Sheet music with 1 instrument

"Entry of the Gladiators" (Thunder & Blazes) for Piano

1 part6 pages03:086 years ago42,345 views
Julius Fučík (pronounced "Foo-chick") was a Czech composer who lived from 1872 – 1916 and was a conductor of military bands. Today his marches are still played as patriotic music in the Czech Republic. However, his worldwide reputation rests on this one work: the Opus 68 march, the Entrance of the Gladiators (Vjezd gladiátorů), which is universally recognized, often under the title "Thunder and Blazes", as one of the most popular theme tunes for circus clowns.

"Entrance of the Gladiators" or "Entry of the Gladiators" was originally titled it "Grande Marche Chromatique," reflecting the use of chromatic scales throughout the piece, but changed the title based on his personal interest in the Roman Empire.
The piece is a little longer than this but the rest is not so familiar to most people.

Although originally created for band, this arrangement is for the acoustic grand piano and It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Baroque Trill Styles Chart

1 part2 pages00:366 years ago30,712 views
Piano
The trill (or shake, as it was known from the 16th until the 19th century) is a musical ornament consisting of a rapid alternation between two adjacent notes, usually a semitone or tone apart, which can be identified with the context of the trill. It is sometimes referred to by the German triller, the Italian trillo, the French trille or the Spanish trino. A cadential trill is a trill associated with a cadence.

In the baroque period, a number of signs indicating specific patterns with which a trill should be begun or ended were used. In the Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach lists a number of these signs together with the correct way to interpret them. Unless one of these specific signs is indicated, the details of how to play the trill are up to the performer. In general, however, trills in this period are executed beginning on the auxiliary note, before the written note, often producing the effect of a harmonic suspension which resolves to the principal note. But, if the note preceding the ornamented note is itself one scale degree above the principal note, then the dissonant note has already been stated, and the trill typically starts on the principal note.

Several trill symbols and techniques common in the Baroque and early Classical period have fallen entirely out of use, including for instance the brief Pralltriller, represented by a very brief wavy line, referred to by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in his Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments (Versuch) (1753–1762).

Beyond the baroque period, specific signs for ornamentation are very rare. Continuing through the time of Mozart, the default expectations for the interpretation of trills continued to be similar to those of the baroque. In music after the time of Mozart, the trill usually begins on the principal note.

All of these are only rules of thumb, and, together with the overall rate of the trill and whether that rate is constant or variable, can only be determined by considering the context in which the trill appears, and is usually to a large degree a matter of opinion with no single "right" way of executing the ornament.
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

"This is My Song" (Finlandia Hymn)

1 part2 pages04:197 years ago23,656 views
"This Is My Song" was penned in 1934 by Lloyd Stone to the tune of Jean Sibelius' Finlandia. The final verse was added in 1939 by Georgia Harkness and remains in the United Methodist Hymnal as Hymn # 437. It is sometimes called "A Song of Peace" which is taken from the second line of the song.

This arrangement was created for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) organ.

Flute Sonata in A Minor (BWV 1013) for Flute

1 part7 pages10:245 years ago11,280 views
Partita in A minor for solo flute by Johann Sebastian Bach (BWV 1013) is a partita in 4 movements, probably composed around 1718. The title, however, is the work of 20th-century editors. The title in the only surviving 18th-century manuscript is "Solo pour une flûte traversière par J. S. Bach". The movements are marked: Allemande, Corrente, Sarabande and Bourrée angloise.

As is the case with so many of J.S. Bach's chamber works, we know virtually nothing about the circumstances in which the Partita in A minor for unaccompanied flute, BWV 1013 was composed. It was probably written sometime during the early 1720s, during the last few years of Bach's tenure as kapellmeister at Cöthen (a job that gave him ample freedom to explore secular chamber music), and at any rate could not have been composed before leaving Weimar in 1717.

Bach's other works for unaccompanied instruments (other than keyboard and lute) -- the Suites for solo cello, BWV 1007-1012 and the Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin, BWV 1001-1006 -- were all informed to one degree or another by his own skill as a string instrument performer (this is not to say that he was necessarily accomplished enough to perform them adequately; indeed, evidence indicates that he was not, and perhaps never tried). With the flute Partita, however, Bach was left almost entirely to his own ingenuity, as neither tradition nor personal familiarity could come into much play during the creation of so unlikely a work.

It is a dance-suite proper in which each of the four most common species of the day -- allemande, courante, sarabande, and bourrée -- makes an appearance, and in which the same remarkable blend of actual tones and implied counterpoint that fuels the violin and cello works is found to be the driving force; it is music of uncommon charm and high Baroque grace.

Lengthiest of the Partita's four movements is the opening allemande, whose running sixteenth-notes outline a broad binary design. As with those movements from the solo violin and cello works that are exclusively melodic (meaning only that no multiple-stopping of the strings is called for) -- such as the "Allemanda" from the D minor violin Partita, very similar in plan to this flute allemande -- there are frequent leaps from one register to another as Bach engages to make melodically plain the implied harmonic voices (bass, treble, etc.) around which the music is written. In each half, the approach to the cadence is made via some juicy, chromatically descending miniature arpeggios.
The courante movement (or, to follow Bach's title more exactly, Corrente), following the Allemande as tradition demands, is of the livelier Italian-derived variety, relatively quick-tempoed and in simple triple meter. Also true to tradition are the assymetrical dimensions of the movement's two "halves": twenty-two bars, forty-one bars. Truly striking is the unexpected high D sharp that the flute hollers out near the end of the first half, by leap no less, and then leaves without ever resolving in the same register, forcing us to be content with an E natural an octave lower.

After an aristocratic sarabande of ingenious rhythmic flexibility, Bach concludes the Partita with a Bourrée Anglais -- then in vogue throughout Europe, to judge from the many appearances of this particular subspecies of the bourrée that pop up in the music of Bach, Handel, and others. Probably the most immediately arresting of the four movements (the others are slower to give up their treasures, not less rich), it is built around the bourrée's typical "backwards" short-short-long rhythm, set up in this case as the counterbalance for more florid running sixteenth-note passages and, as we approach the final cadence to A, some remarkably staid chromatic eighth notes.

This piece was written entirely for Solo (Transverse) Flute.

Canon in D Major for Harp

1 part10 pages06:196 years ago10,950 views
Johann Pachelbel was a German Baroque composer, organist and teacher, who brought the south German organ tradition to its peak. He composed a large body of sacred and secular music, and his contributions to the development of the chorale prelude and fugue have earned him a place among the most important composers of the middle Baroque era.

Pachelbel is best known for the Canon in D Major, the only canon he wrote – although a true canon at the unison in three parts, it is often regarded more as a passacaglia, and it is in this mode that I created this somewhat unique arrangement for the pedal harp.

The "Canon" is probably one of the most recognizable piece of classical music and is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Transylvanian Lullaby (Excerpt from "Young Frankenstein") for Viola
Video

Transylvanian Lullaby (Excerpt from "Young Frankenstein") for Viola

1 part1 page01:324 years ago10,416 views
Guitar
This is an excerpt of the theme taken from the famous film by Mel Brooks "Young Frankenstein" (Transylvanian Lullaby by John Morris) transcribed for Solo Viola.

Note: This work is not my own and is likely copyrighted.

John Leonard Morris (born October 18, 1926) is a retired American film and television composer, best known for his work with filmmaker Mel Brooks.

"Morrison's Jig" for Piano

1 part3 pages01:585 years ago10,003 views
This popular traditional jig is named after Sligo-born, Irish-American fiddler James Morrison, who recorded it in the 1930s. Tom Carmody, who played accordion in Morrison's band, tells this story of its origin:

Jim was up at my house the night before we were to go to the studio, and I played him this jig. Jim asked me where I had got it from and I told him it was my father's jig called “The Stick Across the Hob”. Jim asked me to play it again and he wrote it down as I played, then he got the fiddle and played it off. “I will put that on record tomorrow”, he said, and we'll call it “Maurice Carmody's Favourite”.

Although originally written for Folk Instruments, I created this short arrangement for Solo Acoustic Piano and It is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
Prelude from the Cello Suite in G Major (BWV 1007) for Viola
Video

Prelude from the Cello Suite in G Major (BWV 1007) for Viola

1 part1 page02:204 years ago9,118 views
Viola
It is thought that Bach wrote his six suites for unaccompanied cello between 1717 and 1723, while he was in the employ of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen and had two superb solo cellists, Bernard Christian Linigke and Christian Ferdinand Abel, at his disposal. However, the earliest copy of the suites dates from 1726, and no autographs survive. Thus a chronological order is difficult to prove, though one guesses that these suites were composed in numerical order from the way that they gradually evolve and deepen, both technically and musically.

A Baroque suite is typically a collection of dance movements, usually in binary form with each half repeated. Common elements of the suite were the Allemande (German dance), a moderately slow duple-meter dance; the Courante, a faster dance in triple meter; the Sarabande, a Spanish-derived dance in a slow triple meter with emphasis on the second beat; and a Gigue (Jig), which is rapid, jaunty, and energetic. Bach took these typical dance forms and abstracted them, and then added a free-form, almost improvisatory Prelude which sets the tone for each suite, and a galanterie, an additional dance interposed between Sarabande and Gigue. (In the first two suites, Bach uses a pair of Minuets.) With these dances, Bach experimented and created the first, and arguably still the finest, solo works for a relatively new instrument.

The first suite, in G major, gives the feel of innocent simplicity, and serves as a marvelous opening to these extraordinary works. The Prelude recalls the C major Prelude which opens Book One of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Each piece sets a remarkable atmosphere with no melodies, only strong rhythmic patterns, cunningly evolving harmonies, and evocative textures. Bach uses short, arpeggiated phrases to build larger-scale crescendos and decrescendos, and these phrases in turn aggregate into still larger structures, evoking an endlessly more complicated fractal pattern. This quality would become a characteristic of Bach's cello writing, along with a distinctive rhythmic quality far removed from the character of the original dances. Bach's suiite may have been inspired by viol writing in France and cello writing in Italy, but there was nothing like it before the first suite, and little like it after, except for the five suites that followed.

Although this piece was originally written for cello, I transcribed it for Viola.

"Here I Am, Lord" (UMH #593) for Organ

1 part3 pages01:107 years ago8,755 views
Organ
"Here I Am, Lord" is a hymn composed by Dan Schutte in 1981 after Vatican Council II. Its words are based on Isaiah 6:8 and 1 Samuel 3.

This Catholic hymn is often sung in the United Methodist worship services as well, particularly services that are contemporary rather than traditional in structure and format.

"Jesus Loves the Little Children"

1 part2 pages00:207 years ago6,395 views
Clare Herbert Woolston (1856-1927) was a preacher in Chicago Illinois. He wrote the words for Jesus Loves the Little Children. The music was written by George F. Root (1820-1895), who wrote the words and music for several well known hymns, including Behold the Bridegroom Cometh!. Root originally wrote the tune for Jesus Loves the Little Children to accompany an American Civil War song called Tramp, Tramp, Tramp

The United Methodist Church, since its formation in 1968, has aspired to promote racial inclusion and end centuries of segregation that divided black and white churchgoers. "Jesus Loves the Little Children" is sung to usher-in children's time and is meant to inspire inter-ratial equality at the youngest level.
Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo
Video

Harp Concerto in Bb Major (Opus 4 No 6 HWV 294) for Harp Solo

1 part7 pages06:406 years ago6,268 views
The baroque composer George Frideric Händel, was born in Germany on the 23rd February 1685 and died on the 14th April 1759. He was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. He spent most of his adult life in England and his most well known works are Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks.

He wrote the Op 4 No 6 in B flat major as a Harp Concerto. In that guise it was first performed on 19 February 1736 along with the Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1 at the premiere of Alexander’s Feast.

Handel composed the music in January 1736, and the work received its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 19 February 1736. In its original form it contained three concertos: a concerto in B flat major in 3 movements for "Harp, Lute, Lyrichord and other Instruments" HWV 294 for performance after the recitative Timotheus, plac'd on high.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Going Home" for Organ
Video

"Going Home" for Organ

1 part2 pages03:137 years ago6,208 views
Organ
At a time of great loss, many people find themselves looking for words, they struggle to express their sincere, and often heartfelt, empathy for the sad occasion, it is at these times that music can unveil a dimension of meaning and feeling that words alone cannot create.

I created this hymn version of the folk spiritual "Goin' Home" (from William Arms Fisher/Antonín Leopold Dvořák: "The New World Symphony" Largo Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 Movement 2) for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) in an attempt to reinforce solace in the somber occasion. I believe this intrepretation reveals the light at the end of the tunnel.
"Le Piccadilly"
Video

"Le Piccadilly"

1 part3 pages01:086 years ago5,789 views
Erik Satie, a French composer, studied music at the Paris Conservatory Schola Cantorum. He was the pupil of Vincent D'Indy and Albert Roussel.

Against the romantic Wagnerian style which was incapable of expressing a French sensibility, Satie developed a controlled, abstract and seemingly simple style. His music, in general, features a removed, unaffected beauty. Although his early works anticipate the harmonic innovations of some impressionists, such as Debussy and Ravel, his later compositions foretell the neoclassicism of the early 20th century.

During the 1900's, Erik Satie produced several first rate cafe songs and music hall pieces, which include "Je te veux" - a graceful French waltz and "Le Piccadilly" - with a strong Scott Joplin ragtime flavour.

It is hard for us now to imagine how astonished the Paris audience must have been with Satie's music which was so different from the lush compositions of his peers, Franck and Saint-Saens. Satie's audience must have been especially astonished when the music they heard was accompanied by the composer's bizarre titles and performance instructions. Yet Satie's compositions are still unlike anything else in the piano literature and still full of touching and evocative delight and charm.

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).
"Gymnopédie #1" for Piano
Video

"Gymnopédie #1" for Piano

1 part5 pages03:017 years ago5,527 views
Erik Satie's Gymnopédie #1. Satie's Gymnopedies are what many consider to be the groundwork for today's ambient music; it's as ignorable as it is interesting (although, I find it hard to ignore such great music). These three beautiful pieces for solo piano are calming, reflective, ethereal, relaxing, soothing, and elegant.

Gymnopedie No. 1 - Lent et douloureux (slow and mournfully) with a hollow, but eerily warm melody gently floating atop an accompaniment of steady short-long rhythms, Gymnopedie No. 1 is as expressive as it is transparent. Its simplicity and openness masterfully disguises its apparent dissonances.

See also: #2 (http://musescore.com/user/13216/scores/23965) & #3 (http://musescore.com/user/13216/scores/38026)
"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" for Children's Handbell Choir
Video

"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" for Children's Handbell Choir

1 part1 page00:484 years ago5,493 views
Percussion
"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" is a popular sixteenth-century English carol from the West Country of England. The origin of this Christmas carol lies in the English tradition wherein wealthy people of the community gave Christmas treats to the carolers on Christmas Eve, such as figgy puddings that were very much like modern day Christmas puddings. It is one of the few English traditional carols that makes mentiogn of the New Year celebration and is often the last song carolers sing, wishing all good tidings and happy spirits at Christmastime.

I created this simplified arrangement for the Sierra Vista United Methodist Church (SVUMC) in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The piece covers 2 octaves and is designed for three (3) members of the Children's Handbell Choir. The purpose of this arrangement is to introduce the children to the basic concepts of ringing, note reading, timing and teamwork. This piece is best played using the "HandBells.sf2" Soundfont by FMJ Software (http://www.fmjsoft.com/siframe.html).
"The Last Hope" (Opus 16) for Piano
Video

"The Last Hope" (Opus 16) for Piano

1 part7 pages04:365 years ago5,305 views
Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was the eldest son of a Jewish-English New Orleans real estate speculator and his French-descended bride. Gottschalk may have heard the drums at Place Congo in New Orleans, but his exposure to Creole melody likely came through his own household; his mother had grown up in Haiti and fled to Louisiana after that island's slave uprising. Piano study was undertaken with Narcisse Lettellier, and at age 11, Gottschalk was sent to Paris. Denied entrance to the Conservatoire, he continued with Charles Hallé and Camille Stamaty, adding composition with Pierre Maleden. His Paris debut at the Salle Pleyel in 1845 earned praise from Chopin. By the end of the 1840s, Gottschalk's first works, such as Bamboula, appeared. These syncopated pieces based on popular Creole melodies rapidly gained popularity worldwide. Gottschalk left Paris in 1852 to join his father in New York, only to encounter stiff competition from touring foreign artists. With his father's death in late 1853, Gottschalk inherited support of his mother and six siblings. In 1855, he signed a contract with publisher William Hall to issue several pieces, including The Banjo and The Last Hope. The Last Hope is a sad and sweetly melancholy piece, and it proved hugely popular. Gottschalk found himself obliged to repeat it at every concert, and wrote "even my paternal love for The Last Hope has succumbed under the terrible necessity of meeting it at every step." With an appearance at Dodsworth Hall in December 1855, Gottschalk finally found his audience. For the first time he was solvent, and at his mother's death in 1857 Gottschalk was released from his familial obligations. He embarked on a tour of the Caribbean and didn't return for five years. When this ended, America was in the midst of Civil War. Gottschalk supported the north, touring Union states until 1864. Gottschalk wearied of the horrors surrounding him, becoming an avid proponent of education, playing benefit concerts for public schools and libraries. During a tour to California in 1865, Gottschalk entered into an involvement with a young woman attending a seminary school in Oakland, and the press excoriated him. He escaped on a steamer bound for Panama City. Instead of returning to New York, he pressed on to Peru, Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina, staying one step ahead of revolutions, rioting, and cholera epidemics, but he began to break down under the strain. Gottschalk contracted malaria in Brazil in August 1869; still recovering, he was hit in the abdomen by a sandbag thrown by a student in São Paolo. In a concert at Rio de Janeiro on November 25, Gottschalk collapsed at the keyboard. He had appendicitis, which led to peritonitis. On December 18, 1869, Gottschalk died at the age of 40.

The impact of Gottschalk's music on the later development of ragtime might seem obvious, yet there is no proven link from him to the syncopated popular music he anticipated in works like Bamboula. The music of Scott Joplin and Jelly Roll Morton show traces of Gottschalk's melodic shape and rhythmic pulse, and the New Orleans-born Morton likewise studied under Lettellier. Nickelodeon pianists disserviced Gottschalk by loving him too well; pieces like The Dying Poet and Morte!! turned many a dramatic corner in silent movie houses, and the public began to identify these themes as cliché. By the 1940s, Gottschalk was condemned as hopelessly old-fashioned, and it would take decades of work by scholars to improve his critical fortunes. In his best music, Gottschalk was an American original; masterpieces like Souvenir de Porto Rico, Union, and O ma charmant, épargnez-moi! transcend time through their emotional power, technical mastery, audacity, wit, and charm.

"The Last Hope" is annotated "Meditation Religieuse". It was hugely successful. Gottschalk drew upon a popular vein, that of the religious meditation. The composition became a Presbyterian hymn, "Holy Ghost with light divine..."

This piece is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow"

1 part2 pages00:467 years ago5,259 views
"Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow" from the United Methodist Hymnal # 94 is one of two doxologies used in the United Methodist Service. This is meant to be a short statement of praise, glory, and thanksgiving to God and is a hymn designed to be sung by the worshiping congregation.

The doxology most familiar to United Methodists is the hymn "Old 100th" with the opening line, "Praise God, from whom all blessings flow." In many United Methodist churches, this is listed in worship bulletins as "The Doxology" and is sung by the congregation as the offering is brought forward.

"Ave Maria" (Arcadelt-Dietsch) for Piano

1 part1 page01:585 years ago4,952 views
Pierre-Louis Dietsch (1808 – 1865) was a French composer and conductor, perhaps best remembered for the much anthologized Ave Maria 'by' Jacques Arcadelt, which he loosely arranged from that composer's three part madrigal Nous voyons que les hommes.

He was born Pierre-Louis-Philippe Dietsch in Dijon.[3] Fétis has reported that Dietsch was a choirboy at the Dijon Cathedral, and beginning in 1822 studied at Choron's Institution Royale de Musique Classique et Religieuse in Paris. Later, after 1853, Dietsch was a teacher at the Ecole Niedermeyer (successor of Choron's Institution), a position he held up until his death. In 1830 Dietsch entered the Paris conservatory and studied with Anton Reicha. His subjects included double bass and counterpoint (with Reicha).

Dietsch composed church music as well as an opera Le vaisseau fantôme, ou Le maudit des mers ("The Fantom Ship, or The Accursed of the Sea"), which was first performed on 9 November 1842 at the Paris Opera. The libretto by Paul Foucher and H. Révoil was based on Walter Scott's The Pirate as well as Captain Marryat's The Phantom Ship and other sources, although Wagner thought it was based on his scenario for Der fliegende Holländer, which he had just sold to the Opera. The similarity of Dietsch's opera to Wagner's is slight, although Wagner's assertion is often repeated. Berlioz thought Le vaisseau fantôme too solemn, but other reviewers were more favourable.

This setting of "Ave Maria" is not by Jacques Arcadelt. It is an arrangement by Louis Dietsch (1808-1865) of Arcadelt's "nous voyons que les hommes", written for female voices. The bass part in particular is entirely Dietsch's work

Although this work was originally written for Chorus (SATB), I created this arrangement for Solo Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).