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Plz help!

I just started playing alto sax last week for a summer program and I think all in all it’s an easy instrument to start off on (maybe because I have been playing clarinet for 3 years). But I am still struggling with holding it. It’s very heavy and sometimes my thumb is swollen from holding it. My friend who has been playing alto sax for 4 years says my sax is bigger than hers. I’m sure its alto because my music teacher gave it to me and I can’t switch it out for a different one. Does anyone have any tips on how to hold the sax? Thxxx and I appreciate it- Flutinetist ^~^

My Summer Challange: 10 compositions

As stated in the title, the best way to improve your composing skills is to compose (cliché but very true). Therefore, I will embark on a journey of trying to compose a minimum of 10 compositions over summer break. I want you guys to spread the word and join me! Perhaps, this can not only be a chance to learn, but, also meet new people. 

The rules are as follows: 
You can comment down below featuring your new piece and give a short description of it if you like (e.g. inspiration, the style and question about something you may be unsure about). 
You can post up to 5 scores per comment, but, let's be nice to everyone, by not spamming the comments in order to get views. 

A suggested format would be: 
The number of the piece
piece title - url
short description

Example: 
Gould:
composition #1
''So you want to write a fugue?'' - musescore.com/gould/so-you-want-to-write-a-fugue
A satirical piece...

It is okay if a piece turns out bad or short, the point is that you just do it and have fun along the way. 

List of available jazz standards

Here is the alphabetical list of jazz standards lead sheets that are already done and available in our group. Titles that have been contributed by two or more different group members have additional links to the alternate versions of the leadsheets (noted with "alt chart").

Note that everything can be downloaded as .mscz file and transposed to the key of your choice.

About a Quarter to Nine
After You've Gone || (alt chart) 
Ain't Misbehavin' || (alt chart, Eb)
All Alone
All of Me
All the Things You Are || (alt chart)
Among My Souvenirs
Angel Eyes || (alt chart)
April in Paris
As Time Goes By
Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes)
Bag's Groove
Begin the Beguine || (alt chart)
Black Coffee
Body and Soul
But Not for Me
Ballin' the Jack
Best Thing for You
Born to Be Blue
Call Me Irresponsible
Caravan
Charleston
Cheek to Cheek
Cherokee
China Boy || (alt chart)
Come Rain or Come Shine
Crazy Rhythm
Christmas Song, The
Darn That Dream
Dream a Little Dream of Me || (Mamas & Papas arr.) 
Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans
Don't Be That Way
Don't Blame Me
Don't Get Around Much Anymore
Don't Take Your Love from Me
Drop Me Off in Harlem
East of the Sun
Embraceable You || (alt chart)
Estate
Fly Me to the Moon (4/4) || (3/4) || (alt 4/4 chart)
Flying Home
Foggy Day, A
Frim Fram Sauce, The
Georgia on My Mind
Ghost of a Chance, (I Don't Stand) A
Girl from Ipanema, The (Garota de Ipanema)
Groovin' High
Here's That Rainy Day
Honeysuckle Rose
How Am I to Know?
How Deep Is the Ocean?
How High the Moon
I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me
I Can't Get Started
I Cover the Waterfront
I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)
I Got Rhythm
I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart
I Should Care
I Wish You Love
I Won't Dance || (alt chart)
If I Had You
I'll Remember April
I'll See You in My Dreams || (alt chart)
Indian Summer
Indiana
Isn't It Romantic
It Could Happen to You
It Had to Be You
It Might as Well Be Spring
Joint Is Jumpin', The
Just Friends
La Vie En Rose
Laura
Lester Leaps In
Let's Fall in Love
Let's Get Lost
Louisiana Fairytale
Love for Sale
Love Is Here to Stay || (alt chart)
Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)
Lush Life
Man I Loved, The
Manhã de Carnaval  (also known as A Day in the Life of a Fool)
Maple Leaf Rag
Mean to Me || (alt chart)
Memories of You
Misty
Mr. PC
My Funny Valentine
My Romance
My Ship
Nardis
Nearness of You, The
Night and Day
Night in Tunisia
Nightengale Sang in Berkeley Square, A
Oh, Lady Be Good
Old Country, The
On a Misty Night
On a Slow Boat to China
On the Sunny Side of the Street
Only the Lonely (Jimmy Van Heusen song)
Over the Rainbow
Out of Nowhere
Perdido
Pick Yourself Up
Poinciana
Prelude to a Kiss
Puttin' on the Ritz
Que reste-t-il de nos amour?
Rosetta
Round Midnight
Royal Garden Blues
Satin Doll
Secret Love
Sentimental Journey
September Song
Shiny Stockings
Skylark
Smile
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes
Sophisticated Lady
Someone to Watch Over Me
Sonnymoon for Two
St. James Infirmary
St. Louis Blues
Stardust [with verse] || (alt chart)
Stars Fell on Alabama
Stella By Starlight
Stompin' at the Savoy || (alt chart)
Summertime
Sweet Georgia Brown
Sweet Lorraine
Take the 'A' Train
Taking a Chance on Love
Tea for Two
There Is No Greater Love
There Will Never Be Another You || (alt chart)
These Foolish Things
They Can't Take That Away from Me
This Can't Be Love
Topsy
Turn Out the Stars
The Two Lonely People
Two Sleepy People
Walkin My Baby Back Home
Way You Look Tonight, The
What Is This Thing Called Love?
What's New?
When You're Smiling
Where or When
Willow Weep for Me
Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams
Yesterdays
You Go to My Head || (alt chart)

+++++

New Piano Roll Feature on the musescore.com

Today marks the release of MuseScore Piano Roll. Piano Roll is a popular and convenient method to display piano notation in a way that not only simplifies learning a new piece for novice musicians who lack a teacher, it also beautifully visualizes each score.


(Video captured from https://musescore.com/classicman/scores/33715 )

Give it a try by simply clicking on the Piano Roll icon now available on all solo piano scores. Be sure to tell us what you think in Improving MuseScore.com!



All of these improvements are designed to not only make MuseScore.com the most valuable resource online for sharing and discovering great musical works but for learning them as well.

We hope you’ll be as excited about this new feature as we were to create it for you, and as always we look forward to your feedback.

This is just the first of an exciting series of updates and releases for MuseScore PianoRoll; we're already hard at work on improving the experience!

Who needs "rules"? What's this nonsense about "rules"? I'm a drifter born to walk the road!

This my take, and what I do when I write music, and how I judge others' music. Your mileage may vary.  Comments welcome.

“I don’t want to sound like Bach or Mozart — rules are for fools and drones with no imagination! I’m a rebel, like Joyce, Stravinsky, and Picasso!”

Who likes or needs “rules”? Who wants to be told where they can or can’t talk, use their cell phone, eat, or park for free? What is this nonsense about books full of “rules” for music, saying you “can’t” use two successive fifths, or sevenths not followed by the note below? Or that fugues “have to have” “expositions” and “episodes” and follow “rules’ preached by other books about what their notes are “allowed” to do?  Are music lovers so arrogant and condescending that they listen to music trying to play “gotcha” when notes don’t do what some damned music professor said they ought to, and laugh and reject that music? Or is this a scam to ensure salaries for “music teachers” who are paid for putting red “X”s on people’s scores? 

And didn’t tremendous artists like Schoenberg, Jackson Pollock and Allen Ginsberg become famous by “breaking rules” (as did Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart)? I never saw a music-police wagon pull up and arrest somebody for “breaking the rules”…. 
 
I see scores here every day, usually attempted complex contrapuntal forms such as fugues and canons, with “I know, I didn’t follow the rules! Sorry!” as a (lame) excuse for why they (almost invariably) sound amateurish, dissonant, and disjoint.

In the past, before the internet and easy-to-use, free score editors, musically sensitive people who went to concerts or church or listened to the vanished thing called “classical radio” would there hear great music of the past. The industrious among us might try to learn more about it by buying “phonograph records” (which, once invested in, had to be listened to many times to justify the acquisition), and scores, ditto, and perhaps trying to play the music they heard on a piano or simpler keyboard,. And maybe we might even buy some music paper, and pencils with erasers, and try to write some new music, and eventually arrive at the conclusion that this stuff was pretty complicated: as with stage magicians, the fact that serious music looks “simple" when done correctly is the very fruit of the art — if you do not learn how to be a magician-musician, the result on stage will be sad and transparent failure.

If you were lucky, you might have been near a good library (mine was almost an hour away) with a good section on music-theory books, or perhaps knew a professional musician, student, or teacher, who could explain how to write music that sounds, to whatever degree, like the music you heard and wanted to emulate. And you would learn that there are indeed methods, abstractions, technologies, and yes, “rules” (many of which differed from century to century and place to place) which causes the music of historical composers to sound the way it does, not like “old music”, but like well-written prose or a well-painted picture, where the parts contribute to the whole, each sentence expresses a logical idea, questions that are raised are answered, and there is no spattered paint or typos all over the piece.  That, not genius or matchless inspiration, is why their music sounds like classical music instead of the uninformed tinkering of beginners. But it is utterly possible to inform yourself, and, with care and diligence, move beyond being a beginner.

If you are a native English (for example, it’s true in any language) speaker, you don’t say “I write my sanata yesterday with C major”, because it’s not English. Any native English speaker knows that, and although we understand it, we use and prefer (reasonably) proper spelling and grammar. Grammar is not a scam to pay teachers; people who speak English (or French, Russian, Arabic, or Japanese) competently not only speak in credible grammar, but best understand and appreciate correct utterances in their respective languages. The same is true of classical music — if you want your creations to be understood with ears accustomed to the form, texture, gestural vocabulary, and overall idiom of that extremely broad genre, you must “do the same thing”, “speak in that language”, i.e., follow the same rules. Failure to do so will prevent your work from sounding like competent classical music.

These “rules” were devised by musician-composers skilled in teaching, in order to codify and transmit, to their pupils, and to us, what they knew about writing music, so that they and we could do it, too, and express our own creativity. The rules of tonal music are not a strait-jacket, but a power tool.

As with every other art, those who “broke the rules”, such as Picasso, Joyce, and Stravinsky, were fully competent in the traditions of their arts before creating iconoclastic work.

"Your mileage may vary."