Sheet music

"Rondo Alla Turca" (K. 331 No. 11 Mvt. 3) for Steel Orchestra

5 parts6 pages03:584 years ago3,421 views
The Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is a piano sonata in three movements. It is uncertain where and when Mozart composed the sonata; however, Vienna or Salzburg around 1783 is currently thought to be most likely (Paris and dates as far back as 1778 have also been suggested).

The last movement, "Alla Turca", popularly known as the "Turkish March", is often heard on its own and is one of Mozart's best-known piano pieces; it was Mozart himself who titled the rondo "Alla Turca". It imitates the sound of Turkish Janissary bands, the music of which was much in vogue at that time. Various other works of the time imitate this Turkish style, including Mozart's own opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail. In Mozart's time, the last movement was sometimes performed on pianos built with a "Turkish stop", allowing it to be embellished with extra percussion effects.

Although originally written for Piano, I created this Arrangement for my friend and Pastor Julian J. Champion of the West Point School of Music located in Chicago IL. It has a single purpose for making music accessable to inner-city and disadvantaged youth. They are a struggling organization with a wonderful purpose. This arrangement is created for Steel Orchestra (Lead Pan, Double Lead, Alto Pan, Cello Pan & Bass Pan) Steel Drums and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Adagio in D Minor (Opus 9 No. 2) for Oboe & Piano

2 parts4 pages04:482 years ago3,404 views
Oboe, Piano
Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (1671 – 1751) was an Italian Baroque composer. While famous in his day as an opera composer, he is mainly remembered today for his instrumental music, such as the concertos.

12 Concerti a cinque (op. 9) is a collection of concertos by the Italian composer Tomaso Albinoni, published in 1722.

The most famous piece from Albinoni's Opus 9 is the Concerto in D minor for oboe (Opus 9, Number 2). It is known for its slow movement. This concerto is probably the second best-known work of Albinoni after the Adagio in G minor (which was once believed to be a reconstruction based on a fragment by Albinoni). The concertos were dedicated to Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, and were first published in Amsterdam. It is possible, but not certain, that they were written in the Elector's court during a 1722 visit there by Albinoni during performances of his theatrical compositions

This concerto in D minor for oboe and strings (Op 9 No 2) was originally composed for Oboe, 2 Violins, Viola and Cello or Continuo and is considered to be Albinoni’s best solo concerto. After an energetic first movement, characterized by dotted rhythms, comes this ravishing Adagio movement. Accompanied by repeated chords in the lower strings and a harp-like configuration in the first violin, the soloist has a soaring line: here is Albinoni at his most appealingly melodic. The concluding movement keeps both soloist and orchestra busy with an imitative arpeggiated figure and plenty of counterpoint.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12_Concerti_a_cinque_%28Albinoni%29).

I created this arrangement of an earlier arrangement for Trumpet & Organ by Michael Rondeau for Solo Oboe and Piano.
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This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error> All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Violin Concerto in E Major (RV 263 Op. 9 No. 4) for String Quartet

4 parts22 pages10:104 years ago3,388 views
Violin, Strings(3)
Although Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) had already accomplished himself as a composer of violin sonatas and of sacred music, nothing propelled his career more than his first set of concertos -- L'estro armonico (Op.3) -- which first appeared in 1711. Besides being widely popular with both musicians and audiences of the day, L'estro armonico had a significant impact on the development of the relatively new solo-concerto. The set's influence was felt all across Europe -- no less a figure than J.S. Bach transcribed six of the Op.3 concertos for keyboard.


La cetra, Op. 9, is a set of twelve violin concertos by Antonio Vivaldi, published in 1727. All of them are for violin solo, strings, and basso continuo, except No. 9 in B flat, which features two solo violins. The set was named after the cetra, a lyre-like instrument, and was dedicated to Emperor Charles VI. La Cetra may not be as well known or as frequently recorded as either Vivaldi's Op. 8 (including the Four Seasons) or Op. 3, L'Estro Armonico, but it is well worth having in your collection. These twelve concertos offer a great deal of rewarding music: beautiful serenades, haunting largos, and even an occasional melody borrowed from the Seasons, fitted out with a striking new accompaniment. In La Cetra, Vivaldi frequently achieves a new level of expressiveness combined with virtuosity which helped pave the way for devilish exploits of Paganini. With a performance as frankly romantic as I Musici's, it's easy to make the connection between these two Italian giants.

I created this transcription of the Violin Concerto in E Major (RV 263 Op. 9 No. 4) for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)
Video

"Ave Maria" for Harp & Voice (SA)

3 parts5 pages02:186 years ago3,384 views
No, it is not only Bach/Gounod when hearing the Ave Maria: Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921), too, set this text to music several times - for example, for organ (without pedal) and two identical voices. The organ is sometimes replaced replaced by a piano (and here, the Harp), the vocal parts can be sung by two sopranos, soprano and mezzo-soprano, or soprano and alto. If the performers are good, one may even consider a performance of this sacred composition in groups. Now available in an attractiv single edition, this setting is valuable addition to the repertoire and impressive alternative to the common Ave settings

This arrangement is created for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Voice Duet (Soprano & Alto) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Ave Maria" for Viola and Piano
Custom audio

"Ave Maria" for Viola and Piano

2 parts3 pages044 years ago3,373 views
Viola, Piano
"Ave Maria" is a much recorded aria composed by Vladimir Vavilov around 1970. It is a musical hoax generally misattributed to Baroque composer Giulio Caccini. Vavilov himself published and recorded it on the Melodiya label with the ascription to "Anonymous" in 1970. It is believed that the work received its ascription to Giulio Caccini after Vavilov's death, by organist Mark Shakhin (one of its performers on the mentioned "Melodiya" longplay), who gave the "newly discovered scores" to other musicians; then in an arrangement made by the organist Oleg Yanchenko for the recording by Irina Arkhipova in 1987, then the piece came to be famous worldwide

Vladimir Fyodorovich Vavilov (1925 – 1973) was a Russian guitarist, lutenist and composer. He was a student of P. Isakov (guitar) and Iogann Admoni (composition) at the Rimski-Korsakov Music College in St Petersburg. He played an important part in the early music revival in the Soviet Union.

Vavilov was active as a performer on both lute and guitar, as a music editor for a state music publishing house, and more important, as a composer. He routinely ascribed his own works to other composers, usually Renaissance or Baroque (occasionally from later eras), usually with total disregard of a style that should have been appropriate, in the spirit of other mystificators of the previous eras. His works achieved enormous circulation, and some of them achieved true folk music status, with several poems set to his melodies.

Vavilov died in poverty, of pancreatic cancer, a few months before the appearance of "The City of Gold", which became a hit overnight.

Although originally written for accompanied voice, I created this arrangement for Viola and Acoustic Piano.
Canon in D Major (Pachelbel's Canon) for Pipe Organ
Video

Canon in D Major (Pachelbel's Canon) for Pipe Organ

1 part5 pages05:162 years ago3,371 views
Percussion
Canon in D Major (Pachebel's Canon) is the name commonly given to a canon by the German Baroque composer Johann Pachelbel in his Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo (German: Kanon und Gigue für 3 Violinen mit Generalbaß) (PWC 37, T. 337, PC 358), sometimes referred to as Canon and Gigue in D or simply Canon in D. Neither the date nor the circumstances of its composition are known (suggested dates range from 1680 to 1706), and the oldest surviving manuscript copy of the piece dates from the 19th century.

Pachelbel's Canon, like Pachelbel's other works, although popular during his lifetime, soon went out of style, and remained in obscurity for centuries thereafter. A 1968 arrangement and recording of it by the Jean-François Paillard chamber orchestra became unexpectedly popular over the next decade, and in the 1970s the piece began to be recorded by many ensembles; by the early 1980s its presence as background music was deemed inescapable. From the 1970s to the early 2000s, elements of the piece, especially its chord progression, were used in a variety of pop music songs. Since the 1980s, it has also been used frequently in weddings and funeral ceremonies in the Western world.

The canon was originally scored for three violins and basso continuo and paired with a gigue. Both movements are in the key of D major. Although a true canon at the unison in three parts, it also has elements of a chaconne.

In his lifetime, Johann Pachelbel was renowned primarily for his organ and other keyboard music, whereas today he is also recognized as an important composer of church and chamber music. Little of his chamber music survives, however. Only Musikalische Ergötzung—a collection of partitas published during Pachelbel's lifetime—is known, apart from a few isolated pieces in manuscripts. The Canon and Gigue in D major is one such piece. A single 19th-century manuscript copy of them survives, Mus.MS 16481/8 in the Berlin State Library. It contains two more chamber suites. Another copy, previously in Hochschule der Künste in Berlin, is now lost.

The circumstances of the piece's composition are wholly unknown. Hans-Joachim Schulze, writing in 1985, suggested that the piece may have been composed for Johann Christoph Bach's wedding, on 23 October 1694, which Pachelbel attended. Johann Ambrosius Bach, Pachelbel, and other friends and family provided music for the occasion. Johann Christoph Bach, the oldest brother of Johann Sebastian Bach, was a pupil of Pachelbel. Another scholar, Charles E Brewer, investigated a variety of possible connections between Pachelbel's and Heinrich Biber's published chamber music. His research indicated that the Canon may have been composed as a kind of "answer" to a chaconne with canonic elements which Biber published as part of Partia III of Harmonia artificioso-ariosa. That would indicate that Pachelbel's piece can't be dated earlier than 1696 – the year of publication of Biber's collection. Other versions are occasionally put forward, for example, suggesting the date of canon's composition as early as 1680.

Pachelbel's Canon combines the techniques of canon and ground bass. Canon is a polyphonic device in which several voices play the same music, entering in sequence. In Pachelbel's piece, there are three voices engaged in canon, but there is also a fourth voice, the basso continuo, which plays an independent part.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachelbel%27s_Canon).

Although originally written for 3 violins and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Pipe Organ.
Allegro from Concerto Grosso (Opus 6 No. 1 HWV 319) for Clarinet Quartet
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Allegro from Concerto Grosso (Opus 6 No. 1 HWV 319) for Clarinet Quartet

4 parts5 pages04:136 years ago3,356 views
The Concerti Grossi, Op. 6, or Twelve Grand Concertos, HWV 319–330, are 12 concerti grossi by George Frideric Handel for a concertino trio of two violins and violoncello and a ripieno four-part string orchestra with harpsichord continuo. First published by subscription in London by John Walsh in 1739, in the second edition of 1741 they became Handel's Opus 6. Taking the older concerto da chiesa and concerto da camera of Arcangelo Corelli as models, rather than the later three-movement Venetian concerto of Antonio Vivaldi favoured by Johann Sebastian Bach, they were written to be played during performances of Handel's oratorios and odes. Despite the conventional model, Handel incorporated in the movements the full range of his compositional styles, including trio sonatas, operatic arias, French overtures, Italian sinfonias, airs, fugues, themes and variations and a variety of dances. The concertos were largely composed of new material: they are amongst the finest examples in the genre of baroque concerto grosso.

The earliest of the twelve to be composed, Op. 6, No. 1 in G major, is built in five movements, the jubilant 6/8 meter Allegro finale coming across as something like frosting on top of the fugal fourth movement. The work (HWV 319) was mostly newly composed. The first movement was a complete reworking of a first draft of the overture for Imeneo, Handel's penultimate Italian opera, composed over a prolonged period from 1738 to 1740.

The fugal fourth movement (Allegro) has a catchy subject, first heard completely from the soloist. Despite being fugal in nature, it does not adhere to the strict rules of counterpoint, surprising the listener instead with ingenious episodes, alternating between the ripieno and concertino; at the close, where a bold restatement of the theme would be expected, Handel playfully curtails the movement with two pianissimo bars. The last concerto-like movement is an energetic gigue in two parts, with the soloists echoing responses to the full orchestra.

Although originally written for a small String Chamber orchestra, I created this arrangement for Clarinet Quartet (3 Bb Clarinets & Bass Clarinet). Thank you to Dr. Leonard Anderson for Clarinet-specific technical assistance. This piece is best played using the Clarinet soundfont from SoundFont Downloads at (http://www.soundfontdownloads.com).
"Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee" (UMH # 89) for English Handbells
Video

"Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee" (UMH # 89) for English Handbells

2 parts1 page00:326 years ago3,352 views
I created this quick and simple arrangement of the "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee" (UMH Hymnal # 89) for English Handbells to support an introit at the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC).

"Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee" is a poem written by Henry van Dyke in 1907 with the intention of musically setting it to the famous "Ode to Joy" melody of the final movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's final symphony, Symphony No. 9.

Van Dyke wrote this poem in 1907 while staying at the home of Williams College president Harry Augustus Garfield. He was serving as a guest preacher at Williams at the time. He told his host that the local Berkshire Mountains had been his inspiration. The lyrics were first published in 1911 in Van Dyke's Book of Poems, Third Edition.

This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).

"Pavane for a Dead Princess" for String Quintet

5 parts4 pages04:073 years ago3,333 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece written for solo piano by the French composer Maurice Ravel in 1899 when he was studying composition at the Conservatoire de Paris under Gabriel Fauré. Ravel also published an orchestrated version of the Pavane in 1910.

Ravel described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". The pavane was a slow processional dance that enjoyed great popularity in the courts of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

This antique miniature is not meant to pay tribute to any particular princess from history, but rather expresses a nostalgic enthusiasm for Spanish customs and sensibilities, which Ravel shared with many of his contemporaries (most notably Debussy and Albéniz) and which is evident in some of his other works such as the Rapsodie espagnole and the Boléro.

Although originally written for solo piano, I created this arrangement for String Quintet (2 Violins, 2 Violas & Cello).

"Trumpet Voluntary" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts4 pages03:125 years ago3,329 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674–1707) was an English baroque composer, organist and, pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark's March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes's Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke's piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has featured in royal weddings.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell), was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

For many years, the piece was incorrectly attributed to his elder, and more widely-known, contemporary, Henry Purcell, who was organist of Westminster Abbey. The misattribution emanated from an arrangement for organ, that was published in the 1870s by a Dr. William Spark, then town organist of Leeds. It was later adopted by Sir Henry Wood in his well-known arrangement for trumpet, string orchestra and organ.

The oldest source is a collection of keyboard pieces published in 1700. A contemporary version for wind instruments also survives. According to some sources, the march was originally written in honour of George, Prince of Denmark, the consort of the then Princess, later Queen Anne of Great Britain.

The march is very popular as wedding music (it was played during the wedding of Lady Diana Spencer and Prince Charles in St Paul's Cathedral) and was often broadcast by the BBC during World War II, especially when broadcasting to occupied Denmark.

Although originally written for Trumpet & Organ, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

"Pie Jesu" (Opus 48 No. 4) for Flute & Harp

2 parts2 pages02:326 years ago3,316 views
Flute, Harp
Composed around 1887 in response to the death of his father, Gabriel Faure's Pie Jesu is actually an orchestral piece written for Soprano. He actually composed his Requiem in D minor, (Opus 48) between 1887 and 1890. This choral–orchestral setting of the Roman Catholic Mass for the Dead is the best known of his large works.

Pie Jesu (Merciful Jesus) is a motet derived from the final couplet of the Dies irae and often included in musical settings of the Requiem Mass. The settings of the Requiem Mass by Luigi Cherubini, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Duruflé, John Rutter, Karl Jenkins and Fredrik Sixten include a Pie Jesu as an independent movement. Of all these, by far the best known is the Pie Jesu from Fauré's Requiem; Camille Saint-Saëns said of it, "just as Mozart's is the only Ave verum corpus, this is the only Pie Jesu".

Although this work was originally created for Soprano and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Ave Maria" (de Somma) for Piano

1 part2 pages03:125 years ago3,317 views
Bonaventura Somma (1893 - 1960) was an Itallian composer born in the town of Chianciano Terme, a small town located in the province of Siena , July 30, 1893. As a teenager, he attended the Conservatory of Rome , where he was a student of various modern composers such as Ottorino Respighi. After completing his studies, he was for many years a professor at the Conservatory of Santa Cecilia in Rome and directed, in Rome, the Choir of the ' Accademia di Santa Cecilia , collaborating with the most important conductors and composers of his era ( Karajan , Toscanini , Perosi , etc..).

The Hail Mary, also commonly called the Ave Maria (Latin) or Angelic Salutation, is a traditional Christian prayer asking for the intercession of the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. In Roman Catholicism, the prayer forms the basis of the Rosary and the Angelus prayers. In the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches, a similar prayer is used in formal liturgies, both in Greek and in translations. It is also used by many other groups within the Catholic tradition of Christianity including Anglicans, Independent Catholics, and Old Catholics. Some Protestant denominations, such as Lutherans, also make use of a form of the prayer.

Based on the greeting of the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary in the Gospel of Luke, the prayer takes different forms in various traditions. It has often been set to music, although the most famous musical expression of the words Ave Maria by Schubert does not actually contain the Hail Mary prayer.

Although originally created for chorus and Organ, I created this arrangement for Solo Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Fantaisie ≈ Valse

1 part4 pages026 years ago3,315 views
Strings
Walking through the streets of Paris a hundred years ago, Erik Satie could not have looked more normal in his black bowler hat and tie. But Mr. Satie was dreaming of music no one had heard before – music like ancient chants and modern circus tunes rolled into one. A friend of poets, puppeteers, magicians, great painters like Picasso, and the Surrealists, Satie was at the center of a world where sense was nonsense, and the imagination ruled supreme.

rik Satie's first great piano period dates back to his youth and his first time spent in Montmartre. During these years he wrote some 20 piano pieces, five songs, some sketches for string quartet, theatre music for Joséphin Péladan and a little orchestral piece, later re-used as the penultimate movement in Trois morceaux en forme de poire for piano duet.

Among the first works by young Satie to be published were two salon-waltzes printed as supplements in his father's publication La musiques des familles on March 17th and July 28th of 1887. The first appended with the curious numbering "Opus 62" (!), and the second with the following introduction:

"Today we publish a charming Fantaisie-valse for piano by Erik Satie. This work by a very young musician is elegant in structure and gracious in rhythm, without dryness. All the author's works, amongst which we will mention Three Melodies, indicate a propensity for reverie and a tendency to move away from the strict laws of symmetrical rhythm."

The rather trivial, frequently-repeated phrases and the bassnotes around the basic chords are typical of the style of the simple salon music of the day.

At the same time, it can be noted that Satie - conciously or not - managed to avoid the sentimentality to the style. Instead, both waltzes have traits of timeless simplicity. Perhaps, even, something of the starkness one usually associates with the Gymnopédies.

"Promenade" from "Pictures at an Exhibition" for Pipe Organ

1 part2 pages01:284 years ago3,312 views
Organ
Pictures at an Exhibition is a suite in ten movements (plus a recurring, varied Promenade) composed for piano by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky in 1874.

The suite is Mussorgsky's most famous piano composition, and has become a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It has become further known through various orchestrations and arrangements produced by other musicians and composers, with Maurice Ravel's arrangement being the most recorded and performed.

Although arranged for Piano by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov, I created this arrangement for Pipe Organ to support a memorial service at my Church.
"Entry of the Gladiators" (Thunder & Blazes) for Sax Quartet
Video

"Entry of the Gladiators" (Thunder & Blazes) for Sax Quartet

4 parts6 pages03:073 years ago3,304 views
Soprano Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone
Julius Fučík (pronounced "Foo-chick") was a Czech composer who lived from 1872 -- 1916 and was a conductor of military bands. Today his marches are still played as patriotic music in the Czech Republic. However, his worldwide reputation rests on this one work: the Opus 68 march, the Entrance of the Gladiators (Vjezd gladiátorů), which is universally recognized, often under the title "Thunder and Blazes", as one of the most popular theme tunes for circus clowns.

"Entrance of the Gladiators" or "Entry of the Gladiators" was originally titled it "Grande Marche Chromatique," reflecting the use of chromatic scales throughout the piece, but changed the title based on his personal interest in the Roman Empire. The piece is a little longer than this but the rest is not so familiar to most people.

Although originally created for band, I created this arrangement for Saxophone Quartet (Soprano, Alto, Tenor & Baritone).

"The Skye Boat Song" for Harp & Flutes

3 parts4 pages01:516 years ago3,294 views
Flute(2), Harp
"The Skye Boat Song" is a Scottish folk song, which can also be played as a waltz, recalling the escape of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) from Uist to the Isle of Skye after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. The song tells how Charles escaped in a small boat, with the aid of Flora MacDonald, disguised as a serving maid. The song is a traditional expression of Jacobitism and its story has also entered Scotland as a national legend.

The song was not in any older books of Scottish songs, though it is in most miscellanies like The Fireside Book of Folk Songs. It is often sung as a lullaby, in a slow rocking 6/8 time. In addition to being extremely popular in its day, and becoming a standard among Scottish folk and dance musicians, it has become more widely known in the modern mainstream popular music genre.

Although originally written for folk instruments, I created this arrangement at the request of Belgian flautist, Jenne Van Antwerpen for Concert (Pedal) Harp and Flutes (2).
Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra
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Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:224 years ago3,293 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory to God in the Highest), BWV 191, is a church cantata written by the German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, and the only one of his church cantatas set to a Latin text. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig probably in 1745 to celebrate the end of the Second Silesian War on Christmas Day. The composition's three movements all derive from the Gloria of an earlier Missa written by Bach in 1733, which the composer would later use as the Gloria of his Mass in B minor.

Gloria in excelsis Deo was written in Leipzig for Christmas Day, as indicated by the heading on the manuscript in Bach's own handwriting, "J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti." (Jesu Juva Festo Nativitatis Christi -- Celebration for the birth of Christ), to be sung around the sermon. Recent archival and manuscript evidence suggest the cantata was first performed not in 1743, but in 1745 at a special Christmas Day service to celebrate the Peace of Dresden, which brought to an end the hardships imposed on the region by the Second Silesian War.

Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Unlike Bach's other church cantatas, the words are not in German, taken from the bible, a chorale or contemporary poetry, but in Latin, taken from the Gloria and the Doxology. This late work is the only Latin cantata among around 200 surviving sacred cantatas in German. It is based on an earlier composition, the Missa in B minor (Kyrie and Gloria) which Bach had composed in 1733 and that would, in 1748, become part of his monumental Mass in B minor. The first movement (Gloria) is an almost identical copy of the earlier work, while the second and third movements are close parodies. Parts, for instance, of the fugal section of Sicut erat in principio, taken from the Cum sancto spiritu of the 1733 setting, are moved from a purely vocal to an instrumentally accompanied setting. The modifications Bach made to the last two movements of BWV 191, however, were not carried over into the final manuscript compilation of the Mass in B minor, leaving it a matter of speculation whether or not these constitute "improvements" to Bach's original score.

The cantata bears the heading ::J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti. Gloria in excelsis Deo. à 5 Voci. 3 Trombe Tymp. 2 Trav 2 Hautb. 2 Violini Viola e Cont. Di J.S.B. in Bach's own handwriting. The cantata is festively scored for soprano and tenor soloists and an unusual five-part choir (with a dual soprano part), three trumpets, timpani, two flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Mass in B minor structure#Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_in_excelsis_Deo,_BWV_191).

I created this arrangement of the opening Coro: "Gloria in excelsis Deo. Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis" (Glory to God in the highest, and peace on earth to men of good will) for Small orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Double Basses).
"Silence" for Piano
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"Silence" for Piano

1 part1 page00:155 years ago650 views
Piano
"Silence" for Piano is a musical parody.

This piece is best played by not playing it at all. The melody is a powerfully subtle mix of dynamic yet monotone, intricate yet legato techno-clutter derived in whole rather from the notes "not played".

"Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:14a year ago3,245 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harp
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Harp, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).