Top Groups

Discussions

Educational "essential rudiments" percussion posters for free!

Good day! My name is Mikhail Kirilin, i'm the PR manager of Musescore. We prepared an educational posters with essential rudiments exercises for percussionists. Here's the photo how this one looks like: 
https://sun9-8.userapi.com/c854532/v854532527/11ee70/K10NmaHZH2g.jpg

We will be glad to send those for FREE — right now i've got 20 physically posters.The only condition is: the posters are available to teachers, educators and studio professionals only. 

Here's the form to sign: 
https://forms.gle/nyzRe2ZZKU8zeY9KA

All i need in exchange, will be the photo of this poster in a classroom/studio :)

For those, who want to use this one in a digital form

  1. I can send you the digital mockup — it's easy to print because it is black/white. Text me with direct message or mail m.kirilin@musescore.com">m.kirilin@musescore.com
  2. We've uploaded notations to Musescore account: https://musescore.com/mdl/checkitout

Hope that you like our idea. We'll make more free posters soon after this :)

Musecorps Composition Competition #1 - Colors!

Hello, everyone!

I've been sitting on this group for over a year without really doing anything with it. Its original purpose was to bring together the drum corps community on MuseScore by allowing others to post their own drum corps arrangements. In my original post on this group, I mentioned that I wanted to start a series of competitions that you guys can participate in, and I'm happy to say that I'm going to give a go, starting today!

So, what is the first competition?

I want to start off with something simple: Create a drum corps arrangement for any song that has a color in its name.

Here are the rules:
- Follow typical drum corps format (3 trumpet, 2 mellophone, 3 baritone, 1-2 tuba)
- You don't need to include percussion, but it might increase your chances of winning
- Only submit one arrangement per person!
- Arrangement must be at least 1:30 long, but no more than 5:00

When you're ready to enter, just reply to this post with a link to your arrangement. 

So, if you win... what do you actually win? In the future, I hope to offer a month of Musescore Pro to winners. Maybe if enough people show interest? For this first competition, though, I will post the winner's arrangement to my YouTube channel, with a link(s) to whatever you want to advertise. Your YouTube, your Instagram, whatever!

Assuming people actually participate, I plan to end this competition by Tuesday, 10/15, by 10PM EST. Have fun!

Flute Sonata in Eb, need some feedback

If you haven't seen it yet, here is the link to my flute sonata:

https://musescore.com/user/50070/scores/5703661

I nicknamed it The Haydn Sonata because I am trying to get across a Haydnesque feel to it. I have noticed these things predominant in each composer of the Classical Period Trifecta:

  • Haydn: Humor, melodic and harmonic surprises
  • Mozart: Alberti bass, effortless grace
  • Beethoven: Sheer power, even when the melody is more lyrical

Haydn is the one who inspired me to write this flute sonata. I wrote the sonata exposition in just an hour and this is the first sonata for a duet that actually has a finished exposition.
 
There are quite a few surprises in my sonata exposition. Here they are:

Bar 5: Sudden entry of the flute and absence of the piano
Bar 6: Sudden reentry of the piano
Bar 10: Short diminuendo, like the theme isn't quite done yet
Bar 11: Short staccato variant of the theme over a syncopated bass
Bar 14: Sudden forte cadence, theme is now finished
Bar 15: Piano dynamic in transition material right after a cadence at forte, sudden absence of the flute
Bar 21: Forte dynamic when transition material is taken up an octave, flute comes back
Bar 26: Piano dynamic yet again, descending trill motive
Bar 41: Very busy texture as the repeat comes closer
Bar 47: Sudden change in texture, sudden dynamic change as it repeats

I'm wondering, is my sonata exposition Haydnesque in its nature? I tried to get a Haydnesque feel to it by being more humorous than serious with the music. Anything impossible for the flutist? Does it feel like a Molto Allegro to you(tempo is at quarter note = 140 BPM)? Or should I just take the Molto off and just have Allegro as my tempo marking? 

Arranging Presto Agitato, Any suggestions for the sixteenths?

I am arranging Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata for a string quartet. I might add a double bass if I think it is necessary, but so far, no issues with it being a quartet, at least not in the first and second movements. Now I'm arranging the Presto Agitato and as if it wasn't hard enough with the need to smoothly transition from the viola to the violin in those sixteenths, if I keep the interval relationship, the notes are going to be too high. I could get away with this octave displacement in the previous 2 movements(With the first movement, I basically did this octave displacement for the entire bass line to fit it into the cello), but now, the octaves the sixteenths are in are crucial to getting the right sound out of the Presto Agitato.

There are 2 things I can think of as to how to get the Presto Agitato to sound right, one of which keeps the instrumentation, and another of which keeps the original octaves.

Option 1: Add Double Bass

This would keep the original octaves, and I could have it play the bass line and have the sixteenths start in the cello and rise upwards to the viola and second violin.

Option 2: Move bass line to Viola for first measure of each arpeggio run

This would keep the instrumentation I have going of a string quartet and for everything except the bass line, the original octaves would be kept as well.

Which one of these 2 options do you think would be better? Any other suggestions?

NOTE: I'm only asking about the arpeggio runs, the scales and Alberti bass are easier to arrange.