Sheet music with 15 instruments

Water Music Suite No. 1 in F Major (HWV 348) for Small Orchestra

15 parts66 pages15:24a year ago1,377 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon(2), Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
There is a story that George Frideric Handel's magnificent Water Music was originally intended as a peace offering to King George I. In 1710, prior to his ascension to the British throne, the then Elector of Hanover had given the rather vagabond composer a generous position at his court; but Handel never actually fulfilled his duties. After the Elector relocated to London, the composer was more than a little reluctant to face his old master. As the story goes, it was not until 1717, when Handel seized the opportunity to provide some musical entertainment for the King's now-famous barge party on the River Thames, that the composer was restored in the royal eye; George I was completely enamored with the Water Music (asking for the hour-long work to be repeated three times and not returning to the palace until the wee hours) and all past transgressions were immediately forgotten. There was indeed a grand party on the Thames on July 17, 1717, during which some of Handel's music (possibly but not definitely the Water Music) was played, but the rest of the story is likely highly fictionalized.

It appears that Handel drew upon three already-composed suites of instrumental music, each scored for slightly different instrumental forces, when putting together the Water Music; the Water Music Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348, scored for a pair of oboes, bassoon, two horns, two violins, and basso continuo, is the largest of the three, comprising ten more-or-less separate pieces.

The Overture that begins the first Water Music Suite is in two large sections. The stately and eminently restrained exuberance of the first and slower section, built entirely out of a single ornamented pick-up gesture, finally boils over into the vivacious, partially fugato, allegro portion of the piece. There are two printed endings for the Overture: one ending in a full and rich cadence to tonic, the other climaxing on a dramatic half cadence.

Next up is an Adagio e staccato (the heading is apparently Handel's), and then a large three-part movement that moves from an "allegro" (not Handel's heading) built on a regal, fanfare-like, repeated-note motive in triple meter, to a Corelli-derived Andate in D minor and then back to the allegro "da capo." If we count this Allegro-Andante-Allegro as a single movement, there are really only nine pieces in the Suite.

A delightful minuet (sometimes called simply Andante or Moderato) precedes the famous Air, which is marked by Handel to be played three times. Another minuet and trio, this time starting off with a robust horn duet, follows.

The Bourrée, like the Air, is to be played three times; on the second time around the two oboes take the place of the two violin sections, and on the third the two contingents join forces.

After a Hornpipe, Handel finishes the Suite with a substantial fast movement (not titled, but written in ordinary Baroque allegro style) not in F major, but rather in its relative minor, perhaps in an effort to make more seamless the transition between this Suite and the following one in D major (HWV 349).

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/water-music-suite-no-1-for-orchestra-in-f-major-hwv-348-mc0002368487).

Although originally created for Large orchestra, I created this arrangement of Water Music Suite in F Major (HWV 348 No. 1) for Small Orchestra (Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinets, Bassoon, Contrabassoon, Bb Trumpets, French Horns, Trombones, F Tubas, Timpani, Violins, Violas, Cellos & Bass).

"Praeludium" für Kleines Orchester

15 parts14 pages02:535 years ago932 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet(2), Bassoon, French Horn, Trombone, Timpani, Percussion(2), Strings(5)
Edvard Armas Järnefelt (1869 – 1958), was a Finnish composer and conductor. Refered to as Armas, Järnefelt was born in Vyborg, in the Grand Duchy of Finland, the son of general August Aleksander Järnefelt and Elisabeth Järnefelt (née Clodt von Jürgensburg). His siblings were Kasper, Arvid, Erik, Ellida, Ellen, Aino, Hilja and Sigrid. Armas Järnefelt was the first Finnish composer to conduct Richard Wagner's operas in Finland. He achieved some minor success with his orchestral works Berceuse and Praeludium.

Järnefelt's music teacher in Helsinki was Ferruccio Busoni and in Paris, Jules Massenet. He enjoyed a close relationship with Jean Sibelius, who was married to Järnefelt's sister Aino. From 1905 Armas Järnefelt worked in Sweden. He became a Swedish citizen in 1909, and died in Stockholm.

Although originally written for small orchestra and percussion, I created this transcription for Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, French Horn, F Trombone, Timpani (C & F), Xylophone, Tubular Bells & String Ensemble (Violins (2), Viola, Cello & Bass).
Found in Community

Groups

United Methodist Church

1 discussion • 378 scores • 45 members

Discussions

The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!
Sinfonia: "Ich liebe den Höchsten von ganzem Gemüte" (BWV 174 No 1) for String Orchestra
Video

Sinfonia: "Ich liebe den Höchsten von ganzem Gemüte" (BWV 174 No 1) for String Orchestra

15 parts46 pages07:124 years ago785 views
Strings(15)
Ich liebe den Höchsten von ganzem Gemüte (I love the Highest with my entire being), BWV 174, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the second day of Pentecost and first performed it on 6 June 1729.

Bach wrote the cantata in Leipzig for Pentecost Monday. The prescribed readings for the feast day were from the Acts of the Apostles, the sermon of Peter for Cornelius (Acts 10:42–48), and from the Gospel of John, "God loved the world so much ..." from the meeting of Jesus and Nicodemus (John 3:16–21). The cantata text was written by Picander and published in his collection of cantata texts for a year in 1728. Picander had written in the preface that he hoped "the lack of poetic elegance would be compensated for by the sweetness of the incomparable Kapellmeister Bach, and that these songs will be sung Lieder in the main churches of devout Leipzig." Nine of Bach's cantatas on his texts in that volume are extant. If Bach composed more, they are lost.In the first aria the poet considers the beginning of the gospel, "Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt ..." (For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life), and concludes that the Christian owes love to God in return for God's love. The gospel word is quoted and reflected in the following recitative. The last aria addresses the congregation to seize the salvation offered by God's love. The closing chorale is the first stanza of Martin Schalling's "Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr", expressing love for God.

For the opening sinfonia, Bach added parts to a movement from his Brandenburg Concerto No. 3. He could employ many players as he had started to direct a Collegium Musicum, a Bürgervereinigung (an "association of musically inclined burghers") who played his church music as well. Bach first performed the cantata on 6 June 1729; he noted the year in the score.

The cantata begins with a sinfonia, which Bach derived from the first movement of his Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, possibly composed already in Weimar. For the cantata, he added to the nine string parts two new parts for corno da caccia and a ripieno trio of oboe I and violin I, oboe II and violin II, taille and viola, parts that are also new, but reinforcing existing parts. John Eliot Gardiner hears in the result the addition of "new-minted sheen and force to the original concerto movement, its colours and rhythms even sharper than before".

In the first aria, two obbligato oboes in imitation introduce themes which the voice picks up. "Gently rocking siciliano melodies, expressing spiritual tranquillity and compassion" appear in extended ritornellos. The recitative is accompanied by three upper string parts, similar to the original Brandenburg concerto movement. In the second aria, the violins and violas are combined to an obbligato part, "whose 'knocking' motif of repeated notes insistently underlines the urgency of the text". The cantata is closed by a four-part chorale setting of the well-known melody which Bach used to conclude his St John Passion with the third stanza, "Ach Herr, laß dein lieb Engelein".

Although this Cantata is scored for three soloists, alto, tenor and bass, a four-part choir only in the chorale, two corni da caccia, two oboes, taille (tenor oboe), three solo violins, three solo violas, three solo cellos and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for String Orchestra (7 Violins, 4 Violas, 3 Cellos and String Bass).

Chorale: "Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir" (BWV 130 No 1) for Small Orchestra

15 parts25 pages05:143 years ago766 views
Flute, Trumpet(2), Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(7)
Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir (Lord God, we all praise you), BWV 130,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig in 1724 for Michaelis, the feast of Michael, the archangel, on 29 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Paul Eber (1554). Bach composed the cantata in his second year in Leipzig for the St. Michael's Day. That year, Bach composed a cycle of chorale cantatas, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724. The feast celebrated the Archangel Michael and all the angels each year on 29 September. In Leipzig, the day coincided with a trade fair.

The hymn is only distantly related to the readings, concentrating on the thought that the Christians sin and deserve bad treatment, but may be raised to joy in a "seliger Tod" (blessed death). An unknown poet kept the first and the last two stanzas as movements 1, 5 and 6 of the cantata. He derived movement 2, a recitative, from stanzas 2 and 3, movement 3, an aria, from stanzas 4 to 6, movement 4, a recitative, from stanzas 7 to 9, and movement 5, an aria, from stanza 10. The theme of the song, praise and thanks for the creation of the angels, is only distantly related to the readings. In movement 3, a connection can be drawn from the mentioning of Satan as the "alter Drachen" (old dragon), to Michael's fight. Movement 4 shows examples of angelic protection in the Bible, of Daniel (Daniel 6:23), and of the three men in the fiery furnace (Daniel 3). Prayer for protection by angels, as Elijah taken to heaven (2 Kings 2:11), continues the text, concluded by general praise, thanks and the request for future protection.

In the opening chorus, Bach illustrates the singing of angels in different choirs by assigning different themes to the strings, the oboes and the trumpets, in a rich scoring typical only for the most festive occasions of the liturgical year such as Christmas. Mincham compares the movement to the 15 opening movements preceding it in the second annual cycle: "it is the most lavishly scored chorus so far and certainly the most extrovertly festive in character".

In movement 3, trumpets and timpani accompany the bass voice in a description of the battle against Satan. A soft duet of soprano and tenor recalls guardian angels saving Daniel in the lions' den and the three men in the furnace. John Eliot Gardiner compares the flute line in a gavotte for tenor to "perhaps the fleetness of angelic transport on Elijah's chariot". The closing choral again includes "the angelic trumpets".

The cantata in six movements is festively scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, flauto traverso, three oboes, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herr_Gott,_dich_loben_alle_wir,_BWV_130).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorale: "Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir" (Lord God, we all praise you) for a Modern Small Orchestra (Flute, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 4 Violins, 2 Violas & Cello.

"Et Resurrexit" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 18) for Wind Ensemble

15 parts27 pages06:335 years ago642 views
Flute(5), Oboe(2), English Horn, Clarinet(2), French Horn(2), Bassoon(2), Timpani
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Et Resurrexit" (The Resurrection) for Wind Ensemble (Flutes (3), Alto Flutes (2), Oboes (2), English Horn, Bb Clarinets (2), French Horns (2), Timpani & Bassoons (2)).

Recitativo & Choral: "Nun seid ihr wohl gerochen" (BWV 248 Nos. 63 & 64) for Small Orchestra

15 parts24 pages07:073 years ago629 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Recitativo & Choral: "Was will der Höllen Schrecken nun/Nun seid ihr wohl gerochen” (How can hell frighten now/Now you are well avenged) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Contrabass).

Chorus: "Kortte lebe, Kortte blühe" (BWV 207 No 9) for Small Orchestra

15 parts20 pages04:403 years ago426 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Vereinigte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten (United discord of quivering strings), BWV 207,[a] is a secular cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach and first performed on 11 December 1726 in Leipzig.

Bach composed this cantata to celebrate the appointment of Gottlieb Kortte as professor of Roman Law at Leipzig University. The librettist of the work is unknown: it may have been Picander, who had been providing libretti for Bach from at least the previous year when they collaborated on another academic cantata Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft, BWV 205.

Bach incorporated music from his first Brandenburg Concerto, which was composed years earlier. The third movement of the concerto is used for the opening chorus with trumpets replacing the concerto's horns and some of the instrumental music given to the choir.

There is a related work Auf, schmetternde Töne der muntern Trompeten, BWV 207a.

The cantata features four solo singers: Glück (soprano), Dankbarkeit (alto), Fleiß (tenor), and Ehre (bass). It is also scored for four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two flutes, two oboes d'amore, taille, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vereinigte_Zwietracht_der_wechselnden_Saiten,_BWV_207).

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorus: "Kortte lebe, Kortte blühe" (Long live Kortte, may he flourish!) for Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinets, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Der Herr hat Guts an uns getan" (BWV 119 No 7) for Small Orchestra

15 parts23 pages06:244 years ago422 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, French Horn, Tuba, Timpani, Strings(4)
Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn (Praise the Lord, o Jerusalem), BWV 119, is a sacred cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for Ratswechsel, the inauguration of a new town council, and first performed it on 30 August 1723.

Bach composed the cantata during his first year in Leipzig for a service at St Nicholas Church to celebrate the change of council or Ratswechsel. Early in his career he had written at least one cantata for the equivalent service at Mühlhausen. There are five surviving cantatas for the Ratswechsel at Leipzig.

The text of the cantata consists of verses from psalms 147, 85 and 126, lines from Martin Luther's "German Te Deum" and poems by unknown writers. To suit the event for which it was written, these are all turned into hymns of thanking and praising God for Leipzig's prosperity and asking him to protect the city in the future.

Even among other festive music written by Bach, this work's scoring for four trumpets is unusual. It is characterised by a very solemn character and the attributes of courtly homage music, such as the opening chorus in the form of a French overture or fanfare-like trumpet interjections in the bass recitative. Bach created a work that in musical terms corresponds less to sacred music and more to the type of secular music for a princely court, as had been required of him during his time in office in Köthen. Only in its final two movements does Bach again use simple forms to emphasize the work's character of a church cantata, implying that earthly powers do not last, but God – the supreme ruler – is entitled to have the last word.

In addition to its dotted rhythms, the opening chorus is remarkable for the musical opposition between the trumpets and the rest of the instrumental parts. The middle section is faster, incorporating both fugal techniques and paired entries. The coda is an adaptation of the first section.

After a secco recitative, the oboes da caccia present the dotted-rhythm ritornello to introduce the tenor aria. The vocal entry is before the ritornello cadence. The following bass recitative is introduced and concluded with a fanfare-like trumpet and timpani line.

The fifth movement is an alto aria with two obbligato recorders, the only minor-mode movement. The obbligato presents high repeated notes beginning midway through the ritornello theme, which recurs as episodes and at the conclusion of the movement. The movement is, in effect, a trio sonata.

A soprano recitative precedes the second chorus, which is introduced by a long ritornello theme featuring an "imperious" trumpet melody. This theme plays four times during the da capo movement, which also includes elements of fugue. A very short yet harmonically adventurous alto recitative serves as the penultimate movement. The cantata ends "with the subtlest touches of flamboyance" in a chorale.

Although originally scored for four soloists—soprano, alto, tenor and bass—a four-part choir, four trumpets, timpani, two recorders, three oboes, two oboes da caccia, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet, French Horn, F Tuba, Timpani, 2 Volins, Violas & Cellos) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) as well as the "Dirty Brass Trumpet SoundFont" Soundfont at http://hotfile.com/dl/107684584/730b25e/Dirty_Brass_Trumpet_SoundFont_20.

Chorus: "Jesu, nun sei gepreiset" (BWV 41 No 1) for Small Orchestra

15 parts56 pages08:143 years ago398 views
Trumpet(2), Harpsichord, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(7)
Jesu, nun sei gepreiset (Jesus, now be praised), BWV 41,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for New Year's Day, the feast also celebrated the naming and circumcision of Jesus, and first performed it on 1 January 1725. It is based on the hymn by Johannes Hermann (1591).

That year, Bach composed a cycle of chorale cantatas, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724. The cantata is based on the hymn for New Year's Day in three stanzas by Johannes Hermann (1591) who was also a Thomaskantor. Its melody is by Melchior Vulpius, who first published it in his Ein schön geistlich Gesangbuch, printed in Jena (1609). The hymn calls Jesus by name first, fitting to the celebration of the naming. Otherwise it is more concerned with the beginning of the New Year. It was popular in Leipzig and was used in two more of Bach's cantatas for the occasion, Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, BWV 190 and Gott, wie dein Name, so ist auch dein Ruhm, BWV 171. An unknown poet kept the first and the last stanza as movements 1 and 6, and paraphrased stanza 2 to a sequence of alternating arias and recitatives, expanding the 14 lines by additional ideas, but not specifically referring to the gospel.

In the opening chorus, a chorale fantasia, Bach faced the problem of structuring the unusually long stanza of 14 lines and an additional repeat of the first two lines, as seems to have been customary in Leipzig. The concerto of the orchestra is dominated by a syncop fanfare motif from the trumpets. In the first four lines, repeated in the next four and the final two, the soprano sings the cantus firmus, with the lower voices in free polyphony. Lines 9 and 10, speaking of "in guter Stille" (in good silence) are marked adagio; the choir sings in homophony in triple meter, accompanied by the orchestra without the trumpets. Lines 11 and 12, repeated in 13 and 14, are a presto fugato, with the instruments playing colla parte, expressing "Wir wollen uns dir ergeben" (We want to devote ourselves to you), an "enthusiastic rededication to spiritual values". The fugal subject is derived from the first phrase of the chorale melody. Lines 15 and 16 repeat lines 1 and 2, saying "behüt Leib, Seel und Leben" (Protect our body, soul and life).

In contrast, both arias have been described as chamber music. The first aria is sung by the soprano, accompanied by three oboes in pastoral 6/8 time. A short secco recitative leads to a tenor aria, which is dominated by an obbligato violoncello piccolo in expansive movement. The last recitative for bass contains one line from Martin Luther's Deutsche Litanei (German litany), which Bach set for four-part choir, marked allegro, as if the congregation joined the prayer of the individual. The closing chorale corresponds to the first movement. The lines are separated several times by its trumpet motif; the trumpets are silent in lines 9 to 14; lines 11 to 14 are in 3/4 time; the final fanfare recalls the beginning.

John Eliot Gardiner notes that Bach achieves a suggestion of the year's cycle by ending both the first movement and the end of the cantata as the work began, as a "closing of the circle".

The cantata in six movements is scored for four soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, three oboes, two violins, viola, violoncello piccolo da spalla and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesu,_nun_sei_gepreiset,_BWV_41).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Jesu, nun sei gepreiset" (Jesus, now be praised) for Small Orchestra (Bb Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, Bassoon, Timpani, 4 Violins, 2 Violas and Cellos).

Coro: "O ewiges Feuer, o Ursprung der Liebe" (BWV 34 No 1) for Small Orchestra

15 parts53 pages09:133 years ago345 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
O ewiges Feuer, o Ursprung der Liebe (O eternal fire, o source of love), BWV 34,[a] is a church cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach as an adaptation of a previously composed secular cantata, BWV 34a. This piece reached its current form in Leipzig in 1740 or by 1746 for the first day of Pentecost. The date of the work's premiere is unknown, but it certainly took place in or before 1746.

The opening chorus presents the image of eternal heavenly flame. The instrumental ritornello comprises a sustained trumpet entry, active strings, and "flickering" oboes, drums, and trumpets. Unlike in most da capo movements, this ritornello appears only at the beginning and end. Each voice enters on a long note, imitating the trumpet and presenting the notion of "eternal Divine Love shining through the ongoing flames of consecration". The middle section develops these themes in minor keys before the ritornello returns to reprise the A section.

The two recitatives (the second and fourth movements, for tenor and bass respectively) are quite similar in character: they adopt an authoritative tone, are in minor mode, and begin with a bass pedal.

The alto aria conveys images of contentment by incorporating a lilting berceuse-like rhythm, with violin obbligato and flute in tenths and octaves. It is accompanied by a tonic pedal in the continuo. The aria is in adapted ternary form.

The closing chorus adopts the end of the bass recitative as its introduction. The violins and oboes then play an ascending figure to introduce the new melody. The movement is structured as a 12-bar instrumental section, repeated with choir, followed by a 31-bar instrumental section, repeated with choir.

The piece is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, bass) and four-part choir, two oboes, two flauti traversi, timpani (tamburi), three trombe in D, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_ewiges_Feuer,_o_Ursprung_der_Liebe,_BWV_34).

I created this arrangement of the opening coro: "O ewiges Feuer, o Ursprung der Liebe" (O eternal fire, o source of love) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet in Bb, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Contrabass).

Chorale: "Dem wir das Heilig jetzt" (BWV 129 No 5) for Small Orchestra

15 parts8 pages03:024 years ago335 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Strings(4)
Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (Praised be the Lord, my God), BWV 129, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for Trinity Sunday and possibly first performed it on 16 June 1726. It is a general praise of the Trinity, without a reference to a specific gospel reading. Addressing God the Creator, the Saviour and the Comforter, it could be used for other occasions such as Reformation Day. The cantata is festively scored and ends in a chorale fantasia, like the Christmas Oratorio. It is the conclusion of Bach's second annual cycle of cantatas, containing chorale cantatas.

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for Trinity Sunday, the earliest in 1726. In his second year Bach had composed chorale cantatas between the first Sunday after Trinity of 1724 and Palm Sunday, but for Easter had returned to cantatas on more varied texts, possibly because he lost his librettist. Later Bach composed again chorale cantatas to complete his second annual cycle. This cantata is one of the completing works. It is based entirely on the unchanged words on the chorale Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (1665) by Johann Olearius and celebrates the Trinity in five stanzas.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Romans, reflecting "depth of wisdom" (Romans 11:33–36), and from the Gospel of John, the meeting of Jesus and Nicodemus (John 3:1–15). Unlike most chorale cantatas of 1724/25, but similar to the early Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4 and Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren, BWV 137, also composed after the second cantata cycle, Bach left the chorale text unchanged, thus without a reference to the readings.

Although originally scored for three soloists, soprano, alto and bass, a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, flauto traverso, two oboes, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for a Modern Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, 2 Flutes, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

"Et expecto" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 21) for Small Orchestra

15 parts15 pages02:422 years ago328 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum" (and expect the resurrection of the dead) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Chorus: "Vereinigte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten" (BWV 207 No 1) for Small Orchestra

15 parts31 pages05:033 years ago223 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe(2), Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Vereinigte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten (United discord of quivering strings), BWV 207,[a] is a secular cantata composed by Johann Sebastian Bach and first performed on 11 December 1726 in Leipzig.

Bach composed this cantata to celebrate the appointment of Gottlieb Kortte as professor of Roman Law at Leipzig University. The librettist of the work is unknown: it may have been Picander, who had been providing libretti for Bach from at least the previous year when they collaborated on another academic cantata Zerreißet, zersprenget, zertrümmert die Gruft, BWV 205.

Bach incorporated music from his first Brandenburg Concerto, which was composed years earlier. The third movement of the concerto is used for the opening chorus with trumpets replacing the concerto's horns and some of the instrumental music given to the choir.

There is a related work Auf, schmetternde Töne der muntern Trompeten, BWV 207a.

The cantata features four solo singers: Glück (soprano), Dankbarkeit (alto), Fleiß (tenor), and Ehre (bass). It is also scored for four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, two flutes, two oboes d'amore, taille, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vereinigte_Zwietracht_der_wechselnden_Saiten,_BWV_207).

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Vereinigte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten" (United discord of quivering strings) for Small Orchestra (3 Bb Trumpets, Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinets, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).