Sheet music

Concert Etude in F-Sharp minor "Gnomenreigen" (Dance of the Gnomes)

1 part11 pages02:24a year ago433 views
Piano
Two Concert Études (Zwei Konzertetüden), S.145, is a set of two piano works composed in Rome around 1862-63 by Franz Liszt and dedicated to Dionys Pruckner, but intended for Sigmund Lebert and Ludwig Stark’s Klavierschule. It consists of two parts: Waldesrauschen (Forest Murmurs) and Gnomenreigen (Dance of the Gnomes). The second piece is Gnomenreigen (Dance of the Gnomes) in F-sharp minor. It is known for its technical difficulty in its fast and soft passages, where the pianist imitates the sound of gnomes. It first has a theme in F-sharp minor consisting of grace notes followed by eights. Then it goes to a fast, playful theme in A major. It repeats themes, and also has a theme with repeating bass notes, such as the sixty consecutive low Ds. Finally, the A major theme is repeated for a climactic part of the étude, this time in F-sharp major. (Wikipedia) The piece was heard in an orchestral arrangement as part of the Little Mermaid Ballet in the 1952 Danny Kaye film, Hans Christian Andersen. Performance by Umi Garrett (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCVFUBs8RSw)

Gnome Village

7 parts8 pages02:37a year ago183 views
Clarinet, Flute, Percussion, Harpsichord, Strings(3)
An arrangement of the theme in the Gnome Village in Runescape. Originally composed by Ian Taylor.

1. Promenade - Gnome, Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)

4 parts7 pages03:09a year ago481 views
Guitar(3)
This is the first part of the well-known composition of Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition”: Promenade and Gnomus. I started with this transcription in 2005. It was my goal to transcribe this masterpiece - which was originally written for piano – for three guitars. The challenge was to find a key in which it was possible to play the complete work on three guitars. I figured out that it would be feasible if the complete work would be shifted half an octave upwards. Also, the guitars should tune the sixth string (6) from E to D (and for one part the third guitar should tune the sixth string to C). By applying this technique, the switch to another key from one part to the next, which is so characteristically for the whole sequence, would be preserved. Of course, this is relative from one part to the next, because of the shift of half an octave. Okay, just skip this technical stuff and start playing this beautiful music. I appreciate your comment.

Dance of the Gnomes

6 parts9 pages01:335 months ago37 views
Trumpet, Baritone Saxophone, Organ, Other woodwinds, Percussion(2)
Another complete experiment -all thoughts appreciated.

Dance of the Gnomes

10 parts34 pages02:26a month ago14 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Percussion, Timpani

"The King of the Færies" for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages02:225 years ago4,011 views
Flute, Harp
A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural. The Irish banshee (Irish Gaelic "bean sí" or Scottish Gaelic "bean shìth", which both mean "fairy woman") is sometimes described as a ghost Historians believe that the fairy queens and kings are in fact the old pagan gods and goddesses 'in disguise' who have long been revered by the Irish. Once stated that, "the Celtic gods of Ireland had long been wiped out, buried under the sway of Catholicism". Many who have been to the Emerald Isle, or listened to many folk tales can see that the old gods live on in folk tales as the giants of the hill; the Gobhan Saor who built all the bridges of Ireland; the Gille Decair, a clown and trickster; the carl (serf) of the drab coat and many others. The old deities were once worshipped throughout Ireland, however it is in the west that they are best remembered now, the east having been more Christianized and anglicised, and subject to more invasions. By contrast, the west of Ireland, to which the native Irish were driven ("to hell or Connaught") has held on longer to her ancient heritage. Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.

Gnomus

1 part4 pages02:194 years ago3,238 views
Piano
Pictures at an Exhibition is a suite in ten movements composed for piano by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky in 1874. The suite is Mussorgsky's most famous piano composition, and has become a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It has become further known through various orchestrations and arrangements produced by other musicians and composers, with Maurice Ravel's arrangement being the most recorded and performed. Gnomus is in E♭ Minor with the tempo “Vivo” followed by “Meno mosso, pesante”. Stasov comment: “A sketch depicting a little gnome, clumsily running with crooked legs”. Hartmann's sketch, now lost, is thought to represent a design for a nutcracker displaying large teeth. The lurching music, in contrasting tempos with frequent stops and starts, suggests the movements of the gnome.

Scenes from "Pictures at an Exhibition"

34 parts43 pages10:40a year ago2,180 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(4), Accordion, Bassoon(2), Alto Saxophone(2), Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet, Guitar(7), Bass(4), Tuba(2), Violin, Percussion(3), Contrabass
A medley for wind band combining the highlights of Modest Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" suite, featuring the following movements: Promenade, The Gnome, The Old Castle, Tuileries, Cattle, Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks, Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle, The Hut On Fowl's Legs (Baba-Yaga), The Great Gate of Kiev Update: Fixed articulations, added solo trumpet part.

"Morning Mood" from Peer Gynt (Suite No. 1 Opus 46) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages04:273 months ago607 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness. Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly. Grieg opens the first Peer Gynt suite with a piece called "Morning Mood", originally played at the beginning of the fourth act. A gentle E major theme is announced by the flutes, and then the oboes, against a static harmonic background that effectively emulates the stillness of the first moments of dawn. This lovely melody--an inverted arch shape--is taken through a sparkling palette of subtle harmonic inflections; bright flute trills join the musical mixture as "Morning Mood" comes to a gentle close. Although "Morning Mood" is only four minutes long, Grieg manages to capture in music something both timeless and universal. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500). Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Morning Mood" for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, F Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

Concert Etude in D-flat "Waldesrauschen" (Forest Murmurs)

2 parts8 pages03:10a year ago331 views
Piano(2)
Two Concert Études (Zwei Konzertetüden), S.145, is a set of two piano works composed in Rome around 1862-63 by Franz Liszt and dedicated to Dionys Pruckner, but intended for Sigmund Lebert and Ludwig Stark’s Klavierschule. It consists of two parts: Waldesrauschen (Forest Murmurs) and Gnomenreigen (Dance of the Gnomes). Waldesrauschen (Forest Murmurs) in D-flat major is the first of the two pieces in this set. It is known for its beauty and imitation of wind in the forest. (Wikipedia) Preformance By Claudio Arrau (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=teFMIzxET3w)

"Anitra's Dance" from Peer Gynt (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Oboe & Strings

6 parts6 pages03:413 months ago252 views
Oboe, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness. Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly. After a single, magical E major chord, "Anitra's Dance" begins with a buoyant violin melody over a compelling pizzicato background. This little theme is taken through several small harmonic adventures during the middle of the dance (including a warm and welcome, albeit brief, pass through D major). During the reprise of the opening section Grieg allows for some melodic imitation by the celli. Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500). Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Anitra's Dance" for Oboe & Strings (Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

Nell'antro del Re della Montagna

3 parts5 pages02:178 months ago215 views
Flute, Organ, Percussion
LISTEN TO THE END!!! "In the Hall of the Mountain King" (Norwegian: I Dovregubbens hall) is a piece of orchestral music composed by Edvard Grieg in 1875 as incidental music for the sixth scene of act 2 in Henrik Ibsen's 1867 play Peer Gynt. It was originally part of Opus 23 but was later extracted as the final piece of Peer Gynt, Suite No. 1, Op. 46. Its easily recognizable theme has helped it attain iconic status in popular culture, where it has been arranged by many artists (See Grieg's music in popular culture). The English translation of the name is not literal. Dovre is a mountainous region in Norway, and "gubbe" translates into (old) man or husband. "Gubbe" is used along with its female counterpart "kjerring" to differentiate male and female trolls, "trollgubbe" and "trollkjerring". In the play, Dovregubben is a troll king that Peer Gynt invents in a fantasy. The piece is played as the title character Peer Gynt, in a dream-like fantasy, enters "Dovregubben (the troll Mountain King)'s hall". The scene's introduction continues: "There is a great crowd of troll courtiers, gnomes and goblins. Dovregubben sits on his throne, with crown and sceptre, surrounded by his children and relatives. Peer Gynt stands before him. There is a tremendous uproar in the hall." The lines sung are the first lines in the scene. Grieg himself wrote "For the Hall of the Mountain King I have written something that so reeks of cowpats, ultra-Norwegianism, and 'to-thyself-be-enough-ness' that I can't bear to hear it, though I hope that the irony will make itself felt."The theme of "to thyself be... enough" – avoiding the commitment implicit in the phrase "To thine own self be true" and just doing enough – is central to Peer Gynt's satire, and the phrase is discussed by Peer and the mountain king in the scene which follows the piece. [Wikipedia]

Existence

4 parts6 pages03:063 years ago146 views
A SATB choral piece using the translated text of the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu (circa 500 BC) regarding the nature of existence. Freely available for download performance on request at ; gnomedom@gmail.com No strings attached (of any sort)