Sheet music for Contrabass

"Fossils" from the "Carnival of the Animals" for Winds & Strings

13 parts7 pages01:212 years ago3,461 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"The Carnival of the Animals" is a musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

It was composed in February 1886 while Saint-Saëns was vacationing in a small Austrian village. It was originally scored for a chamber group of flute/piccolo, clarinet (B flat and C), two pianos, glass harmonica, xylophone, two violins, viola, cello and double bass, but is usually performed today with a full orchestra of strings, and with a glockenspiel substituting for the rare glass harmonica. The term for this rare 11-piece musical ensemble is a "hendectet" or an "undectet."

Saint-Saëns, apparently concerned that the piece was too frivolous and likely to harm his reputation as a serious composer, suppressed performances of it and only allowed one movement, Le cygne, to be published in his lifetime. Only small private performances were given for close friends like Franz Liszt.

Saint-Saëns did, however, include a provision which allowed the suite to be published after his death. It was first performed on 26 February 1922, and it has since become one of his most popular works. It is a favorite of music teachers and young children, along with Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. In fact, it is very common to see any combination of these three works together on modern CD recordings.

Movement 12. Fossiles (Fossils)

Strings, two pianos, clarinet, and xylophone: Here, Saint-Saëns mimics his own composition, the Danse macabre, which makes heavy use of the xylophone to evoke the image of skeletons playing card games, the bones clacking together to the beat. The musical themes from Danse macabre are also quoted; the xylophone and the violin play much of the melody, alternating with the piano and clarinet. The piano part is especially difficult here - octaves that jump in quick thirds. Allusions to "Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman" (better known in the English-speaking world as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star), the French nursery rhymes "Au clair de la lune", and "J'ai du bon tabac" (the piano plays the same melody upside down), the popular anthem Partant pour la Syrie, as well as the aria Una voce poco fa from Rossini's The Barber of Seville can also be heard.


Although originally written for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Winds (Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Je te Veux" for String Quintet

5 parts7 pages04:513 years ago6,038 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"Je te veux" (French for I want you) is a song composed by Erik Satie to a text by Henry Pacory. A sentimental, slow waltz, it was originally written for the singer Paulette Darty, whose accompanist Satie had been for a period of time.

During the 1900's, Erik Satie produced several first rate cafe songs and music hall pieces, which include "Je te veux" - a graceful French waltz and "Le Piccadilly" - with a strong Scott Joplin ragtime flavour.

This song was registered on November 1902, but some argue it had actually been composed in 1897. Satie composed various versions of the Je te veux waltz, including one for piano. I created this arrangement from the Piano version for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra

11 parts10 pages02:05a year ago4,015 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is a dance for a ballerina. It is the third movement in The Nutcracker pas de deux. This pas de deux is from Act 2 of the 1892 ballet The Nutcracker. It is danced by the principal female dancer. The number was choreographed by Lev Ivanov to music written by Tchaikovsky.

Choreographer Marius Petipa wanted the Sugar Plum Fairy's music to sound like "drops of water shooting from a fountain". Tchaikovsky found the ideal instrument to do this job in Paris in 1891. It was then that he came across the recently invented celesta. This instrument looked like a piano. It sounded like bells. Tchaikovsky wrote, "[The celesta is] midway between a tiny piano and a Glockenspiel, with a divinely wonderful sound." He wanted to use the celesta in The Nutcracker. He asked his publisher to buy one. He wanted to keep the purchase a secret. He did not want other Russian composers to "get wind of it and ... use it for unusual effects before me."

Tchaikovsky introduced the celesta to Russian music lovers on 19 March 1892 when the Nutcracker Suite was performed for the Russian Musical Society in St. Petersburg. The instrument is forever identified with the Sugar Plum Fairy. It is heard in other parts of Act 2 of The Nutcracker besides the Sugar Plum Fairy's dance. The "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" is one of the ballet's best known musical numbers. It is often "jazzed up" for television commercials at Christmas time.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 3) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Celesta, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Danse Macabre" (Opus 40) for Harp & Strings

7 parts30 pages07:303 years ago3,872 views
Violin(3), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harp
The "Danse Macabre" (Opus 40) was written as a tone poem for orchestra in 1874 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. It started out in 1872 as an art song for voice and piano with a French text by the poet Henri Cazalis, which is based in an old French superstition. In 1874, the composer expanded and reworked the piece into a tone poem, replacing the vocal line with a solo violin. Normally heard as a symphonic performance, this piece is unusual as an arrangement for Harp and Strings however, I created this arrangement to emphasize macabre elements and uniquely dynamic range of the Concert (Pedal) Harp. I took liberal license in my interpretation of the original score, and as such, this arrangement is uniquely my "vision" of how this piece sounds to me.

According to the ancient superstition, "Death" appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by strings on the Swell with its "E-string" tuned to an "E-flat" in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The intrepretation in Measure 25+ is of a solo violin playing the tritone (or "Devil's interval") consisting of an A and an E-flat—in an example of scordatura tuning, the violinist's E string has actually been tuned down to an E-flat to create the dissonant tritone. Starting at Measure 173, is a melodic quote of the "Dies irae", a Gregorian chant from the Requiem Mass that is melodically related to the work's second theme. The Dies irae is presented in a major key, which is unusual. The abrupt break in the texture at measure 456 represents the dawn breaking (a cockerel's crow, played on the melody) and the skeletons returning to their graves.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danse_Macabre) and other sources.

I created this arrangement from the orchestral work for Concert (Pedal) Harp & Strings (Violins, Violas, Cellos & Basses).

"Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:14a year ago3,551 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harp
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Waltz of the Flowers" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 8) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Harp, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra
Video

Chorus: "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" (BWV 191 No 1) for Small Orchestra

16 parts29 pages06:224 years ago3,361 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory to God in the Highest), BWV 191, is a church cantata written by the German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, and the only one of his church cantatas set to a Latin text. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig probably in 1745 to celebrate the end of the Second Silesian War on Christmas Day. The composition's three movements all derive from the Gloria of an earlier Missa written by Bach in 1733, which the composer would later use as the Gloria of his Mass in B minor.

Gloria in excelsis Deo was written in Leipzig for Christmas Day, as indicated by the heading on the manuscript in Bach's own handwriting, "J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti." (Jesu Juva Festo Nativitatis Christi -- Celebration for the birth of Christ), to be sung around the sermon. Recent archival and manuscript evidence suggest the cantata was first performed not in 1743, but in 1745 at a special Christmas Day service to celebrate the Peace of Dresden, which brought to an end the hardships imposed on the region by the Second Silesian War.

Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Unlike Bach's other church cantatas, the words are not in German, taken from the bible, a chorale or contemporary poetry, but in Latin, taken from the Gloria and the Doxology. This late work is the only Latin cantata among around 200 surviving sacred cantatas in German. It is based on an earlier composition, the Missa in B minor (Kyrie and Gloria) which Bach had composed in 1733 and that would, in 1748, become part of his monumental Mass in B minor. The first movement (Gloria) is an almost identical copy of the earlier work, while the second and third movements are close parodies. Parts, for instance, of the fugal section of Sicut erat in principio, taken from the Cum sancto spiritu of the 1733 setting, are moved from a purely vocal to an instrumentally accompanied setting. The modifications Bach made to the last two movements of BWV 191, however, were not carried over into the final manuscript compilation of the Mass in B minor, leaving it a matter of speculation whether or not these constitute "improvements" to Bach's original score.

The cantata bears the heading ::J.J. Festo Nativit: Xsti. Gloria in excelsis Deo. à 5 Voci. 3 Trombe Tymp. 2 Trav 2 Hautb. 2 Violini Viola e Cont. Di J.S.B. in Bach's own handwriting. The cantata is festively scored for soprano and tenor soloists and an unusual five-part choir (with a dual soprano part), three trumpets, timpani, two flauto traverso, two oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo. Its only link to Christmas is the opening chorus on Luke (Luke 2:14), to be performed before the sermon. The other two movements after the sermon (marked "post orationem") divide the general words of the Doxology in a duet Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui sancto (corresponding to the Domine Deus, the central piece of the Gloria of the Mass in B minor) and a final chorus Sicut erat in principio (corresponding to Mass in B minor structure#Cum sancto spiritu of the Gloria). The final movement may contain ripieno markings (to accompany the chorus) similar to the ripieni found in Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110, which was also a nativity cantata.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_in_excelsis_Deo,_BWV_191).

I created this arrangement of the opening Coro: "Gloria in excelsis Deo. Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis" (Glory to God in the highest, and peace on earth to men of good will) for Small orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Double Basses).

"Morning Mood" from Peer Gynt (Suite No. 1 Opus 46) for Small Orchestra

14 parts13 pages04:27a year ago3,149 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
To most of the concert-going public, Edvard Grieg is only familiar as the composer of two fabulously popular concert works: the Concerto for piano and orchestra, and the first Orchestral Suite extracted from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, Peer Gynt. Ever since the Peer Gynt Suite No.1, Op.46 appeared in the late 1880s it has been a staple of the orchestral repertory. Indeed, it is safe to say that its four constituent pieces are among the most frequently played and immediately recognizable ever written; yet, in a good performance, they still retain a great deal of their original vitality and freshness.

Ibsen's five-act drama concerns a young Norwegian ruffian named Peer Gynt, who dreams of becoming emperor of the world. His sundry adventures--abducting a bride-to-be during her wedding, abandoning her for another woman, being tormented by gnomes, posturing as a prophet among the Arabs, eloping with and being subsequently double-crossed by an Arab princess, and finally returning to Norway--are the stuff of high drama and adventure, and are rough and isolated in a way that is peculiarly Nordic. Grieg captures this tone perfectly.

Grieg opens the first Peer Gynt suite with a piece called "Morning Mood", originally played at the beginning of the fourth act. A gentle E major theme is announced by the flutes, and then the oboes, against a static harmonic background that effectively emulates the stillness of the first moments of dawn. This lovely melody--an inverted arch shape--is taken through a sparkling palette of subtle harmonic inflections; bright flute trills join the musical mixture as "Morning Mood" comes to a gentle close. Although "Morning Mood" is only four minutes long, Grieg manages to capture in music something both timeless and universal.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/peer-gynt-suite-for-orchestra-or-piano-or-piano-4-hands-no-1-op-46-mc0002395500).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of the "Morning Mood" for Small Orchestra (Piccolo, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, F Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra
Video

"In the Hall of the Mountain King" from "Peer Gynt" (Suite No 1 Opus 46) For Piano & Small Orchestra

11 parts15 pages02:27a year ago2,737 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Piano
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" (Norwegian: I Dovregubbens hall) is a piece of orchestral music composed by Edvard Grieg in 1875 as incidental music for the sixth scene of act 2 in Henrik Ibsen's 1867 play Peer Gynt. It was originally part of Opus 23 but was later extracted as the final piece of Peer Gynt, Suite No. 1, Op. 46. Its easily recognizable theme has helped it attain iconic status in popular culture, where it has been arranged by many artists (See Grieg's music in popular culture).

The English translation of the name is not literal. Dovre is a mountainous region in Norway, and "gubbe" translates into (old) man or husband. "Gubbe" is used along with its female counterpart "kjerring" to differentiate male and female trolls, "trollgubbe" and "trollkjerring". In the play, Dovregubben is a troll king that Peer Gynt invents in a fantasy.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Hall_of_the_Mountain_King).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Piano, Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

Toccata & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 565) for String Quintet

5 parts16 pages08:392 years ago2,626 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
The Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, is a piece of organ music written, according to its oldest extant sources, by Johann Sebastian Bach. Its time of origin, narrowed down depending on author, lies between c.1704 and the 1750s. The piece opens with a toccata section, followed by a fugue that ends in a coda. To a large extent the piece complies to the characteristics deemed typical for the north German organ school of the baroque era, but divergent stylistic influences, such as south German characteristics, have been described in scholarly literature on the piece.

For a century after its creation the only certainty about this Toccata and Fugue is that it survived in a manuscript written by Johannes Ringk. The first publication of the piece, in the Bach Revival era, was in 1833, through the efforts of Felix Mendelssohn, who also performed the piece in an acclaimed concert in 1840. The piece knew a fairly successful piano version by Carl Tausig in the second half of the 19th century, but it was not until the 20th century that its popularity rose above that of other organ compositions by Bach. That popularity further expanded until the Toccata and Fugue in D minor came to be considered as the most famous work in the organ repertoire.

A wide, and often conflicting, variety of analyses has been published about the piece: for instance in literature on organ music it is often described as some sort of program music depicting a storm, while in the context of Disney's Fantasia it was promoted as absolute music, nothing like program music depicting a storm. In the last quarter of the 20th century scholars like Peter Williams and Rolf-Dietrich Claus published their studies on the piece, and argued against its authenticity. Bach scholars like Christoph Wolff defended the attribution to Bach. Other commentators ignored the authenticity doubts or considered the attribution issue undecided. No edition of the Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis listed the Toccata and Fugue among the doubtful works, nor does its entry on the website of the Bach Archive in Leipzig even mention alternative views on the attribution issue. Johann Sebastian Bach's most famous organ piece is notable for its rhythmic drive as well for as its arresting opening motif.

Considered the epitome of scary organ music by the many who associate it with melodramatic silent-film scenes, it has been transcribed in various ways. Through much of the twentieth century it was often heard in an orchestral arrangement by Leopold Stokowski. The romanticized, roaring registration often used in organ performances is still effective, although interpretations aiming for historical accuracy tend to give the work a lighter touch. It is difficult to establish a chronology of Bach's organ works, for most of their autograph manuscripts (except for those from the end of his career) have been lost. Works such as this one have come down to us only in copies made by his students. In the absence of clues provided by the composer's handwriting, the paper he wrote on, inscriptions that appear on the manuscript, and so forth, scholars have tried to guess the date of this work based on stylistic considerations. Because of its most salient structural aspect -- the interpenetration of the toccata material and the contrapuntal fugue -- the work has been assigned to the beginning of Bach's career, before his 1708 move to Weimar. It is perhaps the very earliest among Bach's well-known masterpieces. The alternation of quasi-improvisatory and contrapuntal sections was characteristic of the works of the north German organist Dietrich Buxtehude, whom Bach walked some two hundred miles to hear in 1704, taking a leave of absence from his post as organist at the Neukirche in Arnstadt. By fully realizing the dramatic potential inherent in this technique, Bach created a timeless work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toccata_and_Fugue_in_D_minor,_BWV_565).

Although originally composed for Organ, I created this modern interpretation of the Toccata & Fugue in D Minor (BWV 565) for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra

13 parts17 pages02:33a year ago2,566 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work..

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "March" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 2) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Tubas, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Cataluña" from "Suite Española" (Opus 47 No. 1 Mvt. 2) for String Quintet

5 parts5 pages03:372 years ago2,279 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz y Pascual (1860 – 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on folk music idioms. Transcriptions of many of his pieces, such as Asturias (Leyenda), Granada, Sevilla, Cadiz, Córdoba, Cataluña, and the Tango in D, are important pieces for classical guitar, though he never composed for the guitar. The personal papers of Albéniz are preserved, among other institutions, in the Biblioteca de Catalunya.

Isaac Albéniz’s Suite española, Op. 47, is a suite for solo piano. It is mainly composed of works written in 1886 which were grouped together in 1887, in honour of the Queen of Spain. Like many of Albeniz’s works for the piano, these pieces depict different regions and musical styles in Spain.

The work originally consisted of four pieces: Granada, Cataluña, Sevilla and Cuba. The editor Hofmeister republished the Suite española in 1912, after Albéniz's death, but added Cádiz, Asturias, Aragón and Castilla. The other pieces had been published in other editions and sometimes with different titles (Asturias was originally the prelude from the suite Chants d'Espagne).

Each of these works refers to the geographical region portrayed. From Granada in Andalusia there is a Serenata, from Catalonia a Curranda or Courante, from Sevilla a Sevillanas and from Cuba (which was still part of Spain in the 1880s) a Notturno in the style of a habanera, from Castile a seguidillas, from Aragon a Fantasia in the style of a jota, and from Cadiz a saeta. This last example, like Asturias (Leyenda), is geographically inaccurate.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_espa%C3%B1ola):

Although originally created for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Cataluña (Courante) for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).

"Scotland the Brave" (Alba an àigh) for String Ensemble

6 parts5 pages03:152 years ago1,818 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass
"Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: "Alba an àigh" with àigh meaning joy, happiness, prosperity, luck, success - lots of good things, but not brave or bravery) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Surprisingly, Scotland has no national anthem, although along with "Flower Of Scotland", the Gaelic Air "Alba An Aigh" rendered in English as "Scotland The Brave" is as good as. Written in 2/4 time, it is of surprisingly recent origin, and was published first around 1911 as "Scotland, The Brave!!!", and has been dated from around 1891-95, although the sentiment dates back to at least the 1820s. It was probably originally a flute solo, though the instrumental version is more usually played on the bagpipes.

The definitive lyrics were penned as recently as 1951. Glasgow man Cliff Hanley (1923-99) was an author, historian and broadcaster among his other talents; he wrote the new words for Robert Wilson, a performer who needed a song for the finale of his show at a Christmas Scottish review that was being performed at the Glasgow Empire Theatre.

"Scotland The Brave" is also known as "Brave Scotland", "My Bonnie Lass", My Bonnie Lassie" (with alternative lyrics) and as "Scotland Forever". "My Bonnie Lassie" was actually penned by two American songwriters Roy C. Bennett and Sid Tepper (who wrote songs for Elvis).

The instrumental version is also the authorised pipe band march of the British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

In content, lyrically, it is similar to "Land Of My Fathers" and similar national anthems and patriotic songs, extolling the natural beauty of the country as well as the bravery of its warriors. This piece is hands-down, the most popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades.

Although this piece was originally written for Scottish Pipe bands, I arranged it for String Ensemble (2 Violins, 2 Violas, Cello & Bass) at the request of a follower.
"Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra
Video

"Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra

12 parts11 pages03a year ago1,571 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Arabian Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 5) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horns, French Horns, Bassoons, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).
"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

"Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra

12 parts8 pages01:05a year ago1,393 views
Piccolo, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Percussion, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work.

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Chinese Dance" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 6) for Small Orchestra (Piccolos, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horns, Bassoons, Glockenspiel, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

Water Music Suite No. 1 in F Major (HWV 348) for Small Orchestra

15 parts66 pages15:24a year ago1,380 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon(2), Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
There is a story that George Frideric Handel's magnificent Water Music was originally intended as a peace offering to King George I. In 1710, prior to his ascension to the British throne, the then Elector of Hanover had given the rather vagabond composer a generous position at his court; but Handel never actually fulfilled his duties. After the Elector relocated to London, the composer was more than a little reluctant to face his old master. As the story goes, it was not until 1717, when Handel seized the opportunity to provide some musical entertainment for the King's now-famous barge party on the River Thames, that the composer was restored in the royal eye; George I was completely enamored with the Water Music (asking for the hour-long work to be repeated three times and not returning to the palace until the wee hours) and all past transgressions were immediately forgotten. There was indeed a grand party on the Thames on July 17, 1717, during which some of Handel's music (possibly but not definitely the Water Music) was played, but the rest of the story is likely highly fictionalized.

It appears that Handel drew upon three already-composed suites of instrumental music, each scored for slightly different instrumental forces, when putting together the Water Music; the Water Music Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348, scored for a pair of oboes, bassoon, two horns, two violins, and basso continuo, is the largest of the three, comprising ten more-or-less separate pieces.

The Overture that begins the first Water Music Suite is in two large sections. The stately and eminently restrained exuberance of the first and slower section, built entirely out of a single ornamented pick-up gesture, finally boils over into the vivacious, partially fugato, allegro portion of the piece. There are two printed endings for the Overture: one ending in a full and rich cadence to tonic, the other climaxing on a dramatic half cadence.

Next up is an Adagio e staccato (the heading is apparently Handel's), and then a large three-part movement that moves from an "allegro" (not Handel's heading) built on a regal, fanfare-like, repeated-note motive in triple meter, to a Corelli-derived Andate in D minor and then back to the allegro "da capo." If we count this Allegro-Andante-Allegro as a single movement, there are really only nine pieces in the Suite.

A delightful minuet (sometimes called simply Andante or Moderato) precedes the famous Air, which is marked by Handel to be played three times. Another minuet and trio, this time starting off with a robust horn duet, follows.

The Bourrée, like the Air, is to be played three times; on the second time around the two oboes take the place of the two violin sections, and on the third the two contingents join forces.

After a Hornpipe, Handel finishes the Suite with a substantial fast movement (not titled, but written in ordinary Baroque allegro style) not in F major, but rather in its relative minor, perhaps in an effort to make more seamless the transition between this Suite and the following one in D major (HWV 349).

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/water-music-suite-no-1-for-orchestra-in-f-major-hwv-348-mc0002368487).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of Water Music Suite in F Major (HWV 348 No. 1) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoon, Contrabassoon, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, F Tubas, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Funeral March" from Piano Sonata No.2 (Op. 35 Mvt. 3) for String Ensemble

7 parts9 pages07:172 years ago1,351 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello(2), Contrabass
Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B♭ minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata's common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837.

The sonata comprises four movements: (1) Grave – Doppio movimento (in B♭ minor and in modified sonata form with the first subject absent in the recapitulation, ending in B♭ major), (2) Scherzo (in E♭ minor and in ternary form, middle section and ending in G♭ major), (3) Marche funèbre: Lento (in B♭ minor and in ternary form) & (4) Finale: Presto (in B♭ minor)

This, the third movement, begins and ends with the celebrated funeral march in B♭ minor which gives the sonata its nickname, but has a calm interlude in D♭ major.

No one knows for sure exactly what inspired Chopin to write the march. But Kallberg says there's evidence that he associated it with the Polish uprising of the 1830s. Chopin, who was born in Poland, sympathized with his countrymen in their revolt against the Russians. Though Chopin was living in exile elsewhere in Europe, he feared for his family and friends in the face of the Russians' violent response. "His colleagues said that he often played in salons, and the only way to get him to stop playing was to get him to play the March," Kallberg says. "He was so caught up in the emotions of it." Chopin's march has been played at the funerals of heads of state, including those of John F. Kennedy and, ironically, Russian leaders Brezhnev and Stalin. But the very first time it was performed at a funeral may have been the most important: Chopin's own.

Source NPR (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124039949).

Although composed for Solo Piano, I created this Interpretation for String Ensemble featuring a solo Viola (2 Violins, 2 Violas, 2 Cellos & Bass).

"It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year" for Clarinet & Strings

6 parts4 pages01:29a year ago1,320 views
Clarinet, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
"It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year" is a popular Christmas song written in triple time in 1963 by Edward Pola and George Wyle. It was recorded and released that year by pop singer Andy Williams for his first Christmas album, The Andy Williams Christmas Album. However, the song was not released as a promotional single by Williams' record label (Columbia Records) that year, as they instead opted to promote his cover of "White Christmas" as the official promo single from the album.

The song is a celebration and description of activities associated with the Christmas season, focusing primarily on get-togethers between friends and families. Among the activities included in the song is the telling of "scary ghost stories," a Victorian Christmas tradition that has mostly fallen into disuse,[2][3] but survives in the seasonal popularity of numerous adaptations of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Other activities mentioned include hosting parties, spontaneous visits from friends, universal social gaiety, spending time with loved ones, sledding for children, roasting marshmallows, sharing stories about previous Christmases, and singing Christmas carols in winter weather.

In a 2005 interview, Williams discusses how The Andy Williams Show figured into his recording of "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year": "George Wyle, who is a vocal director, who wrote all of the choir stuff and all of the duets and trios and things that I did with all the guests, he wrote a song just for the show – I think the second Christmas show we did – called "Most Wonderful Time of the Year". So I did that, you know, every Christmas, and then other people started doing it. And then suddenly it's become – not suddenly but over 30 years – it's become a big standard. I think it's one of the top 10 Christmas songs of all time now."

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_the_Most_Wonderful_Time_of_the_Year).

Although originally recorded for Voice and Orchestra, I created this arrangement for Bb Clarinet & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
"Trepak" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 4) for Small Orchestra
Custom audio

"Trepak" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 4) for Small Orchestra

16 parts11 pages01:06a year ago1,334 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba(2), Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893) was a Russian composer who lived in the Romantic period. He is one of the most popular of all Russian composers. He wrote melodies which were usually dramatic and emotional. He learned a lot from studying the music of Western Europe, but his music also sounds very Russian. His compositions include 11 operas, 3 ballets, orchestral music, chamber music and over 100 songs. His famous ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty) have some of the best known tunes in all of romantic music.

Tchaikovsky's ballet of the Nutcracker is based on Alexandre Dumas' translation of the original tale by E.T.A. Hoffman. Act One tells a story of how little Clara aids her magical Christmas gift (a nutcracker in the form of a soldier) defeat an army of mice. As a reward, in Act Two, he takes her to his magic kingdom and introduces her to a variety of subjects in a colorful stream of character dances. Tchaikovsky was initially displeased with the scenario for the ballet, which would be his last, because it lacked real drama. However, he reconciled himself to it and completed the Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a, which was popular from its first performance, before going on to complete the entire ballet. Those seven dances -- including the familiar Spanish (Chocolate), Arab (Coffee), Chinese (Tea), and Russian dances -- and the overture are essentially the same as they appeared in the final, full ballet. To these he added interludes and scenes, with music and orchestrations that are just as delightful. His supply of lovely themes is endless, and he constantly provides brilliant orchestration. Unique features of his instrumentation include the Overture, which is entirely without cellos and double basses; the "Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy," which was inspired by the new celesta, an instrument Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris while working on the score; and the "Waltz of the Snowflakes," which uses a children's chorus. He also used toy instruments, perfectly in keeping with a story for children. The ballet was not as successful as his other stage works when it first appeared, however, now the traditional Christmas ballet is so popular that its annual performance keeps many a ballet company afloat. If all you know of this ballet is the famous suite, by all means hear the entire work..

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ilyich_Tchaikovsky).

Although originally created for Orchestra, I created this Transcription of the "Trepak" from the Nutcracker Suite (Opus 71a Mvt. 4) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horns, Bassoons, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, Euphoniums, Tubas, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Ständchen" (D.957) for String Quintet

5 parts4 pages03:36a year ago1,280 views
Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
There was a time when this Ständchen (Serenade) was the most famous serenade in the world. Of course, that time was after Schubert had been popularized (and sanitized) by the film Lilac Time, a film in which Richard Tauber played the composer as a jovial fat man whose most salient characteristic was his infinite sentimentality and in which Ständchen became the theme song and leitmotif of the film. After Lilac Time, Ständchen showed up everywhere in all sorts of arrangements: as background music, as a popular song and, perhaps most memorably, in a klezmer version.

Nevertheless Ständchen is still the most famous serenade in the world. However, its fame has all but cost the song its identity. In far too many contemporary interpretations of the song, Ständchen becomes a tear-jerking piece of sentimental puffery, a lonely swain singing of his love into the night breezes, rather than the altogether more sublte piece of sweet melancholy it is. Rescuing the song from its interpreters requires seeing the song for what it really is and not what decades of sentimentality have turned it into.

To start with, of course, there is the melody. Like most of Schubert's greatest melodies, it only seems sublime in its apparent simplicity. But there are so many subtleties to it: the opening line's arching rise and aching fall through the tonic minor chord, the central phrase's yearning leaps to the minor sixth of the dominant, the closing line's supple turns around the tonic. And then there is the heartbreaking harmonies' movements to the relative major and then the tonic major which relapse into the tonic minor which mirror the melody's sweet melancholy. And then there is the song's structure of two strophically set verses followed by a climactic third verse in which the singer entreats his sweetheart to join him and "make me happy" set to music which rises to the heights of submediant minor passion only to sink back to tonic minor melancholy. But, still, the singer has his hopes and, in a final stroke of genius, Schubert ends the song in the tonic major.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/st%C3%A4ndchen-leise-flehen-meine-lieder-song-for-voice-piano-schwanengesang-d-957-4-mc0002448706)

Although originally created for Solo Piano, I created this arrangement of "Ständchen" (Serenade D.891) for String Quintet (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).