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Looking Back


Why am I seeing this?

Uploaded on Jul 10, 2017

The title is due to the fact that this Rag was put together from jottings, sketches and ideas from about 40 years ago, now put into some kind of order with a couple of key changes and a little revision.

Pages 4
Duration 4:17
Measures 90
Key signature 3 flats
Parts 1
Part names Piano
Privacy Everyone can see this score
License None (All rights reserved)
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Really enjoyable rag! While this piece "looks back", I'll be looking forward to hear more from you.

Thank you again for the comment John, and well spotted!!
That little bridge in bars 72-73 is a well-worn musical cliche that I have seen used, not just by Joplin but other Ragtime composers, so, if it’s good enough for them.........
As for the fourth strain, the 40 year old sketch I intended to use steadfastly refused to go where I wanted it to within the constraints of 16 bars, so that had to be put to one side for later. A couple of hours later I was playing Kismet and yes, I did take a little inspiration from the final strain although I hope I have deviated enough from it to avoid charges of plagiarism!!
As far as the left-hand 10ths go, they are meant to be played “split” but, still a relative novice at MuseScore, I have yet to learn how to notate that.
I totally agree with your comments on the Joplin-Hayden collaborations especially Felicity, one of my favourites. In common with a lot of Ragtime historians, I still wonder which of them was responsible for each element. We all have our pet theories.
Not far short of running out of sketches now so the next one may take a little more time on the assumption that Divine intervention will not lend a hand.
Once again, thanks for taking the time to comment
Best wishes, David

Another very evocative piece! I suspect you may have (had) a youthful admiration for the Joplin-Hayden collaborations (which are very charming), as I note the reference to 'Sunflower Slow Drag' in Bars 72-3; and isn't that a bit from 'Kismet' in the final strain that follows?
I'm not sure of our relative ages - I have a few more years to work before my pension ! - but beginning about 5 years ago, I found myself 'in negotiation' with rag composition-attempts made by my much younger self; and the experience has been most instructive and rewarding. (Although, in imagination, 'he' and I do shout at each other sometimes !)
I like the sound of your LH 10ths, although my hand won't stretch to playing them as-written. Your key-scheme is a little untypical (though I know of - indeed have tried to write - rags that don't simply go to, or stay in, the subdominant in the Trio). I very much hope to see more compositions from you; and am curious to see what might develop as and when you 'run-out' of pre-existing material... Best regards, John.

In reply to by John-of-Lewes

Thank you again for the comment John, and well spotted!!
That little bridge in bars 72-73 is a well-worn musical cliche that I have seen used, not just by Joplin but other Ragtime composers, so, if it’s good enough for them.........
As for the fourth strain, the 40 year old sketch I intended to use steadfastly refused to go where I wanted it to within the constraints of 16 bars, so that had to be put to one side for later. A couple of hours later I was playing Kismet and yes, I did take a little inspiration from the final strain although I hope I have deviated enough from it to avoid charges of plagiarism!!
As far as the left-hand 10ths go, they are meant to be played “split” but, still a relative novice at MuseScore, I have yet to learn how to notate that.
I totally agree with your comments on the Joplin-Hayden collaborations especially Felicity, one of my favourites. In common with a lot of Ragtime historians, I still wonder which of them was responsible for each element. We all have our pet theories.
Not far short of running out of sketches now so the next one may take a little more time on the assumption that Divine intervention will not lend a hand.
Once again, thanks for taking the time to comment
Best wishes, David