Sheet music for Recorder

Prelude: "Ich ruf ’ zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ" (BWV 639) for Pipe Organ

5 parts2 pages02:072 years ago1,383 views
Organ, Oboe, Recorder, Other Woodwinds(2)
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.

In these chorale preludes, the traditional Lutheran hymns are subjected to various types of polyphonic treatment, with different types of countersubjects and imitative devices.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 639) "Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ" (I call to you, Lord Jesus Christ) for Pipe Organ with the Organ Registration assistance of Bernard Greenberg (user: https://musescore.com/user/1831606)

Fantasia & Fugue in G Minor (BWV 542 "The Great") for Pipe Organ

3 parts16 pages11:432 years ago1,327 views
Recorder(2), English Horn
The Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, is an organ prelude and fugue by Johann Sebastian Bach. It acquired that name to distinguish it from the earlier Little Fugue in G minor, which is shorter. This piece is not to be confused with the Prelude and Fugue in A minor, which is also for organ and also sometimes called "the Great".

It was transcribed for piano by Franz Liszt as S.463. Modern arrangers have orchestrated the work.

Evidence suggests that J.S. Bach completed and revised the Fantasia and Fugue in G minor for organ, BWV 542, as an audition for an organist position in Hamburg in 1720. Bach didn't get the job, but, happily enough, posterity did get the piece; generations of organists since then have considered it one of their repertoire's crown jewels. The two parts of BWV 542 (the fantasia -- sometimes titled Prelude instead -- and the fugue) are thought to have been composed separately: the fugue is assigned Bach's Weimar years (1708-1717) and the fantasia to his time in Cöthen (1717-1723, but, if the audition theory is correct, not later than 1720).

The fantasia opens spaciously and in recitative-like style, but as it unfolds Bach finds room for dense passages in upper-voice imitation. There are five more or less balanced sections to this fantasy; intensely dramatic sections are interwoven with quieter, more even passages. The wide tonal scope of the fantasia has been a subject of fascination for two centuries of musicians: just when some kind of harmonic stability seems to arrive, Bach shoots off on a mock-improvised cadenza that jolts the music into a whole new pitch realm. Thus the fantasia both lives up to its name and contains quite a bit of contrapuntal rigor, and then, on top of that, more than one worthy mind has deemed the fugue to be Bach's ultimate accomplishment in the field of organ counterpoint. The task of selecting a king from that noble crowd, however, is not an enviable one. Though it provides the sense of a stable answer to the fantasia in its predominantly even sixteenth note rhythms, it is similarly ambitious harmonically: Bach makes two revolutions through the entire circle of fifths. The fugue makes a fine contrast with the later music of the fantasia while nevertheless seeming of a piece with it.

Source: AllMusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/fantasia-and-fugue-for-organ-in-g-minor-great-bwv-542-bc-j42-57-67-mc0002358946).

I created this transcription of the Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor (BWV 542) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele" (BWV 654) for Pipe Organ

6 parts5 pages06:572 years ago535 views
Organ(2), Other Woodwinds, Recorder, Flute, English Horn
The Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes, BWV 651–668, are a set of chorale preludes for organ prepared by Johann Sebastian Bach in Leipzig in his final decade (1740–1750), from earlier works composed in Weimar, where he was court organist. The works form an encyclopedic collection of large-scale chorale preludes, in a variety of styles harking back to the previous century, that Bach gradually perfected during his career. Together with the Orgelbüchlein, the Schübler Chorales and the third book of the Clavier-Übung, they represent the summit of Bach's sacred music for solo organ.

Early versions of almost all the chorale preludes are thought to date back to 1710–1714, during the period 1708–1717 when Bach served as court organist and Konzertmeister (director of music) in Weimar, at the court of Wilhelm Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Weimar. As a result of encouragement from the Duke, a devout Lutheran and music lover, Bach developed secular and liturgical organ works of all forms, in what was to be his most productive period for organ composition. As his son Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach mentions in his obituary or nekrolog: "His grace's delight in his playing fired him to attempt everything possible in the art of how to treat the organ. Here he also wrote most of his organ works." During Bach's time at Weimar, the chapel organ there was extensively improved and enlarged; occupying a loft at the east end of the chapel just below the roof, it had two manual keyboards, a pedalboard and about a dozen stops, including at Bach's request a row of tuned bells. It is probable that the longer chorale preludes composed then served some ceremonial function during the services in the court chapel, such as accompanying communion.

When Bach moved to his later positions as Kapellmeister in Köthen in 1717 and cantor at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig in 1723, his obligations did not specifically include compositions for the organ. The autograph manuscript of the Great Eighteen, currently preserved as P 271 in the Berlin State Library, documents that Bach began to prepare the collection around 1740, after having completed Part III of the Clavier-Übung in 1739. The manuscript is made up of three parts: the six trio sonatas for organ BWV 525–530 (1727–1732); the Canonic Variations on "Vom Himmel hoch da komm' ich her" BWV 769 added at the same time as the chorale preludes (1739–1750); and an early version of Nun komm' der heiden Heiland (1714–1717), appended after Bach's death.

The first thirteen chorale preludes BWV 651–663 were added by Bach himself between 1739 and 1742, supplemented by BWV 664 and 665 in 1746–7. In 1750 when Bach began to suffer from blindness before his death in July, BWV 666 and 667 were dictated to his student and son-in-law Johann Christoph Altnikol and copied posthumously into the manuscript. Only the first page of the last choral prelude BWV 668, the so-called "deathbed chorale", has survived, recorded by an unknown copyist. The piece was posthumously published in 1751 as an appendix to the Art of the Fugue, with the title "Wenn wir in höchsten Nöthen sein" (BWV 668a), instead of the original title "Vor deinen Thron tret ich hiermit" ("Before your throne I now appear").

The soberly ornamented, but melismatic, chorale in the soprano alternates with the dance-like ritornellos of the two intertwining lower parts above a pedal bass; the unearthly counterpoint between the four different parts creates an air of great serenity, a "rapturous meditation" on the rite of communion. The adornment in the title is illustrated by the French-style ornamentation of the upper parts.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Eighteen_Chorale_Preludes#Chorale_Preludes_BWV_651.E2.80.93668).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 654) "Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele" (Adorn yourself, dear soul) for Pipe Organ. The MuseScore registration used is as follows:

Swell: Church Organ (at octave and 8vb)
Great: Pan Flute (at octave & 8va) & Recorder (at octave & 8vb)
Pedals: Church Organ (8vb), flute (8vb) & English Horn (at octave).

Prelude: "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (BWV 727) for Pipe Organ

4 parts2 pages02:042 years ago500 views
Recorder, Other Woodwinds, Organ, English Horn
As organist at Weimar, Johann Sebastian Bach was charged with providing a harmonic underpinning for the singing of Lutheran chorale tunes chosen for each day. Bach wrote out many of these harmonizations, in part as instruction for younger composers (they are still used for this purpose). A derivation of this practice, Bach's conception of the organ chorale, as manifested in the chorale preludes, dates from 1713 -1714, about the time he became familiar with Vivaldi's concertos.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) contains chorale preludes for the church year written during the composer's service at Weimar (1708 - 1717). In about 1713, Bach began assembling the Orgel-Büchlein, and his earliest entries seem to be Her Christ, der ein'ge Gottes-Sohn, BWV 601, In dulci jubilo, BWV 608, Christ ist erstanden, BWV 627, and Heut' triumphieret Gottes Sohn, BWV 630. These were very original compositions, highly expressive miniatures based on a chorale melody, supported with refined counterpoint, and featuring highly condensed motivic writing.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein was essentially complete by 1716. Only the fragment O Traurigkeit and the chorale prelude, Helft mir Gottes Güte preisen, BWV 613, were added later. "Complete" is used with some reservation here, because Bach originally projected 164 pieces but completed fewer than 50. In Bach's manuscript, pages with finished pieces alternate with blank ones intended for other chorale preludes. The later pieces differ from Bach's earlier chorale elaborations, in that they contain only one statement of the melody and are intended to demonstrate how to accompany a chorale with contrapuntally proper figurations that support the meaning of the text.

In the early 1740s Bach assembled a number of chorale preludes, possibly with the intention of publishing them as a set. These Achtzehn Choräle (Eighteen Chorales) BWV 651 - 668 were almost certainly written before 1723 and revised later. The Fantasia super Komm, heiliger Geist, BWV 651 is an especially impressive, extended elaboration of the chorale melody, which is in the pedal. The tune is treated in a less ornate fashion in the next prelude of the set (BWV 652). The highly convoluted Von Gott will ich nicht lassen, BWV 658 also contains the chorale melody in the pedal.

The six Schübler chorales (BWV 645 - 650) are derived from Bach's cantatas and contain one of his most popular chorale preludes, on the melody Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, BWV 645.

The third part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, published in Leipzig in 1739, contains 21 chorale preludes (not all appear in every publication), many of which are for manuals only. Nine of these are meant for use during the Mass, while the others are for the catechism. Among the most impressive is Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, BWV 671, which is in five voices with the chorale melody in the pedal. More complex is the first of two preludes on Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 686, which is in six parts, including two pedal parts.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/herzlich-tut-mich-verlangen-chorale-prelude-for-organ-bwv-727-bc-k109-mc0002372335).

I created this Transcription of the Chorale Prelude (BWV 727) "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" (I yearn from my heart) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland" (BWV 599) for Organ

2 parts1 page01:112 years ago490 views
Other Woodwinds, Recorder
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 599): "Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland" (Now come, Savior of the heathens) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude & Fugue in D Major (BWV 532) for Pipe Organ

3 parts17 pages09:412 years ago468 views
Organ, Recorder, Flute
Like most of Bach's organ compositions, this piece was written during his tenure in Weimar between 1709 and 1717. Many of his greatest and most well known organ works were written during this period, including, for example, the Prelude and Fugue in E major, BWV 566. The composer was residing in Weimar after being hired by the ruling duke of Weimar, Wilhelm Ernst, in 1709 as an organist and member of the court orchestra; he was particularly encouraged to make use of his unique talents with the organ by the duke. Indeed, his fame on the instrument grew and he was visited by many students of the organ to hear him play and to try to learn from his technique. The Prelude and Fugue in D major was probably composed in 1710, although this is not certain. However, it was definitely written before Bach codified the clear two-section prelude and fugue in the form of what is used in the The Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 846–893, which was composed in 1722. This is because BWV 532 features a lengthy, complex, self-contained fugue preceded by a multisectional prelude.

The piece is in two sections: a prelude and a fugue. Both the sections are in D major but, to begin with, there is no tempo marking given on either section. Both pieces are in 4/4.

The prelude commences with a semi-quaver scale from the pedals, and then the manuals begin with an intricate quaver pattern between the hands. Another run from the pedals is then followed by a continuation of the quaver pattern from the right-hand. The quaver pattern then repeats one octave lower. The pedals then play arpeggiated patterns which begin a repeated theme and slow down throughout. This lasts for four bars. A sustained pedal then accompanies the manuals, which have a dotted quaver, semi-quaver rhythm. This then turns into a repeated G♯, B demi-semi-quaver rhythm. This then slows to a series of repeated cadences.

A new phrase then begins with an ascending scale in the manuals leading up to a large D major chord. A new tempo is then introduced: Alla breve, and then a large phrase is introduced with a very polyphonic texture and a prominent tune. A section then starts with chords played in the manuals and the quavers played in the pedals. This continues for another long period of time until the left hand takes the tune and the right hand plays the quavers.

When this section finishes, a new tempo of Adagio begins. A new theme then arrives with slow quavers on the lower manual and pedal and ascending scales in the upper manual. The prelude then concludes with a slow theme, on broken arpeggios and some slow, elongated final chords.

The subject of the fugue is eight measures long and consist of tight figurations encompassing an entire octave. Bach takes this subject firstly through the relative minor and then the mediant minor, and then to the minor harmony of the leading tone and the major harmony on the supertonic. After this progression we enter an episode with a flurry of figures on the dominant and then a full entry of the subject on the tonic that works to resolve the preceding tension so well that the eventual coda almost has the nature of an afterthought.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prelude_and_Fugue_in_D_major,_BWV_532).

I created this transcription of the Prelude and Fugue in D Major (BWV 532) for Pipe Organ

Prelude: "Ach Gott und Herr" [per canonem] (BWV 714) for Pipe Organ

3 parts1 page022 years ago417 views
Recorder, Flute, English Horn
As organist at Weimar, Johann Sebastian Bach was charged with providing a harmonic underpinning for the singing of Lutheran chorale tunes chosen for each day. Bach wrote out many of these harmonizations, in part as instruction for younger composers (they are still used for this purpose). A derivation of this practice, Bach's conception of the organ chorale, as manifested in the chorale preludes, dates from 1713 -1714, about the time he became familiar with Vivaldi's concertos.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein (Little Organ Book) contains chorale preludes for the church year written during the composer's service at Weimar (1708 - 1717). In about 1713, Bach began assembling the Orgel-Büchlein, and his earliest entries seem to be Her Christ, der ein'ge Gottes-Sohn, BWV 601, In dulci jubilo, BWV 608, Christ ist erstanden, BWV 627, and Heut' triumphieret Gottes Sohn, BWV 630. These were very original compositions, highly expressive miniatures based on a chorale melody, supported with refined counterpoint, and featuring highly condensed motivic writing.

Bach's Orgelbüchlein was essentially complete by 1716. Only the fragment O Traurigkeit and the chorale prelude, Helft mir Gottes Güte preisen, BWV 613, were added later. "Complete" is used with some reservation here, because Bach originally projected 164 pieces but completed fewer than 50. In Bach's manuscript, pages with finished pieces alternate with blank ones intended for other chorale preludes. The later pieces differ from Bach's earlier chorale elaborations, in that they contain only one statement of the melody and are intended to demonstrate how to accompany a chorale with contrapuntally proper figurations that support the meaning of the text.

In the early 1740s Bach assembled a number of chorale preludes, possibly with the intention of publishing them as a set. These Achtzehn Choräle (Eighteen Chorales) BWV 651 - 668 were almost certainly written before 1723 and revised later. The Fantasia super Komm, heiliger Geist, BWV 651 is an especially impressive, extended elaboration of the chorale melody, which is in the pedal. The tune is treated in a less ornate fashion in the next prelude of the set (BWV 652). The highly convoluted Von Gott will ich nicht lassen, BWV 658 also contains the chorale melody in the pedal.

The six Schübler chorales (BWV 645 - 650) are derived from Bach's cantatas and contain one of his most popular chorale preludes, on the melody Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, BWV 645.

The third part of Bach's Clavier-Übung, published in Leipzig in 1739, contains 21 chorale preludes (not all appear in every publication), many of which are for manuals only. Nine of these are meant for use during the Mass, while the others are for the catechism. Among the most impressive is Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, BWV 671, which is in five voices with the chorale melody in the pedal. More complex is the first of two preludes on Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 686, which is in six parts, including two pedal parts.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/ach-gott-und-herr-chorale-prelude-per-canonem-for-organ-bwv-714-bc-k172-mc0002391332).

I created this Transcription of the Chorale Prelude per canonem (BWV 714) "Ach Gott und Herr" (Ah, my Lord and God) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "O Lamm Gottes unschuldig" (BWV 656) for Pipe Organ

2 parts9 pages08:302 years ago403 views
Organ, Recorder
The Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes, BWV 651–668, are a set of chorale preludes for organ prepared by Johann Sebastian Bach in Leipzig in his final decade (1740–1750), from earlier works composed in Weimar, where he was court organist. The works form an encyclopedic collection of large-scale chorale preludes, in a variety of styles harking back to the previous century, that Bach gradually perfected during his career. Together with the Orgelbüchlein, the Schübler Chorales and the third book of the Clavier-Übung, they represent the summit of Bach's sacred music for solo organ.

Early versions of almost all the chorale preludes are thought to date back to 1710–1714, during the period 1708–1717 when Bach served as court organist and Konzertmeister (director of music) in Weimar, at the court of Wilhelm Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Weimar. As a result of encouragement from the Duke, a devout Lutheran and music lover, Bach developed secular and liturgical organ works of all forms, in what was to be his most productive period for organ composition. As his son Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach mentions in his obituary or nekrolog: "His grace's delight in his playing fired him to attempt everything possible in the art of how to treat the organ. Here he also wrote most of his organ works." During Bach's time at Weimar, the chapel organ there was extensively improved and enlarged; occupying a loft at the east end of the chapel just below the roof, it had two manual keyboards, a pedalboard and about a dozen stops, including at Bach's request a row of tuned bells. It is probable that the longer chorale preludes composed then served some ceremonial function during the services in the court chapel, such as accompanying communion.

When Bach moved to his later positions as Kapellmeister in Köthen in 1717 and cantor at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig in 1723, his obligations did not specifically include compositions for the organ. The autograph manuscript of the Great Eighteen, currently preserved as P 271 in the Berlin State Library, documents that Bach began to prepare the collection around 1740, after having completed Part III of the Clavier-Übung in 1739. The manuscript is made up of three parts: the six trio sonatas for organ BWV 525–530 (1727–1732); the Canonic Variations on "Vom Himmel hoch da komm' ich her" BWV 769 added at the same time as the chorale preludes (1739–1750); and an early version of Nun komm' der heiden Heiland (1714–1717), appended after Bach's death.

The first thirteen chorale preludes BWV 651–663 were added by Bach himself between 1739 and 1742, supplemented by BWV 664 and 665 in 1746–7. In 1750 when Bach began to suffer from blindness before his death in July, BWV 666 and 667 were dictated to his student and son-in-law Johann Christoph Altnikol and copied posthumously into the manuscript. Only the first page of the last choral prelude BWV 668, the so-called "deathbed chorale", has survived, recorded by an unknown copyist. The piece was posthumously published in 1751 as an appendix to the Art of the Fugue, with the title "Wenn wir in höchsten Nöthen sein" (BWV 668a), instead of the original title "Vor deinen Thron tret ich hiermit" ("Before your throne I now appear").

The first verse of this Good Friday hymn, is a subdued prelude in four parts based on the cantus firmus, which appears explicitly in the soprano line over the flowing quaver accompaniment; in the second verse the cantus firmus moves to the alto line and the quaver figures become more lively; in the final verse, the pedal finally appears to take up the cantus firmus, beneath a four part fugal counter-subject in triplets, first in a forthright angular figuration, then in hammered repeated notes leading to an anguished chromatic passage, indicative of the crucifixion, and finally in peaceful flowing quavers.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Eighteen_Chorale_Preludes#Chorale_Preludes_BWV_651.E2.80.93668).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 656) "O Lamm Gottes unschuldig" (Oh innocent lamb of God) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "Erschienen ist der herrliche Tag" (BWV 629) for Pipe Organ

7 parts1 page00:432 years ago352 views
Organ, Recorder(4), English Horn(2)
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

Note that D. Buxtehude's BuxWV 224 (https://musescore.com/user/1831606/scores/1164491) work on the same tune, which seems to be a model for it in some ways (not the canon, though).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 629) "Erschienen ist der herrliche Tag" (The glorious day has come) for Pipe Organ with the Organ Registration assistance of Bernard Greenberg (user: https://musescore.com/user/1831606).

Prelude: "Christe, du Lamm Gottes" (BWV 619) for Pipe Organ

7 parts1 page01:122 years ago328 views
Organ, Recorder(2), Clarinet(2), Flute, English Horn
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.


Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

In "Christe, du Lamm Gottes" (BWV 619), the descending-scale motif (over the interval of a sixth, "most of the time") reveals no motivic or seemingly other musical connection to the cantus; perhaps its gentle descent was chosen for some spiritual/theological connection with the chorale, but from the coldest, most "analytical" vantage-point, this seems an eminently study-worthy example of "formulaic", in the most positive sense of Bach doing what he does effortlessly, unrolling of "Take a chorale (in canon, even), take an arbitrary pattern, and fit B to A." As I have said before, fitting arbitrary motifs and patterns (see BW 157.1) to given harmonic contexts is perhaps the most fundamental technical instrument of Baroque musical architecture.

Source: Bernard Greenberg (https://musescore.com/user/1831606).

I created this Transcription of the Choral Prelude (BWV 619) "Christe, du Lamm Gottes" (Christ, Lamb of God) for Pipe Organ.
Sonata in B Minor (HWV 376 Op. 1 No. 18) for Flute, Recorder, Violin & Organ
Custom audio

Sonata in B Minor (HWV 376 Op. 1 No. 18) for Flute, Recorder, Violin & Organ

4 parts10 pages07:568 months ago299 views
Flute, Recorder, Violin, Percussion
Georg Friedrich Händel (1685 – 1759) was a German, later British, baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos. Handel received important training in Halle and worked as a composer in Hamburg and Italy before settling in London in 1712; he became a naturalised British subject in 1727. He was strongly influenced both by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and by the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

The 14 sonatas published as Handel's "Op. 1" have a complex history. Composed at various stages in his career, they were first issued under that designation by the Amsterdam publisher Roger in the 1720s, a publication rapidly followed around 1726 by a "more correct" but equally unauthorized edition from Handel's London publisher, John Walsh. In fact, modern comparison with Handel's autograph of both publications has revealed serious errors. The Sonata in C minor for Oboe and Bass Continuo, which was published as No. 8 in the Roger and Walsh collections, is one of the earlier works included, being generally accepted by Handel scholars as having been composed during around 1711 or 1712, the period when he first settled in London following the sensational success of his opera Rinaldo in February 1711. During the early years of the eighteenth century, the oboe and recorder (both of which were at this time played by the same performer) challenged the previous hegemony of the violin as a solo instrument in sonatas, although this is the only oboe sonata included in "Op. 1." There are four short movements, an expressive Largo, an Allegro based on a chromatic theme, an Adagio, and a lively concluding Bourrée anglaise.

In 1724, Witovogel of Amsterdam published a collection of 15 solo sonatas with basso continuo composed by George Frideric Handel (1685-1759). Although the solo parts could be played by the violin, the flute or the oboe, six of the 15 have established themselves as violin sonatas. Of these, the Sonata in D major has established itself as perhaps the most popular of the six. In four movements, arranged slow -- fast -- slow -- fast, the Sonata in D major is Handel at his most characteristic. The opening Affettuoso is as deeply expressive as the best slow opera arias. The following Allegro is as brilliantly virtuosic as in the best fast opera arias. The following Larghetto in the minor is as expressive as the opening movement, but with the darker colorings of the tragic arias. The closing Allegro is as virtuosic as the previous Allegro, but with a more lively and dance-like feel.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/oboe-sonata-in-c-minor-op1-8-hwv-366-mc0002394682).

Although originally written for Recorder & Keyboard, I created this Interpretation of the Sonata in B Minor (HWV 376 Opus 1 No 18) for Flute, Tenor Recorder, Violin & Organ (2 Manuals w/o Pedals).

Prelude: "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (BWV 636) for Recorder & Strings

4 parts1 page01:39a year ago293 views
Recorder, Violin, Viola, Cello
The Orgelbüchlein ("Little Organ Book") BWV 599-644 is a collection of 46 chorale preludes for organ written by Johann Sebastian Bach. All but three of them were composed during the period 1708–1717, while Bach was court organist at the ducal court in Weimar. The remaining three, along with a short two-bar fragment, were added in 1726 or later, after Bach's appointment as cantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig.

The collection was originally planned as a set of 164 chorale preludes spanning the whole liturgical year. The chorale preludes form the first of Bach's masterpieces for organ with a mature compositional style in marked contrast to his previous compositions for the instrument. Although each of them takes a known Lutheran chorale and adds a motivic accompaniment, Bach explored a wide diversity of forms in the Orgelbüchlein. Many of the chorale preludes are short and in four parts, requiring only a single keyboard and pedal, with an unadorned cantus firmus. Others involve two keyboards and pedal: these include several canons, four ornamental four-part preludes, with elaborately decorated chorale lines, and a single chorale prelude in trio sonata form. The Orgelbüchlein has a four-fold purpose: it is a collection of organ music for church services, a treatise on composition, a religious statement, and an organ-playing manual.

In these chorale preludes, the traditional Lutheran hymns are subjected to various types of polyphonic treatment, with different types of countersubjects and imitative devices. The two pieces chosen by Mr. Escaich show two different compositional approaches: in the New Year chorale In dir ist Friede ("In You is Peace"), the melody is heard in close four-part imitation, elaborating on the very first two measures of the tune in particular. The Easter hymn Christ ist erstanden ("Christ Has Risen"), by contrast, is given in three variations; what is remarkable is that not only the countersubjects change from one variation to the next but the melody itself undergoes slight modifications. However, the chorale melody doesn't wander from voice to voice but stays in the treble all the way through.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgelb%C3%BCchlein).

Although originally created for Organ, I created this Interpretation of Choral Prelude (BWV 635) "Dies sind die heil'gen zehn Gebot" (These are the ten commandments) for Alto Recorder & String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).

Fughetta: "Wir glauben all an einen Gott" (BWV 681) for Pipe Organ

1 part1 page01:192 years ago272 views
Recorder
The Clavier-Übung III, sometimes referred to as the German Organ Mass, is a collection of compositions for organ by Johann Sebastian Bach, started in 1735–36 and published in 1739. It is considered Bach's most significant and extensive work for organ, containing some of his musically most complex and technically most demanding compositions for that instrument.

In its use of modal forms, motet-style and canons, it looks back to the religious music of masters of the stile antico, such as Frescobaldi, Palestrina, Lotti and Caldara. At the same time, Bach was forward-looking, incorporating and distilling modern baroque musical forms, such as the French-style chorale.

The work has the form of an Organ Mass: between its opening and closing movements—the prelude and "St Anne" fugue in E-flat, BWV 552—are 21 chorale preludes, BWV 669–689, setting parts of the Lutheran mass and catechisms, followed by four duets, BWV 802–805. The chorale preludes range from compositions for single keyboard to a six-part fugal prelude with two parts in the pedal.

The purpose of the collection was fourfold: an idealized organ programme, taking as its starting point the organ recitals given by Bach himself in Leipzig; a practical translation of Lutheran doctrine into musical terms for devotional use in the church or the home; a compendium of organ music in all possible styles and idioms, both ancient and modern, and properly internationalised; and as a didactic work presenting examples of all possible forms of contrapuntal composition, going far beyond previous treatises on musical theory.

The manualiter fughetta in E minor is both the shortest movement in Clavier-Übung III and the exact midpoint of the collection. The subject paraphrases the first line of the chorale; the two-bar passage later in the movement leading to two dramatic diminished seventh chords is constructed over the second chorale line. Although not strictly a French ouverture, the movement does incorporate elements of that style, in particular the dotted rhythms. Here Bach follows his custom of beginning the second half of a major collection with a French-style movement (as in the other three Clavier-Übung volumes and in both volumes of Das Wohl-Temperierte Clavier). It also complements the preceding chorale prelude by following an Italian style with a contrasting French one. Although still evidently written for organ, in style it most resembles the Gigue for harpsichord from the first French Suite in D.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clavier-%C3%9Cbung_III).

I created this Transcription of the Manualiter Fughetta (BWV 681) "Wir glauben all' an einen Gott" (We all believe in one God) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "Dies sind die heil'gen zehn Gebot" (BWV 678) for Pipe Organ

3 parts7 pages03:572 years ago242 views
Other Woodwinds, Recorder(2)
The Clavier-Übung III, sometimes referred to as the German Organ Mass, is a collection of compositions for organ by Johann Sebastian Bach, started in 1735–36 and published in 1739. It is considered Bach's most significant and extensive work for organ, containing some of his musically most complex and technically most demanding compositions for that instrument.

In its use of modal forms, motet-style and canons, it looks back to the religious music of masters of the stile antico, such as Frescobaldi, Palestrina, Lotti and Caldara. At the same time, Bach was forward-looking, incorporating and distilling modern baroque musical forms, such as the French-style chorale.

The work has the form of an Organ Mass: between its opening and closing movements—the prelude and "St Anne" fugue in E-flat, BWV 552—are 21 chorale preludes, BWV 669–689, setting parts of the Lutheran mass and catechisms, followed by four duets, BWV 802–805. The chorale preludes range from compositions for single keyboard to a six-part fugal prelude with two parts in the pedal.

The purpose of the collection was fourfold: an idealized organ programme, taking as its starting point the organ recitals given by Bach himself in Leipzig; a practical translation of Lutheran doctrine into musical terms for devotional use in the church or the home; a compendium of organ music in all possible styles and idioms, both ancient and modern, and properly internationalised; and as a didactic work presenting examples of all possible forms of contrapuntal composition, going far beyond previous treatises on musical theory.

The prelude is in the mixolydian mode of G, ending on a plagal cadence in G minor. The ritornello is in the upper parts and bass on the upper manual and pedal, with the cantus firmus in canon at the octave on the lower manual. There are ritornello episodes and five entries of the Cantus firmus, yielding the number of commandments. The distribution of parts, two parts in each keyboard and one in the pedal is similar to that of the de Grigny Livre d'Orgue, although Bach makes much greater technical demands on the right hand part.

Commentators have seen the canon as representing order, with the pun on canon as "law". As also expressed in Luther's verses, the two voices of the canon have been seen as symbolising the new law of Christ and the old law of Moses, which it echoes. The pastoral quality in the organ writing for the upper voices at the opening has been interpreted as representing the serenity before the Fall of Man; it is followed by the disorder of sinful waywardness; and finally order is restored in the closing bars with the calm of salvation.

The writing for the two upper voices is similar to that for obligato instruments in a cantata: their musical material is independent of the chorale, The opening pedal G on the other hand can be heard as a foretaste of the repeated Gs in the cantus firmus. In between the cantus firmus is sung in canon at the octave on the second manual. The fifth and final entry of the cantus firmus is in the distant key of B flat (G minor): it expresses the purity of the "kyrie eleison" at the end of the first verse, which brings the prelude to a harmonious close.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clavier-%C3%9Cbung_III).

I created this transcription of the Chorale Prelude (BWV 678) "Dies sind die heil'gen zehn Gebot" (These are the holy Ten Commandments) for Pipe Organ.

Prelude: "Kyrie, Gott Vater" (BWV 669) for Pipe Organ

4 parts3 pages02:512 years ago201 views
Other Woodwinds(2), Flute, Recorder
The Clavier-Übung III, sometimes referred to as the German Organ Mass, is a collection of compositions for organ by Johann Sebastian Bach, started in 1735–36 and published in 1739. It is considered Bach's most significant and extensive work for organ, containing some of his musically most complex and technically most demanding compositions for that instrument.

In its use of modal forms, motet-style and canons, it looks back to the religious music of masters of the stile antico, such as Frescobaldi, Palestrina, Lotti and Caldara. At the same time, Bach was forward-looking, incorporating and distilling modern baroque musical forms, such as the French-style chorale.

The work has the form of an Organ Mass: between its opening and closing movements—the prelude and "St Anne" fugue in E-flat, BWV 552—are 21 chorale preludes, BWV 669–689, setting parts of the Lutheran mass and catechisms, followed by four duets, BWV 802–805. The chorale preludes range from compositions for single keyboard to a six-part fugal prelude with two parts in the pedal.

The purpose of the collection was fourfold: an idealized organ programme, taking as its starting point the organ recitals given by Bach himself in Leipzig; a practical translation of Lutheran doctrine into musical terms for devotional use in the church or the home; a compendium of organ music in all possible styles and idioms, both ancient and modern, and properly internationalised; and as a didactic work presenting examples of all possible forms of contrapuntal composition, going far beyond previous treatises on musical theory.

BWV 669 is a chorale motet for two manuals and pedal in 4/2 time. The four lines of the cantus firmus in the phrygian mode of G are played in the top soprano part on one manual in semibreve beats. The single fugal theme of the other three parts, two in the second manual and one in the pedal, is in minim beats and based on the first two lines of the cantus firmus. The writing is in alla breve strict counterpoint, occasionally departing from the modal key to B flat and E flat major. Even when playing beneath the cantus firmus, the contrapuntal writing is quite elaborate. The many stile antico features include inversions, suspensions, strettos, use of dactyls and the canone sine pausa at the close, where the subject is developed without break in parallel thirds. Like the cantus firmus, the parts move in steps, creating an effortless smoothness in the chorale prelude.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clavier-%C3%9Cbung_III).

I created this transcription of the Chorale Motet (BWV 669) "Kyrie, Gott Vater" (Kyrie, O God, Eternal Father) for Pipe Organ.

"Cailin Deas Crúite na mBó" (a Pretty Maid Milking the Cow)

3 parts3 pages02:395 months ago75 views
Recorder(2), Harp
The English title of this work triggered my interest, cows and milking in music?
I was in for a pleasant surprise by Mike Magatagan, who has a bunch of very useful scores for recorder players, though you might need to change some instruments. Also don’t be put off by the Gaelic title Cailin Deas Crúite na mBó, it just means a pretty maid milking the cow. It is an old love song where a man muses about a pretty milk maid he has seen, so beautiful that he would forego all earthly riches provided he can spend his days at the side of this pretty girl milking the cow. The ¾ time stamp gives this tune a melancholy feeling; you don’t have to be a scholar in Gaelic to be touched by this song.

I link a version in Gaelic on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=71&v=-u2nBBmOCn8

Mike's score: https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/118434