fastidious elegance, led Alkan to delineate his own characteristic features by direct, occasionally pathological, comparison.

The first and second collections of Chants, sharing opus number 38, were published by Richault in 1857 for piano (in E Major) however, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp in Eb Major and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Les Berceaux" (Opus 23 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:236 years ago964 views
Flute, Harp
Gabriel Fauré was born in Pamiers, Ariège, Midi-Pyrénées, in the south of France, the fifth son and youngest of six children of Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87).

Fauré is regarded as one of the masters of the French art song, or mélodie. His devotion to the mélodie spans his career, from the ever-fresh "Le papillon et la fleur" of 1861 to the masterly cycle L'horizon chimérique, composed sixty years and more than a hundred songs later. Fauré's songs are now core repertoire for students and professionals, sung in conservatories and recital halls throughout the world.

Gabriel Fauré's "Les berceaux," Op. 23 No. 1 (written in 1879), a setting of a poem by Sully Prudhomme, uses a flowing melodic line in the vocal part and a characteristic accompaniment in the piano to evoke the movement of both ships and of cradles (berceaux), linking the two together in motion and emotion.

The poem describes large ships rocked by the water and cradles rocked by women: "But the day of farewells will come, because women must weep, and curious men must dare the lure of the horizon." But though ships carry men away from their cradles, the ships sense, and are momentarily held back by, the soul of the cradles.

The song opens with the lulling motion of arpeggios in the piano bass line, underpinning a soothing, quietly sung vocal line. At the line "But the day of farewells will come, " a crescendo slowly builds to a forte climax on "dare the lure of the horizon." The piano leads the way back to the more flowing sprit of the opening, ending the song in the tone in which it began.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Elégie" for Flute & Harp
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"Elégie" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:116 years ago673 views
Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (1842 – 1912) was a French composer best known for his operas. His compositions were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and he ranks as one of the greatest melodists of his era. Soon after his death, Massenet's style went out of fashion, and many of his operas fell into almost total oblivion. Apart from Manon and Werther, his works were rarely performed.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano and Voice, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Mélodie" (Opus 10 No. 5) for Harp

1 part3 pages02:186 years ago313 views
Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (1842 – 1912) was a French composer best known for his operas. His compositions were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and he ranks as one of the greatest melodists of his era. Soon after his death, Massenet's style went out of fashion, and many of his operas fell into almost total oblivion. Apart from Manon and Werther, his works were rarely performed.

The "Mélodie pourie Violoncelle" by Jules Massenet (1842-1912) was perhaps one of the most popular melodies in Europe of the fin de sicle, the last decades of the nineteenth century, often referred to as the Belle Epoque. Massenet originally composed it in 1866 for a piano cycle titled Pieces de Genre, Op. 10 No 5. In 1872, he incorporated the piece into Les Erinnyes (The Furies), a play by Leconte de Lisle. The sorrowful melody for muted cello became a solo piece entitled Melodie-Elogie and was arranged numerous times for many instruments and instrumental ensembles. At some point it was adapted to the lyrics doux printemps d'autrefois by Louis Gallet (1698?-1757).

Although this piece was originally written for Cello and Piano, Gabriel Verdalle arranged this work for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Andante from "The Reformation" (Opus 107 N0. 5) for Oboe & Harp
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Andante from "The Reformation" (Opus 107 N0. 5) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:266 years ago441 views
Oboe, Harp
The Symphony No. 5 in D major/D minor, Op. 107, called the Reformation Symphony, was composed by Felix Mendelssohn in 1830 in honor of the 300th anniversary of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession. This Confession was a key document of Lutheranism and its Presentation to Emperor Charles V in June 1530 was a momentous event of the Protestant Reformation. The symphony was written for a full orchestra and was the second extended symphony that Mendelssohn had written. It was not published until 1868, 21 years after the composer's death - hence its numbering as '5'. Although the symphony is not very frequently performed, it is better known today than it was during Mendelssohn's lifetime.

I created this arrangement of the third movement of Mendelssohn’s Reformation Symphony; arguably one of the most memorable melodies Mendelssohn ever wrote. I believe that this version for Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp retains all the beauty and finesse of the original.

"Star of the County Down" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:136 years ago3,612 views
Flute, Harp
"Star of the County Down" is an old Irish ballad set near Banbridge in County Down, in Northern Ireland. The tune is a pentatonic melody, similar to that of several other works, including the almost identical English tune "Kingsfold", well known from several popular hymns, such as "Led By the Spirit". The folk tune was the basis for Ralph Vaughan Williams' Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus.

The melody was also used in an old Irish folk song called "My Love Nell". The lyrics of "My Love Nell" tell the story of young man who courts a girl but loses her when she emigrates to America. The only real similarity with "Star of the County Down" is that Nell too comes from County Down. This may have inspired McGarvey to place the heroine of his new song in Down as well (McGarvey was from Donegal).

"The Star of the County Down" uses a tight rhyme scheme. Each stanza is a double quatrain, and the first and third lines of each quatrain have an internal rhyme on the second and fourth feet: [aa]b[cc]b. The refrain is a single quatrain with the same rhyming pattern.

The song is sung from the point of view of a young man who chances to meet a charming lady by the name of Rose (or Rosie) McCann, referred to as the "star of the County Down". From a brief encounter the writer's infatuation grows until, by the end of the ballad, he imagines wedding the girl.

Although this piece was originally written for traditional folk instruments, I arranged it for Flute and Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp

"Shenandoah" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:276 years ago5,930 views
Flute, Harp
"Oh Shenandoah!" seems to have originated in the early nineteenth century as a land ballad in the areas of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, with a story of a Scots/Irish trader who fell in love with the daughter of the Indian chief Shenandoah. The song was taken up by sailors plying these rivers, and thus made its way down the Mississippi to the open ocean. The song had great appeal for American deep-sea sailors, and its rolling melody made it ideal as a capstan shanty, where a group of sailors push the massive capstan bars around and around in order to lift the heavy anchor.

Before and during the French and Indian War, the Scots/Irish were among the first to suffer, and among those who suffered most because of their inhabitation of the frontier and their proximity to the various Indian tribes, many of whom couldn’t get along with each other, let alone, with the white settlers. The Scots/Irish had fresh memories of the border raids from the days back in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

The song reached its first height of popularity perhaps a little before the 1840s, the beginning of the fast clipper ship era that added so much to American growth. The song was traditional with the U.S. Army cavalry, who called it “The Wild Mizzourye”. In fact, “Shenandoah” was known by countless names, including: “Shennydore”, “The Wide Missouri”, “The Wild Mizzourye”, “The Oceanida” and “Rolling River”.

The song "Oh, Shenandoah" became almost a hymn in Virginia, commemorating these early Scots/Irish settlers and their land that they loved.

Although this piece was originally written for traditional folk instruments, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Passacaglia" in G Minor (C.105) for Harp

1 part4 pages04:196 years ago2,396 views
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber's "Passacaglia" in G minor is part of a group of pieces composed either for the Archbishop of Salzburg, Maximilian Gandolph, Count Khüenburg (Biber's employer) or the Salzburg Confraternity of the Rosary. Finished probably in 1676, the bulk of the pieces are violin sonatas on the 15 mysteries of the rosary and are among the most important scordatura works ever written for the violin.

The basis of the Passacaglia is a descending tetrachord: G, F, E flat, D. Many such pieces are built on descending tetrachords, but in this case it may constitute a reference. In the original publication the piece is headed by an illustration of the what is called the Guardian Angel, in this case appearing to a small child. The Passacaglia's opening four notes, which become its bass pattern, may refer to the traditional hymn to the Guardian Angel, "Einen Engel Gott mir geben" (God, Give Me an Angel), which has a similar tune and was published in 1666.

Sixty-five statements of the descending tetrachord support variations in this continuously developing work. After 30 statements at the opening pitch level, the motive moves up an octave for 15 statements, then back down to the original level for the last 20. This pattern, however, does not delineate the structure of the piece. Five sections of similar length are marked off by appearances of the descending tetrachord played alone, grouping the variations thusly: 1-9, 10-19, 20-36, 37-50, and 51-65.

Generally, the notes of the Passacaglia theme sustain while variations occur above them, requiring great skill on the part of the player. For some of the variations, particularly those with figures that rocket rapidly skyward, Biber does not sustain the notes of the theme, allowing the player ample time to execute the flourishes. Over the constantly sounding theme, Biber creates a series of contrasting variations of various moods before closing the piece by outlining a G major triad. It is one of the best works for solo violin before those of J.S. Bach.

Although this piece was originally written for Violin, I created this arrangement for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sonata No. 1 in C Major (Opus 20 No. 1) for Harp

1 part7 pages07:466 years ago1,027 views
A close contemporary of Weber, the German-born Friedrich Kuhlau settled in Copenhagen, where he spent the greater part of his career as a composer, pianist and teacher. Kuhlau wrote a copious quantity of music for the piano, including a fine Piano Concert .

Kuhlau was most famous in his day as a flutist and composer for flute. But, he obviously was a good keyboard player and his Sonatinas are part of the regular student repertoire, like the Sonatinas of Clementi. They are actually a little bit more difficult than Clementi, and so serve as a good bridge to Mozart Sonatas. The most popular of the Sonatinas is Opus 20, No. 1.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano, I adapted this work for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Elegie" (Opus 3 No. 1) for Harp

1 part7 pages04:116 years ago938 views
Harp
Sergei Rachmaninov (also spelled Rachmaninoff) was a legendary Russian composer and pianist who emigrated after the Communist revolution of 1917, and became one of the highest paid concert stars of his time, and one of the most influential pianists of the 20th century.

Written in 1892, the "Elegy" in Eb Minor begins with mournful, melancholic melody, always moving on the off-beat, that gradually builds in intensity in 3rds and 6ths. A warm, comforting melody wells up from the bass and slowly builds to a soaring climax.
The music crashes back down to earth and almost dies out, before the first theme re-emerges, even more beautiful and sad than before. It concludes with one last struggle and a final collapse.

Although this piece was originally written for Piano, I adapted this work for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Arabesque" No. 2 for Concert Harp

1 part10 pages03:446 years ago913 views
The Two Arabesques (Deux arabesques), L. 66, is a pair of arabesques composed by Claude Debussy. They are two of Debussy's earliest works, composed between the years 1888 and 1891, when he was still in his twenties.

Although quite an early work, the arabesques contain hints of Debussy's developing musical style. The suite is one of the very early impressionistic pieces of music, following the French visual art form. Debussy seems to wander through modes and keys, and achieves evocative scenes through music.

The Arabesque No. 2 (Andantino con moto) is written in the key of G major and is noticeably quicker and more lively in tempo than the Arabesque No. 1. It opens with left hand chords and right hand trills. The pieces makes several transpositions and explores a lower register of the piano. Again notable is a hint of the pentatonic scale. The style more closely resembles some of Debussy's later works. Like the closing bars of the first arabesque, this arabesque closes in a similar fashion.

The vocabulary of Debussy's music is rich in harmonic dimension. The composer uses 7ths, 9ths, 11th and more, while he intersperses whole tone progressions that are so characteristic of his writing. If density, or volume ever applied to musical performance, this piece meets all requirements for a slow entry into notes, and a swimming motion through them therefore although originally written for Piano (and variations thereof), I chose to create this arrangement for concert harp to accentuate these characteristics of the original work.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Clair de Lune" for Harp
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"Clair de Lune" for Harp

1 part7 pages03:466 years ago4,415 views
Claude-Achille Debussy (1862 – 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures working within the field of impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions In France, he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903. A crucial figure in the transition to the modern era in Western music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.

Beginning in the 1890s, Debussy developed his own musical language largely independent of Wagner's style, colored in part from the dreamy, sometimes morbid romanticism of the Symbolist Movement. Debussy became a frequent participant at Stéphane Mallarmé's Symbolist gatherings, where Wagnerism dominated the discussion. In contrast to the enormous works of Wagner and other late-romantic composers, however, around this time Debussy chose to write in smaller, more accessible forms. The Deux Arabesques is an example of one of Debussy's earliest works, already developing his musical language. Suite bergamasque (1890) recalls rococo decorousness with a modern cynicism and puzzlement. This suite contains (this) one of Debussy's most popular pieces, "Clair de Lune".

His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch. Often Debussy's work reflected the activities or turbulence in his own life. In French literary circles, the style of this period was known as symbolism, a movement that directly inspired Debussy both as a composer and as an active cultural participant.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Rêverie" for Flute & Harp
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"Rêverie" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages03:286 years ago1,927 views
Flute, Harp
Claude Debussy was born into a poor family in France, but his obvious gift at the piano sent him to the Paris Conservatory at age 11. At age 22, he won the Prix de Rome, which financed two years of further musical study in the Italian capital. After the turn of the century, Debussy established himself as the leading figure of French music.

Debussy showed an early affinity for the piano, and he began taking lessons at age seven. By age 10 or 11, he had entered the Paris Conservatory, where his instructors and fellow students recognized his talent but often found his attempts at musical innovation strange.

His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch. Often Debussy's work reflected the activities or turbulence in his own life. In French literary circles, the style of this period was known as symbolism, a movement that directly inspired Debussy both as a composer and as an active cultural participant.

Some of the greatest works of the impressionist artists Renoir and Monet are paintings of a dreamy young woman gazing at reflections in water, water’s depths, or the sky. The idea of reflection is very important, as in impressionism, the reflection is more “real” than the actuality. In art works such as The Boat (1867) by Renoir, the impressionist technique allowed the state of reverie to be boldly explored. It is no coincidence that one of Debussy’s most popular piano works is entitled ‘Rêverie’.

‘Rêverie’ moves slowly and deliberately, and yet with a rhythm that brings to mind water flowing and bubbling in a fountain. As the song continues, the music becomes more wavelike in tone. It then becomes soft and tranquil and moves back and forth in a slight crescendo only to die away again.

Although this piece was originally written for piano, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Albinoni's Adagio" for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages05:326 years ago8,272 views
Flute, Harp
The Adagio in G minor for strings and organ continuo is believed to be a neo-baroque composition by Remo Giazotto. It is usually referred to as "Albinoni's Adagio", or "Adagio in G minor by Albinoni, arranged by Giazotto", but many scholars believe it is an entirely original work by Giazotto.

It was supposedly based on a fragment of a second-movement basso continuo line from a "Sonata in G minor" by Tomaso Albinoni purportedly found among the ruins of the old Saxon State Library, Dresden, after it was firebombed by the Allies during World War II, but since Giazotto's death in 1998 it has emerged that no such fragment has been found or recorded to have been in possession by the Saxon State Library, and it is presumed the piece is entirely his own composition.

The piece is most commonly orchestrated for string ensemble and organ, or string ensemble alone, but has achieved a level of fame such that it is commonly transcribed for other instruments.

The piece has also permeated popular culture, having been used as background music for such films as Gallipoli, television programs and in advertisements.

Although this Work was originally written for Strings, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Groves of Blarney" (Theme & Variation) for Harp

1 part4 pages02:096 years ago610 views
Thomas Moore (1779 – 1852) was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of The Minstrel Boy and The Last Rose of Summer. He was responsible, with John Murray, for burning Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was often referred to as Anacreon Moore.

From and old Irish air (originally titled "Castle Hyde"), became "The Groves of Blarney" around 1790 by R. A. Millikin, and was included by Thomas Moore, to his own new words, in his Irish Melodies in 1813. Beethoven set the air and even Mendelssohn wrote a pioan fantasia on it (Op.15, 1827), and it is sung by a soprano in Act 2 of Flotow's Martha.


This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Elegie" (Opus 29) for Flute & Harp

2 parts11 pages05:526 years ago366 views
This is a little known and seldom performed work of Robert Lehmann. Although penned in 1882, the "Elegie" (Opus 29) was first published in 1899.

Although this piece was originally written for Harp and Cello, I arranged it for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Romance sans Paroles" (Opus 17 No 3) for Harp

1 part4 pages02:496 years ago779 views
When Gabriel Fauré was a boy, Berlioz had just written La damnation de Faust and Henry David Thoreau was writing Walden. By the time of his death, Stravinsky had written The Rite of Spring and World War I had ended in the devastation of Europe. In this dramatic period in history, Fauré strove to bring together the best of traditional and progressive music and, in the process, created some of the most exquisite works in the French repertoire. He was one of the most advanced figures in French musical circles and influenced a generation of composers world-wide.

Issued by Hamelle in 1880, the three Romances sans paroles—a graceful nod to Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte—are Fauré's first published piano music, though they probably date from 1863, when the composer was still a student at the École Niedermeyer. Their early gestation makes them all the more remarkable as, already, they possess a unique look on the page and a distinctively fluent feel beneath the fingers. If the opening Andante quasi allegretto and final Andante moderato sound like salon fare, they are already superior salon fare and, though simple, fraught with persuasive charm and recognizably Fauréenne felicities. The central Allegro molto, on the other hand, recalls the playful airiness of Mendelssohn, as well as that composers ardent brilliance. Once known, the set proved sufficiently popular to merit an arrangement for violin or cello and piano by Jules Delsart, published by Hamelle in 1896. Nos. 1 and 2 were given their official premières at a concert of the Société Nationale de Musique, February 25, 1881, by Pauline Roger, while the third waited until an SNM concert of January 19, 1889.


I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp to highlight the delicate arpeggios and add to the romantic ambience and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Andante Religioso" (Opus 1) for Harp

1 part5 pages03:016 years ago223 views
Next to nothing is known about either Gabriel Verdalle (1845-1912) or this "Andante Religioso (Opus 1) written entirely for Solo (Pedal) harp. Many feel that Verdalle possessed a "Satie-esque" circularity that is most engaging.

This piece is the first in a series of about 90 works spanning his professional career. The original manuscript indicates that this work was dedicated to his Grandmother Madame Guillaume.

This piece was written entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Romance sans Paroles" (Opus 6) for Harp

1 part5 pages02:176 years ago284 views
Next to nothing is known about either Gabriel Verdalle (1845-1912) or this "Romance sans Paroles" (Opus 6) written entirely for Solo (Pedal) harp. Many feel that Verdalle possessed a "Satie-esque" circularity that is most engaging.

This piece is the sixth in a series of about 90 works spanning his professional career. The original manuscript indicates that this work was dedicated to Georges Norton (from Louisville, Kentucky).

This piece was written entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Mélancolie" (Opus 30) for Flute & Harp

2 parts8 pages03:186 years ago353 views
Next to nothing is known about either Gabriel Verdalle (1845-1912) or this "Mélancolie" (Opus 30) written for Violin and Concert (Pedal) harp. Many feel that Verdalle possessed a "Satie-esque" circularity that is most engaging.

This piece is the 30th in a series of about 90 works spanning his professional career. The original manuscript indicates that this is a solo from the Opera Mélancolie (A Firmin Touche).

Although this piece was originally written for Violin and Concert (Pedal) Harp, I arranged it for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Sous la Feuillée" (Opus 29) for Harp

1 part5 pages04:266 years ago220 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on 19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

François (or Francis) Thomé (1850 - 1909), was a French pianist and composer. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Jules Laurent Duprato and Ambroise Thomas. After leaving the Conservatoire he became well known as a composer of salon pieces and was in demand as a pianist and teacher. His music was particularly successful in the French provinces, and two of his operas were first performed outside Paris. He became popular towards the end of the 19th Century as a composer of accompanied poems, but is also known for his stage works which encompassed various genres, including ballet, pantomime, incidental music (for a wide range of plays), bleuettes, and operettas, such as Baron Fric (1886).

"Sous la Feuillée" (Opus 9) was a transcription for Concert (Pedal) Harp of the 1887 Piano work by Francis Thomé. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"En Bateau" for Harp
Video

"En Bateau" for Harp

1 part7 pages03:576 years ago837 views
Claude-Achille Debussy (1862 – 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures working within the field of impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions In France, he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903. A crucial figure in the transition to the modern era in Western music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.

One third of the art songs Debussy composed were settings of the poems of Paul Verlaine (1844-1896). The poet’s influence on the composer was immense. A description of the poet’s style, one favoring insinuation over declaration, might even be applied to Debussy’s music. An accumulation of fleeting subtleties is more to the point than a grander revealed structure.

The first movements of Debussy’s Petite Suite of 1889 are drawn from two poems of Verlaine’s 1869 volume Fêtes galantes. The poems evoke the era of 18th-century aristocrats on country outings, the world depicted in the fanciful paintings of Fragonard and Watteau. Partiers assume the archetypal Commedia dell'Arte roles – there are countesses and rogues, priests and knights, all engaged in an atmosphere of frivolity.

In En bateau (Sailing), revelers in a boat have their minds on romantic trysts as they sail at dusk on a dark lake. Debussy’s music captures perfectly a mood of water-borne serenity and languor, opening with a kind of musical sigh that made the Petite Suite immediately popular with a wide audience.

But Verlaine’s poem has a wrinkle. There is a desire for romance, but no consummation. In fact, the poem ends with a wistfulness, despite a happy tone – promise unfulfilled.

Although this 1st movement from the Petite Suite was originally composed for orchestra (and later Piano by Jaques Durand), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Allemande from Partita No.1 in B♭ Major (BWV 825) for Harp
Video

Allemande from Partita No.1 in B♭ Major (BWV 825) for Harp

1 part4 pages01:436 years ago850 views
The Partitas, BWV 825–830, are a set of six Harpsichord suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach, published from 1726 to 1730 as Clavier-Übung I, and the first of his works to be published under his direction. They were, however, among the last of his keyboard suites to be composed, the others being the 6 English Suites, BWV 806-811 and the 6 French Suites, BWV 812-817.

The six Partitas (BWV 825-830) are part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, but were published singly, beginning in 1726 with this B flat major effort. A new partita appeared each year thereafter until 1731, when the whole collection was issued. Each of the six is a suite containing allemandes, sarabandes, minuets, and various other dances and numbers. The B flat major Partita consists of seven short movements, the first being a praeludium, a moderately paced piece so typical of Bach's music in its stately confidence, serene joy, and deftly wrought contrapuntal writing. There follow an allemande, corrente (courante), sarabande, and gigue which comprise the standard sequence of dances that make up a partita. Actually, Bach inserted two brief minuets between the sarabande and gigue.

The allemande is lively and brimming with thematic activity, contrapuntal elements abounding in subtle detail, the music racing by breathlessly under beams of sunshine. The corrente is a bit shorter than the two previous movements. It, too, is lively, but lighter in mood and more carefree than the allemande.

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I arranged it for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Sérénade" (Opus 5) for Harp
Video

"Sérénade" (Opus 5) for Harp

1 part8 pages03:546 years ago360 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

With an apparent attempt to express the sound of the romantic Spanish guitar, Hasselmans write the "Sérénade pour Harpe" (Opus 5) entirely for Harp in 1890. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Follets" (Opus 48) for Harp
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"Follets" (Opus 48) for Harp

1 part10 pages02:326 years ago500 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on 19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

The will o' the wisp (fool's fire) refers to ghostly lights seen at night or twilight that hover over swamps or bogs in still air. They look like a flickering lamp and seem to recede if approached. This "Caprice-Etude" by Alphonse Hasselmans captures the mysterious beautiful of this natural phenomenon using 32nd-note upward arpeggios in rapid succession.

Hasselmans wrote "Les Follets pour Harpe" (Opus 48) sometime after 1899 entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"L'âme Évaporée" for Flute & Harp
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"L'âme Évaporée" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:386 years ago1,657 views
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed.

The son of a shopkeeper and a seamstress, Debussy began piano studies at the Paris Conservatory at the age of 11. While a student there, he encountered the wealthy Nadezhda von Meck (most famous as Tchaikovsky's patroness), who employed him as a music teacher to her children; through travel, concerts and acquaintances, she provided him with a wealth of musical experience. Most importantly, she exposed the young Debussy to the works of Russian composers, such as Borodin and Mussorgsky, who would remain important influences on his music.

Debussy began composition studies in 1880, and in 1884 he won the prestigious Prix de Rome with his cantata L'enfant prodigue. This prize financed two years of further study in Rome—years that proved to be creatively frustrating. However, the period immediately following was fertile for the young composer; trips to Bayreuth and the Paris World Exhibition (1889) established, respectively, his determination to move away from the influence of Richard Wagner, and his interest in the music of Eastern cultures.

After a relatively bohemian period, during which Debussy formed friendships with many leading Parisian writers and musicians (not least of which were Mallarmé, Satie, and Chausson), the year 1894 saw the enormously successful premiere of his Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun)—a truly revolutionary work that brought his mature compositional voice into focus. His seminal opera Pelléas et Mélisande, completed the next year, would become a sensation at its first performance in 1902. The impact of those two works earned Debussy widespread recognition (as well as frequent attacks from critics, who failed to appreciate his forward-looking style), and over the first decade of the twentieth century he established himself as the leading figure in French music—so much so that the term "Debussysme" ("Debussyism"), used both positively and pejoratively, became fashionable in Paris. Debussy spent his remaining healthy years immersed in French musical society, writing as a critic, composing, and performing his own works internationally. He succumbed to colon cancer in 1918, having also suffered a deep depression brought on by the onset of World War I.

Debussy's personal life was punctuated by unfortunate incidents, most famously the attempted suicide of his first wife, Lilly Texier, whom he abandoned for the singer Emma Bardac. However, his subsequent marriage to Bardac, and their daughter Claude-Emma, whom they called "Chouchou" and who became the dedicatee of the composer's Children's Corner piano suite, provided the middle-aged Debussy with great personal joys.

Debussy wrote successfully in most every genre, adapting his distinctive compositional language to the demands of each. His orchestral works, of which Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune and La mer (The Sea, 1905) are most familiar, established him as a master of instrumental color and texture. It is this attention to tone color—his layering of sound upon sound so that they blend to form a greater, evocative whole—that linked Debussy in the public mind to the Impressionist painters.

"L'âme Évaporée", is from Deux Romances (2 Romances), cand was composed in June of 1885 and later published in December 1891. This overwhelming melody is based on a poem by Paul Bourget (1852-1935), extracted from Confessions (1882).

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Solo Voice (Chant), I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Beau Soir" for Oboe & Harp

2 parts4 pages01:576 years ago760 views
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed.

Debussy wrote successfully in most every genre, adapting his distinctive compositional language to the demands of each. His orchestral works, of which Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune and La mer (The Sea, 1905) are most familiar, established him as a master of instrumental color and texture. It is this attention to tone color—his layering of sound upon sound so that they blend to form a greater, evocative whole—that linked Debussy in the public mind to the Impressionist painters.

"Beau Soir" (French for "Beautiful Evening") is a French art song written by Claude Debussy. It is a setting of a poem by Paul Bourget. Debussy was twenty or twenty one when he wrote this song (ca.1883), and his music was marked by the aesthetics of the period.

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Solo Voice (Chant), I created this arrangement for Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp to highlight the somber elegance and delicate arpeggios and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Lied Ohne Worte" (Opus 19 No. 1) for Flute & Harp
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"Lied Ohne Worte" (Opus 19 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts9 pages04:206 years ago645 views
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn (1809 – 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

He wrote "Songs Without Words" (Lieder ohne Worte) is a series of short, lyrical piano pieces by the Romantic composer Felix Mendelssohn, written between 1829 and 1845.

The eight volumes of Songs Without Words, each consisting of six "songs" (Lieder), were written at various points throughout Mendelssohn's life, and were published separately. The piano became increasingly popular in Europe during the early nineteenth century, when it became a standard item in many middle-class households. The pieces are within the grasp of pianists of various abilities and this undoubtedly contributed to their popularity. This great popularity has caused many critics to under-rate their musical value.

The first volume was published by Novello in London (1832) as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, but the later volumes used the title Songs Without Words.

Although this work was originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Noël" (Opus 43 No. 1) for Flute & Harp

2 parts7 pages02:476 years ago715 views
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 - 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th century composers. Among his best-known works are his Nocturnes for piano, the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune", and his Requiem.

Faure composed "Noël" in 1885 clearly as an occasional piece; a little Christmas song destined for a performance where a harmonium was available to add a festive carillon color to the piano accompaniment.

The original text embraces a traditional religiosity to which Faure responds dutifully at the end of the piece, although a certain atypical unctuousness hovers uncomfortably over the music unless it is performed with open-hearted innocence.

Although this work was originally written for Piano, Harmonium and voice, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp to retain it's color and elegance (sans harmonium) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Away in the Manger" a Character Piece for Harp
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"Away in the Manger" a Character Piece for Harp

1 part1 page02:126 years ago618 views
Harp
The song was first published with two verses in an Evangelical Lutheran Sunday School collection, Little Children's Book for Schools and Families (1885), edited by James R. Murray (1841–1905), where it simply bore the title "Away in a Manger" and was set to a tune called "St. Kilda," credited to J.E. Clark.

I created this character arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) to highlight the somber elegance of the work. This piece is truly heart-felt for me and I hope that you will agree that this is one of my better arrangements.

"O Holy Night" In C♭ Major for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages02:106 years ago6,271 views
Flute, Harp
"O Holy Night" ("Cantique de Noël") is a well-known Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem "Minuit, chrétiens" (Midnight, Christians) by Placide Cappeau (1808–1877). Cappeau, a wine merchant and poet, had been asked by a parish priest to write a Christmas poem. Unitarian minister John Sullivan Dwight, editor of Dwight's Journal of Music, created a singing edition based on Cappeau's French text in 1855. In both the French original and in the two familiar English versions of the carol, the text reflects on the birth of Jesus and of mankind's redemption.
"Confidence" (Opus 24) for Harp
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"Confidence" (Opus 24) for Harp

1 part5 pages02:306 years ago296 views
A. Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on 19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

As a solo performer Hasselmans often played his own compositions in concert, many of which were very difficult. Of his fifty-four works all were for solo harp, none for harp and orchestra. His output includes a handful of popular pieces, such as Gitana, Op. 21 (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/gitana-caprice-for-harp) and La Source, Op. 44 (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/la-source-opus-44-tude-for-harp-).

"Confidence" (Romance sans Paroles) Opus 24 was written in 1890 however, little is know about this work.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Cantique de Jean Racine" (Opus 11) for Harp & Woodwind Quartet

5 parts5 pages03:146 years ago983 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Harp
Cantique de Jean Racine (Op. 11) is a work for mixed chorus and piano or organ by Gabriel Fauré. Written by the nineteen year old composer in 1864-5, the piece won Fauré the first prize when he graduated from the École Niedermeyer and was first performed the following year on August 4, 1866, with accompaniment of strings and organ. It was first published around 1875 or 1876 (Schoen, Paris, as part of the series Echo des Maîtrises) and appeared in a version for orchestra (possibly by the composer) in 1906.

The text is a French translation, by the 17th century French dramatist Jean Racine, of a medieval Latin hymn, Consors paterni luminis. When Gabriel Fauré set the translation to music, he gave it the title Cantique de Jean Racine, rather than the title of the original hymn.

Although originally written for Organ and Chorus, I created this arrangement for Harp & Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Les Baricades Mystérieuses" for Harp

1 part4 pages02:326 years ago2,442 views
François Couperin (1668-1733) was certainly the greatest of the French claveinists and surely one of the greatest of French composers. In his four books of Pièces de clavecin, Couperin took the harpsichord music of Chambonnières, Marchand, and especially his uncle Louis Couperin to the pinnacle of the French musical art with clear forms, graceful melodies, elegant harmonies, and a tone that eschews virtuosity in favor of expressivity. The six ordres or suites from Couperin's second book are no longer the series of stylized dance movements in diverse keys familiar from his first book, but rather collections of works more often than not bearing some sort of descriptive title, all of which are in the same key (with the major and minor modes being considered in some sense equivalent).

Music historians have puzzled over the enigmatic title of "Les baricades misterieuses" only to reach the conclusion that it will simply remain a mystery why Couperin named it Les Barricades mystèrieuses. However, we know that it is a movement, in rondeau form, from the Sixth Ordre of the Pièces de clavecin, Book II, published in 1716 or 1717. Like a Vermeer interior, the music conjures up the otherworldly stillness of place, in which a dreamer, reassured by the silent counterpoint of shadows and subdued lights, feels free to retreat into a world, distant yet strangely familiar, of tranquil thoughts and memories. Couperin, who profoundly understood the soul of the harpsichord, uses an even, almost uniform, tone, staying in the muted register of the instrument, to create a quiet aural background against which a gentle, intriguing contrapuntal tapestry is displayed. To weave this tapestry, Couperin employs syncopation and broken chords, achieving an unmistakable lute-like sonority with four voices. According to the eminent music historian James R. Anthony, this piece exemplifies Couperin's ability to transform the structure of each contrasting couplet of a rondeau from simple to complex by introducing harmonic and textural changes. A brilliant instance of this achieved complexity, Anthony has written, "is the final couplet of 'Les Baricades mistérieuses' (Book 2, Ordre 6), which, in its broken-chord spacing and in its delayed resolutions of suspensions, has the sound of Fauré or even of Schumann."

Although originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Coventry Carol" for Flute & Harp
Video

"Coventry Carol" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:476 years ago1,290 views
Flute, Harp
The "Coventry Carol" is a Christmas carol dating from the 16th century. The carol was performed in Coventry in England as part of a mystery play called The Pageant of the Shearmen and Tailors. The play depicts the Christmas story from chapter two in the Gospel of Matthew (Chapter 2). The carol refers to the Massacre of the Innocents, in which Herod ordered all male infants under the age of two in Bethlehem to be killed. The lyrics of this haunting carol represent a mother's lament for her doomed child. It is the only carol that has survived from this play.

The oldest known text was written down by Robert Croo in 1534, and the oldest known printing of the melody dates from 1591 however, the author is unknown. As a town’s plays and songs were once valuable commodities, the original copy of the play was kept by the town council for safe keeping, but, disappeared. Fortunately, the Coventry antiquarian Thomas Sharp saved copies in two volumes dating from the 1800s.

While it’s a little too dark to land on everyone’s Christmas carol A-list, it is tempered in this arrangement with Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Aubade" (Opus 30) for Harp

1 part5 pages02:576 years ago285 views
Alphonse Hasselmans was born in Liège on 5 March 1845 and died in Paris on 19 May 1912. he was a French harpist and composer of Belgian birth. As solo harpist with the orchestras of the Paris Conservatoire, Opéra and Opéra-Comique, and as professor at the Conservatoire, he played a significant part in the harp revival at the turn of the century; he wrote about 50 pieces.

As a solo performer Hasselmans often played his own compositions in concert, many of which were very difficult. Of his fifty-four works all were for solo harp, none for harp and orchestra. His output includes a handful of popular pieces, such as Gitana, Op. 21 (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/gitana-caprice-for-harp) and La Source, Op. 44 (http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/la-source-opus-44-tude-for-harp-).

"Aubade" ("Sérénade") Opus 30 was written in 1893 however, little is know about this work aside from the dedication "A son élève Madame la comtesse de Lauriston" (A student of Madame la Comtesse de Lauriston).

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sonata 1 in F Major (TWV 41:F2) for Harp

1 part5 pages05:536 years ago719 views
Georg Philipp Telemann (1681 – 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Żary, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann.

First published in a German music periodical in 1728, this work was originally written for bassoon and continuo but was accompanied by a note from the composer that the solo part could be played two octaves higher on a recorder. In more modern performances the flute has become the instrument of choice as the level of difficulty makes the piece difficult to play on a bassoon or recorder. In four short movements in the traditional slow-fast-slow-fast pattern the work is just over ten minutes in length. Beginning with a somewhat lyrical triste, the first movement is sweet. But the second movement explodes with exuberance and it is indeed difficult to image the work played on a recorder, much less a bassoon, at the tempo typically selected by the modern flautist. Likewise, the third movement andante leads to a similarly animated vivace which seem barbarically difficult even for a modern flute equipped with the Boehm key system. The work is brilliant and animated and an excellent example of the type of piece Telemann tossed off with little effort and great effect.

Although this piece was written for period instruments, I created this arrangement for the Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Fugue Romantique" (from BWV 1001) for Harp

1 part7 pages04:346 years ago593 views
The Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin (BWV 1001–1006) are a set of six works composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. They consist of three sonatas da chiesa, in four movements, and three partitas, in dance-form movements.

The set was completed by 1720, but was only published in 1802 by Nicolaus Simrock in Bonn. Even after publication, it was largely ignored until the celebrated violinist Josef Joachim started performing these works. Today, Bach's Sonatas and Partitas are an essential part of the violin repertoire, and they are frequently performed and recorded.

I created this romantic fugue variant ("Fugue Romantique") by adapting the solo and continuo parts from the fugue from the Sonata No. 1 in G minor, for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp.

Please note that I took creative license with this piece and as such, it may not appeal to all listeners (musically, spiritually or emotionally). I do not intend to offend anyone so I will apologize up front!

It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross" (from UMC # 301) for Harp

1 part1 page03:266 years ago898 views
Take fifteen hymnals and stack them one on top of another. Taken all together, that's about the number of hymns Fanny Crosby wrote in her lifetime! Of course, many of those have been forgotten today, but a large number remain favorites of Christians all over the world.

Francis Jane Crosby was born into a family of strong Puritan ancestry in New York on March 24, 1820. As a baby, she had an eye infection which a quack doctor treated by placing hot poultices on her red and inflamed eyelids. The infection did clear up, but scars formed on the eyes, and the baby girl became blind for life. A few months later, Fanny's dad became ill and died. Mercy Crosby, widowed at 21, hired herself out as a maid while Grandmother Eunice Crosby took care of little Fanny.

She wrote "Jesus, Keep Me Near the Cross" on November 20, 1850 at Thirtieth Street Methodist Church in Cincinnati. Businessman William Doane gave her a melody he had written. Fanny, listening to it, felt it said, “Jesus keep me near the cross,” and she promptly wrote the words.

This is my Concert (Pedal) Harp arrangement of their work, with added introduction measures, ornamentation, and prepared for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC).

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages01:496 years ago3,134 views
The eighth number in Claude Debussy's first book of piano Preludes, a volume the composer worked on between about 1907 and 1910, is the celebrated "La fille aux cheveux de lin" (The Girl with the Flaxen Hair), two pages of delicate, superbly-crafted music that rival the Clair de lune from the Suite bergamasque and the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun as the most widely recognized entry in the composer's catalog.

One of Debussy's happiest decisions when composing his Preludes is, sadly, one that has been all but undone by publishers. Nowadays one finds the Preludes' picturesque little descriptions (such as "girl with the flaxen hair") at the top of each piece in bold, assertive type. When Debussy put the pieces to paper, however, he placed the descriptions at the end of each piece, as hints, even questions -- these are not the miniature, concrete-subjected tone poems we are sometimes led to believe. Indeed, the title La fille aux cheveux de lin is so famous that it can sometimes distract from the fact that the piece is as perfectly poised and flawlessly balanced a work of piano music as one might hope for.
The unaccompanied melody at the opening glistens (it is really just an arpeggio, so guilelessly drawn that one marvels at the effect it has). The mild climax in the middle of the piece is fine china -- radiant but ever so brittle, always in danger of being irreparably cracked or even smashed by an over-zealous pianist. The uncertain parallel fourths of the final pianissimo "murmuring" (called thus by Debussy) are turned on their heads after four bars, rising up into the warm sun of one last sonorous G flat major chord.

Although originally written for Solo Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Slane (Be Thou My Vision)" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:266 years ago2,866 views
Flute, Harp
In the Fifth century A.D. Saint Patrick came to the Hill of Slane in County Meath in an early on attempt to convert pagan Ireland to Christianity. On the eve of the Christian feast of Easter, 433 A.D. which coincides with the Druid feast of Bealtine (Beal's fire) and the Spring Equinox, St. Patrick lit a bonfire upon the Hill of Slane. There was a law that no fire should be lit in the vicinity when the great festival fire of Bealtine blazed at the Royal seat of power on the visibly nearby Hill of Tara.

The lighting of a fire seems trivial to us but at the time it was equivalent to declaring war on the Druids and their pagan beliefs and war against the King of Ireland. That small act of starting a fire was a turning point in St. Patrick's life and in the history of Ireland. The Hill of Slane is where Saint Patrick confronted Laoghaire (pronounced Leary) , the High King of Tara and all Ireland. Patrick lit the Easter fire contrary to the Druidic law, and changed the spiritual landscape of Ireland forever.

"Slane -- Be Thou My Vision" (Irish: Bí Thusa 'mo Shúile) is a traditional Irish hymn commonly attributed to Dallán Forgaill. It is popular among English-speaking churches around the world.

I created this arrangement for Flute & Celtic or Concert (Pedal) Harp.
"Passacaille" (HWV 432) for Harp
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"Passacaille" (HWV 432) for Harp

1 part4 pages06:566 years ago3,849 views
George Frideric Handel, born in Halle, grew up as the son of a barber-surgeon who wanted his boy to study law. Young Handel successfully rebelled, and by 1703 was playing violin and keyboard in Hamburg’s opera orchestra. Handel spent four years it Italy (1706-1710), where he moved amidst the musical elite of the day – meeting Corelli, Scarlatti, and Pasquini – and received the nickname “il caro Sassone” (the dear Saxon).

Back in the days before international copyright laws, any publisher could publish anything they wanted without fear of legal action. Thus, Jeanne Roger of Amsterdam published "surrepticious [sic] and incorrect Copies" of the suites in 1719 without paying or informing the composer. This led Handel to publish the works himself in London in 1720. The Suite in G Suite is one of the grandest and most impressive of the suites. In six movements, the Suite in G minor is much more than a standard-issue set of stylized dance movements. The first movement is an overture in the French style with a massive opening Adagio, followed by a fast and brutal Presto, with a pummeling theme played in thirds, sixths, and octaves. The following movement is a quietly lyrical Andante with a gently embellished melody. The next movement is a propulsive, two-voice Allegro in 3/8 time. The central Sarabande, marked Andante con moto, is an incredibly simple and affecting series of three- and four-voice chords with the melody as the top voice. The Gigue that follows is a hurtling movement in two virtuoso voices. The climax and culmination of the Suite in G minor is the monumental Passacaglia of contrapuntal force majeure.

This passacaglia (Passacaille) derives from a musical form that originated in early seventeenth-century Spain and is still used by contemporary composers. It is usually of a serious character and is often, but not always, based on a bass-ostinato and written in triple meter.

This Passacaille has become well known as a duo for violin and viola, arranged by the Norwegian violinist Johan Halvorsen.

Although this piece was written for period keyboard, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land" for Solo Harp
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"Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land" for Solo Harp

1 part7 pages08:356 years ago3,057 views
Welsh harpist John Thomas was one of the most acclaimed harpist-composers of his time. His career culminated as official harpist to Queen Victoria. John Thomas' Welsch background, combined with classical training in London led him to composer a multitude of works in classical style, all imbued with Welsh folk melodies.

Attributed birth and death dates for John Thomas seem approximate, with some references listing the former as 1826 and the latter as 1914. The Minstrel's Adieu to His Native Land is one of John Thomas' most famous works, written for harp but sounding like an appropriate background theme for just about every touring player. The Welsh title of this masterwork is Ffarwell y Telynor, and the piece was originally concocted for the private harpist of Queen Victoria.

Yoonee van den Eynde and Judy Loman are among the many harpists who have since interpreted Thomas' works for the instrument. Geneviève Chevallier and Christine Fleischmann presented his Grand Duet for Two Harps in E flat major on an early-'90s collection of tandem harp twanging. Early new age advocates have also brought Thomas' music in line with the spacy genre's Celtic harp connection.

This piece is written entirely for Solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Aria" from Sonata in F Major (Op. 1 No. 7) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages03:586 years ago805 views
Jean-Marie Leclair (1697 - 1764) was a French composer and violinist. Initially a dancer, he lived from 1723 in Paris, where he became a prominent soloist and began producing violin sonatas (from 1723). He also appeared abroad, and in 1733 became ordinaire de la musique du roi at the French court. In 1738-43 he served the court of Orange in the Netherlands and (in 1740-43) François du Liz at The Hague. He then lived mainly in Paris, where he was murdered (probably by his nephew).

Foremost in Leclair's output are over 60 solo, duet and trio sonatas for violin. In these he imbued the Italian style with French elements more successfully than most of his contemporaries, using short ornamented phrases and colourful harmonies; the idiom reflects his own virtuoso technique. He also composed concertos, minuets, suites etc, ballet music, an opera (Scylla et Glaucus, 1746) with many striking features and other vocal music. He was an influential teacher and is considered the founder of the French violin school.

Leclair was one of several musical brothers. The most important were Jean-Marie (1703-77), a violinist, who directed the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Lyons and composed sonatas and other works, Pierre (1709-84) and Jean-Benoît (1714-after 1759), both violinists and composers in Lyons.

Although originally written for Cello and period keyboard, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Prelude & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 539) for Harp
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Prelude & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 539) for Harp

1 part9 pages08:046 years ago1,098 views
When one contemplates Johann Sebastian Bach and his role in the development of the prelude and fugue, one naturally thinks of the Well-Tempered Clavier, the famous collection in which he explored the possibilities of prelude and fugue writing in an encompassing, encyclopedic way. But the Well-Tempered Clavier represents Bach’s summary of a genre that he codified and refined at an earlier point in his life, in a series of adventurous and increasingly ambitious organ works. These works first emerged during his youthful years as a church organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708) and then reached an extraordinary peak of sophistication and virtuosity during his tenure as court organist in Weimar (1708-1717), where the pleasure that the reigning duke took in his playing “fired him with the desire to try every possible artistry in his treatment of the organ,” as his obituary later put it.

The Prelude and Fugue in D Minor (“Fiddle”), BWV 539, dates from shortly after Bach’s Weimar stay—either from his tenure as court chapel master in Cöthen (1717-1723) or from his initial years as Cantor of the St. Thomas School in Leipzig (1723-1750). The Fugue is a keyboard transcription of the second movement of the Sonata in G Minor for Unaccompanied Violin, BWV 1001, a work completed in 1720. Bach also arranged the Fugue for lute (BWV 1000), and one can certainly understand why he returned to the music several times: based on a crisp, incisive Vivaldi-like theme, it has a relentless forward movement that makes it immensely compelling. The Fugue concludes with a short cadenza in a free style—a remnant of its violin origins.

Although originally composed for Organ, I created this arrangement for Solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Little Fugue" (BWV 578) for Harp Duet

2 parts8 pages03:146 years ago781 views
Fugue in G minor, BWV 578, "The Little Fugue", is a piece of organ music written by Johann Sebastian Bach sometime around his years at Arnstadt (1703–1707). It is one of Bach's best known fugues and has been arranged for other voices, including an orchestral version made by Leopold Stokowski.

It is a common misconception that the Little fugue in G minor is so-called because it is unimportant. In fact, early editors of Bach's work attached this title to distinguish it from the later Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, which is longer in duration.

The fugue's four-and-a-half measure subject is one of Bach's most recognizable tunes. The fugue is in four voices. During the episodes, Bach uses one of Arcangelo Corelli's most famous techniques: imitation between two voices on an eighth note upbeat figure that first leaps up a fourth and then falls back down one step at a time.

Although this piece was originally written for Organ, I created this arrangement for Two (2) Concert (Pedal) Harps and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Londonderry Air" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:536 years ago3,340 views
Flute, Harp
Londonderry Air is an air that originated from County Londonderry in Ireland (now Northern Ireland). It is popular among the Irish diaspora and is very well known throughout the world. The tune is played as the victory anthem of Northern Ireland at the Commonwealth Games. "Danny Boy" is a popular set of lyrics to the tune.

The title of the air came from the name of County Londonderry in Ireland. The air was collected by Jane Ross of Limavady. Ross submitted the tune to music collector George Petrie, and it was then published by the Society for the Preservation and Publication of the Melodies of Ireland in the 1855 book The Ancient Music of Ireland, which Petrie edited. The tune was listed as an anonymous air, with a note attributing its collection to Jane Ross of Limavady.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

"Spanish Dance" No. 1 for Flute & Harp

2 parts11 pages03:346 years ago7,649 views
Flute, Harp
The Spanish Dance No. 1 is from the opera "La Vida Breve" and was composed by Manuel de Falla in 1905 and was first performed in 1913. The Opera was styled after a libretto of Carlos Fernández Shaw.

Manuel de Falla y Matheu (1876 – 1946) was a Spanish Andalusian composer. With Isaac Albéniz, Enrique Granados and Joaquín Turina he is one of Spain's most important musicians of the first half of the 20th century.

"La Vida Breve" always has captivated musicians all over the world. It has been arranged for solo guitar, guitar duo, solo piano, piano duo, and violin and piano. The opera was a turning point for classical music in Spain; for the first time, Falla sought to bring elements of Spanish folk music, flamenco, and especially the gypsy 'cante jondo', or 'deep song', to the classical stage. "La Vida Breve" won first prize in a competition for Spanish opera sponsored by the Royal Academy in 1905.

Although originally written for orchestra (an later arranged for solo Piano), I created this arrangement for Flute & Harp.

"The Skye Boat Song" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts4 pages01:516 years ago3,368 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Skye Boat Song" is a Scottish folk song, which can also be played as a waltz, recalling the escape of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) from Uist to the Isle of Skye after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. The song tells how Charles escaped in a small boat, with the aid of Flora MacDonald, disguised as a serving maid. The song is a traditional expression of Jacobitism and its story has also entered Scotland as a national legend.

The song was not in any older books of Scottish songs, though it is in most miscellanies like The Fireside Book of Folk Songs. It is often sung as a lullaby, in a slow rocking 6/8 time. In addition to being extremely popular in its day, and becoming a standard among Scottish folk and dance musicians, it has become more widely known in the modern mainstream popular music genre.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement at the request of Belgian flautist, Jenne Van Antwerpen for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).

"Come by the Hills" for Oboe, Flute & Harp

3 parts7 pages02:516 years ago1,337 views
Buachaill Ón Eirne (“A Lad from the Éirne.” also known as “Come By The Hills”)

Little is known about this traditional Irish folk song however, the air is Irish, the song is Scottish, as the lyrics of Come By The Hills were composed by a Scottish television producer W. Gordon Smith to this very old tune.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Oboe, Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Concerto II" for Oboe & Strings in D Minor

5 parts13 pages09:316 years ago4,563 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Alessandro Marcello (1669 - 1747) was an Italian nobleman, poet, philosopher, mathematician and musician. A contemporary of Tomaso Albinoni, Marcello was the son of a senator in Venice. As such, he enjoyed a comfortable life that gave him the scope to pursue his interest in music. He held concerts in his hometown and also composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello, being a slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747.

The Concerto for Oboe and Strings in D minor by Alessandro Marcello is one of the most performed oboe concertos in the repertory. It was written in the early 18th century and has become Marcello's most famous work. In the past, and continuing to the present, it has been mistakenly attributed to both Alessandro Marcello's brother Benedetto Marcello and to Antonio Vivaldi. Johann Sebastian Bach made the piece famous by writing a transcription of the piece in C minor for harpsichord (BWV 974).

I have also ccreated an arrangement of the adagio (Movement 2) for English Horn & Harp at: http://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/adagio-from-concerto-ii-for-english-horn-and-harp

"Will You Go Blackbird?" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages026 years ago498 views
During the eighteenth century, the Methodist revival and puritanical reforms nearly obliterated Welsh folk song. Some secular songs were lost altogether, but enough survived to reflect the old traditions, and folksong periodically flourished during subsequent eras. Little is known about this early Welsh tune.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Ave Maria" (D.839) for Flute & Harp
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"Ave Maria" (D.839) for Flute & Harp

2 parts5 pages04:446 years ago2,614 views
Ellens dritter Gesang (Ellens Gesang III, D.839, Op. 52, No. 6, 1825), in English: "Ellen's Third Song", was composed by Franz Schubert in 1825 as part of his Opus 52, a setting of seven songs from Walter Scott's popular epic poem The Lady of the Lake, loosely translated into German.

It has become one of Schubert's most popular works under the title of Ave Maria, in arrangements with various lyrics which commonly differ from the original context of the poem.

Schubert's arrangement is said to have first been performed at the castle of Countess Sophie Weissenwolff in the little Austrian town of Steyregg and dedicated to her, which led to her becoming known as "the lady of the lake" herself.

The opening words and refrain of Ellen's song, namely "Ave Maria" (Latin, "Hail Mary"), may have led to the idea of adapting Schubert's melody as a setting for the full text of the traditional Roman Catholic prayer Ave Maria. The Latin version of the Ave Maria is now so frequently used with Schubert's melody that it has led to the misconception that he originally wrote the melody as a setting for the Ave Maria.

I transcribed this piece for Harp and Flute for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Dieu d'Amour" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:326 years ago1,040 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (8 February 1741 – 24 September 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

Les mariages samnites (The Samnite Marriages) is an opéra comique, described as a drame lyrique, in three acts by André Grétry, The French text was by Barnabé Farmain de Rosoi based on a work by Jean François Marmontel. Although initially unpopular, Mozart created a set of eight variations in 1786 to subscribe to the aria 'Dieu d'amour' (God of Love) from this work (KV 352/374c).

Although originally for Opera, This arrangement features the Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Air from "Zémire et Azor" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:396 years ago372 views
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zemir and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

"Du moment qu'on aime" (The moment one loves) is from Act 3 Scene 5 No. 15 and although written for Opera, this arrangement features the Flute and Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The King of the Færies" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:226 years ago5,360 views
Flute, Harp
A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural.

The Irish banshee (Irish Gaelic "bean sí" or Scottish Gaelic "bean shìth", which both mean "fairy woman") is sometimes described as a ghost

Historians believe that the fairy queens and kings are in fact the old pagan gods and goddesses 'in disguise' who have long been revered by the Irish. Once stated that, "the Celtic gods of Ireland had long been wiped out, buried under the sway of Catholicism". Many who have been to the Emerald Isle, or listened to many folk tales can see that the old gods live on in folk tales as the giants of the hill; the Gobhan Saor who built all the bridges of Ireland; the Gille Decair, a clown and trickster; the carl (serf) of the drab coat and many others. The old deities were once worshipped throughout Ireland, however it is in the west that they are best remembered now, the east having been more Christianized and anglicised, and subject to more invasions. By contrast, the west of Ireland, to which the native Irish were driven ("to hell or Connaught") has held on longer to her ancient heritage.

Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.

"Valse de l'Adieu" (Opus 69 No. 1) for Harp

1 part5 pages07:206 years ago2,433 views
The Waltz in A-flat Major (Op. 69, No. 1), is a waltz composed by Frédéric Chopin. It is also called The Farewell Waltz or Valse de l'adieu.

The waltz was originally written as a farewell piece to Maria Wodzińska, to whom Chopin was once engaged. This autographed copy Pour Mlle Marie, given to her in Dresden, Germany, in September 1835, is now in the National Library (Biblioteka Narodowa) of Poland in Warsaw. Another autographed version of the piece can be found at the Conservatoire de Paris, but is considered to be a less refined version. A third is presented as the posthumous edition of Julian Fontana, but has not been substantiated by any known autograph.

The waltz is in A-flat major, with a time signature of 3/4. The tempo is marked at tempo di valse, or a waltz tempo. The beginning theme, marked con espressione, is melancholic and nostalgic, and reaches a small high point with a fast flourish. The second part is marked sempre delicatissimo, or con anima in other versions. It is somewhat more cheerful that the previous theme, but soon gives way to the same first theme. After a second rendition of the first theme is a third theme, marked as dolce, the most playful theme. It leads to another theme with a series of ascending double-stops. This fourth theme is marked poco a poco crescendo, with other editions adding ed appassionato. This leads back to the third, playful theme, and returns back to the beginning with a da capo al fin.

Although originally composed for Piano, this piece has been adapted to Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Melancholy Waltz" (Opus 69 No. 2) for Harp

1 part6 pages04:346 years ago1,610 views
Frédéric François Chopin ( 1810 - 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of French-Polish parentage. He is considered one of the great masters of Romantic music. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in the Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, Chopin grew up in Warsaw and completed his music education there; he composed many mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.

Chopin's "Deux Valses", Op. 69, were not published during his lifetime, and in fact are products of his earlier days. A rather clear distinction can be made between those of the composer's waltzes that could potentially be used for actual dancing purposes and those which serve more purely musical functions. In the Opus 69 publication, only the latter category is represented.

This second waltz was composed in 1829, and is one of several works that the composer hoped would be burnt upon his death (his wishes, as composers' wishes about such matters so often are, were ignored). It is a melancholy work with three primary melodies and a somewhat more optimistic middle section. Although popular, this is not one of Chopin's most important compositions. The main theme is in the key of B minor and is marked with an overall tempo of Moderato. It is one of several works that the composer hoped would be burnt upon his death. The piece is largely melancholic and changes to B major and again reverts back to the original theme. It is not technically demanding and is one of Chopin's better known pieces.

Although originally composed for Piano, this piece has been adapted to Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Pantomime" from “Zémire et Azor” for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page04:306 years ago891 views
Flute, Harp
André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741 – 1813) was a composer from the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (present-day Belgium), who worked from 1767 onwards in France and took French nationality. He is most famous for his opéras comiques.

"Zémire et Azor" (Zémire and Azor) is an opéra comique, described as a comédie-ballet mêlée de chants et de danses, in four acts by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean François Marmontel based on La Belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast) by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and Amour pour amour by P. C. Nivelle de La Chaussé. The opera includes the famous coloratura display piece La Fauvette in which the soprano imitates birdsong.

The Pantomime (portraying a dramatic act, through gestures, facial expressions, music and, dance) is from Act III Scene IV of "Zémire et Azor" with this arrangement featuring a solo flute with a Concert (Pedal) Harp accompaniment.
"Le Papillon" (Opus 317) Caprice for Harp
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"Le Papillon" (Opus 317) Caprice for Harp

1 part5 pages04:016 years ago410 views
Charles (Carl) Oberthür (1819-1895) was one of the best-known of nineteenth-century harpists and a prolific composer for his instrument. Born in Munich, he held appointments at Zurich and Wiesbaden before settling in London in 1844. At the forefront of English harp playing and teaching for the next fifty years he also maintained strong European connections, teaching at the Paris and Brussels conservatoires, touring extensively and visiting numerous courts and festivals. His private pupils included Princess Stephanie (wife of Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria) and the Duchess of Wellington. In 1884 he toured the USA.

Oberthür’s works include operas, orchestral and choral works and more that three hundred opus numbers for harp, occasionally with other instruments. This caprice was composed entirely for Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Gavote Variation for Harp

1 part1 page02:156 years ago678 views
Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683 - 1764) was one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the Baroque era. He replaced Jean-Baptiste Lully as the dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer for the harpsichord of his time, alongside François Couperin.

Little is known about Rameau's early years, and it was not until the 1720s that he won fame as a major theorist of music with his Treatise on Harmony (1722). He was almost 50 before he embarked on the operatic career on which his reputation chiefly rests. His debut, Hippolyte et Aricie (1733), caused a great stir and was fiercely attacked for its revolutionary use of harmony by the supporters of Lully's style of music. Nevertheless, Rameau's pre-eminence in the field of French opera was soon acknowledged, and he was later attacked as an "establishment" composer by those who favoured Italian opera during the controversy known as the Querelle des Bouffons in the 1750s. Rameau's music had gone out of fashion by the end of the 18th century, and it was not until the 20th that serious efforts were made to revive it. Today, he enjoys renewed appreciation with performances and recordings of his music ever more frequent.

Dance music: the danced interludes, which were obligatory even in tragédie en musique, allowed Rameau to give free rein to his inimitable sense of rhythm, melody, and choreography, acknowledged by all his contemporaries, including the dancers themselves. This "learned" composer, forever preoccupied by his next theoretical work, also was one who strung together gavottes, minuets, loures, rigaudons, passepieds, tambourins, and musettes by the dozen.

Although originally composed for period instruments (possibly Harpsichord and Lute), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings
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Piccolo Concerto (Opus 44, No. 11, RV 443) for Piccolo & Strings

7 parts33 pages10:186 years ago11,773 views
Piccolo, Strings(5), Harpsichord
Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) started playing the violin in his early years. He started studying to become a priest when he was 15 and was ordained in 1703 at the age of 25. In September 1703 Vivaldi became a violin teacher at an orphanage where he started writing concertos and sacred vocal music for the oprhans. Later on he became responsible for all the musical activity of the institution. Around 1717 Vivaldi was offered a new position as Maestro di Cappella (in charge of music in a chapel) of the governor of Mantua. During this period Vivaldi wrote his famous four violin concertos the Four seasons.

Antonio Vivaldi's concertos cut a revolutionary swath through the more fustian rituals of high Baroque music in much the way that minimalism gutted academic serialism 250 years later. They standardized the fast-slow-fast movement scheme that has survived as the classic concerto pattern, and developed the ritornello form (in which a refrain for the ensemble alternates with free episodes for the soloist), using it as a vehicle for thematic integration and elaboration. Vivaldi's 500-plus concertos were athletic entertainments that swept continental Europe, influencing not only younger composers, but causing a wave of stylistic conversion in older ones.

Vivaldi wrote this "Concerto per Flautino" sometime between 1728 and 1729 and although there is not a reliable evidence that the frontispiece information "Concerto per Flautino" means the sopranino recorder (in 'F') as a soloist. The Italian term flautino means simply a "small flute". There is however, a written instruction "Gl'istromti trasportati alla 4a" ("The instruments transposed a fourth"), witch corroborate which the conjecture that this concert was written for a soprano recorder (in 'C'), the standard transposition for recorder in 18th century, where the recorder player needs to read the recorder part like playing with an alto recorder in 'F'.

This arrangement was created for solo Piccolo and String Ensemble (Violins, Viola, Cello & String Bass).

Larghetto from Concerto II (Opus 31 Mvt 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages03:236 years ago909 views
Franz Ignaz Danzi, cellist and composer, was born on June 15, 1763 in Schwetzinger, Germany and died on April 13, 1826 in Karlsruhe, Germany. His father, cellist Innozenz Danzi (1730-1798) was one of the highest paid musicians of the famous Mannheim Orchestra.

Franz began playing cello with that orchestra in 1778, eventually succeeding his father in 1783 (in Munich). In 1807 Franz became Kapellmeister in Stuttgart where he became good friends with Carl Maria von Weber, 23 years his junior (born 1786 - ironically, Weber died on June 5, 1826, less than 2 months after Danzi).

Danzi lived at a significant time in the history of European concert music. His career, spanning the transition from the late Classical to the early Romantic styles, coincided with the origin of much of the music that lives in our concert halls and is familiar to contemporary classical-music audiences. As a young man he knew Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, whom he revered; he was a contemporary of Ludwig van Beethoven, about whom he—like many of his generation—had strong but mixed feelings; and he was a mentor and promoter for the young Carl Maria von Weber.

He composed 4 Flute Concertos between 1806 and 1814 including the Concerto No. 2 in D Minor, Op. 31 in 1806. In addition, he wrote several chamber works for the Flute and 9 Woodwind Quintets (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and F Horn), a medium he is often credited with inventing.

Although originally written for solo flute and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Cliff's End" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:336 years ago626 views
Flute, Harp
Jenne Van Antwerpen is a Flautist, amateur composer and my friend. I am also an amateur with music in general. One day I asked Jenne to "whistle" a tune or jot down a melody using her newly acquired MuseScore typesetting skills. I was pleasantly surprised when she sent me this lovely flute line. I created the corresponding harp accompaniment and we worked together to refine the timbre, range and overall sound.

To me the piece is reminiscent of a lonely Irish woman waiting patiently on the edge of an Éire cliff anticipating the return of her seafaring mate.

This piece was created for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and I enjoyed working with Jenne to create this short work.

"Gavotte" for Harp

1 part2 pages03:486 years ago1,221 views
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660 – 1725) was an Italian Baroque composer especially famous for his operas and chamber cantatas. He is considered the founder of the Neapolitan school of opera. He was the father of two other composers, Domenico Scarlatti and Pietro Filippo Scarlatti.

Scarlatti's music forms an important link between the early Baroque Italian vocal styles of the 17th century, with their centers in Florence, Venice and Rome, and the classical school of the 18th century. Scarlatti's style, however, is more than a transitional element in Western music; like most of his Naples colleagues he shows an almost modern understanding of the psychology of modulation and also frequently makes use of the ever-changing phrase lengths so typical of the Napoli school.

The gavotte (also gavot or gavote) originated as a French folk dance, taking its name from the Gavot people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné, where the dance originated. The gavotte became popular in the court of Louis XIV where Jean-Baptiste Lully was the leading court composer. Consequently several other composers of the Baroque period incorporated the dance as one of many optional additions to the standard instrumental suite of the era. The examples in suites and partitas by Johann Sebastian Bach are best known. When present in the Baroque suite, the gavotte is often played after the sarabande and before the gigue, along with other optional dances such as the minuet, bourrée, rigaudon, and passepied.

The gavotte could be played at a variety of tempi; in his Musicalisches Lexicon (Leipzig, 1732), Johann Gottfried Walther wrote that the gavotte is "often quick, but occasionally slow"; and Johann Joachim Quantz wrote in Versuch einer Anweisung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen (Berlin, 1752) that "A gavotte is almost like a rigaudon, but is a little more moderate in tempo." In the Baroque period, it is typically in binary form. A notable exception is the rondo form of the Gavotte from Bach's Partita No. 3 in E Major for solo violin, BWV 1006.

Although originally composed for period instruments (possibly Lute and Voice), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Menuet 1 from "Deux Menuets" for Harp

1 part2 pages03:096 years ago484 views
In 1683, Jean-Philippe Rameau, the seventh of eleven children, was born into a musical family in Dijon. His father played the organ at two churches there. At eighteen he decided to become a musician, although his father preferred that he enter the legal profession. He traveled to Italy and spent a few months in Milan, playing violin with a group of itinerant musicians. Subsequently, he held various organ posts in Dijon (replacing his father), Lyons, Clermont, and Paris. Two years after settling in Paris at the age of forty-two, he married a nineteen-year old girl, Marie-Louise Mangot. They had four children. He composed cantatas and motets, and he published books and articles on music theory and several small collections of solo harpsichord works. All the while he longed to compose for the operatic stage. He sublimated this desire in his harpsichord works, lavishing on them all the imagination, passion, and drama that would later enliven his great operas.

The minuet, also spelled menuet, is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3/4 time. The word was adapted from Italian minuetto and French menuet, and may have been from French menu meaning slender, small, referring to the very small steps, or from the early 17th-century popular group dances called branle à mener or amener.

Although originally composed for period instruments (possibly Lute), I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Dansmuziek" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages05:206 years ago446 views
Flute, Harp
"Dansmuziek" (Dance Music) is a piece I composed with Jenne Van Antwerpen in 2012. I created the harp part and Jenne the Flute. We worked together to refine the sound in an attempt to create a sultry, sometimes lively modern baroque dance piece.

A sense of longing and melancholy, even a certain element of gloom, has been characteristic of Baroque music since its early days (roughly 1600–1750). This type of dance is closely linked with Baroque music, theatre and opera and in the latter, inherits it's theatrical form.

This work was created entirely for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Yellow Stockings Jig" for Oboe, Flute & Cellos

3 parts4 pages02:366 years ago1,422 views
"Yellow Stockings" is an undeniably Irish tune. The very name has a reference to the saffron truis of the mediaeval Irish. Shakespeare introduces it in "Twelfth Night," and the air dates from the sixteenth century, being known by the natives as Cuma liom, "It is indifferent to me," or "I don't care." Playford printed it as early as 1680, and in 1705, Dean Swift adapted a nursery song, "Hey my kitten, my kitten," to it. Other verses for our Irish tune are "Mad Moll" (1698) and "The Virgin Queen" (1703); and, finally, Tom Moore set it to his lyric, "Fairest put on awhile."

The Jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound meter, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th century England, and was quickly adopted on the Continent where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga). Today it is most associated with Irish dance music and Scottish country dance music. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this unusual arrangement for Oboe (mimicking a pipe solo), Flute (in a strange role as percussion) and Cellos (providing the drone). It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Arioso" (BWV 1056) for Harp Duet
Video

"Arioso" (BWV 1056) for Harp Duet

2 parts3 pages02:486 years ago1,770 views
Like Johann Sebastian Bach's better known Concerto in D minor, this work is thought to be a transcription of a lost concerto. While some scholars have attributed the violin composition to Vivaldi or to a minor German composer, the counterpoint and structure of the clavier seem indicative of Bach's idiom. Written during Bach's Cöthen period, the concerto is in three movements; all three are in ritornello form, in which each movement is based upon a single theme restated in various orchestrations at the opening, the closing, and after each exploratory section.

This, the slow second (Adagio) movement, in the relative major of A flat, begins with a lengthy and elaborate 21-bar arabesque, lightly accompanied by a sparse bass figure of eighth notes. The frequent and extensive ornamentation in the melody make this movement somewhat rococo in character.

Although this piece was originally written for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement for Two (2) Concert (Pedal) Harps and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Passepied" from "Suite Bergamasque" for Harp

1 part8 pages05:166 years ago847 views
Claude-Achille Debussy (1862 – 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures working within the field of impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions In France, he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903. A crucial figure in the transition to the modern era in Western music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.

Beginning in the 1890s, Debussy developed his own musical language largely independent of Wagner's style, colored in part from the dreamy, sometimes morbid romanticism of the Symbolist Movement. Debussy became a frequent participant at Stéphane Mallarmé's Symbolist gatherings, where Wagnerism dominated the discussion. In contrast to the enormous works of Wagner and other late-romantic composers, however, around this time Debussy chose to write in smaller, more accessible forms. The Deux Arabesques is an example of one of Debussy's earliest works, already developing his musical language. Suite bergamasque (1890) recalls rococo decorousness with a modern cynicism and puzzlement. This suite contains (this) one of Debussy's most popular pieces, "Clair de Lune".

His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch. Often Debussy's work reflected the activities or turbulence in his own life. In French literary circles, the style of this period was known as symbolism, a movement that directly inspired Debussy both as a composer and as an active cultural participant.

The passepied is a 17th- and 18th-century dance that originated in Brittany. The term can also be used to describe the music to which a passepied is set. The music is an example of a dance movement in Baroque music and is almost always a movement in binary form with a fast tempo and a time signature of three quavers (eighth notes) per bar, each section beginning with an upbeat of a single quaver.

This work is a more modern example and is the fourth and final movement of Debussy's Suite bergamasque for piano. I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Snow is Dancing" for Harp

1 part4 pages02:376 years ago701 views
Harp
Children's Corner (L. 113) is a six-movement suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was published by Durand in 1908, and was given its world première in Paris by Harold Bauer on December 18 of that year. In 1911, an orchestration of the work by Debussy's friend André Caplet received its première and was subsequently published.

It is dedicated to Debussy's daughter, Claude-Emma (known as "Chou-Chou"), who was three years old at the time. The pieces are not intended to be played by children; rather they are meant to be evocative of childhood and some of the toys in Claude-Emma's toy collection.

Technically, this piece is quite difficult as it requires precise semi-detached playing in both hands with the melody between them. Again, there are a darker moments in the bass near the middle. Thanks to the composer's remarkable color effects, it manages to describe snow - not rain - and muted objects seen through it.

Although originally written for Piano, I created this transcription for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Tarantelle" (Opus 10 No. 2) for Piccolo, Flute & Harp

3 parts9 pages02:446 years ago1,138 views
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 – 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th-century composers. Among his best-known works are his Pavane, Requiem, nocturnes for piano and the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune". Although his best-known and most accessible compositions are generally his earlier ones, Fauré composed many of his greatest works in his later years, in a harmonically and melodically much more complex style.

Though Gabriel Fauré frequently incorporated vocal duets into his sacred works, few duets are to be found among the composer's chansons. One rare example is the Two Duets, Opus 10 (1863 & 1873). The first of these (Puisqu' Ici-bas ), with its strophic arrangement, lends itself naturally to a duet setting. This, the second (Tarantelle) is far less structured and even folkish, and the composer here combines the two voices to evoke the unrestrained nature of the dance. The duet ends with a wild yet graceful refrain that suggests a couple enjoying the abandon of dancing together. While both duets are quick-paced, the strong structure of the first and the looser structure of the second provide a vivid contrast.

Fauré conceived "Two Duets" (Opus 10) for Claudie and Marianne Viardot (his being in love with Marianne at the time). Tarantelle is as much of an erotic song as the times allowed. the first performance of both the duets of Opus 10 was given a concert at the societe Nationale de la Musique (SNM) on 10 April 1875. With the help of Messager, Fauré orchestrated this duet later in the same year.

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Soprano Voices, I created this arrangement for Piccolo (or Flute), Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Puisqu'ici-bas Toute Âme" (Opus 10 No. 1) for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts7 pages02:436 years ago1,499 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
Gabriel Urbain Fauré (1845 – 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th-century composers. Among his best-known works are his Pavane, Requiem, nocturnes for piano and the songs "Après un rêve" and "Clair de lune". Although his best-known and most accessible compositions are generally his earlier ones, Fauré composed many of his greatest works in his later years, in a harmonically and melodically much more complex style.

Though Gabriel Fauré frequently incorporated vocal duets into his sacred works, few duets are to be found among the composer's chansons. One rare example is the Two Duets, Opus 10 (1863 & 1873). The first of these (Puisqu' Ici-bas ), with its strophic arrangement, lends itself naturally to a duet setting. This, the second (Tarantelle) is far less structured and even folkish, and the composer here combines the two voices to evoke the unrestrained nature of the dance. The duet ends with a wild yet graceful refrain that suggests a couple enjoying the abandon of dancing together. While both duets are quick-paced, the strong structure of the first and the looser structure of the second provide a vivid contrast.

This music comes from the same period as Mai. The melody is similarly ingratiating and anxious to please – a good match for the ardour of the poem which also inspired one of Reynaldo Hahn’s most successful early songs. If the packaging of this duet is much more refined and accomplished than Mai it is because Fauré took the sketch of the solo song out of the cupboard and revised it a decade later for those duet-singing sisters, the daughters of Pauline Viardot. At the time Fauré was engaged to Marianne Viardot. This is a hybrid work where the spontaneity of the teenager’s original sketches is checked by the suave manners of the twenty-eight year-old. It is little wonder that this music comes across like an exquisitely delivered calling card, a veritable compliment galant. The piano-writing is typical of the young master’s flawless weave – a silken carpet of sound. Semiquaver arpeggios waft up and down the keyboard. These seem effortless except to the person who has to play them; as always with this composer they contain countless tiny harmonic shifts to catch out the unwary. Fauré can always take us anywhere he likes, and on any degree of the scale; here he proceeds to do just that, like a dentist accomplishing the most difficult bridge-work while his patients (in this case the listeners) are scarcely aware of the drill. The mezzo soprano makes her entrance after a nine-bar solo for the soprano. When the two voices first come together it is in a falling line of seductive thirds (at ‘Puisque, lorsqu’elle arrive / S’y reposer’). Jean-Michel Nectoux has defined this phrase as an example of the ‘Viardot motif’ in Fauré’s music – ‘the formula of a rising sixth or octave followed by a descent through conjunct steps’. There is a masterly interplay between the voices – one can hear the fruits of assiduous study of fugue and counterpoint. But high learning is disguised by a sweetness of diction and gentleness of intent. Even when in love Fauré is a master of self-effacement.

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Soprano Voices, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Spinning Top" for Harp

1 part3 pages01:066 years ago442 views
Alexander Alexandrovich Ilyinsky (1859 – 1920) was a Russian music teacher and composer, best known for the Lullaby (Berceuse), Op. 13, No. 7, from his orchestral suite "Noure and Anitra", and for the opera The Fountain of Bakhchisaray set to Pushkin's poem of the same name. Alexander Ilyinsky was born in Tsarskoye Selo in 1859. His father was a physician in the Alexander Cadet Corps. His students included Vasily Kalinnikov, Anatoly Nikolayevich Alexandrov and Nikolai Roslavets.

This short "The Spinning Top" (Волчок) is meant to invoke the vision of a child's spinning top, wound, released and slowly wobbling toward rest. Although originally written for Piano, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Koboldstanz" from "Poetic Tone Pictures" (Opus 85 No. 8) for Harp

1 part5 pages03:016 years ago971 views
Harp
Widely regarded as the most distinguished of Czech composers, Antonin Dvorák (1841-1904) produced attractive and vigorous music possessed of clear formal outlines, melodies that are both memorable and spontaneous-sounding, and a colorful, effective instrumental sense. Dvorák is considered one of the major figures of nationalism, both proselytizing for and making actual use of folk influences, which he expertly combined with Classical forms in works of all genres. His symphonies are among his most widely appreciated works; the Symphony No. 9 ("From the New World," 1893) takes a place among the finest and most popular examples of the symphonic literature. Similarly, his Cello Concerto (1894-1895) is one of the cornerstones of the repertory, providing the soloist an opportunity for virtuosic flair and soaring expressivity. Dvorák displayed special skill in writing for chamber ensembles, producing dozens of such works; among these, his 14 string quartets (1862-1895), the "American" Quintet (1893) and the "Dumky" Trio (1890-1891) are outstanding examples of their respective genres, overflowing with attractive folklike melodies set like jewels into the solid fixtures of Brahmsian absolute forms.

Dvorák wrote a good deal of music for solo piano, very little of which has ever really made a name for itself in a repertoire whose every corner is filled with more user-friendly, and often more pianistic, works. (Dvorák could hold his own at the keyboard, but he was certainly no virtuoso). Some of the dances and humoresques are occasionally taken off the shelf for a run-through, however, and a few of the sets of short pieces are loved by more pianists than just the Czech-specialists. Perhaps the best of these sets is the Poetic Tone Pictures for piano, Op. 85, 13 colorfully titled pieces supplied with abundant colorful music.

Dvorák apparently came up with the 13 picturesque titles after he had finished composing the pieces in June 1889. They are, in English: 1. Nighttime Path, 2. Toying, 3. At the Old Castle, 4. Song of Spring, 5. Peasant Ballad, 6. Lament, 7. Furiant-Dance, 8. Goblin-Dance, 9. Serenade, 10. Bacchanal, 11. Tittle-tattle, 12. At the Hero's Grave, 13. On the Holy Mountain.

The pieces are in reality not all that short; still, Dvorák hoped that pianists would perform them all together. The many-faceted No. 1 is perhaps most like a small tone-poem. Nos. 7 and 8 make for a nice minor major dance pair; these two are the most immediately appealing of the group, but Dvorák strikes deepest in the serious-subjected Nos. 3, 12, and 13.

Although originally written for Piano, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Snow Falls Soft in the Night" for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:126 years ago775 views
"Snow Falls Soft in the Night" (Leise rieselt der Schnee) is a contemporary German Christmas Carol was written by Eduard Ebel (1839-1905). The English translation for this German Christmas Carol was provided by Loralee Jo Kurzius.

I created this arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) using Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Gigue in C" for Harp

1 part1 page01:286 years ago283 views
Jan Antonín Losy, Count of Losinthal (German: Johann Anton Losy von Losinthal); also known as Comte d'Logy (Losi or Lozi), (ca. 1650 - 1721) was a Bohemian aristocrat, Baroque lute player and composer from Prague. His lute works combine the French style brisé with a more Italian cantabile style. He was probably the most significant lutenist-composer in Bohemia at the height of the lute's popularity there.

As an aristocrat, Count Losy's musical activities would have been expected to remain on an amateur basis. Nevertheless he seems to have gained the admiration of a number of professional musicians for his lute-playing and compositions. In 1697 he took part in a musical contest with Leipzig cantor Johann Kuhnau. While working in Prague in 1715, Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel met Count Losy who "played the lute as well as one who makes a profession of it" and also played the violin. There is no evidence he played other instruments, although there is a rather rich source of transcriptions of his lute compositions for other instruments available (baroque guitar, keyboard, angélique, mandora, and violin).

Although originally written for Lute, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Children, Hear Who's Knocking" for Flute & Harp
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"Children, Hear Who's Knocking" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:306 years ago1,370 views
Flute, Harp
Santa Claus, also known as Saint Nicholas, Father Christmas and simply "Santa", is a figure with legendary, mythical, historical and folkloric origins who, in many western cultures, is said to bring gifts to the homes of the good children during the late evening and overnight hours of Christmas Eve, December 24. The modern figure was derived from the Dutch figure of Sinterklaas, which, in turn, may have part of its basis in hagiographical tales concerning the historical figure of gift giver Saint Nicholas. A nearly identical story is attributed by Greek and Byzantine folklore to Basil of Caesarea. Basil's feast day on January 1 is considered the time of exchanging gifts in Greece.

Saint Nicholas of Myra is the primary inspiration for the Christian figure of Sinterklaas. He was a 4th century Greek Christian bishop of Myra (now Demre) in Lycia, a province of the Byzantine Anatolia, now in Turkey. Nicholas was famous for his generous gifts to the poor, in particular presenting the three impoverished daughters of a pious Christian with dowries so that they would not have to become prostitutes. He was very religious from an early age and devoted his life entirely to Christianity. In continental Europe (more precisely the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and Germany) he is usually portrayed as a bearded bishop in canonical robes.

In the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg, Saint Nicholas ("Sinterklaas", often called "De Goede Sint"—"The Good Saint") is an elderly, stately and serious man with white hair and a long, full beard. He wears a long red cape or chasuble over a traditional white bishop's alb and sometimes red stola, dons a red mitre, and holds a gold-coloured crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd's staff with a fancy curled top.

In the Netherlands the Dutch celebrate on the evening of December 5, with a celebration called "pakjesavond". In the Reformation in 16th-17th century Europe, many Protestants and others changed the gift bringer to the Christ Child or Christkindl, and the date for giving gifts changed from December 6 to Christmas Eve.

I created this arrangement with Jenne Van Antwerpen for two beautiful Belgian children Soetkin and Katelijn. This arrangement uses Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"All Through the Night" for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts4 pages02:466 years ago1,936 views
"All Through the Night" (Welsh: Ar Hyd y Nos) is a Welsh folksong sung to a tune that was first recorded in Edward Jones' Musical and Poetical Relics of the Welsh Bards (1784). The Welsh lyrics were written by John Ceiriog Hughes, and has been translated into several languages, including English (most famously by Harry Boulton) and Breton. One of the earliest English versions was by Thomas Oliphant in 1862.

The melody was used by John Gay in The Beggar's Opera. It is also used in the hymn "Go My Children With My Blessing." The song is highly popular with traditional Welsh male voice choirs, and is sung by them at festivals in Wales and around the world.

The song is also sometimes considered a Christmas carol, and as such has been covered by numerous artists on Christmas albums, most recently including Olivia Newton-John and Michael McDonald who performed the song as a duet on Newton-John's 2007 album Christmas Wish. Cerys Matthews has also sung "Ar hyd y nos".

Although this work was originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Imagination" for Flute & Harp

2 parts6 pages02:176 years ago496 views
The mind is infinite. Its beginnings and its endings are intangible. Thanks to God, our powerful imagination (the "MIND" of mankind) came into being - a new, completely unique mental power that is continuously exploring, discovering, and unraveling the mysteries of nature.

This work is my attempt (albeit amateurish) to portray the mind's insatiable curiosity and its ability to continually adapt and refine itself. To this end, I created it especially for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Little Cuckoo" for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:116 years ago534 views
"Y Gwcw Fach" (The Little Cuckoo), is one of the many Welsh songs dealing with cuckoos, which are a sign of spring. This song asks the cuckoo to carry a message of hope and comfort to the singer’s lover.

Collected just outside Chicago by the Reverend R Silyn Roberts, Gwcw Fach was published by Robert Bryan in Alawon y Celt.

Although written for voice, this arrangement was created for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Tarantelle" from Suite de Ballet (Opus 23 No. 4) for Harp

1 part5 pages03:546 years ago1,336 views
Charles Dennée was an American composer. He wrote many pedagogical pieces for piano, and also composed a number of songs.

The tarantelle groups a number of different folk dances characterized by a fast upbeat tempo, usually in 6/8 time (sometimes 18/8 or 4/4), accompanied by tambourines. It is among the most recognized of traditional southern Italian music. The specific dance name varies with every region, for instance tammuriata in Campania, pizzica in the Salento region, Sonu a ballu in Calabria. Tarantella is popular in Southern Italy as well as in parts of Argentina.

Although originally written for Piano, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Gartan Mother's Lullaby" for Flutes & Harp

3 parts5 pages04:286 years ago2,251 views
"Gartan Mother's Lullaby" is an old Irish song and poem written by Herbert Hughes and Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil, first published in Songs of Uladh [Ulster] in 1904. Hughes collected the traditional melody in Donegal the previous year and Campbell wrote the lyrics. The song is a lullaby by a mother, from the parish of Gartan in County Donegal, to her child. The song refers to a number of figures in Irish mythology, places in Ireland and words in the Irish language.

It is interesting on a personal note that both Hughes & Campbell were from Belfast, Hughes being a Protestant (Methodist) and Campbell a Catholic. Hughes collected the trad melody in Donegal the previous year, and Campbell wrote the lyrics. In the second line, there is a word that sounds something like Eeval, but it refers to "Aoibheal", the fairy or bean sidhe who guards the Grey Rock. According 'True Irish Ghost Stories', "The most famous [sídhe] of ancient times was that attached to the kingly house of O'Brien, Aibhill [Aoibheall], who haunted the rock of Craglea above Killaloe, near the old palace of Kincora. In A.D. 1014 was fought the battle of Clontarf, from which the aged king, Brian Boru, knew that he would never come away alive, for the previous night Aibhill had appeared to him to tell him of his impending fate."

Jenne Van Antwerpen (http://musescore.com/user/53615) and I created this arrangement for 2 Flutes and Harp with emphasis on the quite solace of a bedtime lullaby. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Nun freut euch, lieben Christen gmein" (BWV 734) for Harp

1 part3 pages02:386 years ago604 views
It is frequently the task of musicologists and serious-minded performers, when dealing with so extensive a musical output as J. S. Bach's, to sort through all the many versions of a given piece that exist and to try, at the end of all this digging, to come up with what might reasonably be called the "authentic" version of that piece.

Very often in the case of Bach and other high-profile composers, the task is impossible, but sometimes the evidence in favor of one version or another is strong enough for the myriad individually-minded scholars to reach a consensus and the catalog of works to be altered to reflect the new agreement. This is more or less what has happened over the years regarding Bach's organ chorale prelude on "Nun freut euch, lieben Christen gemein." The prelude, thought to have been composed sometime during Bach's years as court organist in Weimar (1708-1717), survives in two versions, sometimes cataloged as BWV 734 and BWV 734a. In the one version of the piece, the original Lutheran chorale melody (the cantus firmus, it is called) on which Bach's elaboration is based is played by the hands on the organ manuals; in the other version the cantus firmus is found in the organ pedals, with a few minor but, when dealing with so important a part of the repertoire as Bach, vital changes to the music of the other voices.

Neither version survives in a truly authoritative source, but over time and for a variety of reasons, the version with the cantus firmus in the pedals has fallen somewhat into scholarly disfavor and more often than not been labeled "inauthentic," leaving the manual-only version of "Nun freut euch, lieben Christen gemein" as the sole heir to the heading BWV 734.

The melody of "Nun freut euch, lieben Christen gemein" is one of the earliest Lutheran hymn tunes, having been derived by Martin Luther himself in 1524 (the tune was also associated, from 1682 on, with the text "Es ist gewisslich an der Zeit," and one will occasionally find BWV 734 under that title).

Bach puts this cantus firmus in the tenor voice, to be played by the inner fingers of the left hand while the bass moves along in steady eighth notes and the right hand indulges in a florid sixteenth-note obbligato whose opening tones subtly foreshadow, in outline, the first five or six notes of the tenor's cantus firmus melody. As in the original hymn, the first pair of phrases are repeated; the final three phrases make for one long push towards the final G major cadence, richly extended (in Bach's usual plagal/subdominant way) by the running bass and treble obbligato under the umbrella of the tenor's sustained G pedal tone.

When I listened to this piece on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CVGX4I9IhI) I should have heard a powerful organ organ work but, I didn't. I heard a rythmic and romantic harp solo that when slowed-down, became this arrangement.

Although originally written for Pipe Organ, I arranged this piece for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam" (BWV 280) for Harp

1 part1 page02:216 years ago299 views
Johann Sebastian Bach was a prolific German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he introduced no new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, a control of harmonic and motivic organization from the smallest to the largest scales, and the adaptation of rhythms and textures from abroad, particularly Italy and France.

While Bach's fame as an organist was great during his lifetime, he was not particularly well-known as a composer. His adherence to Baroque forms and contrapuntal style was considered "old-fashioned" by his contemporaries, especially late in his career when the musical fashion tended towards Rococo and later Classical styles. A revival of interest and performances of his music began early in the 19th century, and he is now widely considered to be one of the greatest composers in the Western tradition.

Many of Chorales occur in Bach´s Cantatas and Oratorios (Passionen). It is widely believed that Bach did not actually compose the melodies, which were traditional tunes, but rather adapted them from old popular songs. He set hundreds of these traditional melodies for four voices. But, in all of these chorales, the flow of the voices is so beautiful that they have been studied as the perfect model of voice-leading and harmony by composers and music students since they were composed. In our organ collection, Bach´s chorales are typically notated in two staves for better legibility.

"Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam" (BWV 280: "Christ our Lord, went to Jordan") is a choral work by Bach that recants the travel of Jesus Christ to Jordan where he was baptized at the hands of St. John. The baptism of Jesus marks the beginning of his public ministry. This event is recorded in the Canonical Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke. In John 1:29-33.

Although written in German, the English text reads as follows:

Christ our Lord, went to Jordan
according to the will of His Father,
baptized at the hands of St. John,
it was his work and mission;
wanted to give us the gift of a bath,
to wash the sin
and also dispel the bitter death
through His own blood and wounds.
We receive the gift of new life.

Although originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Thine be the Glory" (HWV 63) for Flute, Oboe & Harp

3 parts1 page02:206 years ago1,002 views
Flute, Oboe, Harp
George Frideric Handel (1685–1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalized British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Judas Maccabaeus (HWV 63) is an oratorio in three acts composed in 1746 by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto written by Thomas Morell. The oratorio was devised as a compliment to the victorious Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland upon his return from the Battle of Culloden (16 April 1746). Other catalogues of Handel's music have referred to the work as HG xxii; and HHA 1/24.

In 1884 the Swiss writer Edmond Louis Budry wrote new French words to the same chorus, creating the Easter hymn " À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!", which was later translated into English as "Thine Be the Glory".

Although this work was originally written for Orchestra and Chorus, Daniel Rouwkema created an arrangement for accompanied chorus and I transcribed it for Flute, Oboe and Concert (Pedal) Harp. It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Lobet Gott, unsern Herrn" (BWV 1126) for Harp

1 part1 page01:326 years ago191 views
In the early 1700s, Bach’s chorales enchanted listeners with their inventive harmonies, chromaticism, contrapuntal motion, and changes of tonal center. Since that time, music students the world over have studied the chorales as a paragon of “common practice” harmony and voice leading. And, by virtue of their sublime beauty, musicians continue to perform the chorales to this day.

BWV 1126 is considered to likely be from a lost cantata. It was found untexted with the title: Lobet Gott, unsern Herren first published in 1985 and known temporarily as Breitkopf Anhang 9 until the BWV 1126 number was assigned.

Although originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created original lyrics and set this arrangement for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes
Video

"Gloria in Excelsis Deo" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts7 pages02:446 years ago4,158 views
Flute(2), Harp
"Gloria in excelsis Deo" (Latin for "Glory to God in the highest") is a hymn known also as the Greater Doxology (as distinguished from the "Minor Doxology" or Gloria Patri) and the Angelic Hymn. The name is often abbreviated to Gloria in Excelsis or simply Gloria.

It is an example of the psalmi idiotici ("private psalms", i.e. compositions by individuals in imitation of the biblical Psalter) that were popular in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Other surviving examples of this lyric poetry are the Te Deum and the Phos Hilaron.

The hymn begins with the words that the angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds in Luke 2:14. Other verses were added very early, forming a doxology, which in the 4th century became part of morning prayers, and is still recited in the Byzantine Rite Orthros service.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote several settings of the Gloria. RV 589 is the most familiar and popular piece of sacred music by Vivaldi; however, he was known to have written at least three Gloria settings. Only two survive (RV 588 and RV 589) whilst the other (RV 590) is presumably lost and is only mentioned in the Kreuzherren catalogue. The two were written at about the same time (it is disputed which came first) in the early 18th century.

Although originally composed for voice and orchestra, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).

Rondo from "Fantasie" (Opus 17 Mvt 2) for Harp

1 part7 pages07:186 years ago559 views
Robert Schumann, sometimes known as Robert Alexander Schumann, was a German composer, aesthete and influential music critic. He is regarded as one of the greatest and most representative composers of the Romantic era.

The Fantasie in C major, Op. 17, was written by Robert Schumann in 1836. It was revised prior to publication in 1839, when it was dedicated to Franz Liszt. It is generally described as one of Schumann's greatest works for solo piano, and is one of the central works of the early Romantic period. It is often called by the Italian version, Fantasia; the word "Fantasie" is the German spelling.

The piece has its origin in early 1836, when Schumann composed a piece entitled Ruines expressing his distress at being parted from his beloved Clara Wieck (later to become his wife). This later became the first movement of the Fantasy. Later that year, he wrote two more movements to create a work intended as a contribution to the appeal for funds to erect a monument to Beethoven in his birthplace, Bonn. Schumann offered the work to the publisher Kirstner, suggesting that 100 presentation copies could be sold to raise money for the monument. Other contributions to the Beethoven monument fund included Mendelssohn's Variations sérieuses.

Although originally written for Piano, I created this arrangement of the Rondo (second movement) for solo Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"La Vierge à la Crèche" for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:506 years ago471 views
Joseph Pierre Alexis Contant (12 November 1858 - 28 November 1918) was a Canadian composer, organist, pianist, and music educator. The first notable Canadian composer to be entirely trained in his native country, he stated "I write not for glory but rather to satisfy an irresistible need." Although he had considerable training as a pianist, his knowledge of musical composition was largely self-taught, although not by choice as his life afforded him little opportunity to find suitable teachers. Much of his time was spent dedicated towards teaching, family, and work as a church organist, and his compositional output was minimal before 1900. As his children grew older, he was able to devote more time to composition and therefore his later life was his most productive. A stroke in 1914 virtually ended his activity as a composer.

"La Vierge à la Crèche" ("The Virgin at the Cradle" or "Mary in the Manger") recounts the experience of the Virgin Mary and the newborn Savior Jesus Christ. The composition was intended for Piano and Mezzo Soprano. The lyrics were created by Alphonse Daudet and translate as:

In swaddling clothes white, freshly sewn
The Virgin cradled her Child Jesus
He chirped like a nest of birds
She rocked and sang softly
What we sing our little angels
But the Child Jesus did not fall asleep

Although originally written for Voice and Piano, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Ombra Mai Fu" (HWV 40) for Flute & Harp
Video

"Ombra Mai Fu" (HWV 40) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:406 years ago2,576 views
Flute, Harp
Serse (Xerxes, HWV 40) is an opera seria in three acts by George Frideric Handel. It was first performed in London on 15 April 1738. The Italian libretto was adapted by an unknown hand from that by Silvio Stampiglia for an earlier opera of the same name by Giovanni Bononcini in 1694. Stampiglia's libretto was itself based on one by Nicolò Minato that was set by Francesco Cavalli in 1654. The opera is set in Persia (modern day Iran) in 480 BC and is very loosely based upon Xerxes I of Persia, though there is little in either the libretto or music that is relevant to that setting. Xerxes, originally sung by a castrato, is now generally performed by a mezzo-soprano, contralto or countertenor. Although the English title Xerxes is widely used, the original Italian title was Serse.

The opening aria, "Ombra mai fu", sung by Xerxes to a tree (Platanus orientalis), is set to one of Handel's best-known melodies, and is often played in an orchestral arrangement, known as Handel's "largo" (despite being marked "larghetto" in the score).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"The Smiling Hours" from "Hercules" (HWV 60) for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:306 years ago653 views
Handel characterized this piece as a "musical drama," to be sung in the theater, but unstaged, rather than either oratorio or opera, but it has been performed as both during its history. Like many of his masterworks, such as Messiah, it was written in a short time, from mid-July to mid-August, but it shows no signs of haste. At its first performances at the King's Theater in London, it was very badly received, and many of the composer's supporters blamed this on the extra-musical vagaries of fashionable society rather than on any deficiencies in the work itself. In addition, Handel had hoped to make his music more accessible to the general public by lowering ticket prices, but this did not draw the larger audiences he had hoped for, which also contributed to his calling off further performances. He was deeply disappointed by its failure, which probably contributed to his later illness. Today it is considered one of his strongest musical-dramatic works, behind only Samson and Semele.

The musical characterization is extremely vivid, though the male characters are rather stock types. The music for Hercules is appropriately robust and extroverted, even a bit simple-minded and pompous. Iole's is deeply tragic, as she relives the death of her father, supported by the almost weeping punctuation of the orchestra. This scene is one of the strongest of the opera, coming immediately after the lively march introducing Hercules and his chained captives, and all the more vivid for the contrast. Later her character is developed a bit more, as she expresses her refusal to consider Hyllas' proposal in firm, dignified music, or the crystalline clarity Handel uses to depict her innocence and compassion for those caught up in the tragedy of Dejanira's jealousy. It is Dejanira herself, though, who is the most three-dimensional of the characters, as we see her love, jealous anger, and final desperate remorse, expressed accordingly in melting pathos, furious runs and biting stacatto phrases, and burningly frenzied lines. Handel's mastery is made clear in the way that even when one emotion dominates, others are hinted at. For example, in her first aria, chromatic phrases alternate between more direct cadences, giving her emotions more complexity and a foreshadowing of the darker side of her love.

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Zadok the Priest" (HWV 258 Mvt. 1) for Harp

1 part2 pages01:436 years ago1,159 views
Harp
One of the last official acts of the reign of George I of Great Britain was to both naturalize George Frideric Handel as a British citizen and to commission Handel to write the coronation anthem for King George's son and successor, George II.

As 1727 drew to a close, Britain had been enduring a generation's worth of political and religious turmoil. The union of Scotland and England was still tenuous at best, with many Scots and English Catholics (Jacobites by name) still supporting the line of the deposed King James II. When George I (of the House of Hanover) assumed the throne in 1714, he was hardly popular -- he spoke German and not English -- many Jacobites rose against him and joined James in rebellion. The rebellion was put down, but anti-Hanoverian sentiments still ran strong.

George I looked to the Old Testament for a parallel to his situation, and found one in 1 Kings. The Bible told how King David of Israel, while nearing death was facing his own succession crisis. After some deliberation, he chose his son Solomon as his heir, rather than Solomon's ambitious half-brother Adonijah. In a grand ceremony, David's most trusted advisors, Zadok the priest and Nathan the prophet, annointed Solomon as king. George feared another Jacobite uprising (which nonetheless came in 1745), and wanted to use the spectacle of his son's coronation to establish George II as the legitimate ruler in the public's eye.

Thus Handel was called upon to write an appropriately-grandiose set of anthems for the ceremony, and he didn't disappoint. Four anthems were sung that day: The King Shall Rejoice, Let Thy Hand Be Strengthened, My Heart Is Inditing and Zadok the Priest, but it is the last that has endured.

Zadok the Priest was first sung during the annointing of George II during his coronation on 11 October 1727. It since has been sung at at every British coronation since 1727, the only anthem from Handel's four to endure the last three centuries. It is traditionally performed during the sovereign's anointing.

Although originally created for Chorus (SS-AA-T-BB) and orchestra (two oboes, two bassoons, three trumpets, timpani, strings, continuo), I created this arrangement of the opening movement for Concert (Pedal) Harp..

"Erbarm’ dich, o Herre Gott" (BWV 721) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages04:336 years ago1,020 views
As organist at Weimar, Johann Sebastian Bach was charged with providing a harmonic underpinning for the singing of Lutheran chorale tunes chosen for each day. Bach wrote out many of these harmonizations, in part as instruction for younger composers (they are still used for this purpose). A derivation of this practice, Bach's conception of the organ chorale, as manifested in the chorale preludes, dates from 1713 -1714, about the time he became familiar with Vivaldi's concertos.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) contains chorale preludes for the church year written during the composer's service at Weimar (1708 - 1717). In about 1713, Bach began assembling the Orgel-Büchlein, and his earliest entries seem to be Her Christ, der ein'ge Gottes-Sohn, BWV 601, In dulci jubilo, BWV 608, Christ ist erstanden, BWV 627, and Heut' triumphieret Gottes Sohn, BWV 630. These were very original compositions, highly expressive miniatures based on a chorale melody, supported with refined counterpoint, and featuring highly condensed motivic writing.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein was essentially complete by 1716. Only the fragment O Traurigkeit and the chorale prelude, Helft mir Gottes Güte preisen, BWV 613, were added later. "Complete" is used with some reservation here, because Bach originally projected 164 pieces but completed fewer than 50. In Bach's manuscript, pages with finished pieces alternate with blank ones intended for other chorale preludes. The later pieces differ from Bach's earlier chorale elaborations, in that they contain only one statement of the melody and are intended to demonstrate how to accompany a chorale with contrapuntally proper figurations that support the meaning of the text.

In the early 1740s Bach assembled a number of chorale preludes, possibly with the intention of publishing them as a set. These Achtzehn Choräle (Eighteen Chorales) BWV 651 - 668 were almost certainly written before 1723 and revised later. The Fantasia super Komm, heiliger Geist, BWV 651 is an especially impressive, extended elaboration of the chorale melody, which is in the pedal. The tune is treated in a less ornate fashion in the next prelude of the set (BWV 652). The highly convoluted Von Gott will ich nicht lassen, BWV 658 also contains the chorale melody in the pedal.

The six Schübler chorales (BWV 645 - 650) are derived from Bach's cantatas and contain one of his most popular chorale preludes, on the melody Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, BWV 645.

The third part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, published in Leipzig in 1739, contains 21 chorale preludes (not all appear in every publication), many of which are for manuals only. Nine of these are meant for use during the Mass, while the others are for the catechism.

Among the most impressive is Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, BWV 671, which is in five voices with the chorale melody in the pedal. More complex is the first of two preludes on Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 686, which is in six parts, including two pedal parts.

"Erbarm’ dich, o Herre Gott" 
(Have Mercy Lord, Forgive my Sins) is surprisingly comforting music with a gloomy text (in English):

Have mercy, Lord, my sin forgive;
For Thy long-suffering is great!
O cleanse and make me fit to live,
My sore offence do thou abate
With shame do I my fault confess,
’Gainst Thee alone, Lord, have I sinned.
Thou art the source of righteousness,
And I the sinner just condemned.

Although originally created for Voice, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Dona Nobis Pacem" for Flute & Harp

2 parts3 pages02:146 years ago2,402 views
"Dona Nobis Pacem" (Grant us Peace) is a song with Latin text, often sung as a canon. The words, which mean "Grant us peace", come from the Latin Mass. The origin of the melody is unknown (most hymnals list it as "traditional"). It is sometimes attributed to Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, though numerous sources attribute it to Mozart.

The Latin text is translated to English as:

Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, grant us peace.

Although originally created for Voice (Mass), I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"For unto us, a Child is Born" (HWV 56 No. 12) for Harp and Woodwind Quartet
Video

"For unto us, a Child is Born" (HWV 56 No. 12) for Harp and Woodwind Quartet

5 parts6 pages04:586 years ago2,138 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Harp
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

"For Unto Us a Child Is Born" is a chorus from Part 3 (No. 12) with the lyrics: "For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given, and the government shall be upon His shoulder; and His name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The Mighty God, The Everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace."

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon).

"Pastoral Symphony" (HWV 56 No. 13) for Harp

1 part2 pages02:016 years ago794 views
Harp
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

The three-part structure of the work approximates to that of Handel's three-act operas, with the "parts" subdivided by Jennens into "scenes". Each scene is a collection of individual numbers or "movements" which take the form of recitatives, arias and choruses. There are two instrumental numbers, the opening Sinfony in the style of a French overture, and the pastoral Pifa, often called the "pastoral symphony", at the mid-point of Part I.

The pastoral interlude that follows begins with the short instrumental movement, the Pifa, which takes its name from the shepherd-bagpipers, or pifferare, who played their pipes in the streets of Rome at Christmas time. Handel wrote the movement in both 11-bar and extended 32-bar forms; according to Burrows, either will work in performance.

Although originally written for period instruments, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"And He Shall Purify" (HWV 56 No. 7) for Harp and Woodwind Quartet

5 parts4 pages02:556 years ago673 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Harp
The "Messiah" (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts). It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742, and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Handel's reputation in England, where he had lived since 1713, had been established through his compositions of Italian opera. He turned to English oratorio in the 1730s, in response to changes in public taste; Messiah was his sixth work in this genre. Although its structure resembles that of conventional opera, it is not in dramatic form; there are no impersonations of characters and very little direct speech. Instead, Jennens's text is an extended reflection on Jesus Christ as Messiah, moving from the prophetic phrases of Isaiah and others, through the Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection of Christ to his ultimate glorification in heaven.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces, with optional settings for many of the individual numbers. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the trend has been towards authenticity; most contemporary performances show a greater fidelity towards Handel's original intentions, although "big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

"And he shall purify the sons of Levi" is a chorus from Part 1 Scene 2 (No. 7) drawn from Quel fior che alla'ride (July 1741), meaning that Jesus Christ shall purify o the sons of Levi - These had been first the leaders in degeneracy, the corrupters of the people by their example and connivance. Actually Acts 6:7, "a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith." Barnabas also was a Levite. Acts 4:36. But more largely, as Zion and Jerusalem are the titles for the Christian Church, and Israel who believed was the true Israel, so "the sons of" Levi are the true Levites, the Apostles and their successors in the Christian priesthood.

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Dov'e? S'Affretti per Me La Morte" (HWV 28) for Harp

1 part2 pages04:156 years ago391 views
The opera Poro was one of three librettos by Pietro Metastasio set by Handel, the others being Siroe and Ezio. Metastasio's librettos were very popular with opera seria composers, but although poetic, his characterizations are very stiff, and his scenic constructions rigid. The plots are often based on historical fact and involve political intrigue and polemicizing, as well as moral endings and preaching. They preach a certain reality to their audience, and whereas Italian lovers of opera seria conventions ate up the complicated nonsense of his plots, they left Handel the dramatist rather cold. One would think that, as a result, his settings of Metastasio's librettos would therefore be less than splendid. However, Handel often altered the librettos to create more flexible and dramatic scenes, and wrote music which gave the characters full motivations. He creates full-blooded human beings, whose passions and struggles come to the fore. Rather than the stiff, cardboard characters of Metastasio's mechanical plots, Handel develops in his music all of his character's emotions. The music of Poro is imaginative, surprising, splendid, and sublime. It is a heroic opera of the first order, and one of his masterpieces. It was a huge success with the London audience, and ran for sixteen performances during its first run. Not only that, but the publisher John Walsh published a songbook of the audience's favorite melodies, which was sold in great demand. The success of Poro, together with the success of the revivals of Rodelinda and Rinaldo, two other extremely popular operas with the London public, made the 1730-1731 opera season a huge success for Handel. He was the hero of the operatic stage. The nobility again loved him, and it seemed as if he had triumphed over his competition.

The opening of Poro is extremely dramatic. It begins with a grand overture, and then the curtain rises on the middle of a battle scene. Poro has just been defeated by Alexander, and attempts suicide. In order to quicken the action of the drama, Handel shortened many of the lengthy recitatives of Metastasio and, under the influence of current Italian trends, composed a greater number of vocal ensembles. Whereas Metastasio wrote his story about the hero Alexander, Handel's opera concerns love, jealousy, passion, and despair. Handel's imaginative force is imposed on Metastasio, and brings forth an altogether new creation. There are two major duets in the opera, one which closes Act I, and another which ends the opera. In the first, Poro and Cleofide have a love argument, in which each quotes the music of the other in a taunting and bitter fashion. At the end, as the two are finally united, they have a love duet of great sublimity. Of the many moods struck in the opera, there is a military symphony, lovely pastoral music, a beautiful dirge for Cleofide entitled "Se ciel mi divide", and a wonderful siciliano for Gandarte. The finale of the opera is lengthy, brilliant, and wonderfully constructed out of several pieces. The opera was so popular that within one year it had been given twenty performances.

Although originally written for Voice, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sonata in D Minor (K. 141, L. 422) Variation for Harp

1 part3 pages03:226 years ago1,178 views
The original D minor effort (K. 141, L. 422) is one of Scarlatti's finest Sonatas and also one of his most unusual: It was meant to be a toccata whose focus on repeated notes is said to be an attempt to imitate the sonorities of a mandolin. In addition, it makes considerable demands on the soloist with hand-crossings and other keyboard acrobatics executed at rapid tempos.

Originally marked Allegro, the work's opening is striking: the sound world of a mandolin is immediately invoked in the manic character of the repeated notes. Some listeners may identify this rapid-fire, tremolo-like effect more with the guitar, another instrument Scarlatti often imitated in his keyboard works.

The main theme scurries about playfully, but with a sense of urgency in its hyperactivity. The material of the second subject is just as driven, but focuses less on repeated notes, more on heightening the sense of conflict and resolution, but always with elegance, if a breathless elegance. Midway through Scarlatti turns to development of his thematic material, as was his usual course. Here the music maintains the same busy mood in expanding largely on the secondary material, and in those nervous repeated notes as well. Without a doubt the original three-and-a-half minute gem is one of Scarlatti's finest and most challenging sonatas.

Although originally written for Keyboard, I took some creative license with this piece to create this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Allemande from Suite No. 8 (HWV 433) for Harp

1 part2 pages02:586 years ago408 views
George Frideric Handel, born in Halle, grew up as the son of a barber-surgeon who wanted his boy to study law. Young Handel successfully rebelled, and by 1703 was playing violin and keyboard in Hamburg’s opera orchestra. Handel spent four years it Italy (1706-1710), where he moved amidst the musical elite of the day – meeting Corelli, Scarlatti, and Pasquini – and received the nickname “il caro Sassone” (the dear Saxon). According to historian Paul Henry Lang, Handel learned more from Italy than its musicians alone could teach. He learned from the Renaissance paintings that there is a “disciplined passion [in] the resolution of powerful conflicts,” and his later music reflects the search for the auditory equivalent. For much of his life, Handel lived as an Englishman, and his greatest works belong to those years, including the operas Orlando (1733) and Alcina (1735), both dramatizations of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, and the oratorios Messiah (1741) and Jeptha (1752).

Handel's Suite for keyboard were first published in Amsterdam in 1719 by Jeanne Roger. But because Handel received no royalties from Roger, he understandably decided to publish them himself in London the following year. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites are most often sets of stylized dances, occasionally including further additional movements.

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Bard of Armagh" for Flute & Harp

2 parts1 page01:376 years ago1,031 views
"The Bard of Armagh" is an Irish ballad. It is often attributed to Patrick Donnelly. He was made Bishop of Dromore in 1697, the same year as the enactment of the Bishops Banishment Act. Donnelly is believed to have taken the name of the travelling harper Phelim Brady.

The English Lyrics read:

O list to the lay of a poor Irish harper
And scorn not the strains of his near withered hand
But remember his fingers could once toil more sharper
To raise up the memories of his dear native land.

At the fair or the wake I could twist my shillelagh
Or trip through a jig in my brogues bound with straw
And all the pretty fair maids from village and valley
Loved their bold Phelim Brady the Bard of Armagh.

It was long before the shamrock our dear native emblem
Was crushed in its beauty by the Saxon’s lions paw
And all the pretty colleens around me assembled
Loved their bold Phelim Brady the Bard of Armagh.

O how I long to muse on the days of my boyhood
Though four score and two years have flitted since then
But it brings sweet reflections as every young joy should
For the merry hearted boys make the best of old men.

And when Sergeant Death in his cold arms shall embrace me
And lull me to sleep with sweet Erin go Brath
By the side of my Kathleen, my young wife then place me
And forget Phelim Brady The Bard of Armagh.

The song itself, like many heroic, rebel outlaw ballads, dates from the mid 19th century, when it was printed as a broadside ballad in Dublin.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Gigue from Suite No. 8 (HWV 433) for Harp

1 part2 pages02:286 years ago420 views
George Frideric Handel, born in Halle, grew up as the son of a barber-surgeon who wanted his boy to study law. Young Handel successfully rebelled, and by 1703 was playing violin and keyboard in Hamburg’s opera orchestra. Handel spent four years it Italy (1706-1710), where he moved amidst the musical elite of the day – meeting Corelli, Scarlatti, and Pasquini – and received the nickname “il caro Sassone” (the dear Saxon). According to historian Paul Henry Lang, Handel learned more from Italy than its musicians alone could teach. He learned from the Renaissance paintings that there is a “disciplined passion [in] the resolution of powerful conflicts,” and his later music reflects the search for the auditory equivalent. For much of his life, Handel lived as an Englishman, and his greatest works belong to those years, including the operas Orlando (1733) and Alcina (1735), both dramatizations of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, and the oratorios Messiah (1741) and Jeptha (1752).

Handel's Suite for keyboard were first published in Amsterdam in 1719 by Jeanne Roger. But because Handel received no royalties from Roger, he understandably decided to publish them himself in London the following year. Also called Suites de pieces pour le Clavecin, the suites are most often sets of stylized dances, occasionally including further additional movements.

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Impertinence" from the "Aylesford Pieces" for Harp

1 part1 page01:136 years ago268 views
As a frequent guest at the country estate of Lord Aylesford, Handel evidently composed new stuff and re-worked old stuff. The manuscripts were left behind in the Aylesford manor and not discovered until an auction in 1918. Research has shown that some of the material dates from Handel's early years in Hamburg, while other of the pieces were new.

The first adjective that comes to mind is "unpretentious." While Bach was storming the very gates of heaven in Leipzig, here was Handel, relaxed, enjoying holidays in the country, diddling about on his host's harpsichord. But what diddling! Mostly short, often playful, sometimes somber, but always with an air of creative freedom, of unpressured delight in the act of composition. Music, one is tempted to say, for the sake of music.

Although originally written for Keyboard, I created this arrangement for Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"The Cuckoo and the Nightingale" (HWV 295) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages03:256 years ago1,384 views
G. F. Haedel's organ concerto #13 is typical for an instrumental concerto for a pipe organ soloist with an orchestra. The form first evolves in the 18th century, when composers including George Frideric Handel, Antonio Vivaldi and Johann Sebastian Bach wrote organ concertos with small orchestras, and with solo parts which rarely call for the organ pedal board. A few Classical and Romantic works are extant. Finally, there are some 20th- and 21st-century examples, of which the concerto by Francis Poulenc has entered the repertoire, and is quite frequently played.

Organ Concerto #13 is unique in that the bird Sound motives of this Concerto (HWV 295) earned it the common name, "The Cuckoo and the Nightingale".

Although originally written for Organ & Small Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp to emphasize the avian interplay. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Capriccio from Partita II (BWV 826) for Harp

1 part6 pages026 years ago1,039 views
The Partitas, BWV 825–830, are a set of six harpsichord suites written by Johann Sebastian Bach, published from 1726 to 1730 as Clavier-Übung I, and the first of his works to be published under his direction. They were, however, among the last of his keyboard suites to be composed, the others being the 6 English Suites, BWV 806-811 and the 6 French Suites, BWV 812-817.

These six suites for harpsichord are the last set that Bach composed and the most technically demanding of the three. They were composed between 1725 and 1730 or 1731. As with the French and English Suites, the autograph manuscript of the Partitas is no longer extant.

This transcription for Harp is from the 6th (last) movement of Partita No.2 in C minor (BWV 826) and although originally written for Harpsichord, I transcribed this piece for the Concert (Pedal) Harp. This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Aria di Chiesa" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages04:276 years ago881 views
Alessandro Stradella was an Italian composer born in Rome (1644-1682). He spent most of his career in Rome, where he lived independently but composed many works to commissions from Queen Christina of Sweden, the Colonna family and others. Most of his stage works there were prologues and intermezzos, notably for operas by Cavalli and Cesti revived at the new Tordinona Theatre in 1671-2. His life included many scandals and amorous adventures. He left Rome in 1677 after a dispute, and went by way of Venice and Turin (escaping an attempt on his life) to Genoa (1678). His only comic opera, Il Trespolo tutore, was given there in c 1677; later he presented several other operas, including Il Corispero. He was killed there in 1682, again a consequence of an amorous intrigue.

Stradella was one of the leading composers in Italy in his day and one of the most versatile. His music was widely admired, even as far afield as England. Most of it is clearly tonal, and counterpoint features prominently. His vocal output includes c 30 stage works, several oratorios and Latin church works and some 200 cantatas (most for solo voice). In his operas the orchestra consists of two violin parts and continuo, but some other works, such as the oratorio S Giovanni Battista (1675, Rome), follow the Roman principal of concerto grosso instrumentation. There is a clear differentiation between aria and recitative (which sometimes includes arioso writing), but their succession is still fluid; various aria forms are used. Stradella's 27 surviving instrumental works are mostly of the sonata da chiesa type. The scoring and textures of a Sonata di viole of his make it the earliest known concerto grosso; it was apparently a model for Corelli's concertos op.6.

"Aria di Chiesa" is a powerful and moving work, dramatic in its restraint. Research has also shown that it was probably written by Fetis, rather than Stradella. It's not completely unheard of for composers to write compositions themselves and then claim that it's the work of another composer--a kind of reverse plagiarism--Parisotti and Kreisler are among the list of composers who have done this. Some seem to do it as a prank, others to get attention work that they feel would be ignored otherwise, and there are probably still more reasons. In any case, this is not the first of such works, and doubtless won't be the last.

The heavy mood of the piece is set by a fairly lengthy instrumental introduction, and then the voice enters with short, subdued phrases, which eventually pick up momentum and intensity. The lines vary in length, but always contribute to the sense of a highly structured piece. When done with a high level of musicianship and artistic communication, this can be a deeply effective work, equal in intensity to even the most dramatic opera arias or lieder.

Although originally written for Opera, I created this arrangement for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).